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10th AF BOMBER / FIGHTER / COMMANDO / LIAISON UNITS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
10th Air Force
5320th Air Defense Wing
India Air Task Force
American Volunteer Group
China Air Task Force
Eastern Air Command
North Burma Air Task Force
1st Air Commando Gp5th Fighter Sq (Commando)
6th Fighter Sq (Commando)
10th Air Jungle Rescue Detachment
72nd Airdrome Sq
164th Liaison Sq (Commando)
165th Liaison Sq (Commando)
166th Liaison Sq (Commando)
284th Medical Dispensary (Avn)
285th Medical Dispensary (Avn)
309th Airdrome Sq
319th Troop Carrier Sq (Commando)
326th Airdrome Sq
1st Liaison Gp (Provisional)5th Liaison Sq
19th Liaison Sq
71st Liaison Sq
115th Liaison Sq
2nd Air Commando Gp1st Fighter Sq, Commando
2nd Fighter Sq, Commando
127th Liaison Sq
155th Liaison Sq
156th Liaison Sq
236th Medical Dispensary (Avn)
317th Troop Carrier Sq (Commando)
327th Airdrome Sq
328th Airdrome Sq
340th Airdrome Sq
342nd Airdrome Sq
7th Bombardment Gp9th Bombardment Sq
11th Bombardment Sq
22nd Bombardment Sq
436th Bombardment Sq
492nd Bombardment Sq
493d Bombardment Sq
8th Photographic Reconnaissance Gp2nd Combat Camera Unit
3d Photo Technical Unit
7th Photo Technical Sq
9th Photographic Reconnaissance Sq
10th Combat Camera Unit
17th AAF Photo Intelligence Det
20th Tactical Reconnaissance Sq
24th Combat Mapping Sq
40th Photographic Reconnaissance Sq
958th Engineer Co (Avn) Topographic
12th Bombardment Gp81st Bombardment Sq
82nd Bombardment Sq
83d Bombardment Sq
434th Bombardment Sq
33d Fighter Gp58th Fighter Sq
59th Fighter Sq
60th Fighter Sq
51st Fighter Gp16th Fighter Sq
25th Fighter Sq
26th Fighter Sq
36th Fighter Control Sq
51st Fighter Control Sq
322nd Fighter Control Sq
449th Fighter Sq
80th Fighter Gp88th Fighter Sq
89th Fighter Sq
90th Fighter Sq
459th Fighter Sq
311th Fighter Gp385th Fighter Sq
528th Fighter Sq
529th Fighter Sq
530th Fighter Sq
341st Bombardment Gp11th Bombardment Sq
22nd Bombardment Sq
490th Bombardment Sq
491st Bombardment Sq
OTHER UNITS:96th Fighter Control Sq
426th Night Fighter Sq
427th Night Fighter Sq


10th Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 10 Air Force on 4 Feb 1942. Activated on 12 Feb 1942. Redesignated Tenth Air Force on 18 Sep 1942. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Activated on 24 May 1946. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Sep 1960. Activated on 20 Jan 1966. Organized on 1 Apr 1966. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1969. Redesignated Tenth Air Force (Reserve), and activated in the Reserve, on 8 Oct 1976. Redesignated Tenth Air Force on 1 Dec 1985.

Assignments:  Air Force Combat Command, 12 Feb 1942; U.S. Army Forces in China-Burma-India Theater, 5 Mar 1942; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Sector, 21 Aug 1943 (attached to Eastern Air Command, 15 Dec 1943-1 Jun 1945 and further attached to Strategic Air Force, Eastern Air Command, 15 Dec 1943-20 Jun 1944); Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, 27 Oct 1944; Army Air Forces, China Theater, 6 Jul 1945; U.S. Army Air Forces, China Theater, 25 Aug 1945; Army Service Forces, Seattle Port of Embarkation, 5-6 Jan 1946. Air Defense Command, 24 May 1946; Continental Air Command, 1 Dec 1948-1 Sep 1960. Air (later, Aerospace) Defense Command, 20 Jan 1966-31 Dec 1969. Air Force Reserve (later, Air Force Reserve Command), 8 Oct 1976-.

Major Components

Commands:  IX Air Service Area: 19 Mar-1 Jul 1948. X Air Force Service: 1 Feb-20 Aug 1943. XXI Air Force Service: 19 Mar-1 Jul 1948. Karachi American Air Base: 13 Feb-20 Aug 1943.

Divisions:  20 Air: 1 Apr 1966-31 Dec 1967. 24 Air: 19 Nov-1 Dec 1969. 25 Air: 15 Sep-1 Dec 1969. 26 Air: 19 Nov-1 Dec 1969. 27 Air: 15 Sep-19 Nov 1969. 28 Air: 1 Apr 1966-19 Nov 1969. 29 Air: 1 Apr 1966-15 Sep 1969. 30 Air: 16 Dec 1949-1 Sep 1950; 1 Apr 1966-18 Sep 1968. 31 Air: 1 Jul 1968-31 Dec 1969. 73 Air: 1 Jul 1948-27 Jun 1949. 96 Air: 1 Jul 1948-27 Jun 1949. 322 Air: 1 Jul 1948-27 Jun 1949. 323 Air: 1 Jul 1948-27 Jun 1949.

District:  2 Air Reserve: 1 Dec 1951-1 Apr 1954.

Regions:  Fourth Air Force Reserve: 1 Jul-1 Sep 1960. Fifth Air Force Reserve: 1 Jul-1 Sep 1960.

Groups:  3d Combat Cargo: 1944-1945. 7th Bombardment: 1942-1945. 12th Bombardment: 1944-1945. 33d Fighter: 1944-1945. 80th Fighter: 1943-1945. 311th Fighter: 1943-1944. 341st Bombardment: 1942-1944. 443d Troop Carrier: 1944-1945.

Stations:  Patterson Field, OH, 12 Feb-Mar 1942; New Delhi, India, 5 Mar 1942; Barrackpore, Calcutta, India, 16 Oct 1943; Belvedere Palace, Calcutta, India, 8 Jan 1944; Kanjikoah, Assam, India, 20 Jun 1944; Myitkyina, Burma, 2 Nov 1944; Bhamo, Burma, 7 Feb 1945; Piardoba, India, 15 May 1945; Kunming, China, 23 Jul 1945; Liuchow, China, 9 Aug 1945; Kunming, China, 25 Aug 1945; Shanghai, China, 18 Oct-15 Dec 1945; Fort Lawton, WA, 5-6 Jan 1946. Brooks Field (later, AFB), TX, 24 May l946; Offutt AFB, NE, 1 Jul 1948; Fort Benjamin Harrison (later, Benjamin Harrison AFB), IN, 25 Sep 1948; Selfridge AFB, MI, 16 Jan 1950-1 Sep 1960. Richards-Gebaur AFB, MO, 1 Apr 1966-31 Dec 1969. Bergstrom AFB, TX, 8 Oct 1976; Carswell ARS, TX, 30 Jun 1996-.

Commanders:  None (not manned), 12-16 Feb 1942; Lt Col Harry A. Halverson, 17 Feb 1942; Maj Gen Lewis H. Brereton, 5 Mar 1942; Brig Gen Earl L. Naiden, 26 Jun l942; Maj Gen Clayton I. Bissell, 18 Aug 1942; Maj Gen Howard C. Davidson, 19 Aug 1943; Brig Gen Adiai H. Gilkeson, 14 Sep 1944; Maj Gen Howard C. Davidson, 11 Oct 1944; Maj Gen Albert F Hegenberger, 1 Aug 1945; unkn, Nov 1945-Jan 1946. None (not manned), 24 May-5 Jun 1946; Col Edward N. Backus, 6 Jun 1946; Maj Gen Howard M. Turner, 18 Jun 1946; Brig Gen Harry A. Johnson, 6 Jan 1948; Maj Gen Paul L. Williams. 1 Jul 1948; Brig Gen Harry A. Johnson, 23 May 1949; Maj Gen Paul L. Williams, 18 Jul 1949; Brig Gen Harry A. Johnson, 18 Nov 1949; Maj Gen Paul L. Williams, 23 Dec 1949; Brig Gen Harry A. Johnson, 4 Jan 1950; Maj Gen Paul L. Williams, 6 Apr 1950; Brig Gen Harry A. Johnson, 30 Apr 1950; Col Cecil E. Henry, 1 Jun 1950; Maj Gen Harry A. Johnson, 14 Jun 1950; Maj Gen Grandison Gardner, 20 Jan 1951; Maj Gen Harry A. Johnson, 1 April 1951; Col Bernard C. Rose, 1 Jul 1953; Maj Gen Richard A. Grussendorf, 2 Jul 1953; Col Paul E. Todd, 1 Aug 1955; Maj Gen Robert E. L. Eaton. 15 Sep 1955; Col Downs E. Ingram, 19 Aug 1959; Maj Gen Harold R. Maddux, 24 Aug 1959-1 Sep 1960. Maj Gen Thomas K. McGehee, 1 Apr 1966; Maj Gen William D. Greenfield, 27 Sep 1967-31 Dec 1969. Maj Gen Roy M. Marshall, 8 Oct 1976; Maj Gen John E. Taylor Jr, 15 May 1978; Maj Gen James C. Wahleithner, 1 May 1984; Maj Gen Roger P. Scheer, 4 May 1985; Brig Gen William B. McDaniel, 1 Nov 1986; Brig Gen John J. Closner III, 6 Jul 1987; Brig Gen Robert A. McIntosh, 5 Jul 1989; Maj Gen David R. Smith, 1 Dec 1990; Maj Gen John A. Bradley, Feb 1998; Maj Gen David E. Tanzi, 4 Mar 2002; Maj Gen Allan R. Poulin, 20 Jan 2005; Maj Gen Richard C. Collins, 24 Dec 2005; Brig Gen Thomas R. Coon, 3 Jun 2007-.

Operations:  Activated for air operations in the China-India-Burma (CBI) theater; commanded tactical units from March 1942-December 1943, then served as a strategic bombardment headquarters in the CBI; later, resumed command over tactical fighter units in June 1944 until August 1945, when it conducted primarily air transport and troop carrier missions through the end of its operations in December 1945. Following WWII, initially conducted air defense operations and training beginning in the late 1940s, then later concentrated on air reserve training throughout the 1950s. Responsible for air defense and early warning forces based in the northern central and later southern central U.S. from 1966-1969. From 1976, exercised intermediate command over reserve component flying training, fighter, bomber, air refueling, rescue, space and special operations forces.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Burma; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1984-30 Jun 1986; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1996; 1 Oct 2004-30 Sep 2006.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)

Emblem:  On an ultramarine blue disc, a white shield in base, winged golden orange, the shield bearing the Arabic numeral "10" ultramarine blue, all below a white five pointed star charged with a red disc, encircled by a white annulet. Approved on 25 Jan 1944; revised on 13 Jan 1977.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 5 Sep 2008.

Commanders and Operations through 5 Sep 2008.

Supersedes statement prepared on 28 Mar 1977.


Source:  "The Army Almanac", U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950.

Lineage:  Activated as 10th Air Force at Patterson Field, Ohio, 12 February 1942. Redesignated the Tenth Air Force, 18 September 1942. Inactivated at Seattle, Wash., 6 January 1946. Activated at Brooks Field, Tex., 24 May 1946.

Commanding generals:  Maj. Gen. Lewis H. Brereton (5 March 1942-25 June 1942); Brig. Gen. Earl L. Naiden (25 June 1942-18 August 1942); Maj. Gen. Clayton L. Bissell (18 August 1942-19 August 1943); Maj. Gen. Howard C. Davidson (19 August 1943-1 August 1945); Maj. Gen. Albert F. Hegenberger (1 August 1945-November 1945); Col. Edward N. Backus, (6-18 June 1946); Maj. Gen. Howard M. Turner (18 June 1946-1 January 1948); Brig. Gen. Harry A. Johnson (1 January 1948-1 July 1948); Maj. Gen. Paul L. Williams (1 July 1948-).

Operational Notes (World War II):  In the China-Burma-India Theater, the Tenth Air Force had, as its primary function, defense of the ferry route over the Hump. From the Kunming terminal, its China Air Task Force struck at enemy installations, port facilities, and shipping in the China Sea, while its India Air Task Force guarded the Dinjan end and insured neutralization of airfields at Myitkyina and other places in northern Burma. Although duties of the China Air Task Force were assumed by the Fourteenth Air Force in March 1943, the Tenth continued to operate from bases in Assam, disrupting enemy lines of communications, flying sweeps over the Bay of Bengal, and mining harbors at Rangoon, Bangkok, and Moulmein. Later, as components of the Eastern Air Command (15 December 1943-1 June 1945), Tenth Air Force units participated in all important phases of the Burma campaign, furnishing airborne support to General Wingate's forces, dropping supplies to Merrill's Marauders, and facilitating General Stilwell's reconquest of North Burma. By April 1945, some 350,000 men were wholly dependent upon air supply by these units. In August 1945, the Tenth moved to China, anticipating an offensive against Japan proper.

Station:  Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind. (Oct. 1948).


History of the CBI Theater:

"Army Air Forces in WWII"  (7 volumes)
Office of Air Force History
Wesley Craven & James Cate, editors
       Site 1:  Hyperwar: U.S. Army Air Force in World War II
       Site 2:  Air Force Historical Studies Office

Table of Contents



5320th Air Defense Wing

Source:  Ex-CBI Roundup, February 1957 issue

American Air Command No. 1; redesignated 5320th Air Defense Wing; redesignated Forward Echelon, 10th Air Force; later incorporated into HQ, 10th AF.

Table of Contents



India Air Task Force

Source:  The Army Air Forces in WWII Vol. IV [Chapter 12], Craven & Cate

Brig. Gen. Clayton L. Bissell (10th AF) had made a careful survey of the staff of his air force, and he promptly appealed for additional personnel to replace officers reassigned to the Middle East. In preparation for operations at the close of the monsoon season, he decided to organize all combat units in India into an air task force comparable to the one then operating in China, and to designate Col. Caleb V. Haynes to command it. When the activation of the India Air Task Force (IATF) should be accomplished, the Tenth Air Force would consist of the CATF under Chennault, the IATF under Haynes, the X Air Service Command under Oliver, the India-China Ferry Command under Tate, and the Karachi American Air Base Command under Brig. Gen. Francis M. Brady.

The IATF was activated at Dinjan, India to support Chinese resistance along the Salween River by hitting supply lines in C and S Burma; the new task force, commanded by Colonel Caleb V Haynes, includes all AAF combat units in India, all based at Karachi-the 7th Bombardment Group (Heavy), the 51st Fighter Group, and the 341st Bombardment Group (Medium).

On paper the IATF had nine squadrons, but not one was fully prepared for combat operations. Of the four heavy bombardment squadrons of the 7th Group, the 9th had not yet been returned from the Middle East, the 436th was just receiving its component of aircraft, and the other two, the 492d and 493d, were mere cadres. The recently activated 341st Bombardment Group (M) had only three squadrons in India, and two of them, the 490th and 491st, were without aircraft. The 22d Squadron was just receiving its planes and had not completed training. A detachment of the 26th Fighter Squadron had moved to Dinjan, but the other squadron of the 51st Fighter Group, the 25th, was in training at Karachi.

By January 1943 headquarters of the IATF had been established at Barrackpore near Calcutta, and the following deployment of combat units was completed: the 25th and 26th Fighter Squadrons were at Sookerating and Dinjan, in Assam; the 436th and 492d Bombardment Squadrons (H) were at Gaya; the 9th and 493d Bombardment Squadrons (H) at Pandaveswar; the 22d and 491st Bombardment Squadrons (M) at Chakulia; and the 490th Bombardment Squadron (M) at Ondal. The newly activated squadrons, though not yet at full strength, were ready to participate in combat, and it appeared that for the first time the Tenth Air Force was in position to challenge Japanese air supremacy in Burma. Although deployment and training had advanced to a stage permitting combat operations, other fundamental problems had to be worked out before the IATF could hope to achieve success comparable to that of the CATF. The Tenth Air Force as a whole was a fairly well-balanced organization, with one heavy group, one medium group, and two fighter groups.

Table of Contents



American Volunteer Group (AVG)
(forerunner to the China Air Task Force, July 1937 - July 1942)


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery


(See 14th AF Units)

Table of Contents



China Air Task Force (CATF)
(forerunner to the 14th Air Force, July 1942 - March 1943)


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery


(See 14th AF Units)

Table of Contents



Eastern Air Command (EAC)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

(15 December 1943-1 June 1945)

In December 1943, the Japanese held almost all Burma and, standing poised on India's eastern frontier, threatened to swarm over Bengal's plains. To meet this crisis, the Supreme Allied Commander in the newly-formed South East Asia Command, Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten, directed the integration of Allied air operations over Burma and formed Eastern Air Command, which was commanded by Lt. General (then Maj. Gen.) George E. Stratemeyer, and responsible to Air Chief Marshall Sir Richard Peirce, the Allied Air Commander-in-Chief. The Supreme Allied Commander originally specified two main objectives: (1) Protect the lines of communication between the supply base of India and the fighting Chinese front and (2) destroy the Japanese air force in Burma. Most of the available RAF and USAAF aircraft in the Theater were given to the General to execute his task.

Thus was born Eastern Air Command, an integrated air force with flying crews and ground personnel from Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and India.

Table of Contents



1st Air Commando Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)


16th Pursuit Gp

16th Pursuit Gp

1st ACG Association


Hailakandi, India - 1944


L-5B, 44-16816 of the 1st ACG -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:  Birth of the Air Commandos

General Henry H. (Hap) Arnold coined the term "Air Commando" in early 1944. This term referred to a group of Air Corps personnel established in India to support British long-range penetration forces in Burma. Its lineage began with the highly secret Project 9, the organizing and recruiting stages in the United States. Project 9 became the 5318th Provisional Group (Air) in India, which airlifted British General Orde Wingate’s Special Forces into Burma during Operation THURSDAY in March 1944. Before the end of the month, it had changed, in name only, to the 1st Air Commando Group (1 ACG).


Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Authorized on the inactive list as 16 Pursuit Group on 24 Mar 1923. Activated on 1 Dec 1932. Redesignated: 16 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 6 Dec 1939; 16 Fighter Group on 15 May 1942. Disestablished on 1 Nov 1943. Reestablished and consolidated (1 Oct 1993) with the 1 Special Operations Wing, which was established as 1 Air Commando Group on 9 Aug 1944, replacing the 1 Air Commando Group (a miscellaneous unit) that was constituted on 25 Mar 1944, activated on 29 Mar 1944, and consolidated on 9 Aug 1944 with the headquarters unit of the new establishment. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Disestablished on 8 Oct 1948. Reestablished on 18 Apr 1962. Activated, and organized, on 27 Apr 1962. Redesignated: 1 Air Commando Wing on 1 Jun 1963; 1 Special Operations Wing on 8 Jul 1968; 834 Tactical Composite Wing on 1 Jul 1974; 1 Special Operations Wing on 1 Jul 1975; 16 Special Operations Wing on 1 Oct 1993; 1 Special Operations Wing on 16 Nov 2006.

Assignments:  3 Attack Wing, 1 Dec 1932; 19 Composite (later, 19) Wing, 15 Jun 1933; 12 Pursuit Wing, 20 Nov 1940; XXVI Interceptor (later, XXVI Fighter) Command, 6 Mar 1942-1 Nov 1943. Army Air Forces India-Burma Sector, 29 Mar 1944 (original unit assigned to 9 Aug 1944, establishment assigned thereafter); Tenth Air Force, 10 Jul 1945; Army Service Forces, 6 Oct-3 Nov 1945. USAF Special Air Warfare Center (later, USAF Special Operations Force), 27 Apr 1962; Tactical Air Command, 1 Jul 1974; Ninth Air Force, 1 Jul 1976; Tactical Air Command, 26 Sep 1980; Ninth Air Force, 1 Aug 1981; 2 Air Division, 1 Mar 1983; Twenty Third Air Force (later, Air Force Special Operations Command), 1 Feb 1987-.

Components

Group:  1 Special Operations (later, 16 Operations; 1 Special Operations): 22 Sep 1992-. 549 Tactical Air Support Training: 15 Dec 1975-1 Jan 1977. 930 Tactical Airlift (later, 930 Air Commando; 930 Special Operations): 1 Jun 1968-18 Jun 1969.

Squadron:  5 Fighter, Commando (later, 605 Air Commando): 1 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945; 15 Nov 1963-1 Jul 1964 (detached 15 Nov 1963-1 Jul 1964). 6 Fighter, Commando (later, 6 Air Commando; 6 Special Operations Training): 30 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945; 27 Apr 1962-29 Feb 1968; 31 Jul 1973-1 Jan 1974. 8 Special Operations: 1 Mar 1974-22 Sep 1992. 9 Special Operations: 18 Apr 1989-22 Sep 1992. 16 Special Operations: 12 Dec 1975-22 Sep 1992. 18 Special Operations: 25 Jan-15 Jul 1969. 20 Special Operations: 1 Jan 1976-22 Sep 1992. 24 Pursuit (later 16 Fighter): 1 Dec 1932-1 Nov 1943. 29 Pursuit (later, 29 Fighter): 1 Oct 1933-1 Nov 1943. 43 Pursuit (Interceptor) (later, 43 Fighter): 1 Feb 1940-1 Nov 1943. 44 Observation (later, 44 Reconnaissance): attached c. Dec 1932-31 Aug 1937, assigned 1 Sep 1937-31 Jan 1940, attached 1 Feb-20 Nov 1940. 55 Special Operations: 18 Apr 1989-22 Sep 1992. 71 Tactical Airlift (later, 71 Air Commando; 71 Special Operations): 1 Jun-16 Dec 1968. 74 Pursuit (later, 74 Attack; 74 Bombardment): 1 Oct 1933-1 Feb 1940. 78 Pursuit: 1 Dec 1932-1 Sep 1937. 164 Liaison: 1 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945. 165 Liaison: 1 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945. 166 Liaison: 1 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945. 310 Attack: 15 May-15 Jul 1969. 311 Attack: 15 May-15 Jul 1969. 317 Air Commando (later, 317 Special Operations): 1 Jul 1964-15 Jul 1969; 15 Apr 1970-30 Apr 1974. 318 Special Operations: 15 Nov 1971-1 Jun 1974. 319 Troop Carrier, Commando (later, 319 Air Commando; 319 Special Operations): 1 Sep 1944-2 Sep 1945; 27 Apr 1962-15 Jul 1969; 30 Jul 1969-15 Jan 1972. 360 Tactical Electronic Warfare: 1-31 Jul 1973. 415 Special Operations Training: 19 Jul 1971-30 Jun 1975. 424 Special Operations (later, 424 Tactical Air Support) Training: 1 Jul 1970-1 Jan 1972. 547 Special Operations (later, 547 Tactical Air Support) Training: 15 Oct 1969-30 Apr 1975. 549 Tactical Air Support Training: 15 Oct 1969-15 Dec 1975. 602 Fighter, Commando: 1 May 1963-1 Oct 1964. 603 Fighter, Commando (later, 603 Air Commando; 603 Special Operations; 603 Special Operations Training): 1 Jul 1963-15 May 1971; 1 Jul 1973-1 Jul 1974. 604 Fighter, Commando: 1 Jul 1963-8 Nov 1964. 775 Troop Carrier: 15 Apr-1 Jul 1964. 4406 Combat Crew Training: 1 Oct 1968-15 Jul 1969. 4407 Combat Crew Training: 15 Jul 1969-30 Apr 1973. 4408 Combat Crew Training: 15 Jul-22 Sep 1969. 4409 Combat Crew Training: 15 Jul-15 Oct 1969. 4410 Combat Crew Training: 27 Apr 1962-1 Dec 1965; 15 Jul-15 Oct 1969. 4412 Combat Crew Training: 25 Oct 1967-15 Jul 1969. 4413 Combat Crew Training: 1 Mar 1968-15 Jul 1969. 4473 Combat Crew Training: 8 Aug 1969-1 Jul 1970. 4532 Combat Crew Training: 25 Oct 1967-15 Jul 1969.

Flight:  7 Special Operations: 1 Jul 1969-31 May 1972.

Stations:  Albrook Field, CZ, 1 Dec 1932-1 Nov 1943. Hailakandi, India, 29 Mar 1944 (original unit); Asansol, India, 20 May 1944-6 Oct 1945 (original unit to 9 Aug 1944, establishment thereafter); Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Eglin Air Force Auxiliary Field No. 9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 27 Apr 1962; England AFB, LA, 15 Jan 1966; Eglin Air Force Auxiliary Field No. 9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 15 Jul 1969-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 1932-1933; Maj Robert L. Walsh, c. 2 Sep 1933-c. 14 Aug 1935; Lt Col Willis H. Hale, Sep 1938-8 Aug 1939; Maj Arthur L. Bump, c. 1939-c. Feb 1941; Capt Roger J. Browne, 24 Feb 1941; Lt Col Otto P. Weyland, 20 May 1941; Maj John A. H. Miller, 1 Mar 1942; Lt Col Philip B. Klein, 10 Apr 1942; Lt Col Hiette S. William Jr., Sep 1942; Maj James K. Johnson, 1943; Maj Edwin Bishop Jr., 25 Sep 1943-unkn. Col Philip G. Cochran, 29 Mar 1944 (original unit); Col Clinton B. Gaty, 20 May 1944 (original unit to 9 Aug 1944; establishment thereafter); Col Robert W. Hall, c. 7 Apr 1945-unkn. Lt Col Miles M. Doyle, 27 Apr 1962; Col Chester A. Jack, 29 Apr 1962; Col Gerald R. Dix, 19 Mar 1963; Col Harry C. Aderholt, 28 Mar 1964; Col Gordon F. Bradburn, 10 Jul 1964; Col Hugh G. Fly Jr., 1 Dec 1965; Col Alpheus W. Blizzard Jr., 3 Apr 1967; Col Albert S. Pouloit, 9 Sep 1967; Col Leonard Volet, 14 Feb 1969; Col Robert W. Gates, 15 Jul 1969; Col Michael C. Horgan, 31 Oct 1970; Col James H. Montrose, 1 Apr 1973; Brig Gen William J. Holton, 11 Jan 1974; Col Edward Levell Jr., 1 Jul 1976; Col Richard H. Dunwoody, 29 Jul 1977; Col Theodore W. Stuart, 13 Mar 1980; Col Hugh L. Cox III, 26 Feb 1982; Col Hugh L. Hunter, 1 Mar 1983; Col Leonard A. Butler, 12 Jul 1985; Col Hanson L. Scott, 28 Aug 1986; Col Dale E. Stovall, 13 Jul 1987; Col George A. Gray III, 21 Jun 1989; Col Gary C. Vycital, c. 29 Aug 1990 (temporary); Col George A. Gray III, c. 24 Nov 1990; Col Gary C. Vycital, c. 24 Dec 1990 (temporary); Col George A. Gray III, 13 Mar 1991; Col Charles R. Holland, 20 Jun 1991; Brig Gen Maxwell C. Bailey, 7 Jun 1993; Brig Gen Norton A. Schwartz, 2 Jun 1995; Col Richard L. Comer, 16 May 1997; Col Donald C. Wurster; 12 Jun 1998; Col David J. Scott, 29 Jul 1999; Col Lyle M. Koenig, 29 Jun 2001; Col Frank J. Kisner, 28 Jun 2002; Col Otis G. Mannon, 24 Oct 2003; Col Norman J. Brozenick Jr., 7 Jul 2005-.

Aircraft:  P-12, 1932-1943; OA-3 1933-1937; B-6, 1933-1937; OA-9, 1937-1940; Y-10, 1937-1940; A-17, 1937-1940; P-26, 1938-1941; P-36, 1939-1942; P-39, 1941-1943; P-40, 1941-1943. B-25, 1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944, 1945; UC-64, 1944-1945; L-1, 1944; L-5, 1944-1945; C-47, 1944-1945; YR-4, 1944-1945; CG-4 (glider), 1944-1945; TG-5 (glider), 1944-1945. C-46, 1962-1964; C/TC/VC-47, 1962-1970, 1973-1975; B/RB-26, 1962-1966; T/AT-28, 1962-1973; L-28 (later, U-10), 1962-1973; C/UC-123, 1963-1973; A-1, 1963-1966, 1969-1972; YAT-28, 1964-1965; YAT-37, 1964; O-1, 1964-1967, 1969-1971; AC-47, 1965, 1967-1969; U-3, 1966-1967; U-6, 1966-1967; UH-1, 1966, 1969-1974, 1976-1985; A/RA-26, 1966-1969; A-37, 1967-1969, 1969-1971, 1973-1974; EC/HC-47, 1967-1969, 1973; AC-123, 1967; C/MC-130, 1968-; AC-130, 1968, 1971-; EC-130, 1969; C/AC-119, 1968-1969, 1971-1972; O-2, 1969-1976; OV-10, 1969-1976; YQU-22 (drone), 1969-1970; QU-22 (drone), 1970-1971; CH-3, 1973-1974, 1976-1980; MH-53, 1980-; MH-60, 1989-; HC-130, 1989-. In addition to the primary aircraft listed above, also flew T-29, 1969-1973; VT-29, 1969-1975; T-33, 1969-1975; T-39, 1969-1975; C-131, 1970-1973; and VC-131, 1973-1975.

Operations:  Provided fighter defense of Panama Canal operations, Dec 1932-Oct 1943. Replaced the 5318th Provisional Air Unit in India in Mar 1944. As a miscellaneous unit, the group was comprised until Sep 1944 of operational sections (rather than units): bomber; fighter; light-plane (and helicopter); transport; glider; and light-cargo. The group provided fighter cover, bomb striking power, and air transport services for Wingate's Raiders, fighting behind enemy lines in Burma. Operations included airdrop and landing of troops, food, and equipment; evacuation of casualties; and attacks against enemy airfields and lines of communication. Converted from P-51 to P-47 fighters and eliminated its B-25 bomber section in May 1944. In Sep 1944, after the original unit was consolidated with the headquarters component of the new establishment (also called 1st Air Commando Group); the sections were replaced by a troop carrier, two fighter, and three liaison squadrons. The group continued performing supply, evacuation, and liaison services for allied forces in Burma until the end of the war, including the movement of Chinese troops from Burma to China in Dec 1944. It also attacked bridges, railroads, airfields, barges, oil wells, and troop positions in Burma and escorted bombers to Burmese targets, including Rangoon. Switched back to P-51s in May 1945. Left Burma in Oct and inactivated in NJ in Nov 1945. Replaced the 4400th Combat Crew Training Group in Apr 1962 and assumed air commando operations and training responsibility. Trained USAF and South Vietnamese Air Force aircrews in the United States and South Vietnam in unconventional warfare, counterinsurgency, psychological warfare, and civic actions throughout the Southeast Asian conflict. Between 11 Jan and 30 Jun 1974, the USAF Special Operations Force and 1st Special Operations Wing merged their operations, and on 1 Jul 1974, the wing assumed responsibility for operating the USAF Air Ground Operations School, which trained personnel in concepts, doctrine, tactics, and procedures of joint and combined operations until 1 Feb 1978, and the USAF Special Operations School, which trained selected American and allied personnel in special operations, until Mar 1983. Elements of the wing participated in the attempt in Apr 1980 to rescue US hostages held in Tehran, Iran. Thereafter, continued to work closely with multi-service special operations forces to develop combat tactics for numerous types of aircraft and conduct combat crew training for USAF and foreign aircrews. Conducted numerous disaster relief; search and rescue; medical evacuation; and humanitarian support missions. Supported drug interdiction efforts in a coordinated program involving multiple US and foreign agencies, 1983-1985. Conducted airdrop and airlift of troops and equipment; psychological operations, close air support, reconnaissance, search and rescue, and attacks against enemy airfields and lines of communications in support of the rescue of US nationals in Grenada, Oct-Nov 1983, and the restoration of democracy in Panama, Dec 1989-Jan 1990. Beginning Aug 1990, deployed personnel and equipment to Saudi Arabia. These forces carried out combat search and rescue, unconventional warfare, and direct strike missions during the conflict, including suppression of Iraqi forces during the Battle of Khafji, Jan 1991. Deployed personnel and equipment worldwide, performing combat search and rescue, and supporting contingencies, humanitarian relief, and exercises that included Bosnia-Herzegovina, Iraq, Kuwait, and Central America. Elements of the wing deployed to participate in operations Provide Comfort in Iraq, 1991-1996 and Deny Flight, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 1993-1995. It supported operation Deliberate Force/Joint Endeavor, Aug-Sep 1995 and 14-20 Dec 1996, flying combat missions and attacking targets critical to Bosnian-Serb Army operations. Wing elements participated in operations Northern and Southern Watch in 1997 and again participated in combat operations in Desert Thunder, Feb-Jun 1998 and Desert Fox, 17-21 Dec 1998. It assumed an additional mission, supporting the Aerospace Expeditionary Forces in Feb 2000. In 2001 and 2003 deployed elements to Afghanistan and Iraq and performed combat operations in the global war on terror.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983; Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Burma and India, [Mar]-20 May 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 1 May 1982-30 Apr 1984; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2005. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: Jul 1963-Jun 1965; 1 Jul 1969-15 Apr 1971; 1 Jan 1976-31 Mar 1977; 15 Jul 1979-15 May 1980; 16 May 1980-30 Apr 1982; 1 May 1985-30 Apr 1987; 1 May 1988-30 Apr 1990; 16 Apr 1992-15 Apr 1994; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)

Emblem (16th Pursuit Gp):  Four lightning bolts, representing the four assigned squadrons, depict destruction from the sky. Approved in 1934.

Emblem (WWII):  (Design taken from the National Standard of the Chindits Old Comrades Association). On a blue field a Burmese Temple Lion and Pagoda, all gold resting on the Morse Code dot, dot, dot, dash. overall a label: NO. 1 AIR COMMANDOS.

Emblem (Current):  Per fess Azure and paly of 13 Gules and Argent, in pale a sword point to base light blue, winged fesswise in chief of the like, the blade surmounted in base by a lamp or enflamed of the third and fourth, all within a diminished bordure of the fifth. Motto: ANY TIME, ANY PLACE. Approved on 6 Jun 1963 (K-14253); replaced emblem approved on 4 Dec 1934 (K-2804). (On 1 October 1993, the 1st Special Operations Wing was redesignated the 16th Special Operations Wing. The unit retained the same emblem.)

Emblem Significance:  The emblem of the 1st Special Operations Wing symbolizes its 63-year mission and emphasizes that the wing is the single focal point for all Air Force special operations matters.

The shield reflects its historic past as the first organization to field limited and unconventional warfare. It was approved for the reconstituted 1st Air Commando Group on June 6, 1943.

The background is national colors with the blue representing the sky and the Air Force. The 13 red and white stripes represent the 13 original colonies, the first American force to engage in limited war. The stripes also are reminiscent of the red and white diagonal markings on some 1st Air Commando Group aircraft, an ancestor of the 1st SOW.

The silver dagger represents the air commando, and the dagger is winged to indicate that commandos come from the air. A golden lamp of knowledge reflects the wing's civic action role and indicates that wing members serve as teachers, as well as warriors, in assisting U.S. allies determine their own way of life and form of government.

The motto, "Any Time, Any Place," emphasizes the 1st SOW is prepared to accomplish its mission whenever or wherever it is called upon to do so. (Source: 1st SOW Fact Sheet, January 2007)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 6 Dec 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Dec 2006.


1st ACG Bomber Section


1st ACG L-5 Pilots


1st SOW Becomes 16th SOW

Source:

(Excerpt)

On Oct. 1, 1993 the United States Air Force redesignated the 1st SOW as the 16th SOW. The redesignation occurred as part of then Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Merrill A. McPeak's effort to protect Air Force heritage.

Upon becoming Chief of Staff, General McPeak tasked the Air Force Historical Research Agency at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. to develop a historical scoring system for wings and squadrons that would permit the Air Force leadership to keep those unit designations with the most history points during down-sizing actions. The historical agency personnel developed a scoring system based upon a unit's total years of service, service streamers, campaign or expeditionary credits, combat decorations, foreign decorations, non-combat decorations and aerial victory credits.

General McPeak directed that no active duty units would have the same designation. At the time, the 1st SOW shared its numerical designation with the 1st Fighter Wing, Langley AFB, VA, and the recently inactivated 1st Space Wing, Peterson AFB, Colo. Under the AFHRA scoring system, the 1st FW accumulated the most points, thus the 1st SOW had to be renamed.

To comply with General McPeak's requirement, the AFHRA personnel reconstituted the 16th Fighter Group and consolidated it with the 1st SOW. The 16th FG had a unique but short history in that it was activated in the Panama Canal Zone on Dec. 1, 1932 and served as part of the then very crucial defense of the Panama Canal. In 1939, the unit was redesignated the 16th Pursuit Group (Interceptor), and in 1941, the 16th Fighter Group. The unit was disbanded on Nov. 1, 1943. The 16th was of historical importance in that it was one of the original 13 Air Force units created between 1918 and 1932.


1st SOW Reborn at Hurlburt Field

As the Air Force prepared to stand up a new Special Operations Wing at Cannon AFB, N.M., it was decided that the 1st SOW heritage should remain at Hurlburt Field. So today, a new chapter in the 1st SOW heritage begins.

The decision to resurrect the 1st SOW designation rose from the fact that the 1st SOW had a strong heritage with Hurlburt Field.


Other Sites of Interest:

The Air Invasion of Burma (Air Force Magazine, November 2009)

Chindits 2nd Campaign 1944

 1st Air Commando Group Operations Aug 43-May 44

Table of Contents



5th Fighter Squadron (Commando)


605th Air Commando Sq


P-47, Asansol, India - late 1944

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 5th Fighter Squadron (Commando) on 9 Aug 1944. Activated on 1 Sep 1944. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted 1963 as 605th Air Commando Squadron, Composite and activated, organized 15 Nov 63, redesignated 605th Special Operations Squadron 1 Aug 68, inactivated 30 Apr 72.

Assignments:  1st Air Commando Group, 1 Sep 1944 - 3 Nov 1945. 1st Air Commando Wing 1963-1 Jul 64 (attached to USAF Southern Command (?) Nov 63-Jul 64), 5700th Air Base Wing -8 Nov 67, 24th Air Commando Wing/Special Operations Wing -1972.

Stations:  Asansol, India, 1 Sep 1944 (one detachment operated from Cox's Bazaar, India, 15-21 Oct 1944, and another from Fenny, India, 8-30 Nov 1944); Fenny, India, 28 Dec 1944; Hay, India, 7 Feb 1945; Asansol, India, 13 May 1945; Kalaikunda, India, 23 May 1945; Asansol, India, 22 Jun - 6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Howard AB, Canal Zone (Panama) 1963-1972.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1945; P-51, 1945.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 17 Oct 1944 - 8 May 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



6th Fighter Squadron (Commando)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 6 Fighter Squadron, Commando, on 22 Sep 1944. Activated on 30 Sep 1944. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted, and activated, on 18 Apr 1962. Organized on 27 Apr 1962. Redesignated: 6 Air Commando Squadron, Fighter, on 15 Jun 1966; 6 Special Operations Squadron on 15 Jul 1968. Inactivated on 15 Nov 1969. Activated on 8 Jan 1970. Redesignated 6 Special Operations Training Squadron on 31 Aug 1972. Inactivated on 15 Sep 1974. Redesignated 6 Special Operations Flight on 25 Mar 1994. Activated on 1 Apr 1994. Redesignated 6 Special Operations Squadron on 1 Oct 1994.

Assignments:  1 Air Commando Group, 30 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945 (attached to First Provisional Fighter Group, 7 Feb-c. 8 May 1945; 2 Air Commando Group, 23 May-20 Jun 1945). Tactical Air Command, 18 Apr 1962; 1 Air Commando Group (later, 1 Air Commando Wing), 27 Apr 1962; 14 Air Commando Wing, 29 Feb 1968; 633 Special Operations Wing, 15 Jul 1968-15 Nov 1969. 4410 Combat Crew Training Wing (later, 4410 Special Operations Training Group), 8 Jan 1970; 1 Special Operations Wing, 31 Jul 1973; 23 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Jan-15 Sep 1974. 16 Operations (later, 1 Special Operations) Group, 1 Apr 1994-.

Stations:  Asansol, India, 30 Sep 1944 (detachments operated from Cox's Bazar, India, 15-21 Oct 1944, 2-8 Nov 1944; and 11-18 Jan 1945, and from Fenny, India, 1-24 Dec 1944); Hay, India, 7 Feb 1945; Asansol, India, 9 May 1945; Kalaikunda, India, 23 May 1945; Asansol, India, 22 Jun-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Eglin Air Force Auxiliary Airfield No. 9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 27 Apr 1962; England AFB, LA, 15 Jan 1966-17 Feb 1968; Pleiku AB, South Vietnam, 29 Feb 1968-15 Nov 1969 (detachment operated from Da Nang AB, South Vietnam, 1 Apr 1968-1 Sep 1969). England AFB, LA, 8 Jan 1970-15 Sep 1974. Hurlburt Fld, FL, 1 Apr 1994-.

Commanders:  Capt Olin B. Carter, c. 30 Sep 1944; Maj Younger A. Pitts Jr., Nov 1944; Capt William J. Hemphill, 19 Feb-Sep 1945; unkn, Sep-3 Nov 1945. Unkn, 27 Apr 1962; Maj William W. McDaniel, 30 Apr 1962; Maj Robert W. Allison Jr., c. Feb 1963; Lt Col Owen P. Farmer Jr., 12 Apr 1963; Maj Siegel M. Dickman, c. Jun 1964; Maj Leroy W. Svendsen Jr., c. Jul 1964; Lt Col Eugene H. Mueller Jr., Oct 1964; Maj Robert A. McCauley, 7 Jun 1965; Lt Col Benjamin M. Washburn, 28 Jun 1965; Col Domenico A. Curto, c. Nov 1965, Maj George G. Duke, c. Jan 1966; Lt Col Wallace A. Ford, 3 May 1966; Maj Joseph C. Holden, c. Jul 1966; Lt Col Wallace A. Ford, 22 Oct 1966; Lt Col Norman F. Repp, 1 Mar 1968; Lt Col James N. Swain Jr., 22 May 1968; Lt Col Alexander E. Corey, 17 Jul 1968; Lt Col Harold D. Hadden, 1 May-15 Nov 1969. Lt Col Donald L. Lanoue, 8 Jan 1970; Maj Wayne K. Beckwith, 31 Aug 1970; Maj Robert L. Martin, 15 Sep 1970; Lt Col Fred T. Coleman, c. Jul 1972-15 Sep 1974. Unkn, 1 Apr 1994; Lt Col Stephen S. Whitson, 1 Oct 1994; Lt Col Monty D. Sexton, 13 Dec 1996; Lt Col Marvin S. Pugmire, 23 Jan 1998; Lt Col Norman J. Brozenick Jr., 30 Jun 1999; Lt Col Eric C. Huppert, 18 Jan 2001; Lt Col James Sikes, 16 Jan 2003-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1945; P-51, 1945. B/RB-26 and L-28 (later, U-10), 1962-1963; T-28, 1962-1967; A-1, 1963, 1966; 1967-1969. A-37, 1970-1974. None assigned, 1994-1995; UH-1N, 1996-; CASA-212, 1998-.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 17 Oct 1944-8 May 1945. Combat in Southeast Asia, 1 Mar 1968-15 Nov 1969. Replacement training for US and allied pilots in A-37 aircraft, Jan 1970-Sep 1974. Served as combat advisory unit to combatant commander during crises; focused on foreign internal defense (FID), 1994-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring 1970.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation: Vietnam, 1 Jun-15 Nov 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with the Combat "V" Device: 1 Feb-20 Jun 1968; 15 Jul 1968-31 May 1969; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2005. Gallant Unit Citation: 6 Oct 2001-30 May 2003. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: Jul 1963-Jun 1965; 15 Sep 1970-31 Dec 1971; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Sep 2004-31 Aug 2006. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Jan 1968-15 Nov 1969.

Emblem:  On a Red disc within a narrow Gold border a White annulet and overall a Blue pale fimbriated Gold bearing in chief a Gold six pointed star highlighted White, between two Gold wings erect, that are issuant from the grip of a White dagger shaded Gray in pale with point to base between two Gold lightning bolts in pile. Approved on 22 March 1966 (K 18600).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 7 Aug 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2003.

Supersedes published information contained in: Judy G. Endicott (ed.), USAF Active Flying, Space, and Missile Squadrons as of 1 October 1995 (Washington: USGPO, 1999).


Photo courtesy of Mr. Charles Phippin, son of Mr. Melvin Phippin (radio repairman, 6th FS)

Table of Contents



10th Air Jungle Rescue Detachment  (See Medical Services Units)

First Helicopter Medical Evacuation in 1944

The China-Burma-India "Hump" airlift operation was the theater for what was probably the first use of a helicopter in a combat rescue. In April 1944, TSgt Ed "Murphy" Hladovcak of the 1st Air Commandos, piloting a Stinson L-1 Vigilant with three wounded British soldiers on board, was forced down over 100 miles (160 km) behind Japanese lines, 15 miles (25 km) west of Mawlu, Burma. Deep in the jungle where an airplane could not land, unable to hike out because of the injured passengers, and with ground-rescue forces days away, the downed men hid from nearby Japanese soldiers. A newly-delivered Army Sikorsky YR-4B helicopter, piloted by Lt. Carter Harmon, with a 175-horsepower engine, was dispatched to try a rescue. In the heat and humidity of Burma, the YR-4B could carry only one passenger at a time, straining its engine past the redline just to lift off. Despite these difficulties, over the two day period 25-26 April 1944, four trips were made in and out to a secure location where the men could safely transfer to a Stinson L-5 Sentinel. The final hasty liftoff was accomplished just as shouting soldiers burst from the jungle. As Lt. Harmon learned later, the soldiers were not Japanese, but an Allied land rescue party that had finally reached the crash site. The great success of the mission encouraged the advocates of helicopters, but few other missions actually took place during WW II.


Other Sites of Interest:

Fact Sheets: Jungle Rescue (National Museum of the USAF)

The Hoverfly in CBI - First Recorded Military Rescue by Helicopter

Igor Sikorsky's R-4 Hoverfly Helicopter

WW II Helicopter Evacuation

Table of Contents



72nd Airdrome Squadron


(See Other Units Page)

Table of Contents



164th Liaison Squadron (Commando)


4th SAS / 18th ASSQ

964th AEWCS

964th AEWCS

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  4th Search Attack Squadron (constituted 362d Bombardment Squadron [Heavy] on 28 Jan 1942; activated on 15 Jul 1942; redesignated: 18th Antisubmarine Squadron [Heavy] on 29 Nov 1942; 4th Sea-Search Attack Squadron [Heavy] on 23 Oct 1943; 4th Search Attack Squadron [Heavy] on 22 Nov 1943; disbanded 10 Apr 1944; reconstituted on 19 Sep 1985) consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 164th Liaison Squadron (Commando) (constituted on 9 Aug 1944; activated on 3 Sep 1944; inactivated on 3 Nov 1945) and the 964th Airborne Warning and Control Squadron (constituted 964th Airborne Early Warning and Control Squadron on 8 Dec 1954; activated on 8 Mar 1955; inactivated on 30 Jun 1974; redesignated 964th Airborne Warning and Control Squadron on 7 Feb 1977; activated on 1 Jul 1977). Redesignated 964th Airborne Air Control Squadron on 1 Jul 1994.

Assignments:  304th Bombardment Group, 15 Jul 1942; 25th Antisubmarine Wing, 30 Dec 1942; I Bomber Command, 24 Aug 1943 (attached to 1st Sea-Search Attack Unit, 30 Sep-22 Oct 1943); 1st Sea-Search Attack Unit (later, 1st Search Attack Group), 23 Oct 1943-10 Apr 1944. 1st Air Commando Group, 3 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945. 8th Air Division, 8 Mar 1955; 552d Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 8 Jul 1955-30 Jun 1974. 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing (later, 552d Airborne Warning and Control Division; 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing, 552d Air Control Wing), 1 Jul 1977; 552d Operations Group, 29 May 1992-.

Stations:  Salt Lake City AAB, UT, 15 Jul 1942; Geiger Field, WA, 15 Sep 1942; Ephrata, WA, 1 Oct 1942; Langley Field, VA, 29 Oct 1942-10 Apr 1944. Asansol, India, 3 Sep 1944; Inbaung, Burma, 19 Dec 1944; Kan, Burma, 15 Jan 1945; Asansol, India, 31 Jan 1945; Shwebo, Burma, 20 Feb 1945; Ondaw, Burma, 12 Mar 1945; Asansol, India, 31 Mar 1945; Sinthe, Burma, 20 Apr 1945; Magwe, Burma, 4 May 1945; Asansol, India, 10 May-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. McClellan AFB, CA, 8 Mar 1955-30 Jun 1974. Tinker AFB, OK, 1 Jul 1977-.

Aircraft:   B-18, 1942-1943; A-20, 1942-1943; B-24, 1942-1943; B-34, 1942-1943; B-17, 1942-1944. C-64, 1944-1945; L-5, 1944-1945. RC-121, 1955-1963; EC-121, 1963-1974. E-3, 1977-.

Operations:  Operational training unit for 25th Antisubmarine Wing, Nov 1942-Oct 1943. Trained B-17 replacement crews, Nov 1943-Apr 1944. Visual reconnaissance, medical evacuation and light transport services for ground forces in Burma, 19 Dec 1944-3 May 1945. Long range surveillance, late 1950s. Rotated aircrews to Southeast Asia, c. 4 Apr 1965-17 May 1974. Combat support in Southwest Asia, 17 Jan-6 Mar 1991.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma, Central Burma. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jul 1969-30 Jun 1970; 1 Jul 1971-31 Dec 1972. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1961-30 Jun 1963; 15 Apr 1965-1 Jul 1966; 2 Jul 1966-1 Jul 1968; 1 Jul 1970-30 Jun 1971; 1 Jul 1977-30 Jun 1978; 1 Jul 1978-30 Jun 1980; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 May 1985 -30 Apr 1987; 1 May 1987-30 Apr 1989; 1 Dec 1989-1 Dec 1991. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-28 Jan 1973.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Yellow border a stylized Phoenix ascending, head and neck Red, body and wings Gray garnished Black, eyed Yellow emitting two Yellow lightning bolts upward and a Yellow trail to the bottom of the disc. Approved in 1978 (KE 64616); replaced emblems approved on 23 Aug 1957 (K 2138) and 10 Apr 1943 (K 2874).

Table of Contents



165th Liaison Squadron (Commando)


965th AEWCS

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  595th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) (constituted on 29 Jan 1943; activated on 16 Feb 1943; inactivated on 1 May 1944) consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 165th Liaison Squadron (Commando) (constituted on 9 Aug 1944; activated on 3 Sep 1944; inactivated on 3 Nov 1945) and the 965th Airborne Warning and Control Squadron (constituted 965th Airborne Early Warning and Control Squadron on 28 Apr 1955; activated on 8 Aug 1955; inactivated on 30 Jun 1971; redesignated 965th Airborne Warning and Control Squadron on 28 Feb 1978; activated on 1 Jul 1978). Redesignated 965th Airborne Air Control Squadron on 1 Jul 1994.

Assignments:  396th Bombardment Group, 16 Feb 1943-1 May 1944. 1st Air Commando Group, 3 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945. 552d Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 8 Aug 1955-30 Jun 1971. 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing (later, 552d Airborne Warning and Control Division; 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing; 552d Air Control Wing), 1 Jul 1978; 552d Operations Group, 29 May 1992-.

Stations:  Mountain Home, AAFld, ID, 16 Feb 1943; Moses Lake AAB, WA, 10 Apr 1943; Drew Field, FL, 5 Nov 1943-1 May 1944. Asansol, India, 3 Sep 1944; Tamu, Burma, 14 Oct 1944; Yazagyo, Burma, 6 Nov 1944; Asansol, India, 27 Nov 1944; Kawlin, Burma, 28 Dec 1944 (detachment operated from Inbaung, Burma, 3-22 Jan 1945); Ye-U, Burma, 10 Jan 1945; Shwebo, Burma, 22 Jan 1945; Asansol, India, 21 Feb 1945; Sinthe, Burma, 14 Mar 1945; Asansol, India, 25 Apr-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. McClellan AFB, CA, 8 Aug 1955-30 Jun 1971. Tinker AFB, OK, 1 Jul 1978-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1943-1944. C-64, 1944-1945; L-5, 1944-1945. RC-121, 1955-1963; EC-121, 1963-1971. E-3, 1978-1979, 1984-.

Operations:  Operational training unit, Mar-Aug 1943; replacement training, Aug 1943-May 1944. Evacuation and light transport services for ground forces in Burma, 6 Oct 1944-23 Apr 1945. Long range surveillance, late 1950s. Rotated aircrews to Southeast Asia, c. 4 Apr 1965-c. Jun 1971. Not operational, c. Sep 1979-1 Jan 1984. Combat support in Panama, 20 Dec 1989-24 Jan 1990 and in Southwest Asia, 17 Jan-6 Mar 1991.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jul 1969-30 Jun 1970. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1961-30 Jun 1963; 15 Apr 1965-1 Jul 1966; 2 Jul 1966-1 Jul 1968; 1 Jul 1970-30 Jun 1971; [1 Jan 1984]-30 Jun 1984; 1 May 1985-30 Apr 1987; 1 May 1987-30 Apr 1989; 1 Dec 1989-1 Dec 1991. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-28 Jun 1971.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Black border, arising in base a Black mountain with three White peaks surmounted by an eagle in descent, (head, neck and tail feathers White, body, upper legs and beak Yellow, lower legs, eye, claws, and details Black) grasping a Yellow lightning bolt; in the top of the disc an arc of three White five-pointed stars. Approved on 31 Jan 1979 (KE 67966); replaced emblem approved on 4 Sep 1956 (K 4705).

Table of Contents



166th Liaison Squadron (Commando)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  466th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) (constituted on 9 Jul 1942; activated on 15 Jul 1942; inactivated on 1 Apr 1944) consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 166th Liaison Squadron (Commando) (constituted on 9 Aug 1944; activated on 3 Sep 1944; inactivated on 3 Nov 1945) and the 966th Airborne Warning and Control Training Squadron (constituted 966th Airborne Early Warning and Control Squadron, and activated on 18 Dec 1961; organized on 1 Feb 1962; inactivated on 31 Dec 1969; redesignated 966th Airborne Warning and Control Training Squadron on 5 May 1976; activated on 1 Jul 1976). Redesignated 966th Airborne Air Control Squadron on 1 Jul 1994.

Assignments:  333d Bombardment Group, 15 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 1st Air Commando Group, 3 Sep 1944-3 Nov 1945. Air Defense Command, 18 Dec 1961; 551st Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 1 Feb 1962; 552d Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 1 May 1963; 551st Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 1 Jul 1969; 552d Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 15 Nov-31 Dec 1969. 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing (later, 552d Airborne Warning and Control Division; 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing; 552d Air Control Wing), 1 Jul 1976; 552d Operations Group, 29 May 1992-.

Stations:  Topeka, KS, 15 Jul 1942; Dalhart, AAFld, TX, 22 Feb 1943-1 Apr 1944. Asansol, India, 3 Sep 1944; Yazagyo, Burma, 13 Nov 1944; Inbaung, Burma, 12 Dec 1944; Asansol, India, 19 Dec 1944 (detachment operated from Arakan, Burma, c. 29 Dec 1944-23 Jan 1945); Sinthe, Burma, 4 Feb 1945; Asansol, India, 14 Mar 1945; Ondaw, Burma, 29 Mar 1945; Meiktila, Burma, 5 Apr 1945; Toungoo, Burma, 27 Apr 1945; Asansol, India, 14 May-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. McCoy AFB, FL, 1 Feb 1962-31 Dec 1969. Tinker AFB, OK, 1 Jul 1976-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1942; B-24, 1942-1943. C-64, 1944-1945; L-5, 1944-1945. RC-121, 1962-1963; TC-121, 1962-1963; EC-121, 1963-1969. WC-135, 1977-1979; E-3, 1977-.

Operations:  Replacement training, Aug 1942-Nov 1943. Evacuation and light transport services for ground forces in Burma, 13 Nov 1944-10 May 1945. Airborne radar surveillance, 1962-1969. Rotated aircrews to Southeast Asia, c. 4 Apr 1965-c. Dec 1969. Trained aircrews 1977-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations: Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: [15 Nov 1969]-31 Dec 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1961-30 Jun 1963; 20 Oct-30 Nov 1962; 15 Apr 1965-1 Jul 1966; 2 Jul 1966-1 Jul 1968; 1 Jul 1977-30 Jun 1978; 1 Jul 1978-30 Jun 1980; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 May 1985-30 Apr 1987; 1 May 1987-30 Apr 1989; 1 Dec 1989-1 Dec 1991. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-31 Dec 1969.

Emblem:  Per bend Celeste and Sable a lightning flash issuant from sinister base bendwise throughout Gules fimbriated Or surmounted by an eagle proper and grasping in both feet a telescope Argent garnished Yellow above a wreath of laurel of the last; all within a diminished bordure of the second. Approved on 15 May 1989 (DFSC 90-02544); replaced emblem approved on 14 Jun 1963 (K 14211).

Table of Contents



285th Medical Dispensary (Avn)  (See Medical Service Units)

Campaign Credit:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



309th Airdrome Squadron  (See Other Units)

Source:

Ex-CBI Roundup, April 1992 issue

Lineage:  Activated 5 Jul 43 at Walla Walla, WA. Serviced 1st Air Commando Gp, 4th Combat Cargo Group, 89th Fighter Squadron.

Stations:  Walla Walla, WA 5 Jul 43-Apr 44; Sioux City AAB, IA Apr 44-; Asansol by 1 Aug 45

Table of Contents



319th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando)


1st ACG Glider Section

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 319 Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando) on 9 Aug 1944. Activated on 1 Sep 1944. Redesignated 319 Troop Carrier Squadron on 29 Sep 1945. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Redesignated 319 Troop Carrier Squadron, Commando, and activated on 18 Apr 1962. Organized on 27 Apr 1962. Redesignated: 319 Air Commando Squadron, Troop Carrier, on 8 Nov 1964; 319 Air Commando Squadron, Tactical Airlift, on 1 May 1967; 319 Special Operations Squadron on 8 Jul 1968. Inactivated on 15 Jan 1972. Activated on 1 Oct 2005.

Assignments:  1 Air Commando Group, 1 Sep 1944; 69 Composite Wing, 2 Sep 1945; Tenth Air Force, c. 27 Sep-27 Dec 1945. 1 Air Commando Group (later, 1 Air Commando Wing; 1 Special Operations Wing), 18 Apr 1962; 4410 Combat Crew Training Wing, 15 Jul 1969; 1 Special Operations Wing, 30 Jul 1969-15 Jan 1972. 16 Operations (later, 1 Special Operations) Group, 1 Oct 2005-.

Stations:  Asansol, India, 1 Sep 1944 (operated from various forward bases in Burma, 4 Dec 1944-17 May 1945); Warazup, Burma, 27 May 1945; Loping, China, 2 Sep 1945; Hu Hsien, China, 7 Oct 1945; India, c. 1 Nov-27 Dec 1945. Eglin Air Force Auxiliary Field No. 9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 27 Apr 1962; England AFB, LA, 15 Jan 1966; Eglin Air Force Auxiliary Field No. 9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 30 Jul 1969-15 Jan 1972. Hurlburt Field, FL, 1 Oct 2005-.

Commanders:  Unkn, Sep 1944-Jan 1945; Maj O. A. Sucker, by Feb 1945; Maj Orlo L. Austin, by Apr 1945; Lt Col Lester L. Bear, May 1945; Maj Alfred Kaufman, 29 Oct 1945; None (not manned), Nov-Dec 1945. Capt Arnold A. Tillman, 27 Apr 1962; Lt Col Richard N. Broughton, 1 Jul 1962; Lt Col William C. Thomas, 11 Mar 1963; Maj Robert D. Bollacker, 1 Jan 1966; Lt Col Russel R. Uhlmann, 2 Feb 1966; Lt Col Earl J. Fitzsimmons, 28 Jul 1966; Lt Col Herman E. Luebbert, 6 Apr 1967; Lt Col Robert F. Theisen, 22 May 1967; Lt Col James D. Metcalf, 15 Feb 1968; Lt Col Lonnie C. Hughes, by Aug 1969; Lt Col Robert L. Self, 29 Sep 1969; Lt Col Robert E. Hubeli, 25 Jun 1971-15 Jan 1972. Lt Col Michael J. Dargenio, 12 Oct 2005-.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1944-1945; CG-4A, 1944-1945. C-46, 1962-1964; C-47, 1962-1966; U-10, 1963-1966; C-123, 1963-1972; T-28, 1965. U-28A, 2005-.

Operations:  Provided airlift support and flew aerial resupply missions to commando bases in CBI theater; conducted airborne drop and glider operations for Allied troops in Burma, central China, and French Indo-China, Oct 1944-Oct 1945; not manned, Nov-Dec 1945. From 1962 to 1965, deployed personnel and equipment to support early counterinsurgency operations and foreign civic action programs in Southeast Asia. Conducted training programs in special air warfare tactics and techniques for USAF and foreign air forces; and provided airlift support to U.S. Army Special Forces. Provided intratheater support for special operations forces, 2005-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: Jul 1963-Jun 1965; 1 Jul 1969-15 Apr 1971; [1 Oct] 2005-31 Aug 2006.

Emblem (WWII):  On a white disc bordered white and blue a question mark in blue.

Emblem (Current):  Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The dragon represents valiant defender, valor and protection. The horse is symbolic of the unit’s readiness for all employments. The stylized globe symbolizes the squadron’s area of operation being global in nature. Approved 21 Jun 2006.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 29 Aug 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 28 Aug 2007.


Picture courtesy of the family of TSgt Donald G. Lewis


WHAT WAS THE ORIGIN OF THE QUESTION MARK INSIGNIA?

ANSWER 1:

Ex-CBI Roundup, March 1984 issue
"How's your CBI I.Q." column
by Mr. Hugh Crumpler

Again Joe Lucke comes to bat: "The outfit was designated the 5318 Provisional Air Unit, or prior to that simply Project 9. (You can get some idea of the magnitude of the undertaking when Project 10 was the B-29's and Project 1 was the B-25 bombing of the Japanese mainland). We had hardly arrived in India when the outfit provoked many comments from airdrome officials with the snatch mechanism on the bottom of the plane. Additionally, the rank and file of us did not know exactly what our mission was. Hence the White Circle with a concentric blue-black ring and a blue-black question mark was created. (It saved a lot of anwers for damn-fool questions)."


ANSWER 2:

Ex-CBI Roundup
April, June, October 1997 Issues

1)  He (the officer in the above picture) is wearing the question mark which was the symbol of the 319th Troop Carrier Squadron of the 1st Air Commando Group.

The question mark was chosen because there were so many questions about the ultimate destination and mission of the squadron. This information was not disclosed to squadron members when it was organized in the United States. All original members of the squadron were volunteers. They were told they were volunteering for a secret mission.

The question mark was displayed on the tail of all the squadron's C-47s. I was the last commander of the squadron. I was not a member of the original cadre.  -- Mr. Al Kaufman


2)  We just returned from our 53d anniversary of the First Air Commando Group held in Holland, MI, May 21 thru May 25.

With 106 attending, I was able to obtain first hand information on the MYSTERY PHOTO, page 9, in the April issue. Lt. Col. William W. Johnson. Jr., USAF Retired, than a 1st Lt. with the C-47 Section, was able to identify the officer in your photo. He was Capt. Edgar L. "Blackie" Barham. Original home town and current address unknown.

Bill also was able to give me a different story on the Question Mark on his A-2 jacket. There appears to be three stories on the patch.

First, Is Bill's version. He said when they were still in the States training, many people questioned the C-47 crews on the "reel, cable and pick up pole" in the hatch installed on each C-47. At the time, it was classified information. However, the reel was to hold a tow cable and the pick up pole was to snatch gliders off the ground while the 47 was in flight.

Second version. At the time the photo was taken we did not know who we were. They kept changing the name of the Group; Project 9, Project CA 281, 5318th Provisional Unit (Air), No. 1 Air Commando Force and finally 1st Air Commando Gp.

Third version. Pilots and crews joked about the fact we don't know who we are and we don't know where we are going.

Hope you like these explanations. Pick the one you prefer.  -- Mr. A.R. Van De Weghe

Table of Contents



326th Airdrome Squadron

Source:  Air Force History Index

Lineage:  Activated 20 Jul 43. At Greenville AAB, SC at some point.

Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC), 1 Dec 43 - 20 May 44, WDGO 26/45

Table of Contents



1st Liaison Group (Provisional)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

1st Liaison Group: 29 Aug 1944 to 30 Apr 1945.

Table of Contents



5th Liaison Squadron

(Detached duty from 77th Tactical Reconnaissance Group)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 5th Observation Squadron (Special) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 7 Feb 1942. Redesignated: 5th Observation Squadron on 8 Aug 1942; 5th Liaison Squadron on 2 Apr 1943. Inactivated on 11 Jan 1946. Activated on 15 Oct 1947. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1949. Redesignated 5th Helicopter flight on 27 Sep 1949. Activated on 27 Oct 1949. Inactivated on 22 Jul 1952. Redesignated 5th Liaison Squadron on 14 Aug 1952. Activated on 8 Sep 1952. Inactivated on 18 Jun 1954.

Assignments:  Office of Chief of Air Corps, 7 Feb 1942 (attached to Field Artillery School to Aug 1942); Army Air Forces, 9 Mar 1942; 74th Observation Group, 8 Aug 1942; 77th Observation Group, 25 Jan 1943; 74th Reconnaissance Group. 2 Apr 1943; IV Air Support Command (later III Tactical Air Division), 11 Aug 1943 (attached to 74th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, 17 Aug-c. 15 Sep 1943); II Tactical Air Division, 12 Oct 1943; AAF, India-Burma Sector, 28 Mar 1944 (attached to Northern Combat Area Command, 20 May-Aug 1944); Tenth Air Force, 21 Aug 1944 (attached to 1st Liaison Group [Prov], 29 Aug 1944 - 30 Apr 1945, and to North Burma Air Task Force, 1 May - c. 5 Sep 1945); AAF, India-Burma Theater, 31 Jul - 11 Jan 1946. Ninth Air Force, 15 Oct 1947 (attached to 316th Troop Carrier Wing to 1 Apr 1949); Fourteenth Air Force, 27 Oct 1949; Tactical Air Command, 1 Aug 1950; Ninth Air Force, 5 Oct 1950 - 22 Jul 1952 (attached to 4415th Air Base Group, 4 Apr 1951 - 22 Jul 1952). Eighteenth Air Force (attached to 314th Troop Carrier Wing), 8 Sep 1952; Alaskan Air Command, 1 Apr 1953 (attached to 39th Air Depot Wing, 1-13 Apr 1953, and to 5039th Air Transport Group, 13 Apr - 1 Jul 1953); 5039th Air Base Wing, 1 Jul 1953 - 18 Jun 1954.

Stations:  Post Field, Okla, 7 Feb 1942; Marshall Field, Kan, 4 Aug 1942; Cox AAFld, Tex, 18 Mar 1943; Desert Center AAFld, Calif, 18 May 1943; Thermal AAFld, Calif, 15 Sep 1943; Alamo AAFld, Tex, 12 Oct 1943 - 27 Feb 1944; Ledo, India, 20 Apr 1944; Shaduzup, Burma, 30 Apr 1944; Myitkyina, Burma, 3 Oct 1944; Bhamo, Burma, 22 Jan 1945; Kharagpur, India, c. 3 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 10-11 Jan 1946. Greenville AAB, SC, 15 Oct 1947 - 1 Apr 1949. Pope AFB, NC, 27 Oct 1949 - 22 Jul 1952; Elmendorf AFB, Alaska, 1 Apr 1953 - 18 Jun 1954 (detachments at Ladd AFB, Alaska, 13 Apr 1953 - 10 May 1954, and Bethel, Alaska, 3 Jul 1953 - 5 May 1954).

Aircraft:  In addition to L-3 and L-4, 1942-1943, including L-1, L-6, and apparently B-18 and O-52 during period 1942-1943; in addition to L-5, 1943-1945, including L-1, 1944-1945, and L-4, 1945. L-13, 1947-1948; L-4 and L-5, 1948-1949. H-5, 1949-1951. L-20, 1952-1954.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 1 May 1944 - Jun 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a pastel blue disc, edged black, a caricatured, dark green airplane in flight towards dexter, having shark's red mouth, with white teeth, yellow binoculars to the eyes, and wearing red boxing gloves on the landing gear, in front of a large white cloud formation, and dropping a yellow can and box toward base, all beneath a white cross, edged red, winged yellow, in chief, in front of a small white cloud formation. (Approved 22 Dec 1944.)


5th LS Engineering Section

Table of Contents



19th Liaison Squadron



Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 19th Observation Squadron (Light) on 5 Feb 1942. Activated on 2 Mar 1942. Redesignated: 19th Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 19th Liaison Squadron on 2 Apr 1943. Inactivated on 1 Dec 1945. Redesignated 19th Tactical Air Support Squadron (Light), and activated, on 17 Jun 1963. Organized on 8 Jul 1963. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 8 Aug 1964. Activated on 16 Oct 1964. Organized on 21 Oct 1964. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1993. Redesignated 19th Weapons Squadron on 24 Jan 2003. Activated on 3 Feb 2003.

Assignments:  Air Force Combat Command, 2 Mar 1942; Army Air Forces, 9 Mar 1942; 66 Observation (later, 66 Reconnaissance) Group, 29 Mar 1942; I Air Support Command (later, I Tactical Air Division), 11 Aug 1943; U.S. Army Forces, China-Burma-India, Apr 1944; Fourteenth Air Force. 29 May 1944 (attached to Y Force, 29 May 1944-); 69 Composite Wing, 10 Jun 1944 (remained attached to Y Force to 8 Aug 1944); Tenth Air Force, 1 Aug-1 Dec 1945. 34 Tactical Group, 8 Jul 1963-8 Aug 1964. 34 Tactical Group, 21 Oct 1964; 6251 Tactical Fighter Wing, 8 Jul 1965 (attached to 6250 Tactical Air Support Group, Provisional, 1 Aug-8 Nov 1965); 505 Tactical Control Group, 8 Nov 1965 (attached to Tactical Air Support Group, Provisional, 6253, 9 Sep-8 Dec 1966); 504 Tactical Air Support Group, 8 Dec 1966; 314 Air Division, 15 Jan 1972; 51 Composite Wing, 30 Sep 1974; 5 Tactical Air Control Group, 8 Jan 1980; 51 Fighter (later, 51 Operations) Group, 1 Oct 1990-1 Oct 1993. USAF Weapons School, 3 Feb 2003-.

Detachment:  Detachment 1, 19th Tactical Air Support Squadron (Light) (Camp Casey, South Korea): 15 Apr 1976-8 Jan 1980.

Stations:  Miami Muni Aprt, FL, 2 Mar 1942; Jacksonville Muni Aprt, FL, 7 Mar 1942; Pope Field, NC, 11 May 1942; Morris Field, NC, 19 Oct 1942; Camp Campbell (later, Campbell AAFld), KY, 3 Apr 1943; Aiken AAFld, SC, 22 Jun 1943-26 Feb 1944; Bombay, India, 9 Apr 1944; Kanchrapara, India, c. 15 Apr 1944; Ondal, India, 29 Apr 1944; Chabua, India, 17 May 1944; Kunming, China, 29 May 1944; Chengkung, China, 28 Mar 1945; Nanning, China, 18 Aug 1945; Calcutta, India, c. Oct-7 Nov 1945; Fort Lewis, WA, 30 Nov-1 Dec 1945. Bien Hoa AB, South Vietnam, 8 Jul 1963-8 Aug 1964. Bien Hoa AB, South Vietnam, 21 Oct 1964; Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam, 1 Aug 1971; Osan AB, South Korea, 15 Jan 1972; Suwon AB, South Korea, 1 Aug 1989; Osan AB, South Korea, 1 Oct 1990-1 Oct 1993. Nellis AFB, NV, 3 Feb 2003-.

Commanders:  Maj Lorick L. Stephenson Jr., 2 Mar 1942; Maj George W. Ribble, 15 Mar 1942; 1st Lt Forrest J. Jourder, 27 Sep 1942; Capt Woodrow Herring, 28 Sep 1942; Capt Horace B. Wetherwell, 8 Oct 1942; Maj Richard D. Day, 26 Apr 1943; Capt Edward W. Gamard, Sep 1944; 1st Lt Dominic V. DiVincenzo, Dec 1944; Maj William E. Surginer, Jan 1945-unkn. Unkn, 8-9 Jul 1963; Maj David W. Shoup, 10 Jul 1963; Lt Col John J. Wilfong, 19 Jul 1963; Lt Col Fredrick J. McAnally, 9 Mar 1964; Lt Col Andrew J. Chapman, 14 Jul-8 Aug 1964. Lt Col Vincent J. Mankowski, 21 Oct 1964; Lt Col Daniel J. Miller, 1 May 1965; Lt Col Alfred N. King, by Jun 1966; Lt Col John J. Jones Jr., 10 Feb 1967; Lt Col Paul D. Jones, 2 Sep 1967; Lt Col James T. Patrick, 13 Mar 1968; Lt Col John D. Ward, 4 Dec 1968; Lt Col William G. Reitz, 3 Jun 1969; Maj Thomas A. Shircliff, 16 Sep 1969 (acting); Lt Col William G. Reitz, 13 Oct 1969; Lt Col William G. Morton, 6 Apr 1970; Lt Col Andrew G. Martin Jr., 19 Jan 1971; Lt Col Irl R. Hollingsworth, 15 Jul-30 Sep 1971; none (not manned), 1 Oct 1971-14 Jan 1972; Col William R. Peters, 15 Jan 1972; Lt Col Reginald H. Shepherd, 25 Jul 1972; Col Ross W. Watt Jr., 8 Aug 1972; Col Charles C. Carr, 13 Aug 1973; Col Elford L. Carwile, Aug 1974; Lt Col Robert J. Watson, 21 Sep 1974; Lt Col Ralph F. Wetzel, 23 Jul 1975; Lt Col Glenn A. Griffith, 22 Jan 1976; Lt Col Felix L. Sambogna, 1 Sep 1977; Lt Col Donald C. Wheeler Jr., 17 Oct 1977; Maj Thomas E. Cleland, 24 Jul 1979 (temporary); Lt Col Ralph D. Barclay, 25 Aug 1979; Lt Col Frederick C. Bosse, 23 Sep 1980; Lt Col Morris R. Taffet, 1 Jul 1982; Lt Col Robert W. Gaskin, c. 15 Jun 1984; Lt Col William E. Townsley, 12 Jun 1985; Lt Col Garland W. Padgett Jr., 26 Jun 1987-unkn; Lt Col Richard B. Tallman Jr., 14 Dec 1990; Lt Col William H. Camp, 29 Jun 1992; Lt Col Sydney G. McPherson, 12 Jul-1 Oct 1993.

Aircraft:  A-20, 1942-1943; B-25, 1942-1943; DB-7, 1942-1943; L-1, 1942-1943, 1944-1945; L-4, 1942-1943, 1943-1944; O-46, 1942-1943; O-52, 1942; P-39, 1942-1943; P-43, 1942-1943; L-2, 1943, 1943-1944; L-3, 1943; L-5, 1943, 1943-1945; L-6, 1943; 1943-1944; P-51, 1943; O-1, 1963-1964. O-1, 1964-1970, 1971; O-2, 1968-1971, 1972-1975; OV-10, 1968-1971, 1975-1983, 1985-c. 1989; OA-37, 1983-1985; A(later OA)-10, 1989-1993.

Operations:  The 19th observation (later, Liaison) Squadron activated on 2 Mar 1942. Flew anti-submarine missions while undergoing observation training at various bases in the southeastern U.S. Shipped to the west coast and departed the U.S. on 9 Mar 1944. Arrived in India in April, and after several weeks of further training, moved to China in May 1944 to begin observation missions in support of Chinese ground forces. At various times, the 19th was based at or operated detachments from Kunming, Chengkung, Nanning, Poashan, Wenshan, Yunnanyi, Chihkiang, Kweiyang, and Liuchow. After Mar 1945, the squadron carried mail and passengers to American liaison personnel in South China, and 19th TASS flew re-supply missions to resistance forces operating behind enemy lines in French Indochina. Shortly after the Japanese surrendered, the 19th returned via India to the U.S., where it inactivated on 1 Dec 1945.

The 19th Tactical Air Support Squadron organized in Jul 1963 South Vietnam, where it flew missions for the Vietnamese Air Force and trained Vietnamese pilots and observers in the 0-1 aircraft. Operations including forward air support, combat support liaison, visual reconnaissance, forward air control of fighters, artillery adjustment, and escort for convoys, trains, and helicopters. Also flew psychological warfare, radio relay, and re-supply missions. Briefly inactivated between Aug and Oct 1964, the 19th TASS renewed its support of combat operations on 21 Oct. Primarily it provided visual and photographic reconnaissance and airborne forward air control for fighter aircraft. Also trained USAF and Vietnamese pilots and observers in 0-1 and, from 1968, 0-2 and OV-10 operations. Then, on 30 Sep 1971, another unit absorbed the 19th's resources. The squadron remained unmanned and unequipped until transferred to Osan AB, South Korea, on 15 Jan 1972. Taking over the 0-2 aircraft of another squadron, the 19th TASS supported the Eighth U.S. Army and Republic of Korea (ROK) ground forces, providing close air and aerial reconnaissance support. In 1973, trained the ROK Air Force to operate a Direct Air Support Center. In 1975, converted to the OV-10A "Bronco" aircraft.

Operated from 1975 until 1980 a tactical air control system from three forward locations, and maintained a detachment from 15 Apr 1976 to 8 Jan 1980 at Camp Casey, one of the three forward locations. Since 1980, the 19th has operated the forward air control mission within the Korean tactical air control system. Operated from Suwon AB, Sep-Nov 1983, while runway repair went on at Osan AB. Converted in 1983 to the OA-37B "Dragonfly" twin-jet aircraft, only to switch back to the OV-10 two years later. Periodically deployed personnel and aircraft at Clark AB, Philippines, for Cope Thunder exercises, supporting close air support tactical fighter aircraft in coordination with tactical air control systems. While assigned to the 5th Tactical Air Control Group during the 1980s, provided battalion liaison officers to the 2nd Infantry Division and OV-10 forward air controllers to the Seventh Air Force commander in support of the Korean Tactical Air Control System. Moved from Osan AB to Suwon AB, South Korea, in August 1989, but returned to Osan on 1 Oct 1990, when it was assigned to the 51st Fighter Group.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive. Vietnam: Vietnam Advisory; Vietnam Defensive; Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Command Hunt VI.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citations (Southeast Asia): 1 Aug 1968-31 Aug 1969; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1970; 30 Jan-30 Sep 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with the Combat "V" Device: 1 May 1963-31 Jul 1964; 1 Jul 1965-15 May 1966; 1 Jul 1966-31 May 1967; 1 May 1969-30 Apr 1970. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 30 Sep 1974-31 Mar 1976; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1984-30 Apr 1986; 1 Dec 1986-2 Oct 1988; 3 Oct 1988-30 Sep 1990; 1 Oct 1992-[1 Oct 1993]. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-[30 Sep 1971]. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 19-20 Aug 1972.

Emblem:  On a white disc, border black, piped white, a gremlin proper, wearing a blue suit trimmed with collar, cuffs, and three buttons, all red, red shoes and cap, diving through the air, peering forward under the cupped right hand while holding brown briefcase in the left hand; binoculars strung about the neck by black straps and flowing to rear. Significance: The insignia typifies the function of the squadron, speedy courier service, observation, reconnaissance, and liaison. Approved on 11 Oct 1943. Photographic Negative Numbers: 26595 AC (black and white); K2842 (Color). (Squadron apparently has used several unofficial emblems at various times, but never carried through with the approval process.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 26 Feb 2003.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Oct 1993.

Table of Contents



71st Liaison Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

International Liaison Pilot and Aircraft Association (ILPA)

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 71st Liaison Squadron on 17 Jun 1943. Activated on 15 Jul 1943. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1945. Consolidated 19 Sep 85 with the 471st Fighter Bomber Sq as the 471st Tactical Electronic Warfare Training Sq (not active).

Assignments:  Tenth Air Force, 15 Jul 1943; US Army Forces, CBI, 19 Aug 1943 (attached to the 5303d Combat Troops [later 5303d Area Command, later Northern Combat Area Command], c. Oct 1943 - Aug 1944; detachment attached to Y Force, Nov 1943 - c. 1 Jul 1944); AAF, India-Burma Sector, 28 Mar 1944; Tenth Air Force, 21 Aug 1944 (attached to 1st Liaison Group [Prov], 29 Aug 1944 - 30 Apr 1945); Fourteenth Air Force, 6 Jul 1945 (attached to XIV Air Force Tactical Air Command, 24 Jul - 1 Aug 1945); Tenth Air Force, 1 Aug - 8 Dec 1945.

Stations:  Ondal, India, 15 Jul 1943; Ramgarh, India, 17 Jul 1943 (detachment at Ledo, India, after 18 Sep 1943); Ledo, India, 26 Oct 1943 (detachment at Kunming, China, Nov 1943 - c. 1 Jul 1944); Sahmaw, Burma, 15 Oct 1944; Katha, Burma, 16 Jan 1945; Myitkyina, Burma, 22 Mar 1945; Dinjan, India, c. 24 Apr 1945 (air echelon at Myitkyina, Burma, to May 1945); Piardoba, India, 12 May - 10 Jul 1945; Kunming, China, 25 Jul 1945; Liuchow, China, 21 Aug 1945; Chihkiang, China, c. 7 Oct 1945; Kunming, China, Oct 1945; Salua AAB, India, 4 Nov - 8 Dec 1945.

Aircraft:  In addition to L-5, 1943-1945, included L-4, 1943-1945, and L-1 and UC-64, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, c. Oct 1943 - May 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Over and through a yellow disc, the caricatured elephant, Dumbo, with ears acting as wings, holding a brown dispatch case under the left foreleg, in flight, toward dexter, wearing aviator's goggles, and having an ornate yellow and orange howdah strapped about the back, containing a brown crutch, a box of freight, proper, and a small, caricatured figure attired in blue pajamas, with a bandage about the head, and the right arm in a sling, leaning out of front of howdah, all over two, small parapack 'chutes with boxes of freight, in front of a small white cloud formation to sinister base. (Approved 20 Feb 1945.)

Table of Contents



115th Liaison Squadron


115th FS

115th FIS

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Organized as 115th Aero Squadron on 28 Aug 1917. Redesignated 636th Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 8 Apr 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 115th Observation Squadron which, having been allotted to NG, was activated on 16 Jun 1924. Ordered to active service on 3 Mar 1941. Redesignated: 115th Observation Squadron (Light) on 13 Jan 1942; 115th Observation Squadron on 2 Apr 1943. Inactivated on 25 Dec 1945. Redesignated 115th Bombardment Squadron (Light), and allotted to ANG, on 24 May 1946. Activated 15 Aug 46, federally recognized 16 Sep 46, inactivated 1 Jan 53. Redesignated 115th Fighter-Bomber Squadron and activated 1 Jan 53, redesignated 115th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 1 Jul 55, 115th Tactical Fighter Squadron 1 Oct 58, 115th Air Transport Squadron, Heavy 9 Jan 60, 115th Military Airlift Squadron 1 Jan 66, 115th Tactical Airlift Squadron 14 Apr 70, 115th Airlift Squadron 31 Mar 91.

Assignments:  Unkn, 28 Aug - Dec 1917; Second Aviation Instruction Center, Dec 1917 - Jan 1919; unkn, Jan - 8 Apr 1919. California NG (divisional aviation, 40th division), 16 Jun 1924; III Army Corps, 3 Mar 1941; Fourth Air Force, 1 Sep 1941; 69th Observation (later Reconnaissance) Group, 3 Sep 1941; II Air Support Command (later II Tactical Air Division), 11 Aug 1943; I (later III) Tactical Air Division, 18 Apr 1944; Tenth Air Force, 29 Oct 1944 (attached to 1st Liaison Group [Prov], 18 Nov 1944 - 30 Apr 1945); Fourteenth Air Force, 6 Jul - 25 Dec 1945 (attached to 312th Fighter Wing, 24 Jul - 1 Aug 1945). Assigned to 111th Bombardment Group 1946-1 Nov 50, 146th Composite Group -Feb 51, 126th Bombardment Group -Dec 51, 4400 Combat Crew Training Group -1953. 146th Fighter-Bomber Group/Fighter-Interceptor Group/Tactical Fighter Group/Air Transport Group -Jun 62, 146th Air Transport Wing -Nov 62, 146th Air Transport Group/Military Airlift Group/Tactical Airlift Group -Feb 75, 146th Tactical Airlift Wing/Airlift Wing -1 Jan 93, 146th Operations Group.

Stations:  Kelly Field, TX, 28 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 31 Oct - 3 Dec 1917; Tours, France, c. 27 Dec 1917; St. Nazaire, France, c. 11 Jan - c. Mar 1919; Garden City, NY, c. 25 Mar - 8 Apr 1919. Los Angeles, Calif, 16 Jun 1924; Paso Robles, Calif, 13 Mar 1941; San Bernardino, Calif, 13 Dec 1941; Ontario, Calif, 1 Jun 1942; Laurel, Miss, 11 Nov 1942; Esler Field, La, 30 Mar 1943; Pollock AAFld, La, 7 Jul 1943; Brownwood AAFld, Tex, 21 Nov 1943 - 14 Sep 1944; Ledo, India 11 Nov 1944 (detachment at Myitkyina, Burma, after 3 Jan 1945); Myitkyina, Burma, 21 Jan 1945; Dinjan, India (air echelon at Myitkyina, Burma), 24 Apr 1945; Nagaghuli, India, 9 May 1945; Chengkung, China, 20 Jul 1945; Hsingchiang, China, 23 Jul 1945 (operated primarily from Peishiyi, China, after 11 Aug 1945); Peishiyi, China, 2 Sep 1945; Luliang, China, 3 Oct 1945; Kancharapara, India, 13 Oct - 10 Nov 1945; Ft Lewis, Wash, 19-25 Dec 1945; Van Nuys Muni Apt, CA 1946-Apr 48, Lockheed Air Term, CA -May 51, Langley AFB, VA -1953. Van Nuys Muni Apt, CA 1953-30 Apr 90 Channel Islands ANGB, CA.

Aircraft:  Included JN-4, DH-4, TW-3, PT-1, BT-1, O-2, and O-17 during period 1924 - 1932; O-38, 1931-1942; in addition to O-47, c. 1938-1943, O-49, 1941-1943, and L-2, 1942-1943, included P-40, 1943, apparently L-4, 1942-1943; in addition to L-5, 1943-1945, included L-1, 1944-1945, and L-4, 1945.

Operations:  Constructed facilities and engaged in supply and related base support activities, 1918-1919. Antisubmarine patrols, 1941-c. Sep 1942; combat in CBI, 3 Dec 1944 - c. 8 May 1945, Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  Theater of Operations.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a wreath or and gules the setting sun behind a grizzly bear passant on a grassy field all proper. (Approved 26 Dec 1929.)

Table of Contents



2nd Air Commando Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)


702nd SMW


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


F-6D reconnaissance version of the Mustang -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 2 Air Command Group on 11 Apr 1944. Activated on 22 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 12 Nov 1945. Disestablished on 8 Oct 1948. Reestablished and consolidated (31 Jul 1985) with the 702 Strategic Missile Wing (ICM-Snark) (established on 17 Jun 1958; activated on 1 Jan 1959; discontinued, and inactivated on 25 Jun 1961). Redesignated as: 352 Special Operations Wing on 31 Jul 1985; 352 Special Operations Group on 21 Sep 1992. Activated on 1 Dec 1992. Consolidated (17 Aug 1998) with the 39 Special Operations Wing (established as the 39 Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing on 20 Oct 1969; activated on 1 Jan 1970; redesignated as 39 Special Operations Wing on 1 Mar 1988; inactivated on 1 Dec 1992). Consolidated group retained designation of 352 Special Operations Group.

Assignments:  III Fighter Command, 22 Apr 1944; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, c. 12 Nov 1944; Tenth Air Force, 10 Jul 1945; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, c. 18 Aug-Oct 1945. 45 Air Division, 1 Jan 1959-25 Jun 1961. Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Service, 1 Jan 1970; Twenty-Third Air Force (later, Air Force Special Operations Command), 1 Oct 1983-.

Components

Squadrons:  1 Fighter, Commando: 22 Apr 1944-12 Nov 1945. 2 Fighter, Commando: 22 Apr 1944-12 Nov 1945. 7 Special Operations: 1 Feb 1987-. 9 Special Operations: 1 Mar 1988-18 Apr 1989. 21 Special Operations: 1 May 1988-31 Oct 2007. 37 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jul 1978-1 Feb 1987. 38 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jul 1978-8 Jan 1981. 40 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jul 1978-31 Dec 1987. 41 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jan 1970-1 Sep 1975. 42 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jan 1970-15 Jun 1973. 43 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jan 1970-1 Jun 1974. 44 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jan 1970-15 Jun 1973. 48 Air Rescue and Recovery: 15 Sep 1972-1 Jan 1976; 1 Oct 1985-31 Dec 1987. 54 Air Rescue and Recovery: 1 Jan 1970-15 Jul 1974. 55 Air Rescue and Recovery (later, 55 Special Operations): 1 Jan 1970-18 Apr 1989. 56 Aerospace Rescue and Recovery: 1 May 1988-1 Apr 1989. 67 Aerospace Rescue and Recovery (later, 67 Special Operations): 17 May 1973-. 71 Aerospace Rescue and Recovery: 8 Mar 1970-1 Jul 1974. 127 Liaison, Commando, 1 May 1944-27 Jul 1945. 155 Liaison, Commando, 1 May 1944-27 Jul 1945. 156 Liaison, Commando, 1 May 1944-27 Jul 1945. 317 Troop Carrier, 1 May 1944-12 Nov 1945. 321 Special Tactics: 1 Jan 1993-. 556 Strategic Missile: 1 Apr-16 Jul 1959.

Detachments:  1 (Elmendorf AFB, AK): 1 Jan 1970-1 Jul 1971. 1 (Homestead AFB, FL): 1 Feb 1973-15 May 1974. 1 (Homestead AFB, FL): 1 Sep 1975-1 Jul 1978. 1 (Ramstein): 1 Feb 1990-1 Dec 1992. 2 (Albrook AFB, CZ): 1 Jan 1970-15 Jul 1975. 2 (K. I. Sawyer AFB, MI): 1 Sep 1975-1 Oct 1977. 3 (Patrick AFB, FL): 1 Jan-8 Jun 1970. 3 (Sondrestrom AB, Greenland): 1 Dec 1971-1 Jul 1973. 4 (Thule AB, Greenland): 1 Jan 1970-31 Jul 1975. 5 (Tyndall AFB, FL): 1 Jan-8 Jun 1970. 5 (Tyndall AFB, FL): 1 Feb 1973-1 Jul 1978. 5 (Tyndall AFB, FL): 8 Jan 1981-1 Feb 1987. 6 (Loring AFB, ME): 1 Feb 1973-15 Apr 1974. 7 (Ramstein AB, Germany): 15 May 1973-1 Nov 1974. 7 (Rhein-Main AB, Germany): 5 Nov-1 Dec 1992. 9 (Zaragoza AB, Spain): 15 May 1973-30 Sep 1977. 10 (Aviano AB, Italy): 15 May 1973-1 Jul 1974. 10 (MacDill AFB, FL): 1 Sep 1975-1 Jul 1978. 11 (Myrtle Beach AFB, SC): 1 Sep 1975-1 Jul 1978. 11 (Myrtle Beach AFB, SC): 8 Jan 1981-1 Feb 1987. 14 (Keflavik AB, Iceland): 15 May 1973-30 Sep 1977. 15 (Patrick AFB, FL): 1 Feb 1973-1 Jul 1978. 15 (Patrick AFB, FL): 8 Jan 1981-1 Feb 1987. 18 (Plattsburgh AFB, NY): 1 Sep 1975-1 Jul 1978.

Stations:  Drew Field, FL, 22 Apr 1944; Lakeland AAFld, FL, 3 May 1944; Alachua AAFld, FL, 9 Jun 1944; Drew Field, FL, 17 Aug 1944; Lakeland AAFld, FL, 22 Aug 1944; Drew Field, FL, 23-28 Oct 1944; Kalaikunda, India, 16 Dec 1944; Karachi, India, 5-21 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 11-12 Nov 1945. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 1 Jan 1959-25 Jun 1961. Richards-Gebaur AFB, MO, 1 Jan 1970; Eglin AFB, FL, 25 Jun 1971-May 1989; Rhein-Main AB, Germany, 1 Jun 1989; RAF Alconbury, England, 1 Jan 1992; RAF Mildenhall, England, 17 Feb 1995-.

Commanders:  Capt L. H. Couch (acting), 22 Apr 1944; Col Arthur R. DeBolt, 1 May 1944; Col Alfred J. Ball Jr., 15 May 1945-unkn. Lt Col Harry W. Robb, 1 Jan 1959; Col Richard W. Beck, 15 Apr 1959; Col Roger A. Stevenson, 22 May-25 Jun 1961. Col Ritchie H. Belser Jr., 2 Jan 1970; Col Lawrence N. Gordon, 23 Jul 1970; Col James E. Dalton, 25 May 1973; Col William E. Moore, 18 Feb 1975; Col Billy R. McGee, 16 Jun 1977; Col Philip S. Prince, 25 Jul 1977; Col Edsel R. Field, 28 Apr 1980; Col James P. Scarff Jr., 24 Feb 1981; Col Albert L. Waters, 25 Jul 1983; Col Edward N. Byra, 6 Aug 1985; Col James L. Hobson Jr., 20 Mar 1987; Col Byron R. Hooten Jr., 5 May 1989; Col Eugene J. Ronsick, 11 Jul 1991; Col Bennie D. Orrell, 1 Dec 1992; Col Stephen R. Connelly, 13 Jul 1994; Col Michael F. Planert, 7 May 1996; Col John W. Zahrt, 15 May 1998; Col Jeffrey W. Walls, 9 May 2000; Col Otis G. Mannon, 14 Jul 2002; Col Dennis M. Jones, 20 Oct 2003; Col Marshall B. Webb, 23 Jun 2005; Col Brian P. Cutts, 29 Jun 2007; Col Lewis E. Jordan Jr., 23 Jul 2008; Col Gary McCollum, 30 Jun 2010-.

Aircraft:  P-51, 1944, 1945; L-5, 1944, 1945; C-64, 1944, 1945; C-47, 1944-1945; CG-4 gliders, 1944, 1945; F-6, 1945; L-1, 1945; L-4, 1945; C-46, 1945. Snark, 1959-1961. CH/HH-3, 1970-c.1988; CH/HH-53, 1970-c.1988; HC-130, 1970-c.1990; HH-43, 1970-1973; UH-1, 1970-1988; HH-1, 1978-c.1988; TH-1, 1978-c.1988; UH-60, 1982-c.1988; MC-130, 1987-; MH-53, 1989-2007; C-130, 1994-.

Operations:  Trained in Florida for air commando operations. Moved to India, Oct-Dec 1944: the troop carrier squadron flew their C-47s to India, arriving by late Oct; a group advanced echelon arrived mid-Nov; and the majority of the group arrived mid-Dec. Between Nov 1944 and May 1945 the group dropped supplies to Allied troops who were fighting the Japanese in the Chindwin Valley in Burma; transported Chinese troops from Burma to China; transported men, food, ammunition, and construction equipment to Burma; dropped Gurka paratroops during the assault on Rangoon; provided fighter support for Allied forces crossing the Irrawaddy River in Feb 1945; struck enemy airfields and transportation targets in Thailand; and flew reconnaissance, light transport, and evacuation for ground forces in forward areas in Burma. After May 1945 the fighter squadrons were in training; in Jun the group's C-47s were sent to Ledo to move road-building equipment, and later the troop carrier squadron transferred to China. During Jun-Jul most of the group's L-5s were turned over to Fourteenth Air Force and the Liaison Squadrons were sent to the Pacific. The remainder of the group returned to the US, Oct-Nov 1945 and inactivated on 12 Nov 1945. As the only Snark missile wing in the USAF, the 702 Strategic Missile Wing performed intercontinental missile test operations from Patrick AFB, Florida, Apr-Jun 1959, and from the Atlantic Missile Range at Cape Canaveral, Florida, c. Dec 1959-Jun 1961. The 39 Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing flew numerous rescue sorties and from Jan 1970 until mid-1971, and supported Strategic Air Command missile silos. After moving to Eglin AFB, FL in Jun 1971, wing assumed responsibility for rescue detachments in the Western Hemisphere and Europe. Later, the 39 Special Operations Wing (SOW) trained and participated in special operations exercises, as well as flew rescue sorties. Wing headquarters and one squadron moved to Germany in May 1989 and became the air component of Special Operations Command Europe. In response to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait on 2 Aug 1990, the majority of the 39 SOW personnel deployed to Turkey (12-17 Jan 1991), and operated as part of the Joint Special Operations Task Force (JSOTF) ELUSIVE CONCEPT. The wing moved to England effective 1 Jan 1992 and served as the air component for Special Operations Command Europe. Trained for and performed special operations airland and airdrop missions in the European Command area of operations, including establishing air assault landing zones, controlling close air support by strike aircraft and gunships, and providing trauma care for wounded and injured personnel. Deployed elements participated in PROVIDE COMFORT II. During the 1990s, the group supported numerous humanitarian and combat operations in Europe, Africa, and Southwest Asia, including Operations PROVIDE PROMISE, DENY FLIGHT, and ALLIED FORCE in Yugoslavia, and PROVIDE COMFORT and NORTHERN WATCH over northern Iraq. Provided insertion, extraction and resupply of US military special operations forces throughout the European theater, 2000-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait. Kosovo: Kosovo Air.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with the Combat "V" Device: 14 Jan-23 Mar 1991; 1 Aug 1998-31 Jul 1999; 1 Aug 2000-31 Jul 2002; 1 Aug 2003-31 Jul 2005. Gallant Unit Citations: 15 Oct 2001-15 Apr 2002; 12 Feb-12 May 2003. Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Oct 2005-30 Sep 2007; 1 Oct 2007-30 Sep 2009. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1972-30 Jun 1974; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1978; 20-29 Nov 1978; 2 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1988; 24 Mar 1991-31 Jul 1992; 1 Aug 1992-31 Jul 1993; 1 Aug 1994-31 Jul 1996; 1 Aug 1996-31 Jul 1998; 1 Aug 1999-31 Jul 2000.

Emblem (WWII):  On a white disc bordered blue an exclamation point flanked by two lightning flashes, all blue.

Emblem (Current):  approved on 28 Feb 1995.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, Operations, and Honors through Apr 2011.



  (See 2nd ACG / L-5 Story in CBI Unit Histories)

Table of Contents



1st Fighter Squadron, Commando

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 1 Fighter Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Apr 1944. Activated on 20 Apr 1944. Redesignated as 1 Fighter Squadron, Commando, on 2 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 12 Nov 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted, and consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 1 Helicopter Squadron, which was constituted on 9 May 1969. Activated on 1 Jul 1969.

Assignments:  Third Air Force, 20 Apr 1944; 2 Air Commando Group, 22 Apr 1944-12 Nov 1945. 1 Composite Wing, 1 Jul 1969; 89 Military Airlift Wing, Special Mission (later, 89 Military Airlift Group; 89 Military Airlift Wing), 1 Jul 1976; 89 Operations Group, 12 Jul 1991; 316 Operations Group, 22 Jun 2006; 811 Operations Group, 1 Nov 2010-.

Stations:  Lakeland AAFld, FL, 20 Apr 1944; Cross City AAFld, FL, 12 Jun 1944; Alachua AAFld, FL, 21 Jun 1944; Drew Field, FL, 17 Aug 1944; Lakeland AAFld, FL, 22 Aug-23 Oct 1944; Kalaikunda, India, 14 Dec 1944; Cox's Bazaar, India, 13 Feb 1945; Kalaikunda, India, 10 May-22 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 11-12 Nov 1945. Andrews AFB, MD, 1 Jul 1969-.

Commanders:  Maj Paul B. Ash, 20 Apr 1944; Lt Col William E. Buxton, 29 Jul 1944; Maj Matthew M. Gordon Jr., 11 Jan 1945; Capt Bobby J. Spann, c. 11 Aug-c. Nov 1945. Lt Col Melvin Swindells Jr., c. Jul 1969; Lt Col William I. Miller Jr., by Sep 1970-unkn; Lt Col Robert E. Lee, 1 Jan 1976; Lt Col John L. Lewis, 28 May 1976; Lt Col John L. Wells, 1 Jul 1976-unkn; Lt Col Mark E. Bridges, c. Jul 1984; Lt Col Allan K. Macaulay, 12 Jul 1985; Lt Col Marion J. Messenger, 11 Sep 1986; Lt Col Dennis J. Eflein, 19 Feb 1988; Lt Col Gary W. Kito, 23 Feb 1990; Lt Col Kenneth M. Page, 23 Mar 1990; Lt Col Mark B. Tucker, 16 Jul 1993; Lt Col David K. Dingley, 5 Jul 1994-unkn; Lt Col Tracy W. Colburn, 12 Feb 2001; Lt Col Charles M. Ennis Jr., 4 Apr 2003; Lt Col Timothy J. O'Brien, 1 Jul 2004; Lt Col Donald A. Snyder, 22 Jun 2006; Lt Col Michael S. Lightfoot, 22 May 2008; Lt Col Robert T. Meeks, 8 May 2009-30 Sep 2010.

Aircraft:  P-51, 1944-1945; F-6, 1945. CH-21, 1969-1970; TH-1, 1969-1970; UH-1, 1969-; CH-3, 1970-1988.

Operations:  Combat in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 14 Feb-9 May 1945. From 1969, provided local airlift for the Executive Department, high-ranking dignitaries, and distinguished visitors; support for emergency evacuation of key government officials; search and rescue; and emergency medical evacuation. Supported Washington D. C. capital area airlift for the Executive Branch, high-ranking dignitaries, military leaders and distinguished visitors, 2006-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns Streamers:  World War II: Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Bangkok, Thailand, 15 Mar 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1976-31 Jan 1977; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1991-30 Jun 1992; 1 Jul 1992-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2002; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jun 2005; 1 Jul 2005-22 Jun 2006.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc edged Yellow within a pattern of five Yellow stars forming a pentagon the White silhouette of the Washington Monument rising from a Green mound in base, the Monument surmounted by a Gray silhouetted helicopter fesswise. MOTTO: FIRST AND FOREMOST. Approved on 25 Feb 1970 (KE 37041).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Oct 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Oct 2010.

Table of Contents



2nd Fighter Squadron, Commando

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 2nd Fighter Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Apr 1944. Activated on 20 Apr 1944. Redesignated 2nd Fighter Squadron (Commando) on 2 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 12 Nov 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted 1963 as 602nd Fighter Squadron, Commando and activated, organized 15 Apr 63, redesignated 1 Aug 68 as 602nd Special Operations Squadron, inactivated 1 Dec 70.

Assignments:  Third Air Force, 20 Apr 1944; 2nd Air Commando Group, 22 Apr 1944 - 12 Nov 1945. 1st Air Commando Group 1963-1 Oct 64, 34th Tactical Group -8 Jul 65, 6251st Tactical Fighter Wing -21 Nov 65, 2nd Air Division -8 Mar 66 (attached to 3d Tactical Fighter Wing Nov 65-Mar 66), 14 Air Commando Wing -8 Apr 67, 56th Air Commando Wing/Special Operations Wing -1970.

Stations:  Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 20 Apr 1944; Cross City AAFld, Fla, 9 Jun 1944; Alachua AAFld, Fla, 21 Jun 1944; Drew Field, Fla, 17 Aug 1944; Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 22 Aug - 23 Oct 1944; Kalaikunda, India, 15 Dec 1944; Cox's Bazaar, India, 13 Feb 1945; Kalaikunda, India, 14 May - 22 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 11-12 Nov 1945. Hurlburt Fld, FL 1963-1 Oct 64, Bien Hoa AB, (South) Viet Nam -8 Feb 66, Nha Trang AB, (South) Viet Nam -8 Apr 67, Nakorn Phanom RTAB, Thailand.-1970.

Aircraft:  P-51, 1944-1945; F-6, 1945;

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 14 Feb - 9 May 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Bangkok, Thailand, 15 Mar 1945 (WDGO 79/45).

Emblem:  Over and through a light turquoise blue disc, a caricatured, brown eagle with yellow beak and feet, diving through space toward dexter base, wearing a GI helmet with orange straps, holding a commando knife, proper, in the beak, and grasping and firing a black "tommy" gun held in the talons, all emitting speed lines to rear. (Approved 3 Aug 1945.)

Table of Contents



127th Liaison Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Designated 127th Observation Squadron, and allotted to NG, on 30 Jul 1940. Activated on 4 Aug 1941. Ordered to active service on 6 Oct 1941. Redesignated: 127th Observation Squadron (Light) on 13 Jan 1942; 127th Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 127th Liaison Squadron on 2 Apr 1943; 127th Liaison Squadron (Commando) on 1 May 1944. Inactivated on 15 Nov 1945. Redesignated 127th Fighter Squadron, and allotted to ANG, on 24 May 1946. Redesignated 127th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine and allotted to Air National Guard 24 May 46, activated 27 Aug 46, redesignated 127th Fighter-Bomber Squadron 24 Oct 50, inactivated 10 Jul 52. Activated 10 Jul 52, redesignated 127th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 1 Jul 55, 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron 1 Apr 61, 127th Tactical Fighter Training Squadron 25 Mar 71, 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron 8 Oct 79, 127th Fighter Squadron 31 Mar 92, 127th Bomb Squadron 1 Jul 94, 127th Air Refueling Squadron 1 Sep 02, 127th Intelligence Squadron 2007.

Assignments:  Kansas NG, 4 Aug 1941; 68th Observation Group, 6 Oct 1941; 75th Observation (later Reconnaissance) Group, 12 Mar 1942; I Air Support Command (later I Tactical Air Division; III Tactical Air Division), 11 Aug 1943; 2nd Air Commando Group, 1 May 1944; United States Army Forces, Pacific, 4 Aug 1945; Thirteenth Air Force, 15 Sep 1945; Seventh Air Force, 29 Oct - 15 Nov 1945.

Stations:  Wichita, Kan, 4 Aug 1941; Sherman Field, Kan, 13 Oct 1941; Tullahoma, Tenn, 13 Apr 1942; Morris Field, NC, 2 Sep 1943; Statesboro AAFld, Ga, 13 Oct 1943; Aiken AAFld, SC, 18 May 1944; Dunnellon AAFld, Fla, 10 Jun 1944; Cross City AAFld, Fla, 21 Jun 1944; Drew Field, Fla, 17 Aug 1944; Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 22 Aug - 23 Oct 1944; Camp Anza, CA 23 Oct 44; Kalaikunda, India, 10 Nov 1944 - 4 Aug 1945 (detachments operated form Cox's Bazaar, India, 20 Jan - c. 7 Feb 1945, and Akyab, Burma, 21 Feb - 19 May 1945); Okinawa, 15 Sep - 15 Nov 1945. Wichita Muni Apt, KS 1946-Nov 50, Alexandria AFB, LA -May 52, Chaumont AB, Champagne, France -1952. Wichita Muni Apt, KS 1952-Jun 54, McConnell AFB, KS -Apr 68, Myrtle Beach AFB, SC -Jul 68, Kunsan AB, (South) Korea -Jun 69, McConnell AFB, KS.

Aircraft:  In addition to O-47, 1942 - c. 1943, L-4, 1942-1944, and L-5, 1943-1944, included O-38, O-46, and O-49, 1941-1942, A-20 and P-40, 1942 - c. 1943, and L-6, 1943-1944; L-5, 1944-1945; C-64, 1944-1945; L-4, 1945; L-1, 1945; BC-1A, 1941-1946?; C-47, 1941-1946?; P-51, 1946-1949; F-84, 1949-1952; P-51; 1952-1954; F-80, 1954-1958; F-86, 1958-1961; F-100, 1961-1971; F-105D/F, 1971-1979; F-4, 1979-1990; F-16, 1987-1993; B-1B, 1994-2002; KC-135R, 2002-2007.

Operations:  Replacement training, Mar - c. Dec 1943. Reconnaissance, light transport, and evacuation for ground forces in forward areas in Burma, 20 Jan - 10 May 1945. Departed the United States for overseas service and arrived in Kalaikunda, India on 16 December 1944 (detachments operated from Cox's Bazaar, India and Akyab, Burma from 20 January - 19 May 1945). Moved to Okinawa 15 September 1945 and remained there as part of the Seventh Air Force until inactivated on 15 November 1945. The primary overseas missions of this squadron were reconnaissance, light transport and evacuation of ground forces in forward areas in Burma.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem (1):  On a light blue disc a dark blue Kansas Jayhawk (dark blue body and wings, yellow feet and beak, brown face, wearing a red helmet and black binoculars, resting upon a white cloud formation. (Approved in 1944.)

Emblem (2):  On a disc of light blue, border ultramarine blue, piped yellow, three blue Kansas Jayhawks in formation flight toward front of aircraft, with yellow beaks and red faces, wearing aviator's helmets and goggles brown, and yellow boxing gloves with white lightning flashes issuing toward front, each Jayhawk having white, jagged spinners and leaving white cloudlike vapor trail to rear. (Approved 6 Jul 1949.)


Source:  184th Intelligence Wing (ANG)

The 184th Intelligence Wing has a proud history and a wealth of tradition. The unit was activated to Federal service during WWII, the Korean Conflict, and the Viet Nam Conflict. The 184th Intelligence Wing has been honored with four USAF Outstanding Unit Awards for exceptionally meritorious service.

Upon Federal recognition as the 127th Observation Squadron on 4 August 1941, the unit's limited equipment included one BC-1A, one C-47, and four L-1 aircraft. On 6 October 1941, the unit was ordered to extended active duty and remained an integral part of the United States Army Air Corps until 6 October 1945, with duty assignments in Tennessee and Okinawa.

On 7 September 1946, the unit reorganized and was designated as the 127th Fighter Squadron with assignment of F-51 "Mustang" aircraft. The F-51 was flown until December 1949, when the unit received the F-84 "Thunder Jet".

Outbreak of the Korean Conflict resulted in mobilization of the 127th Fighter Squadron into Federal service on 10 October 1950. Transferred to Alexandria, Louisiana the unit became part of the Fighter Bomber Wing and deployed with the wing to Chaumont, France. On 9 July 1952, after 21 months on active duty, the newly designated 127th FBS returned to Wichita. For the following year, the 127th FBS was again assigned F-51 aircraft due to the shortage of jets created by the Korean Conflict.

In June 1954, F-80 "Shooting Star" jet fighters were assigned, followed by designation of the unit to the 127th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, and assignment of the F-86 "Sabre Jet" in January 1958.

The unit converted to the F-100 "Super Sabre", and was designated the 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron in April 1961. The unit was reorganized as the 184th Tactical fighter Group on 1 October 1962.

In January 1968, following the North Korea seizure of the USS Pueblo, the unit was ordered to extended active duty, and deployed to Kunsan Air Base, South Korea. The unit was assigned as part of the 354th Tactical Fighter Wing until release from active duty and return to state control in June 1969.

On 25 March 1971, the 184th was designated the 184th Tactical Fighter Training Group and acquired the F-105 "Thunderchief" aircraft. As the USAF Combat Crew Training School, the unit conducted pilot training in the F-105 for nine years.

On 1 October 1973, the 184th assumed the responsibility of operating and maintaining the Smoky Hill Weapons Range at Salina, Kansas. With over 36,000 acres, Smoky Hill is the Air National Guard's largest weapons range.

On 7 August 1979, the unit received its first F-4D "Phantom", and on 8 October 1979, was designated as the 184th Tactical Fighter Group, equipped with 50 F-4D's.

In April 1982, the 184th was tasked to develop a F-4D Fighter Weapons Instructor Course to meet the needs of the Air Reserve Forces and the USAF Tactical Air Command.

The 134th Tactical Control Flight was established at McConnell on 15 September 1982, to provide much needed tactical radar control. A second flying squadron, the 177th Tactical Fighter Training Squadron, was established on 8 February 1984, with responsibility for all conversion and upgrade training in the F-16. To meet F-4D training requirements, the 184th TFG achieved a 9600 sortie annual flying program, flying 45 sorties per day. In August 1985, the unit reached its first 1000 sortie month.

In January 1987, the 184th was tasked to activate a squadron of F-16A/B "Fighting Falcon" aircraft, and conduct conversion and upgrade training in the F-16. On 8 July 1987, the 161st Tactical Fighter Training Squadron was established as the third flying squadron at the 184th TFG. Formal activation ceremonies for the 161st occurred on 12 September 1987, with the unit flying 10 F-16s and conducting its first student training class.

In May 1988, the 184th Mission Support Flight was extended Federal recognition by the Air Force Communication Command.

In August 1988, the 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron graduated its final Fighter Weapons Instructor Course Class. The 127th TFS converted as the second F-16 training squadron. The last F-4D departed from the 184th TFG on 31 March 1990, and the 177th TFTS converted to the F-16.

On 19 October 1988, the 134th Tactical Control Flight was designated as the 134th Tactical Control Squadron.

The 161st TFTS began converting to the F-16 C/D when the first C/D model arrived at the 184th TFG in July 1990.

In March 1992, the 184th Tactical Fighter Group was designated as the 184th Fighter Group, and became part of the newly formed Air Combat Command in June 1992. In addition, each of the three flying squadrons dropped the word "Tactical" and were designated as Fighter Squadrons.

The 134th Tactical Control Squadron was designated as the 134th Air Control Squadron in June 1992.

In July 1993, the 184th Fighter Group changed gaining commands and became part of the new Air Education and Training Command.

In July 1994, the 184th Fighter Group was designated at the 184th Bomb Wing and again became part of the Air Combat Command, flying the B-1B Lancer. The 184th was the first Air National Guard unit to fly bombers.

The 184th was redesigned the 184th Air Refueling Wing on 16 September 2002, flying the KC-135R tanker. In addition to the tanker mission, the 184th also took on several new missions within the information operations mission set.

In April 2008, the 184th Air Refueling Wing was designated the 184th Intelligence Wing making it the first Intelligence Wing in the Air National Guard. With the loss of the flying mission the “Flying Jayhawks” are now the "Fighting Jayhawks".

Even with all the many changes over the years, the 184th continues to be one of the most forward thinking, diversified Wing’s in the Air National Guard.



Source:  Air Force Freedom of Information Act - Heraldry, Lineage & Honor (127th Command and Control Squadron)

Unit History:
  • 127th Command and Control Squadron (2008-Present)
  • 127th Air Refueling Squadron (2002-2008)
  • 127th Bomb Squadron (1992-2002)
  • 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron (1979-1992)
  • 127th Tactical Fighter Training Squadron (1971-1979)
  • 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron (1962-1971)
  • 127th Air Defense Squadron (1950-1962)
  • 127th Fighter Squadron (1946)
  • 127th Liaison Squadron (Commando) (1944-1945)
  • 127th Observation Squadron (Light) (1942-1943)
  • 127th Observation Squadron (1940-1941)

List of Commanders:  Lt. Col. Jason T. Barnes; Lt. Col. David A. Weishaar

Awards:  None.

Mission Statement:

The 127th Command and Control Squadron mission is to provide communication support to the U.S. Government at all levels, including DoD, DHS, FEMA, State, and Local Agencies. These agencies are provided redundant communities during Peace Time, Natural Disasters and National Emergencies. Equipment utilized in support of the mission is flexible and state of the art enabling the 127th to provide services in a full spectrum of situations. Staffed with highly trained dedication citizen airmen, the 127th Command and Control squadron continues the proud heritage of the National Guard by answering out country’s call when needed.

Table of Contents



155th Liaison Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 155th Liaison Squadron on 31 Dec 1943. Activated on 10 Jan 1944. Redesignated 155th Liaison Squadron (Commando) on 1 May 1944. Inactivated on 15 Jan 1946. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948.

Assignments:  III (later I) Tactical Air Division, 10 Jan 1944; 2nd Air Command Group, 1 May 1944; United States Army Forces, Pacific, 4 Aug 1945; Fifth Air Force, 15 Sep 1945; Pacific Air Command, US Army, 15 Dec 1945 - 15 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Aiken AAFld, SC, 10 Jan 1944; Dunnellon AAFld, Fla, 12 Jun 1944; Cross City AAFld, Fla, 21 Jun 1944; Drew Field, Fla, 17 Aug 1944; Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 22 Aug - 23 Oct 1944; Kalaikunda, India, 16 Dec 1944 - 4 Aug 1945 (a detachment operated from various bases in Burma, 8 Feb - 19 May 1945); Okinawa, 15 Sep 1945 - 15 Jan 1946.

Aircraft:  C-64, 1944-1945; L-5, 1944-1945; L-4, 1945.

Operations:  Evacuation, reconnaissance, and light transport services for ground forces in forward areas in Burma, c. 8 Feb - 19 May 1945; not manned, Nov 1945 - 15 Jan 1946.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Over and through a white disc, narrow border gray, a caricatured, light green chicken hawk with yellow beak, feet, and comb, wearing a black and brown revolver in holster strapped about the waist by a white cartridge belt, a black radio head set with two red and one blue electrical flashes emanating from each ear phone, and peering through a pair of black binoculars held in tip of left wing, while perching on a two-bladed airplane propeller brown, all resting on a sphere marked with water indications light blue and land areas medium brown, with lines of latitude and longitude indicated by thin white lines. (Approved by the Office of the Quartermaster General 10 Jun 1944.)

Table of Contents



156th Liaison Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 156th Liaison Squadron on 28 Jan 1944. Activated on 10 Feb 1944. Redesignated 156th Liaison Squadron (Commando) on 1 May 1944. Inactivated on 15 Jan 1946.

Assignments:  III (later I) Tactical Air Division, 10 Feb 1944; 2nd Air Command Group, 1 May 1944; United States Army Forces, Pacific, 4 Aug 1945; Fifth Air Force, 15 Sep 1945; Pacific Air Command, US Army, 15 Dec 1945 - 15 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Statesboro AAFld, Ga, 10 Feb 1944; Aiken AAFld, SC, 18 May 1944; Dunnellon AAFld, Fla, 12 Jun 1944; Cross City AAFld, Fla, 21 Jun 1944; Drew Field, Fla, 17 Aug 1944; Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 22 Aug - 23 Oct 1944; Kalaikunda, India, 16 Dec 1944 - 4 Aug 1945 (a detachment operated from Myitche, Burma, 8 Apr - 3 May 1945, and from Magwe, Burma, 3-31 May 1945); Okinawa, c. 15 Sep 1945 - 15 Jan 1946.

Aircraft:  C-64, 1944-1945; L-5, 1944-1945; L-4, 1945.

Operations:  Reconnaissance, light transport, and casualty evacuation services for ground forces in forward areas in Burma, 8 Apr - 31 May 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



236th Medical Dispensary (Avn)  (See Medical Service Units)

Stations:  Kalaikunda by 1 Aug 45

Table of Contents



317th Troop Carrier Squadron (Commando)  (See CBI Unit Histories)


317th ACS

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  317 Transport Squadron (Cargo and Mail) (constituted on 25 Oct 1943; activated on 28 Oct 1943; disbanded on 9 Apr 1944; reconstituted on 19 Sep 1985) and the 317 Troop Carrier Squadron (constituted as 317 Troop Carrier Squadron, Commando, and activated, on 1 May 1944; redesignated 317 Troop Carrier Squadron on 29 Sep 1945; inactivated on 28 Feb 1946) consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 317 Special Operations Squadron (constituted as 317 Air Commando Squadron, Troop Carrier, on 6 Apr 1964; organized on 1 Jul 1964; redesignated 317 Air Commando Squadron, Utility, on 15 Jun 1966; redesignated 317 Special Operations Squadron on 8 Jul 1968; inactivated on 30 Apr 1974). Redesignated 317 Airlift Squadron (Associate) on 20 Feb 1992. Activated on 1 Apr 1992. Redesignated as 317 Airlift Squadron on 1 Oct 1994.

Assignments:  Eighth Air Force, 28 Oct 1943-9 Apr 1944. 2 Air Commando Group, 1 May 1944; Tenth Air Force, 10 Sep 1945; US Army Forces, India-Burma Theater, c. Jan-28 Feb 1946. 1 Air Commando (later, 1 Special Operations) Wing, 1 Jul 1964; 4410 Combat Crew Training Wing, 15 Jul 1969; 1 Special Operations Wing, 15 Apr 1970-30 Apr 1974. 315 Airlift Wing, 1 Apr 1992; 315 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992-.

Stations:  Camp Griffiss, England, 28 Oct 1943-9 Apr 1944. Camp Mackall, NC, 1 May 1944; Alachua AAFld, FL, 7 Jun 1944; Dunnellon AAFld, FL, 21 Jun 1944; Camp Mackall, NC, 15 Aug 1944; Baer Field, IN, 29 Sep-Oct 1944; Sylhet, India (air echelon), 2 Nov 1944 (detachment operated at Tulihal, India, 10 Nov-c. 18 Nov 1944); Bikram, India (air echelon), 30 Nov 1944 (deployed at Myitkyina, Burma, 5 Dec 1944-6 Jan 1945); Kalaikunda, India, 16 Dec 1944 (detachments operated from Dinjan, India, 8-13 Jan 1945 and Bikram, India, 22-30 Jan 1945); Palel, India, 7 Feb 1945; Kalaikunda, India, 13 Apr 1945 (detachment operated from Akyab, Burma, 29 Apr-1 May 1945 and Comilla, India, 3-20 May 1945); Ledo, India, 1 Jun 1945; Liangshan, China, 10 Sep 1945; Hsian, China, 25 Sep 1945; Kunming, China, 3 Nov 1945; Salua, India, 10 Nov 1945; Hijli, India, 18 Dec 1945; Titagurh, India, 12 Jan-28 Feb 1946. Eglin AF Aux Fld #9, FL, 1 Jul 1964; England AFB, LA, 15 Jan 1966; Eglin AF Aux Fld #9, FL, 15 Apr 1970-30 Apr 1974. Charleston AFB, SC, 1 Apr 1992-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 28 Oct 1943-9 Apr 1944. Maj Arthur Kaufman, 1 May 1944; Maj Wirt E. Thompson Jr., 31 Jul 1944; Maj Richard G. Edwards, 8 Dec 1944; Maj Wallace B. Black, 23 Sep 1945; Capt Eugene H. Edison, 16 Nov 1945-probably 28 Feb 1946. Lt Col David W. Roderick, Jul 1964-Dec 1965; not manned, Jan-c. 12 Jul 1966; Lt Col Russel R. Uhlmann, c. 12 Jul 1966; Lt Col Herman E. Luebbert, 26 Aug 1966; Lt Col Clyde C. Angley, 10 Apr 1967; Lt Col Jack B. Shattuck, 10 Mar 1969; Lt Col Marc S. Barthello Jr., by Apr 1970; Lt Col Robert E. Hubeli, 15 Jan 1972; Lt Col Charles E. McMillan, 12 Jan 1973; Lt Col William O. Schism, 11 Feb-30 Apr 1974. Lt Col Michael L. Smith, 1 Apr 1992; Lt Col Michael J. Lierley, 16 Aug 1992; Lt Col John G. Grones, 2 Apr 1995; Lt Col Ricky E. Carter, 9 Nov 1997; Lt Col Theodore L. Truex, 11 Jul 1999; Lt Col Michael D. Kim, 4 Aug 2001-.

Aircraft:  Unkn, 1943. CG-4, 1944-1945; CG-13, 1944-1945; C-47, 1944-1945; C-46, 1945. C-123, 1964-1965; U-10, 1966-1973; C-47, 1966-1970; AC-47, 1967-1968; T-28, 1967-1968; UH-1, 1970-1974; C-123, 1972-1973; CH-3, 1973-1974. C-141, 1992-1993; C-17, 1993-.

Operations:  Between Oct 1943 and Apr 1944 presumably airlifted cargo and mail for Eighth Air Force within the United Kingdom. Between Nov 1944 and Aug 1945, airlifted troops and cargo in India and Burma, conducting assault landings in Burma in Feb and Apr 1945. Provided aerial transportation for US and allied units in China just after the war, Sep-Nov 1945. Between Jul 1964 and 1973, trained air commando and special operations personnel for combat missions in South Vietnam. Since 1992, the squadron has flown worldwide airlift missions taking part in contingency operations and training exercises, and was the first Air Force Reserve squadron to fly the C-17 aircraft, beginning in 1993. Flew humanitarian airlift missions to Washington DC and New York City, NY, after the terrorist attack on the US, 11 Sep 2001.

Service Streamers:  World War II European-African-Middle Eastern Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma with two Arrowheads; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: [1 Jul 1964]-Jun 1965; 15 Apr 1970-15 Apr 1971; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1997; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Sep 1998-31 Aug 2000; 11 Sep 2001-10 Sep 2003; 1 Aug 2005-31 Jul 2007.

Emblem:  Approved on 15 Mar 1968; revised on 23 Sep 1999.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 26 May 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Sep 2001.

Table of Contents



327th Airdrome Squadron  (See Other Units)

Source:  Air Force History Index

Lineage:  Activated 22 Apr 44 at Drew Field, FL. Stationed at Kalaikunda by 1 Aug 45. Disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Burma.



328th Airdrome Squadron  (See Other Units)

Source:  Air Force History Index

Lineage:  Activated 22 Apr 44 at Drew Field, FL. Stationed at Kalaikunda by 1 Aug 45. Disbanded 8 Oct 48.



340th Airdrome Squadron  (See Other Units)

Source:  Air Force History Index

Lineage:  Activated 22 Apr 44 at Drew Field, FL. Stationed at Kalaikunda by 1 Aug 45. Disbanded 8 Oct 48.



342nd Airdrome Squadron  (See Other Units)

Source:  Air Force History Index

Lineage:  Activated 1 May 44 at Hoffman, NC. Transferred to Dunnellon, FL 21 Jun 44. Transferred to Burma Dec 44. Deactivated Sep 45. Disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Table of Contents



7th Bombardment Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as First Army Observation Group, and organized, on 6 Sep 1918. Demobilized in Apr 1919. Reestablished, consolidated (13 Jan 1994) with the organization established as 1 Army Observation Group, and organized, on 1 Oct 1919. Redesignated 7 Group (Observation) on 26 Mar 1921. Inactivated on 30 Aug 1921. Redesignated: 7 Observation Group on 25 Jan 1923; 7 Bombardment Group on 24 Mar 1923. Activated on 1 Jun 1928. Redesignated: 7 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 6 Dec 1939; 7 Bombardment Group, Heavy on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 7 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, and activated, on 1 Oct 1946. Redesignated 7 Bombardment Group, Heavy on 20 Jul 1948. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated 7 Operations Group on 29 Aug 1991. Activated on 1 Sep 1991. Inactivated on 1 Jan 1993. Activated on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  Air Service, First Army, 6 Sep 1918-Apr 1919. 2 Wing, 1 Oct 1919-30 Aug 1921. IX Corps Area, 1 Jun 1928; 1 Bombardment Wing, c. 30 Oct 1931; IX Corps Area, c. 1 Oct 1933; 1 Wing, 1 Mar 1935; 20 Bombardment Wing, 18 Dec 1940; II Bomber Command, 5 Sep 1941; Far East (later, Fifth) Air Force, c. 22 Dec 1941; Tenth Air Force, Mar 1942; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, 12 Jun-c. 7 Dec 1945 (attached to India China Division, Air Transport Command, 15 Jun-18 Sep 1945); New York Port of Embarkation, 5-6 Jan 1946. Fifteenth Air Force, 1 Oct 1946; Eighth Air Force, 1 Nov 1946; 7 Bombardment Wing, 17 Nov 1947-16 Jun 1952. 7 Wing (later, 7 Bomb) Wing, 1 Sep 1991-1 Jan 1993. 7 Wing (later, 7 Bomb) Wing, 1 Oct 1993-.

Components

Squadrons:  1 Aero (later, 1 Squadron): 1 Oct 1919-30 Aug 1921 (detached 6 May-30 Aug 1921). 7 Air Refueling: 1 Sep 1991-1 Jun 1992. 9 Aero (later, 9 Bombardment; 9 Bomb): Sep-Nov 1918; 1 Apr 1931-6 Jan 1946 (detached 28 Jun-c. 4 Oct 1942); 1 Oct 1946-16 Jun 1952 (detached 16 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952); 1 Sep 1991-15 Aug 1992; 1 Oct 1993-. 11 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1928-15 Sep 1942 (detached 26 Apr-2 May 1942). 12 Aero (later, 12 Squadron): 1 Oct 1919-24 Mar 1920 (detached 13 Oct 1919-24 Mar 1920). 13 Bomb: 14 Jun 2000-9 Sep 2005. 14 Bombardment: 2 Dec 1941-6 Jan 1946 (detached 2 Dec 1941-May 1942; not manned May 1942-6 Jan 1946). 20 Bomb: 1 Sep 1991-18 Dec 1992. 22 Bombardment: 20 Oct 1939-15 Sep 1942 (detached 26 Apr-28 May 1942). 24 Aero: 6 Sep 1918-Apr 1919. 28 Bomb: 1 Oct 1994-. 31 Bombardment: attached 1 Apr -29 Jun 1931, assigned 30 Jun 1931-1 Feb 1938. 32 Bombardment: apparently attached c. 8-16 Dec 1941. 39 Airlift: 1 Oct 1993-1 Apr 1997. 40 Airlift: 1 Oct 1993-1 Apr 1997. 50 Aero: attached c. Oct 1919-23 Mar 1920, assigned 24 Mar 1920-10 Feb 1921. 88 Aero (later, 88 Reconnaissance; 436 Bombardment): attached c. Oct 1919-23 Mar 1920, assigned 24 Mar 1920-10 Feb 1921; attached 28 Sep 1935-24 Feb 1942 (air echelon detached 10 Dec 1941-14 Mar 1942), assigned 25 Feb 1942-6 Jan 1946; assigned 1 Oct 1946-16 Jun 1952 (detached 16 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952). 91 Aero: 6 Sep-Nov 1918. 95 Pursuit: attached 1 Jun 1928-29 Oct 1931. 186 Aero: Unkn [apparently, 1918-1919]. 337 Bomb: 1 Oct 1993-1 Oct 1994. 492 Bombardment: 25 Oct 1942-6 Jan 1946; 1 Oct 1946-16 Jun 1952 (detached 16 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952). 493 Bombardment: 25 Oct 1942-6 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Gondreville, France, 6 Sep 1918; Vavincourt, France, 22 Sep 1918-Apr 1919. Park Field, TN, 1 Oct 1919; Langley Field, VA, 28 Oct 1919-30 Aug 1921. Rockwell Field, CA, 1 Jun 1928; March Field, CA, 30 Oct 1931; Hamilton Field, CA, 5 Dec 1934; Merced Field, CA, 5 Nov 1935; Hamilton Field, CA, 22 May 1937; Ft Douglas, UT, 7 Sep 1940-13 Nov 1941; Brisbane, Australia, 22 Dec 1941-4 Dec 1942 (air echelon operated from Java, c. 14 Jan-1 Mar 1942); Karachi, India, 12 Mar 1942; Dum-Dum, India, 30 May 1942; Karachi, India, 9 Sep 1942; Pandaveswar, India, 12 Dec 1942; Kurmitola, India, 17 Jan 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 6 Oct 1944; Tezpur, India, 7 Jun 1945; Kudhkundi, India, 31 Oct-7 Dec 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946. Fort Worth AAFld (later, Carswell AFB), TX, 1 Oct 1946-16 Jun 1952. Carswell AFB, TX, 1 Sep 1991-1 Jan 1993. Dyess AFB, TX, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  Lt Col John N. Reynolds, 6 Sep 1918-unkn. Unkn, 1919-1921. Capt Frank H. Pritchard, Jun 1928; Maj Carl A. Spaatz, 1 May 1929-29 Oct 1931; Maj Joseph T. McNarney, by 4 Dec 1931-Dec 1934; Col Clarence L. Tinker, by 15 Apr 1935; Lt Col Davenport Johnson, Jan 1937-c. Mar 1938; Lt Col George E. Stratemeyer, unkn-Aug 1938; Lt Col Ralph Royce, Oct 1938-c. May 1941; Maj Stanley K. Robinson, 1941; Maj Austin A. Straubel, 29 Jan 1942; 1Lt James E. Tull, 7 Feb 1942 (acting); Col Cecil E. Combs, 22 Mar 1942; Col Conrad F. Necrason, 1 Jul 1942; Lt Col William A. Delahay, Feb 1944; Col Aubrey K. Dodson, 27 Mar 1944; Col Harvey T. Alness, 6 Nov 1944; Col Howard F. Bronson Jr., 24 Jun 1945-unkn. Col John G. Erickson, 1 Oct 1946; Col Hewitt T. Wheeless, 16 Dec 1946; Col Alan D. Clark, 27 Jun 1947 (additional duty after 17 Nov 1947); Col Charles D. Farr, 7 Feb 1949; Col John A. Roberts, 17 Aug 1949; Col Richard T. Black, 24 Oct 1950; none (not manned, 16 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952. Col Charles R. Hardesty, 1 Sep 1991; Col Joseph F. Czarkowski, 7 Apr 1992-1 Jan 1993. Col Thomas A. O'Riordan, 1 Oct 1993; Col Andrew M. Gessner, 14 Feb 1994; Col Anthony M. Beat, 18 May 1995; Col Anthony F. Przybyslawski, 23 Aug 1996; Col Douglas L. Raaberg, 19 May 1998; Col Christopher Miller, 3 Apr 2000; Col Michael R. Moeller, 17 Aug 2001; Col Jeffrey K. Beene, 22 Jul 2003; Col Scott A. Vander Hamm, 8 Jul 2005-.

Aircraft:  Breguet 14, DH-4, Salmson 2 in addition to Spad XIII and Sopwith FE-2, 1918-1919. Unkn, 1919-1921. OA-2, 1928-unkn; LB-7, 1929-unkn; B-3, B-4, O-19, O-38, 1931-1934; B-12, 1934-1936; B-10, 1936-1937; B-18, 1937-1940; B-17, 1939-1942; B-25, LB-30, 1942; B-24, 1942-1945. B-29, 1946-1948; B-36, 1948-1951. B-52, 1991-1993; KC-135, 1991-1993. B-1, 1993-; C-130, 1993-1997.

Operations:  The First Army Observation Group, made up of the 24th and 91st Aero [Observation] and the 9th Aero [night observation] Squadrons, performed photographic reconnaissance and day and night visual reconnaissance of the battle field area, especially in the enemy's rear areas opposite the area of attack, Sep-Nov 1918. Demobilized in France in Apr 1919. Consolidated (1994) with the organization established as the 1st Army Observation Group on 1 Oct 1919 at Park Field, TN. Inactivated less than two years later, on 30 Aug 1921. Activated again as the 7 Bombardment Group on 1 Jun 1928. For the next eleven years, engaged in training activities, flights of mercy, experimentation with air refueling and air transport of supplies, and participation in various exercises and air shows. Group was in the process of moving to the Philippines when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 Dec 1941. Six of the Group's B-17 aircraft reached Hawaii during the enemy attack but landed safely. The ground echelon, on board a ship in the Pacific Ocean, was diverted to Australia. The air echelon moved its B-17s via North Africa and India to Java, where from 14 Jan to 1 Mar 1942, it operated against the Japanese advancing through the Philippines and Netherlands East Indies. Received the Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for its action against enemy aircraft, ground installations, warships and transports. Reunited with the ground echelon in India in Mar 1942, the group resumed combat under Tenth Air Force against targets in Burma. It received B-25s and LB-30s in early 1942 but by the end of the year had converted entirely to B-24s. From then through Sep 1945, bombed airfields, fuel and supply dumps, locomotive works, railways, bridges, docks, warehouses, shipping, and troop concentrations in Burma and struck oil refineries in Thailand, power plants in China and enemy shipping in the Andaman Sea. Ceased bombing operations in late May 1945 and was attached to the Air Transport Command to haul gasoline from India over the Himalayas to China. Received second DUC for damaging enemy's line of supply in southeast Asia with an attack against rail lines and bridges in Thailand on 19 Mar 1945. Returned to US in Dec 1945 and inactivated the following month. Activated on 1 Oct 1946 as a B-29 bombardment group. Received its first B-36 aircraft in late 1948 and by mid-1949 completed conversion. Began flying B-36Ds equipped with jet pods in Aug 1950 but on 16 Feb 1951 became a paper organization. With all assigned flying squadrons reassigned directly to the 7 Bombardment Wing, the group inactivated on 16 Jun 1952. As part of a major Air Force-wide reorganization, the Group was redesignated 7 Operations Group and again became the combat element of the 7 Wing. It controlled two B-52 squadrons and one KC-135 air refueling squadron. When flying operations ended at Carswell AFB, TX in Dec 1992, the group inactivated the following month. Upon activation of the 7 Wing at Dyess AFB, TX on 1 Oct 1993, the group again activated as the combat element of the wing. Equipped with B-1B and C-130 aircraft, the group's mission included bombardment and tactical airlift. It lost its airlift responsibilities in Apr 1997. At that time it also gained a conventional bombing mission. In Nov 1998, deployed several aircraft to Oman in support of Operation Desert Fox, where the B-1 flew its first combat missions on 17 and 18 Dec 1998. Since 1999, trained bomber aircrews for global conventional bombing.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne; Lorraine. World War II: Burma; East Indies; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Netherlands East Indies: 14 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Thailand: 19 Mar 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004.

Emblem:  WWII: Shield: Azure, on a bend or three crosses pattee sable. Crest: On a wreath of the colors (or and azure) a drop bomb palewise sable piercing a cloud proper. Motto: Mors Ab Alto - Death from Above. (Approved 30 Jan 1933. This emblem was modified 12 Sep 1952.)  Current:  Group will use the wing emblem with group designation in the scroll.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Dec 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Dec 2006.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (7th Bomb Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 7 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 3 Nov 1947. Organized on 17 Nov 1947. Redesignated: 7 Bombardment Wing, Heavy on 1 Aug 1948; 7 Wing on 1 Sep 1991; 7 Bomb Wing on 1 Jun 1992: 7 Wing on 1 Oct 1993; 7 Bomb Wing on 1 Apr 1997.

Assignments:  Eighth Air Force, 17 Nov 1947; 19 Air Division, 16 Feb 1951 (attached to 5 Air Division, 10 Jul-13 Sep 1955); Eighth Air Force, 13 Jun 1988; Twelfth Air Force, 1 Oct 2002-.

Components

Group:  7 Bombardment (later, 7 Operations): 17 Nov 1947-16 Jun 1952; 1 Sep 1991-1 Jan 1993; 1 Oct 1993-. 11 Bombardment: attached 1 Dec 1948-16 Feb 1951.

Squadron:  7 Air Refueling: 1 Apr 1958-15 Apr 1960; 1 Mar 1964-1 Sep 1991. 9 Bombardment: attached 16 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1968; assigned 31 Dec 1971-1 Sep 1991. 20 Bombardment: 25 Jun 1965-1 Sep 1991. 98 Bombardment: attached 1-10 Dec 1957. 436 Bombardment: attached 16 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-1 Aug 1958. 492 Bombardment: attached 16 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-15 Jun 1959. 919 Air Refueling: 15 Apr-15 Jul 1960. 920 Air Refueling: 15 Apr-15 Jul 1960. 4018 Combat Crew Training: 1 Apr 1974-31 Mar 1983.

Stations:  Fort Worth AAFld (later, Griffiss AFB; Carswell AFB), TX, 17 Nov 1947; Dyess AFB, TX, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  Col Alan D. Clark, 17 Nov 1947; Col William P. Fisher, 11 May 1949; Brig Gen Clarence S. Irvine, 3 Jan 1950; Col John A. Roberts, 16 Feb 1951; Col George T. Chadwell, 29 Oct 1951; Col John A. Roberts, 14 Apr 1952; Col George T. Chadwell, 2 Jan 1953; Col Clarence A. Neely, 1 May 1954; Col Raymond S. Sleeper, 1 Jul 1955; Col Frederick D. Berry Jr., 3 Jul 1957; Col John A. Roberts, 16 Jul 1957; Col James Y. Parker, 5 Jan 1959; Col George J. Eade, 6 Jul 1961; Col Don W. Bailey, 17 Jul 1963; Col Vincent M. Crane, c. 28 Apr 1965; Col Don W. Bailey, c. 12 Jun 1965; unkn (wing headquarters depleted), c. 1 Aug-c. 30 Nov 1965; Col Don W. Bailey, c. 1 Dec 1965; Col Benjamin B. Shields, 1 Aug 1966; Col Ralph T. Holland, 12 Aug 1966; Col Carlton L. Lee, 23 Jun 1967; Col Winston F. Moore, 28 Jul 1968; Col Samuel E. Dyke, 30 Apr 1969; Col Edward R. Van Sandt, 11 Sep 1969; Lt Col Paul A. Warner, 16 Sep 1969; Col Samuel E. Dyke, c. 31 Mar 1970; Col Donald D. Adams, 27 Apr 1970; Col Robert L. Holladay Jr., 2 Jun 1971; Col Walter C. Schrupp, 26 May 1972; Col John D. Beeson, 31 May 1973; Col Walter C. Schrupp, 1 Nov 1973; Col David E. Blais, 9 Aug 1974; Col Edward L. Todd, 31 Jan 1977; Col Francis L. Asbury, 2 Apr 1979; Brig Gen Robert L. Kirtley, 19 Feb 1981; Col Martin J. Ryan Jr., 20 Apr 1982; Col O. K. Lewis Jr., 25 Oct 1983; Col Charles G. Kucera, 3 Jun 1985; Col Donald F. Allan, 17 Nov 1986; Col George P. Cole Jr., 12 Feb 1987; Col John B. Sams Jr., 3 Aug 1988; Col Julian B. Hall Jr., 16 Jul 1990; Col Richard Szafranski, 9 Jul 1991; Col Gary L. Barber, 28 May 1993; Brig Gen Jerrold P. Allen, 1 Oct 1993; Brig Gen Charles R. Henderson, 4 Aug 1994; Brig Gen Larry W. Northington, 4 Aug 1995; Brig Gen Michael C. McMahan, 26 Mar 1997; Brig Gen Joseph P. Stein, 18 Jun 1999; Brig Gen Wendell L. Griffin, 28 Nov 2000; Col Jonathan D. George, 10 Jan 2003; Col Garrett Harencak, 30 Aug 2004; Col Timothy M. Ray, 28 Jul 2006-.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1947-1948; B-36, 1948-1958; XC-99, 1949; RB-36, 1950; B-52, 1957, 1958-1965, 1965-1969, 1970-1992; KC-135, 1958-1960, 1964-1965, 1965-1969, 1970-1992; B-1, 1993-; C-130, 1993-1997.

Operations:  Trained with B-29s in global bombardment operations, Nov 1947-Dec 1948. Began converting to B-36 bombers in Jun 1948. Controlled two B-36 groups, Dec 1948-Feb 1951, and three B-36 squadrons, Feb 1951-May 1958. Flight-tested XC-99 in Jun 1949 and evaluated RB-36 in 1950. Deployed at Nouasseur AB, French Morocco, 10 Jul-13 Sep 1955. Had an attached B-52 squadron, 1-10 Dec 1957, and converted to B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers, May-Jun 1958. Trained in global strategic bombardment and air refueling operations. Beginning 13 Apr 1965, the wing deployed its forces to the Pacific area to support SAC combat operations in Southeast Asia. All wing bombers and tankers, along with aircrews and some support personnel, deployed in Apr-May 1965. In the United States, the wing gained the assets of a second B-52 squadron from another wing in Jun 1965, giving it a bomber capability again. All B-52 resources deployed to the Pacific area by 1 Aug 1965, along with most of the wing's remaining support personnel, leaving the 7 Wing as a small non-flying cadre to operate Carswell AFB, TX. Wing headquarters remained non-operational to c. 1 Dec 1965, when B-52/KC-135 resources began returning. The wing continued to support SAC operations in Southeast Asia through the remainder of the conflict and into 1975, but on a reduced scale except for the period c. 1 Sep 1969-c. 28 Mar 1970, when most wing resources were required overseas, and only a small cadre remained at home. In addition to its other activities the wing conducted B-52D consolidated training for SAC, 1 May 1972-c. 15 Dec 1972 and 5 Jan-15 Dec 1973. By mid-1973 most wing KC-135 resources had redeployed, and most B-52 resources returned by Jan 1974. The wing resumed nuclear alert status on 3 Jan 1974. From 4 Dec 1973 to May 1975, the wing conducted B-52D replacement training, and from Jan 1974 also conducted B-52D combat crew training, i.e., providing B-52 flight training to novice crews. Beginning in Jun 1974 the wing also conducted B-52 and KC-135 Central Flight Instructors' courses. Participated in numerous USAF and NATO exercises worldwide. Used B-52s for ocean surveillance and ship identification in joint naval operations. Wing KC-135 aerial refuelers supported tanker task forces worldwide. In Oct-Nov 1983, the wing supported the invasion of Grenada with aerial refueling. Also in 1983, B-52 crews began training with a new weapon system, the SRAM (Short Range Attack Missile) and later, in 1985, the ALCM (Air Launched Cruise Missile). Flew numerous atmospheric sampling missions, 1986-1987, in response to the Chernobyl (Russia) nuclear reactor accident. Deployed air refueling personnel and equipment to provisional wings in Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-Feb 1992. The wing hosted the first Soviet START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) exhibition inspection team in Sep 1991. Began preparations for base closure at Carswell AFB in Jan 1992. Released of all operational capabilities on 1 Jan 1993. Closed Carswell AFB on 30 Sep 1993 and moved to Dyess AFB, TX, without personnel or equipment, on 1 Oct 1993. Equipped with B-1B and C-130 aircraft, the 7 Wing regained its combat and worldwide tactical airlift missions. In 1997, assumed responsibility for all B-1B initial qualification and instructor upgrade training for Air Combat Command. Since 2000, provided bombing, airlift support, training and combat support to combatant commanders.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Sep 1969-28 Mar 1970. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 18 Jun-1 Dec 1965; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Sep 1969-28 Mar 1970.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 7 Operations Group prior to 1 Aug 1948. Service Streamers. None. Campaign Streamers. World War I: St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne; Lorraine. World War II: Burma; East Indies; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citations: Netherlands Indies, 14 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Thailand, 19 Mar 1945.

Emblem:  Approved 30 Jan 1933 for group and on 15 Jun 1994 for wing.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Dec 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Dec 2006.


Other Sites of Interest:

7th Bomb Wing B-36 Association

Table of Contents



9th Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 9 Aero Squadron on 14 Jun 1917. Redesignated 9 Squadron on 14 Mar 1921. Inactivated on 29 Jun 1922. Redesignated: 9 Observation Squadron on 25 Jan 1923; 9 Bombardment Squadron on 24 Mar 1923. Activated on 1 Apr 1931. Redesignated: 9 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 Dec 1939; 9 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 13 Jul 1943. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 9 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated, on 1 Oct 1946. Redesignated 9 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 20 Jul 1948. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1968. Redesignated 9 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 28 Jan 1969. Activated on 2 Jul 1969. Redesignated: 9 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 31 Dec 1971; 9 Bomb Squadron on 1 Sep 1991. Inactivated on 15 Aug 1992. Activated on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  Unkn, 14 Jun 1917-Sep 1918; 1 Army Observation Group, 6 Sep 1918; 3 Army Air Service, c. 21 Nov 1918; unkn, 12 May-Jul 1919; Western Department, Jul 1919; Ninth Corps Area, 20 Aug 1920-29 Jun 1922. 7 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1931-6 Jan 1946 (attached to United States Army Middle East Air Force for operations, 28 Jun-c. 4 Oct 1942). 7 Bombardment Group, 1 Oct 1946 (attached to 7 Bombardment Wing, 16 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 7 Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1968. 340 Bombardment Group, 2 Jul 1969; 7 Bombardment Wing, 31 Dec 1971; 7 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991-15 Aug 1992. 7 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1993-.

Stations:  Camp Kelly, TX, 14 Jun 1917; Selfridge Field, MI, 8 Jul 1917; Garden City, NY, 28 Oct-22 Nov 1917; Winchester, England, c. 8 Dec 1917; Grantham, England, c. 28 Dec 1917-7 Aug 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 23 Aug 1918; Amanty, France, 28 Aug 1918; Vavincourt, France, 21 Sep 1918; Preutim, France, 21 Nov 1918; Trier, Germany, 5 Dec 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 18 May 1919; Marseilles, France, 25 May-7 Jun 1919; Park Field, TN, 12 Jul 1919; March Field, CA, 22 Jul 1919; Rockwell Field, CA, 2 Aug 1919 (flight operated from Calexico, CA, to Apr 1920); March Field, CA, 15 Nov 1919; Rockwell Field, CA, 11 Dec 1919; Mather Field, CA, 27 Apr 1920-29 Jun 1922. March Field, CA, 1 Apr 1931; Hamilton Field, CA, 5 Dec 1934; Fort Douglas, UT, 7 Sep 1940; Salt Lake City, UT, 13 Jan-13 Nov 1941; Brisbane, Australia, 22 Dec 1941-4 Feb 1942 (ground echelon); (air echelon operated from Singosari, Java, 13-19 Jan 1942 and Jogjakarta, Java, 19 Jan-c. 1 Mar 1942); Karachi, India, c. 8 Mar 1942 (air echelon), 14 Mar 1942 (ground echelon); Allahabad, India (air echelon at Baumrauli, India), 27 Apr-29 Jun 1942; Lydda, Palestine, 2 Jul-4 Oct 1942; Karachi, India, 5 Oct 1942 (operated from Gaya, India, 14 Nov-12 Dec 1942); Pandaveswar, India, 12 Dec 1942; Kurmitola, India, 11 Jun 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 1 Oct 1944; Tezpur, India, 1 Jun-7 Dec 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946. Fort Worth AAFld (later, Griffis AFB; Carswell AFB), TX, 1 Oct 1946-25 Jun 1968. Carswell AFB, TX, 2 Jul 1969-15 Aug 1992. Dyess AFB, TX, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  Capt George E. A. Reinburg, 14 Jun 1917; 1Lt Samuel B. Eckert, 22 Aug 1917; none, c. 8 Dec 1917; 1Lt J. A. Richards, 8 Feb 1918; 1Lt Frank H. Miller, c. 13 Aug 1918; 1Lt Maury Hill, c. 16 Aug 1918; 1Lt Thomas A. Box, 2 Sep 1918; 1Lt Edward R. Kenneson, 30 Sep 1918; Capt Willis A. Diekema, Dec 1918; unkn, May-Jun 1919; none, c. 10-31 Jul 1919; Lt Col Henry L. Watson, 1 Aug 1919; Capt Robert L. Walsh, 1 Nov 1920; unkn, 2 Aug 1921-29 Jun 1922. Capt Leo F. Post, 1 Apr 1931; 2Lt William A. Matheny, Jul 1933; unkn, Dec 1933-Mar 1935; Capt John M. Davies, Apr 1935; Capt Donald J. Keirn, c. 1 Jun 1935; Capt John J. Morrow, 17 Jun 1935; Capt John M. Davies, c. Aug 1935; Capt Kenneth N. Walker, Oct 1936-Jan 1938; Capt Wilfred J. Paul, c. 2 Feb 1938; Maj Thad V. Foster, c. Sep 1938; Maj Elmer E. Adler, c. 15 Feb 1940; unkn, c. Apr-30 Jun 1941; Maj Richard H. Carmichael, 1 Jul 1941; unkn, 5 Oct-Nov 1941; Maj Conrad F. Necrason, c. Dec 1941; Maj Donald M. Keiser, 15 Mar 1942; Maj Max R. Fennell, 3 Aug 1942; Maj Willard A. Fountain, 3 Nov 1942; Capt Homer E. Adams, 3 Jan 1943; Maj William Stark, Feb 1943; Maj Joseph S. Pirruccello, 6 Apr 1943; Capt Allan A. Latham, 21 Oct 1943; Maj David N. Kellogg, 29 Dec 1943; Maj William B. Kyes, c. 9 May 1944; Maj William C. Dabney, Nov 1944; Capt John M. Dozier, 7 Jun 1945; unkn, 2 Oct 1945-6 Jan 1946. None, 1-24 Oct 1946; Lt Col Willard W. Wilson, 25 Oct 1946; Lt Col William F. Savoic, 5 Aug 1947; Lt Col George T. Chadwell, Aug 1948; Maj Toy B. Husband, 8 May 1949; Lt Col John B. Carey Jr., 24 Jun 1949; Lt Col Richard T. Black, 26 Jan 1950; Lt Col Francis J. Schuck, Jul 1950; Maj Ralph R. Taylor Jr., Jan 1951; Lt Col Norris J. Ansell, 1 Jun 1952; Lt Col Lester F. Richardson, c. 3 Feb 1953; Lt Col Raymond E. Buckwalter, c. 10 May 1953; Lt Col William J. Cook, c. Apr 1955; Lt Col Charles W. Johnson Jr., Apr 1956; Lt Col Paul Beard, 1 Jul 1956; Lt Col Wesley L. Pendergraft, 20 May 1957; Lt Col Clifford Schoeffler, c. 1 Dec 1957; Maj James S. Gardner, Jun 1958; Lt Col Jack H. Heinzel, Jun 1958; Lt Col Clifford Schoeffler, Jul 1958; Lt Col Jack H. Heinzel, Sep 1958; Lt Col Clifford Schoeffler, Oct 1958; Lt Col Harry R. Patrick, c. 25 Jul 1959; Lt Col Allen C. Phenis, 1 Apr 1961; Lt Col James S. Gardner, 27 Aug 1962; Lt Col Luther L. Hampton, 1 Jun 1964; Lt Col George E. Porter, 1 Oct 1965; Lt Col Junior Hendricks, c. 1 Apr 1967-25 Jun 1968. Lt Col Robert S. Montgomery, 2 Jul 1969; Lt Col David N. Gooch, c. 15 Oct 1970; unkn, 4 Sep-30 Dec 1971; Lt Col Caryl W. Calhoun, 31 Dec 1971; Lt Col Pintard M. Dyer, 18 Jul 1972; Lt Col John T. Cornelius, 1 Jun 1973; Lt Col Donald L. Marks, 1 Jul 1974; Lt Col Leslie H. Coody Jr., 1 Jul 1975; Lt Col Claude L. Branson, 6 Jul 1976; Lt Col Lloyd L. Moir Jr., 21 Nov 1977; Lt Col John C. Dalton, 30 May 1979; Lt Col Thad A. Wolfe, 1 May 1981; Lt Col David F. Johnson, 10 Sep 1981; Lt Col Harvard L. Lomax, 15 Dec 1982; Lt Col George I. Conlan, 25 Jun 1984; Lt Col Michael J. Kehoe, 15 Jul 1985; Lt Col Arvid P. Pederson, 24 Jan 1986; Lt Col Thomas W. Ellers, 7 Apr 1987; Lt Col Andrew W. Smoak, 29 Mar 1988; Lt Col Gerald J. Venteicher, 15 Aug 1989; Lt Col Bevley E. Foster Jr., 3 May 1991-15 Aug 1992. Lt Col Douglas L. Raaberg, 1 Oct 1993; Lt Col Stephen E. Wright, 26 Jun 1995; Lt Col John D. Allers, 19 Jul 1996; Lt Col Daniel J. Charchian, 10 Aug 1998-.

Aircraft:  Sopwith Camel, 1917; Sopwith Scout, 1917; Breguet 14, 1918-1919; DH-4, 1918-1922; Sopwith FE-2, 1918-1919; several German airplanes, including LVG C VI, Fokker D VII, Pfalz D XII, DFW C V, Halberstadt C IV and V, Rumpler C, and Hannover C L III, 1919. O-19, O-38, B-3, and B-4, 1931-1934; B-12, 1934-1937; B-10, 1935-1938; OA-4, 1937; B-18, 1937-1941; B-17, 1940-1942; LB-30, 1942; B-24, 1942-1945. B-29, 1946-1948; B-36, 1948-1958; B-52, 1958-1968. FB-111, 1969-1971; B-52, 1971-1992. B-1, 1993-.

Operations:  Combat with First Army as observation unit specializing in night reconnaissance, 2 Sep-11 Nov 1918, and subsequently served with Third Army as part of occupation forces until May 1919. Mexican border patrol, Aug 1919-Apr 1920 and c. Jan-Jul 1921. Antisubmarine patrols off California coast, 8-c. 12 Dec 1941. Combat in Southwest Pacific, c. 13 Jan-c. 1 Mar 1942; CBI, 2 Apr-4 Jun 1942, 22 Nov 1942-10 Jun 1944, and 19 Oct 1944-10 May 1945; and MTO, c. 4 Jul-1 Oct 1942; transportation of gasoline to forward bases in China, 20 Jun-30 Sep 1944 and Jun-Sep 1945. Deployed B-52s and aircrews for combat in Southeast Asia, Jun-Nov 1965. Trained B-52 aircrews to maintain combat readiness, 1971-1992. Provided aircraft and aircrews for nuclear and conventional taskings, 1993-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: Lorraine; St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Philippine Islands; East Indies; Burma; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive; Egypt-Libya.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Netherlands Indies, 14 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Thailand, 19 Mar 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 18 Jun-1 Dec 1965; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (WWII).

Emblem:  Approved on 26 Jul 1932, based on World War I emblem.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 2 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 1998.


Other Sites of Interest:  7th Bomb Wing B-36 Association

Table of Contents



11th Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 11 Aero Squadron (Day Bombardment) on 26 Jun 1917. Redesignated: 11 Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 Mar 1921; 11 Bombardment Squadron on 25 Jan 1923. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1927. Activated on 1 Jun 1928. Redesignated: 11 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 Dec 1939; 11 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 15 Sep 1942; 11 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 9 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 2 Nov 1945. Consolidated (11 Jan 1982) with 11 Pilotless Bomber Squadron, Light, which was constituted on 17 Jun 1954. Activated on 1 Sep 1954. Redesignated 11 Tactical Missile Squadron on 8 Jun 1955. Inactivated on 18 Jun 1958. Activated on 1 Oct 1982. Inactivated on 31 May 1991. Redesignated 11 Bomb Squadron on 24 Jun 1994. Activated on 1 Jul 1994.

Assignments:  Unkn, 26 Jun 1917-Sep 1918; 1 Day Bombardment Group, 10 Sep-Nov 1918; unkn, Nov 1918-17 Sep 1919; 1 Day Bombardment (later, 2 Bombardment) Group, 18 Sep 1919; Air Corps Training Center, 18-31 Jul 1927. 7 Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1928 (attached to 17 Bombardment Group, 26 Apr-2 May 1942); 341 Bombardment Group, 15 Sep 1942-2 Nov 1945. Ninth Air Force, 1 Sep 1954; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Jul 1956 (attached to 7382 Guided Missile Group, 1 Jul-14 Sep 1956); 587 Tactical Missile Group, 15 Sep 1956-18 Jun 1958. 501 Tactical Missile Wing, 1 Oct 1982-31 May 1991; 2 Operation Group, 1 Jul 1994-.

Stations:  Camp Kelly, TX, 26 Jun 1917; Scott Field, IL, 12 Aug-6 Dec 1917; Winchester, England, 1 Jan 1918; Stamford, England, 9 Jan 1918; Waddington, England, 24 Jun 1918; Winchester, England, 7 Aug 1918; Le Havre, France, 12 Aug 1918; St Maxient Aerodrome, France, 14 Aug 1918; Romorantin, France, 20 Aug 1918; Delouze, France, 26 Aug 1918; Amanty, France, 6 Sep 1918; Maulan, France, 24 Sep 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 17 Jan 1919; Guitres, France, 1 Feb 1919; St Denis de Pile, France, 19 Feb 1919; Sablons, France, 9 Mar 1919; Libourne, France, 13 Apr 1919; Bordeaux, France, 16-21 Apr 1919; Camp Mills, NY, 1 May 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, 2 May 1919; Hazelhurst Field, NY, 5 May 1919; Ellington Field, TX, 26 May 1919; Ft Bliss, TX, 23 Jun 1919 (flight operated from Marfa, TX, c. Aug-c. 5 Nov 1919); Kelly Field, TX, 8 Nov 1919; Langley Field, VA, 30 Jun 1922; March Field, CA, 3 Jun-31 Jul 1927. Rockwell Field, CA, 1 Jun 1928; March Field, CA, 29 Oct 1931 (operated from Winslow, AZ, 17-21 Jan 1932); Hamilton Field, CA, 5 Dec 1934; Ft Douglas, UT, 7 Sep 1940; Salt Lake City, UT, c. 18 Jan-13 Nov 1941; Brisbane, Australia, 22 Dec 1941 (operated from Muroc, CA, 8-c. 12 Dec 1941, and Singosari, Java, 13-19 Jan 1942); Jogjakarta, Java, 19 Jan-c. 1 Mar 1942; Melbourne, Australia, c. 4 Mar-6 Apr 1942; Columbia AAB, SC, c. 26 Apr-2 May 1942; Karachi, India, c. 20 May 1942; Allahabad, India, 27 May 1942; Kunming, China, 4 Jun 1942 (detachments operated from Kweilin, Hengyang, and Nanning, 30 Jun-20 Jul, 2-6 Aug, and 24 Oct-28 Nov 1942; from Dinjan, India, 28 Jun-c. 24 Oct 1942; and from Karachi, India, c. May 1942-21 Jun 1943); Kweilin, China, 21 Jun 1943 (detachments operated from Hengyang, Suichwan, Nanning, and Lingling, Jun 1943-Jun 1944); Yang Tong, China, 28 Jun 1944 (detachments operated from Kweilin and Liuchow, 28 Jun-1 Nov 1944); Yangkai, China, 2 Nov 1944- c. Sep 1945 (detachments operated from Laowhangpin, 28 Feb-c. Mar 1945, and Chihkiang, 28 Mar-1 Apr 1945); Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-2 Nov 1945. Orlando AAB, FL, 1 Sep 1954-21 Jun 1956; Sembach AB, Germany, 1 Jul 1956-18 Jun 1958. RAF Greenham Common, England, 1 Oct 1982-31 May 1991. Barksdale AFB, LA, 1 Jul 1994-.

Commanders:  Capt George E. Lowell, 26 Jun 1917-unkn; Maj Jack W. Heard, (by Aug) 1917-umkn; Lt Joseph G. B. Molton, (by Dec) 1917-unkn; Capt Charles L. (or P.) Heater, c. Aug 1918-unkn. Unkn, 1-20 Jun 1928; Capt Edward C. Black, 21 Jun-c. 27 Oct 1928; unkn, c. 28 Oct 1928-27 Apr 1930; 1 Lt Charles H. Howard, 28 Apr 1930-c. Jul 1933; unkn, c. Jul 1933-c. 1938; 1 Lt John G. Armstrong, (by Feb 1938)-unkn; Maj Austin A. Straubel, (by Dec 1941)-c. Mar 1942; none (apparently not manned, Mar-Apr 1942); Maj Gordon C. Leland, c. 26 Apr-3 Jun 1942; unkn, 4-9 Jun 1942; Lt Col William E. Basye, 10 Jun 1942; Maj Everett W. Holstrom, 1 Jan 1943; Maj Allan P. Forsythe, 25 May 1943; Lt Col Morris F. Taber, 1 Aug 1943; Lt Col Joseph B. Wells, 20 Nov 1943; Capt Theodore J. Michel, 14 Apr 1944; Lt Col Charles G. Willes, Oct 1944-c. Sep 1945; unkn, c. Oct-2 Nov 1945. Maj Robert Burns, 1 Sep 1954; Maj Paul J. Ireland, 13 Oct 1955; Maj Martin D. Fetherolf, Jr., 15 Sep 1956-18 Jun 1958. Unkn, 1 Oct 1982; Lt Col Roland E. Hahn, 30 Jan 1983; Lt Col William A. Larson, 20 Dec 1984; Lt Col John B. Ficklin, 5 Jun 1985; Lt Col Donald J. Harvell, 9 Apr 1988; Lt Col James I. Murrie, 14 Apr 1990-unkn. Lt Col Harry B. McCarraher, 1 Jul 1994; Lt Col Johnnie R. Madison, 17 Jun 1996; Lt Col Steven M. Ciccanti, 12 May 1997; Lt Col Roderick E. Gillis, 22 Dec 1998; Lt Col Lloyd D. DeSerisy, 22 May 2000; Lt Col Bryan K. Bartels, 7 Jun 2002 ; Lt Col Parker W. Northrup III, 7 Jun 2004; Lt Col Daniel A. Kosin, 13 Jun 2006-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  DH-4, 1918; included DH-4, MB-2 (NBS-1), and LB-1, during period 1919-1927. Primarily LB-7 and O-2 during period 1928-1931; included B-2, B-3, B-4, B-6, O-19, and O-38 during period 1931-1934; primarily B-12, 1934-1936, and B-10, 1936-1937; B-18, 1937-1940; B-17, 1939-1942; LB-30, 1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945. Matador, 1954-1958. Tomahawk GLCM, 1982-1991. B-52, 1994-.

Operations:  Combat as a day bombardment unit with First Army, 14 Sep-5 Nov 1918. Mexican border patrol, c. Aug-Nov 1919. Participated in demonstrations of effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships, 5 Sep 1923. Antisubmarine patrols off California coast, 8-c. 10 Dec 1941. Combat in Southwest Pacific, c. 13 Jan-c. 1 Mar 1942. Combat in the CBI, 3 Jun 1942-20 Jun 1945.(NOTE: the 11th Bomb Squadron was assigned to the 7th Bm Grp from 1928 thru Sep 1942. B-17s of the 11th were enroute to the Phillipines, and approaching Wheeler Field, Hawaii during the Japanese attack on Dec. 7th, 1941. After the Java defensive, the 11th was redesignated a Medium outfit and flew B-25s to India to rejoin with the 7th Bm Grp in May 42. The 11th immediately was attached to the China Air Task Force, flying a few missions with the AVG P-40s escorting. While continuing to support Gen Chennault, the 11th was transferred to 341st BM Grp (M) on 15 Sep 42.) Missile operations, 1954-1958 and 1982-1991. Since 1994, trained B-52 combat crews; maintained readiness to deploy in support of national objectives; provided nuclear deterrence; maintained ability to sustain heavy firepower in global situations.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne; Lorraine. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Philippine Islands; Central Pacific; East Indies; New Guinea; Western Pacific; India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive; Air Combat; Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Netherlands Indies, 14 Jan-1 Mar 1942; French Indo-China, 11 Dec 1944-12 Mar 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 15 Sep 1956-30 Apr 1958; 1 Oct 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1987-31 May 1989; 1 Jun 1989-31 May 1991; 1 Jul 1994-31 May 1995; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1996; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1997; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002.

Emblem:  Mr. Jiggs with an aerial bomb under his arm, on a White disc. Approved on 3 Mar 1924 from World War I emblem and reinstated in Jul 1994 (K 2662); replaced emblem approved on 12 May 1955 (K 9167).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 6 Sep 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 6 Sep 2006.


Other Sites of Interest:

U.S. Army Air Forces; China-Burma-India Theater, WW II

11th Bomb Sq (globalsecurity.org)

A Photo History of the 11th Bomb Squadron

Table of Contents



22nd Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

    
"Bombing Eagles" Insignia
(India 1942-43)

Designed by 22nd Squadron member Sgt. Charles F. Wright. It portrays an eagle, "King of the Air", dropping bombs against the mountains of Burma and suggests the operations of the Squadron during its first year in India. Officially adopted as the Squadron Insignia in December 1942 and used as a shoulder and jacket patch, and painted on all 22nd planes. However, it was not officially approved by USAAF headquarters as it was considered too similar to the "Eagle Squadron" insignia.
    
"Battlin' Bulldogs" Insignia
(China, 1944-45)

Over and through a lemon yellow disc, border light brown, a caricatured, pugnacious, light brown B-25 aircraft in flight, toward dexter base, wearing a red brown derby and a red-and-white-striped turtle-neck sweater, having look of ferocity on caricatured face, machine gun barrels, proper, issuing from nostrils, and a large brown cigar fired, proper, with white band, held in mouth, leaving white seed lines and trailing smoke toward rear, proper. (Approved 19 Mar 1945.)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (22nd Air Refueling Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted 22d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), and activated, on 20 Oct 1939. Redesignated: 22d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) c. 15 Sep 1942; 22d Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 28 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 2 Nov 1945. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 22d Air Refueling Squadron, Medium, which was constituted on 5 May 1950. Activated on 16 Jun 1950. Redesignated 22d Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, on 15 Jun 1960. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Jul 1962. Activated on 21 Feb 1963. Organized on 1 Jul 1963. Inactivated on 1 Dec 1989. Redesignated 22d Air Refueling Squadron on 29 Sep 1992. Activated on 1 Oct 1992. Inactivated on 30 Aug 2002. Redesignated 22 Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, and converted to provisional status, on 22 Jan 2003.

Assignments:  7th Bombardment Group, 20 Oct 1939 (attached to 17th Bombardment Group for training, 26 Apr-28 May 1942); 341st Bombardment Group, 15 Sep 1942-2 Nov 1945. 22d Bombardment Group, 16 Jun 1950 (attached to 22d Bombardment Wing, 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 22d Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952; 92d Bombardment (later, 92d Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 15 Jun 1960-1 Jul 1962. Strategic Air Command, 21 Feb 1963; 22d Bombardment (later, 22d Air Refueling) Wing, 1 Jul 1963-1 Dec 1989. 366th Operations Group, 1 Oct 1992-30 Aug 2002. Air Mobility Command to activate or inactivate at any time after 22 Jan 2003. Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate at any time after 19 Mar 2003.

Stations:  Hamilton Field, CA, 20 Oct 1939; Ft Douglas, UT, 7 Sep 1940; Salt Lake City, UT, c. 21 Jun-13 Nov 1941; Brisbane, Australia, 22 Dec 1941-19 Jan 1942 (ground echelon); (air echelon at Muroc, CA, 8-c. 12 Dec 1941; Hickam Field, TH, 18 Dec 1941-5 Jan 1942; Singosari, Java, 13-19 Jan 1942); Jogjakarta, Java, 19 Jan 1942 (detachment operated from Nandi Airport, Fiji Islands, 14-c. 18 Feb 1942, and from Townsville, Australia, c.20 Feb-c. 14 Mar 1942), Melbourne, Australia, c. 4 Mar-6 Apr 1942; Columbia AAB, SC, 26 Apr-28 May 1942; Karachi, India, 23 Jul 1942; Chakulia, India, 3 Dec 1942; Yangkai, China, 8 Jan 1944 (detachments operated from Yunnani, China, 29 Apr-6 May 1944, and c. 5 Nov 1944-c. 20 Jan 1945; Peishiyi, China, 27 Feb-25 Mar 1945; and Chihkiang, China, 29 Mar-c. 1 Apr 1945); Calcutta, India, c. 15 Sep-4 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-2 Nov 1945. March AFB, CA, 16 Jun 1950 (deployed at Mildenhall RAF, England, 7 Dec 1953-5 Mar 1954; Ernest Harmon AFB, Newfoundland, 3 Mar-19 Apr 1955; and Elmendorf AFB, AK, 3 Jan-2 May 1956); McChord AFB, WA, 15 Jun 1960-1 Jul 1962. March AFB, CA, 1 Jul 1963-1 Dec 1989. Mountain Home AFB, ID, 1 Oct 1992-30 Aug 2002.

Commanders:  Unkn, 20 Oct 1939-Dec 1941; Maj K. B. Hobson, by 28 Dec 1941; Capt Frank D. Sharp, 23 Jul 1942; Capt Robert S. Puckett, 8 Jan 1943; Lt Col Philip Main, by Jul 1944; Maj Bruce H. Berryman, May 1945-unkn. Capt William P. Lemme, 16 Jun 1950; Maj John H. Schweitzer, unkn-22 May 1951; Lt Col Delink, 22 May 1951; WO Frick, by Sep 1951; Lt Col Gordon F. Goyt, by Jun 1952; Lt Col David C. Jones, Jun 1953; Lt Col Horace E. Hatch, Jun 1954; Lt Col Raymond K. Hamlyn, c. 1 Apr 1955; Lt Col Albert M. Elton, Feb 1956; Lt Col Kenneth C. Diehl, 22 Aug 1957; Maj Edward J. Zeuty, May 1960; Col Kenneth C. Diehl, by Jul 1960-1 Jul 1962. Lt Col Paul R. Springer, 1 Jul 1963; Lt Col Frank W. Nunnally, c. Oct 1965; Lt Col R. A. Fromm, c. Jan 1967; Lt Col John C. Schoppe, by Sep 1967; Lt Col Robert D. Harter, 1 Apr 1969; Lt Col Robert L. Parks, 15 Aug 1970; Lt Col Vernard Marston, 15 Jan 1972; Lt Col Gary E. Spohn, 22 Jul 1972; Lt Col Robert B. Strain, 17 Jun 1974; Lt Col Richard Skovgaard, 1 Aug 1975; Lt Col James H. Roach, 21 Jul 1977; Lt Col John N. Luebberman, 1 Apr 1980; Lt Col Donald W. Bruce, 22 May 1981; Lt Col George P. Pehlvanian, 1 Aug 1982; Lt Col Klaus Kirschbaum, 24 May 1983; Lt Col James D. Lambert, 3 Sep 1985; Lt Col Larry N. Koehn, 7 Aug 1987; Lt Col Larry D. Thomas, 10 Feb-1 Dec 1989. None (not manned), 1-6 Oct 1992; Lt Col John F. Gaughan II, 7 Oct 1992; Lt Col James A. Fisher, 17 Jun 1994; Lt Col David J. Lawton, 1 Aug 1995; unkn, 1 Jan 1997-30 Aug 2002.

Aircraft:  In addition to B-18, included A-17 during period 1939-1940; B-17, 1940-1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945. KC-97, 1952-1960; KC-135, 1960-1962. EC-135, 1963-1970; KC-135, 1963-1967, 1967-1989. KC-135, 1992-2002.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols off California coast, 8-c. 10 Dec 1941; combat in Southwest Pacific, c. 13 Jan-c. 1 Mar 1942; detachment under control of USN in combat from the Fiji Islands and Australia, 14 Feb-c. 14 Mar 1942. Combat in CBI, 14 Dec 1942-25 Jul 1945. Not manned, 16 Jun 1950-Jun 1952. Global air refueling missions, 1953-1962 and 1963-1989. Loaned all aircraft and crews to other units for combat refueling operations in SEA, 10 Mar-c. 1 Oct 1967 and 10 Apr 1972-Aug 1973. Air refueling for invasion of Grenada, 23 Oct-21 Nov 1983; deployed personnel and aircraft to Turkey, Jul-Oct 1996, in support of Operation Provide Comfort, and to Bahrain, Sep-Nov 1997, the first test of the composite wing as a complete air expeditionary force; combat refueling in Southwest Asia, 2001-2002.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Philippine Islands; East Indies; New Guinea; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Netherlands Indies, 14 Jan-1 Mar 1942; French Indo-China, 11 Dec 1944-12 Mar 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Apr-1 Oct 1967; 25 Mar-1 May 1968; 1 Jul 1969-30 Jun 1970; 1 Sep 1970-30 Jun 1972; 1 Jul 1975-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1977-30 Jun 1979; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989; 1 Jul-1 Dec 1989; 1 Oct1992-28 Feb 1994; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 1999; 1 Jun 1999-31 May 2001; 1 Jun 2001-31 May 2002.

WWII Emblem:  Over and through a lemon yellow disc, border light brown, a caricatured, pugnacious, light brown B-25 aircraft in flight, toward dexter base, wearing a red brown derby and a red-and-white-striped turtle-neck sweater, having look of ferocity and caricatured face, machine gun barrels, proper, issuing from nostrils, and a large brown cigar fired, proper, with white band, held in mouth, leaving white speed lines and trailing smoke toward rear, proper. (Approved 19 Mar 1945.)

22nd ARS Emblem:  Azure, a flight symbol fesswise throughout Vert fimbriated Or surmounted by a mule Proper; all within a diminished inner bordure of the second and a diminished outer bordure of the third. Approved on 15 Nov 1994; replaced emblems approved on 13 Dec 1960 (K 12199), 27 Sep 1955 (153488 A. C.), and 19 Mar 1945 (29205 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 19 Mar 2003.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Aug 2002.


Source:  22nd Bomb Squadron Association

In 1942 and 1943 this squadron flew B-25 Mitchell bombers in the 10th Air Force in India. In 1944 the squadron moved to Yangkai, China, to become a part of the 14th Air Force under command of General Clare Chennault. The squadron continued operations from Yangkai through the remainder of the war.

In 1938 the 22nd had been commissioned as a heavy bombardment squadron. By 1941 it was flying B-17's out of Australia and Java. In 1942 the ground echelon was reorganized in South Carolina as the 22nd Bombardment Squadron. The air echelon was known at that time only as Project #157. They were assigned B-25's and flew them to Karachi, India (present day Pakistan), where they carried out combat missions from India and China as a part of the China Air Task Force. The 22nd Bomb Squadron participated in a daring daylight raid on Hong Kong harbor on October 25, 1942, a strategic follow-up to Jimmy Doolittle's famous raid on Japan just five months earlier.

Late in 1942 the 22nd Bombardment Squadron (M) came together as part of the 341st Bombardment Group (M) at Chakulia, India, about 100 miles west of Calcutta. Throughout 1943 the squadron attacked Japanese lines of supply and airfields in Burma, helping to keep open the only remaining Allied supply line from India, over the Himalaya Mountains (the Hump) to China.

From early 1944 until the end of the war the squadron operated out of Yangkai, near Kunming, Yunnan Province, in the southwesterly part of China. From that location, the squadron continued to protect the Hump air lift by giving air support to Allied land operations in northern Burma. In addition, the squadron conducted aerial attacks on enemy supply lines in French Indochina (now Vietnam) and throughout southeast China and the South China Sea.


Other Sites of Interest:  U.S. Army Air Forces; China-Burma-India Theater, WW II

Table of Contents



436th Bombardment Squadron


(WW I design)


(c. 1960 insignia - assigned to
4238th Strategic Wing)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 88th Aero Squadron on 18 Aug 1917; Redesignated: 88th Squadron 14 Mar 1921; 88th Observation Squadron on 25 Jan 1923; Inactivated on 1 Aug 1927; Activated on 1 Jun 1928. Redesignated: 88th Observation Squadron (Long-range, Amphibian) 1 Mar 1935; 88th Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 Sep 1936; 88th Reconnaissance Squadron (Long Range) on 6 Dec 1939; 88th Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 436th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1942. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946; Redesignated 436th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy), and activated, on 1 Oct 1946. Redesignated: 436th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Jul 1948. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Apr 1963; Redesignated 436th Strategic Training Squadron on 12 Feb 1986; Activated on 1 Jul 1986. Redesignated 436th Training Sq c. 1992.

Assignments:  Unkn, 18 Aug 1917-1 May 1918; I Corps Observation Group, May 1918; III Corps Observation Group, Aug-Nov 1918 (attached to V Corps Observation Group, 12-17 Sep 1918); unkn, Nov 1918-Sep 1919; 2nd Wing, Sep 1919 (attached to 1st Army Observation Group, c. Oct 1919); 1st Army Observation Group, 24 Mar 1920; Air Service Field Officer's School, 10 Feb 1921 (attached to 1st Provisional Air Brigade for operations, 6 May-3 Oct 1921); Fifth Corps Area 15 October 1921; Air Corps Training Center, May-1 Aug 1927. Eighth Corps Area, 1 Jun 1928 (attached to Field Artillery School to c. Nov 1931); 12th Observation Group, 30 Jun 1931; 1st Wing, 1 Mar 1935; 7th Bombardment Group; attached 1 Sep 1936 (air echelon attached to 31st Bombardment Squadron, 10 Dec 1941-c. 8 Feb 1942, and to USN, c. 8 Feb-14 Mar 1942), and assigned 25 Feb 1942-6 Jan 1946. 7th Bombardment Group, 1 Oct 1946; 7th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952; 4238th Strategic Wing, 1 Aug 1958 - 1 April 1963; Strategic Air Command 1 July 1986-1992; 7th (Bomb) Wing, 1992-.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 18 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 11-27 Oct 1917; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 16 Nov 1917; Amanty, France, 1 Feb 1918; Ourches, France, 28 May 1918; Francheville, France, 7 Jul 1918; Fermes-de-Greves, France, 4 Aug 1918; Goussancourt, France, 4 Sep 1918; Fermes-de-Greves, France, 9 Sep 1918; Souilly, France, 12 Sep 1918; Pretz-en-Argonne, France 14 Sep 1918; Souilly, France, 20 Sep 1918; Bethelainville, France, 4 Nov 1918; Villers-la-Chevre, France, 29 Nov 1918; Trier, Germany, 6 Dec 1918; Le Mans, France, 1-10 Jun 1919; Mitchell Field, NY, 27 Jun 1919; Scott Field, Ill, 11 Jul 1919; Langley Field, Va, 5 Sep 1919 (operated from Charleston, W Va, 3-8 Sep 1921; detachment at Charleston until Oct 1921); Godman Field, Ky, 15 Oct 1921; Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, 11 Oct 1922; Brooks Field, Tex, 7 May-1 Aug 1927; Post Field, Okla, 1 Jun 1928; Brooks Field, Tex, 5 Nov 1931; Hamilton Field, Calif, 28 Sep 1935; Ft Douglas, Utah, 7 Sep 1940; Salt Lake City, Utah, c. 15 Jan-11 Nov 1941; Brisbane, Australia, 22 Dec 1941-4 Feb 1942 (operated from Hickam Field, Hawaii, 7 Dec 1941-10 Feb 1942, Nandi Airport, Fiji Islands, 12-17 Feb 1942, Townsville, Australia, 20 Feb-c. 14 Mar 1942); Karachi, India, 12 Mar 1942; Allahabad, India, 1 Jun 1942; Gaya, India, 14 Nov 1942; Bishnupur, India, 25 Feb 1943; Panagarh, India, 25 Sep 1943; Madhaiganj, India, 13 Dec 1943; Tezgaon, India, 14 Jun 1944; Madhaiganj, India, 6 Oct 1944 (detachment based at Luliang, China, ferrying gasoline to Suichwan, China, Dec 1944-Jan 1945); Tezpur, India, 1 Jun-7 Dec 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946; Ft Worth AAFld (later Carswell AFB), TX, 1 Oct 1946; Barksdale AFB, LA, 1 Aug 1958-1 Apr 1963; Carswell AFB, TX, 1 Jul 1986-1 Jun 1993; Dyess AFB, TX, 1 Jun 1993-.

Aircraft:  AR type, 1918; Sopwith 1, 1918; Salson 2, 1918-1919; included DH-4 and O-2 during period 1919-1927. O-2, 1928-1930; in addition to O-19, 1930-1935; included O-31 and C-1 during period 1930-1033; O-43,1934-1935; in addition to O-35, 1935-1937, and B-12, 1936-c. 1937, included O-27, OA-4, Y1OA-8, B-7, and B-10 during period 1935-1938; B-18, 1937-1940; B-17, 1939-1942; B-24, 1942-1945. B-29, 1946-1948; B-36, 1948-1958; B-52, 1958-.

Operations:  Combat as corps observation squadron with I, II, III, IV, and V Army Corps, 30 May-10 Nov 1918; subsequently served with VII Army Corps in occupation force, Nov 1918-May 1919. Participated in demonstrations of effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships, Jun-Sep 1921. Deployed for service in connection with civil disorders arising from West Virginia coal strike, Sep 1921. Dropped food and supplies and flew photographic missions on connection with flood-relief operations in central California, 12-13 Dec 1937. Air echelon under attack during its arrival in Hawaii, 7 Dec 1941; air echelon on combat while operating from Hawaii, Fiji Islands, and Australia, 9 Dec 1941-c. 14 Mar 1942; combat in CBI, 4 Jun 1942-10 Jun 1944 and 19 Oct 1944-10 May 1945; transported gasoline to China, 20 Jun-30 Sep 1944 and 17 Jun-18 Sep 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  World War I: Lorraine; Ile-de-France; Champagne-Marne; Aisne-Marne; Champagne; Oise-Aisne; St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Central Pacific; East Indies; Burma; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Thailand, 19 March 1945.

Emblem:  A rough rider in black in silhouette on an orange disc. (Approved 2 Feb 1924 from World War I emblem.)


436th BS Briefing


436th BS Briefing

Table of Contents



492nd Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


B-24J Serial # 42-73160, 492nd BS -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 80th Aero Squadron on 15 Aug 1917. Redesignated 492nd Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 13 Feb 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 492nd Bombardment Squadron which was constituted and allotted to the reserve on 31 Mar 1924. Disbanded on 31 May 1942. Consolidated (1960) with 492nd Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) which was constituted on 19 Sep 1942. Activated on 25 Oct 1942. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 492nd Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Jul 1948. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Feb 1963.

Assignments:  Unkn, 15 Aug 1917-Feb 1918; Headquarters, Air Service, Service of Supply, Feb-Dec 1918 (detachment attached to Second Aviation Instruction Center, 25 Apr-9 Dec 1918); Unkn 9 Dec 1918-13 Feb 1919; 7th Bombardment Group, 25 Oct 1942-6 Jan 1946; 7th Bombardment Group 1 Oct 1946; 7th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952; 4228th Strategic Wing, 15 June 1959-1 Feb 1963.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 15 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 3-22 Nov 1917; Tours, France 17 Dec 1917; Brest, France, c. 30 Dec 1918 - c. 19 Jan 1919; Garden City, NY, c. 31 Jan-13 Feb 1919; Seattle, Wash, 31 Mar-31 May 1942; Karachi, India, 25 Oct 1942; Gaya, India, 14 Nov 1942; Bishinupur, India 26 Feb 1943; Panagarah, India, 25 Apr 1943; Madhaiganj, India, 22 Jan 1944; Tezgaon, India, 17 Jun 1944; Madhaiganj, India, 6 Oct 1944 (detachment at Luliang, China, ferrying gasoline to Suichwan, China, 20 Dec 1944-30 Jan 1945); Tezpur, India, 1 Jun-7 Dec 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1945; Ft Worth AAFld, Tex, 1 Oct 1946; Columbus AFB, Miss, 15 June 1959 - 1 Feb 1963.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1942-1945; B-29, 1946-1948; B-36, 1948-1958; B-52, 1958-1963.

Operations:  Constructed and maintained facilities, Jan-Dec 1918. Apparently never active during period 1924-1942 when allotted to the reserve with assignment to Ninth Corps Area and designated station at Seattle, Wash. Combat in CBI, 24 Jan 1943-10 Jun 1944 and 19 Oct 1944-10 May 1945; transported gasoline to forward bases in China, 20 Jun-30 Sep 1944 and 20 Jun-18 Sep 1945.

Service Streamers:  Theater of Operations.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Thailand, 19 Mar 1945; Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 6 Oct 1959 - 15 Jul 1960.

Emblem:  On a disc, light blue edged dark blue, in front and above clouds white in base, a personalized bee, body and wings natural, legs enclosed in boxing gloves red, wearing goggles over a red cap, observing through a telescope black, and standing on a bomb blue, flying through space. (Approved 28 Feb 1952.)


Other Sites of Interest:

7th Bomb Wing B-36 Association

 492nd Bombardment Squadron History

Table of Contents



493d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 493 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 Sep 1942. Activated on 25 Oct 1942. Redesignated as 493 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 6 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with 93 Air Refueling Squadron, Medium, which was constituted on 2 Feb 1949. Activated on 1 Mar 1949. Redesignated as: 93 Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Feb 1955; 93 Air Refueling Squadron on 1 Sep 1991. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1995. Activated on 31 Mar 1995.

Assignments:  7 Bombardment Group, 25 Oct 1942-6 Jan 1946. 93 Bombardment Group, 1 Mar 1949 (attached to 93 Bombardment Wing, 15 Jul 1950-30 Jan 1951 and 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 93 Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952; 93 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991; 398 Operations Group, 1 Jun 1992-31 Mar 1995. 92 Operations Group, 31 Mar 1995-.

Stations:  Karachi, India, 25 Oct 1942; Pandaveswar, India, 7 Jan 1943; Tezgaon, India, 17 Jun 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 5 Oct 1944 (detachment at Luliang, China, 17 Dec 1944-26 Jan 1945); Dudhkundi, India, 31 Oct 1945; Kanchrapara, India, 19 Nov 1945; Camp Angus (near Calcutta), India, 25 Nov-7 Dec 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946. Castle AFB, CA, 1 Mar 1949-31 Mar 1995 (operated from Upper Heyford RAF, England, 9 Dec 1951-6 Mar 1952; Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, 1 Apr-15 May 1954; Ernest Harmon AFB, Newfoundland, 29 Jun-14 Aug 1954; Thule AB, Greenland, 19 Jan-c. 15 Mar 1955; Elmendorf AFB, AK, 2 Nov 1955-5 Jan 1956 and 27 Sep-c. 24 Dec 1956). Fairchild AFB, WA, 31 Mar 1995-.

Commanders:  1Lt Harold K. Trinkle, 25 Oct 1942; Maj Wesley Werner, c. 1 Jan 1943; Capt Robert C. Bailey, c. 6 Nov 1943; Lt Col James McKee, 17 Aug 1945; unkn, Oct 1945-6 Jan 1946. Unkn, 1 Mar 1949; Lt Col Barnett S. Allen, 22 Mar 1949; Lt Col Jean B. Miller, by Sep 1950; Lt Col Arthur S. Cresswell, by Sep 1951; Lt Col Walter S. Shackleford Jr., by 30 Sep 1952; Lt Col Ralph V. Miller, Jan 1954; Lt Col Frank G. Latawiec, 1 May 1954; Lt Col Kenneth R. Rea, 25 Mar 1957; Lt Col Eldridge G. Shelton Jr., Nov 1958; Lt Col Douglas H. Smith, Oct 1959; Lt Col Edward B. Fitch, Jul 1963; Lt Col John A. Decker, by 30 Sep 1964; Lt Col Robert L. Weston, by 31 Mar 1968; Lt Col Paul Echabarns, by 31 Oct 1968; Lt Col Claude D. Lamb, 15 Jul 1969; Lt Col William A. Kevan, 2 Nov 1970; Lt Col Ted M. McLean, 1 Aug 1971; Lt Col Donald L. Kope, 24 Nov 1972; Lt Col Vess J. Taylor, 20 Nov 1974; Lt Col Alan Kessler, 2 Sep 1975; Lt Col Richard J. Cappell, 1 Mar 1976; Lt Col Martin F. Lapp, 28 Dec 1976; Lt Col William R. Borowski, 5 Jul 1978; Lt Col Charles M. Millar Jr., 20 Jul 1979; Lt Col John D. Lunt, 13 May 1981; Lt Col Bruce R. Johnson, by 14 May 1982; Lt Col Larry A. Bell, 1 Aug 1984; Lt Col William J. Howard, 11 Jul 1985; Lt Col George R. Thomson, 23 Mar 1986; Lt Col Stephen R. Lorenz, 17 Aug 1987; Lt Col George J. Sweetnam Jr., 30 Jun 1989; Lt Col Marc B. Stormont, 1 Jul 1991; Lt Col David L. Cramer, 21 Jun 1994; Lt Col Frederick L. Jaklitsch, 1 Jul 1994; Lt Col Casey L. Henkle, 18 Dec 1995; Lt Col Robert E. Parker, 22 Jan 1997; Lt Col Stephen Bernard, 27 Feb 1998; Lt Col Edward M. Minahan, 13 Jun 2000; Lt Col David F. Ellis, 30 May 2002; Lt Col Darren Hartford, 15 Jun 2004; Lt Col Glenn B. LeMasters, 12 Jun 2006; Lt Col Patrick J. Rhatigan, 20 Mar 2008; Lt Col Fred R. Cunningham, 30 Jun 2009-.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1943-1945. KB-29, 1950-1953; KC-97, 1953-1957; KC-135, 1957-.

Operations:  Activated in non-operational status in India on 25 Oct 1942. Became operational with B-24s on 7 Jan 1943. Attacked communications, oil refineries, Japanese military targets, naval vessels, and troop concentrations in Burma from Jan 1943 to Jan 1944. Transported gasoline to forward bases in China, Jun-Oct 1944 in support of Operation MATTERHORN. In early 1945, dropped radio-controlled JB-2 azimuth only (AZON) bombs, an early type of a precision-guided munition, on rail lines and bridges in Burma. Dropped propaganda leaflets in Burma, Jun-Sep 1945. Inactivated in early Jan 1946. Activated on 1 Mar 1949 but not manned until Sep 1950. Received KB-29 tankers in Oct 1950, became combat ready in Oct 1951, and participated in deployment of 93 Bombardment Wing to the United Kingdom, Dec 1951-Mar 1952. Converted from KB-29s to KC-97s in Nov-Dec 1953. Provided air refueling of parent wing bombers for their wartime mission, training, exercises and overseas deployments. Converted to KC-135s in May 1957. Ceased KC-135 aircrew training on 1 Jul 1959 (the 924th Air Refueling Squadron picked up that function), but after Aug 1963, (when the 924th Air Refueling Squadron was inactivated), the 93 Air Refueling Squadron began conducting KC-135 aircrew training for all Strategic Air Command KC-135 aircrews as primary mission along with its continuing air refueling mission. Routinely supported Alaskan, European, and Pacific tanker task forces. Refueled wing B-52s to support their wartime taskings; and other US Air Force, Navy, and Marine aircraft for routine training, operations, exercises, and worldwide contingencies that required tanker support. Following the 11 Sep 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, squadron tankers refueled combat aircraft for Operations NOBLE EAGLE, ENDURING FREEDOM, and IRAQI FREEDOM.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive. Southwest Asia: Liberation and Defense of Kuwait. Kosovo: Kosovo Air.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Thailand, 19 Mar 1945. Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Jun 2003-31 Dec 2005. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1956-1 Jul 1959; 1 Jun 1962-1 Apr 1963; 1 Apr 1973-30 Jun 1974; 1 Jul 1983-30 Jun 1985; 1 Jul 1988-30 Jun 1990; 2 Aug 1990-11 Apr 1991; 1 Jun 2001-31 May 2003; 1 Jan 2006-31 Aug 2007; 1 Sep 2007-31 Aug 2008.

Emblem (Current):  Azure, a Pegasus ascending bendwise sinister Argent above a demi-globe issuant from sinister base of the first gridlined Or, a mullet of eight in sinister chief White; all within a diminished bordure Gules. MOTTO: DOMINI ARTIS-Masters of the Art. Approved on 9 Dec 1994; replaced emblem approved on 22 Jun 1955 (152926 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, Honors, and Emblem through 18 Apr 2012.

Table of Contents



8th Photographic Reconnaissance Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 8 Photographic Reconnaissance Group on 15 Sep 1943. Activated on 1 Oct 1943. Redesignated as: 8 Photographic Group, Reconnaissance on 9 Oct 1943; 8 Reconnaissance Group on 15 Jun 1945. Inactivated on 5 Nov 1945. Disbanded on 6 Mar 1947. Reconstituted, and redesignated as 318 Electronic Warfare Group, on 31 Jul 1985. Redesignated as 318 Information Operations Group on 17 Jul 2000. Activated on 1 Aug 2000.

Assignments:  III Reconnaissance Command, 1 Oct 1943; 89 Reconnaissance Training Wing, 27 Oct 1943; Tenth Air Force, c. 31 Mar 1944; Army Air Forces (AAF), India-Burma Sector, China-Burma-India Theater (later, AAF, India-Burma Theater), 18 Jul 1944; Army Service Forces, c. 8 Oct-5 Nov 1945. Air Force Information Warfare Center, 1 Aug 2000; 688 Information Operations Wing, 18 Aug 2009-.

Squadrons:  9 Photographic Reconnaissance: 25 Apr 1944-Oct 1945. 20 Tactical Reconnaissance: 25 Apr 1944-Oct 1945. 24 Combat Mapping: 25 Apr 1944-Sep 1945. 40 Photographic Reconnaissance: 18 Jul 1944-Nov 1945. 23: 1 Aug 2000-. 39: 1 Aug 2000-. 92 Information Warfare Aggressor: 1 Nov 2000-. 346 Test: 1 Aug 2000-. 453 Electronic Warfare: 1 Aug 2000-.

Commanders:  Lt Col Paul A. Zartman, 1 Oct 1943; Col Charles P. Hollstein, 12 Dec 1943; Col James W. Anderson Jr., 24 Jan 1945; Lt Col John R. Gee, Oct-c. 5 Nov 1945.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1943-1945; F-5, F-7, 1944-1945; F-6, 1945.

Stations:  Peterson AAFld, CO, 1 Oct 1943; Gainesville AAFld, TX, 26 Oct 1943-12 Feb 1944; Worli, India, c. 31 Mar 1944; Bally Seaplane Base, India, c. 15 Apr 1944-7 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 3-5 Nov 1945. Kelly AFB (later Kelly Fld Annex, Lackland AFB), TX, 1 Aug 2000-.

Operations:  Trained to provide photographic intelligence for air and ground forces. Moved to India, Feb-Mar 1944. Equipped with F-5, F-6, F-7, and P-40 aircraft which operated from various bases in India, Burma, and China. In addition to operational flying units, group consisted of a variety of components which performed combat camera, combat mapping, engineer topographic; and photo lab, intelligence, and technical functions. Group comprised the American portion of a combined AAF-Royal Air Force organization, the Photo Reconnaissance Force. Conducted photographic-reconnaissance, photographic-mapping, and visual- reconnaissance sorties. Produced maps, mosaics, terrain models, and target charts of areas in Burma, China, French Indochina, and Thailand. Also bombed and strafed enemy installations and provided escort for bombardment units. Returned to United States, Oct-Nov 1945, and inactivated on 5 Nov 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jun 2008-31 May 2009. Air Force Organizational Excellence Award: 1 Jun 2003-31 May 2004.

Emblem:  WWII: None.  Current: Approved on 1 Aug 2011.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 19 Nov 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Nov 1945.

Table of Contents



2nd Combat Camera Unit

Source:

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 2 Army Air Forces Combat Camera Unit on 4 Feb 1943. Activated on 12 Feb 1943. Redesignated as 2 Combat Camera Unit on 1 Aug 1945. Inactivated on 30 Nov 1945. Activated on 1 Jun 1949. Inactivated on 26 Sep 1949. Activated on 1 Sep 1950. Redesignated as 2 Photographic Squadron on 1 May 1951. Inactivated on 8 Jun 1954. Consolidated (1 Apr 1992) with the 1352 Audiovisual Squadron, which was designated, and activated, on 1 Oct 1985. Redesignated as: 1352 Audiovisual Squadron (Combat Camera) on 1 Feb 1990; 2 Combat Camera Squadron on 1 Apr 1992. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1996. Activated on 23 Oct 2009.

Assignments:  1 Motion Picture Unit, 12 Feb 1943; AAF, India-Burma Sector, c. 27 Jun 1944 (attached to 8 Photo Reconnaissance Group, Jul-26 Oct 1944; XX Bomber Command, 27 Oct 1944-c. Apr 1945); XXI Bomber Command, c. 8 Jun 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul-30 Nov 1945. 311 Air Division (attached to 91 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing), 1 Jun-26 Sep 1949. 2750 Air Base Wing, 1 Sep 1950; Air Pictorial Service, 5 Jun 1951; 4860 Photo (later, 1350 Photo) Group, 12 Feb 1952 (attached to Far East Air Forces, 24 Jul 1952-); Air Photographic and Charting Service, 1 Jan-8 Jun 1954 (remained attached to Far East Air Forces to 8 Jun 1954). Aerospace Audiovisual (later, Air Combat Camera) Service, 1 Oct 1985; 615 Air Mobility Operations Group, 22 Jul 1994-1 Apr 1996. Air Force Public Affairs Agency, 23 Oct 2009-.

Stations:  Culver City, CA, 12 Feb 1943-3 May 1944 (not manned, Feb-Aug 1943); Karachi, India, 27 Jun 1944; Bally, India, 10 Jul 1944; Tollygunge, India, Jul 1944; Kharagpur, India, Nov 1944; Hijli, India, Nov 1944-6 May 1945; Tinian, 8 Jun-30 Nov 1945. McGuire AFB, NJ, 1 Jun-26 Sep 1949. Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, 1 Sep 1950; Long Beach, CA, 15 Sep 1951; Lockheed Air Terminal, Burbank, CA, 1 Apr-16 Jun 1952; Yokota AB, Japan, 24 Jul 1952-8 Jun 1954. Norton AFB, CA, 1 Oct 1985; March AFB, CA, 4 Oct 1993-1 Apr 1996. Hill AFB, UT, 23 Oct 2009-.

Service Streamers:  World War II Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  Korea: Summer-Fall, 1952; Third Korean Winter; Summer, 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1986-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991. Air Force Organizational Excellence Award: 1 Jun 1991-31 May 1993.

Emblem:  Approved on 29 Mar 1995.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 27 Jan 2010.

Supersedes statement prepared on 22 Sep 1995.


Source:  1st Combat Camera Unit

In July 1994, the 1st and 2nd Combat Camera Squadrons were transferred to their respective Air Mobility Operations Groups (AMOG). AirACCS was inactivated on 30 September 1994 ending 43 years of outstanding duty to the USAF. By late 1996, the 2nd Combat Camera Squadron located at Travis AFB, CA was inactivated leaving the 1st Combat Camera Squadron at Charleston AFB, SC as the only active duty Combat Camera Squadron in the Air Force.


Other Sites of Interest:

58th Bomb Wing Memorial, New England Air Museum; Profile of Mr. Fred G. Baun, Jr

International Combat Camera Association, Inc; Member Roster (Mr. Charles E. Vanpelt)

Table of Contents



3d Photographic Technical Unit

Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (3d Intelligence Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted as 3 Photo Lab Section on 9 Oct 1943. Activated on 20 Oct 1943. Redesignated as 3 Photographic Technical Unit on 10 Nov 1944. Inactivated on 5 Nov 1945. Consolidated (16 Oct 1984) with the 8 Reconnaissance Technical Squadron, which was constituted on 25 Jan 1952. Activated on 16 Feb 1952. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1970. Redesignated as: 3 Reconnaissance Technical Squadron on 16 Oct 1984; 3 Intelligence Squadron on 6 Oct 2010. Activated on 1 Nov 2010.

Assignments:  74 Tactical Reconnaissance Group, 20 Oct 1943; Tenth Air Force, 22 Apr 1944; 8 Photographic Reconnaissance Group, 18 Jul 1944-5 Nov 1945. Eighth Air Force, 16 Feb 1952-31 Mar 1970. 480 Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Group, 1 Nov 2010-.

Stations:  Morris Fld, NC, 20 Oct 1943; Campbell AAFld, KY, 8 Nov 1943; Camp Patrick Henry, VA, 13-22 Feb 1944; India, 25 Apr 1944; Dinjan, India, ca. Jun 1944; Bally, India, ca. Nov 1944-7 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NY 3-5 Nov 1945. Carswell AFB, TX, 16 Feb 1952; Westover AFB, MA, 1 May 1955-31 Mar 1970. Fort Gordon, GA, 1 Nov 2010-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Burma; India-Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jul 1965-30 Jun 1966.

Emblem:  Approved on 30 Oct 1959, however the emblem does not meet current standards. The unit may submit a new design in accordance with AFI 84-105.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 1 Mar 2011.

Table of Contents



7th Photographic Technical Squadron

Source:

Mr. Bernie Shearon

CBIVA Sound-off, Spring 2000 Issue

Lineage:  Activated 16 Nov 1943 at Will Rogers Field, OK, inactivated 11 Jan 46, activated 10 Aug 48, inactivated 27 Jun 49, consolidated 16 Oct 84 with 497 Reconnaissance Technical Sq as 7th Reconnaissance Technical Sq redesignated 497th Intelligence Sq, activated unknown.

Assignments:  8th Photo Reconnaissance Gp 1944-unknown. 1 AF 1948-1949. Air Intel Agency unknown -1 Dec 03, 480 Intel Wg.

Stations:  Kharagpur, India -1944 Bally Seaplane Base -unknown. Rochester NY 1948-1949 (reserve unit manned mostly by employees of Kodak). Bolling AFB unknown-.


Source:  Ex-CBI Roundup, March 2000 Issue  (See CBI Unit Histories)

The 7th Photo Tech Squadron was activated 16 Sept 1943 at Will Rodgers Field, Oklahoma. Approximately 70 officers and 225 enlisted men boarded the SS Mariposa in San Pedro, CA, on 9 March 1944 and arrived in the harbor of Bombay on April 8, 1944. Then came the infamous train ride across India to Calcutta and into the plains of Bengal to a place called Gushkara. On 9 June 1944, the Squadron set up final housekeeping at Bally Seaplane Base just north of Calcutta.

The 7th Photo Tech Squadron was assigned to the 8th Photo Recon Group and therein became the Theater's major supplier of photographic prints, filling orders for photo interpretation, map production, bombing missions, etc.

The majority of the Squadron left Calcutta 12 December 1945 aboard the Gen. Muir, arriving in New York on 10 January 1946 and then on to Camp Kilmer, NJ. There the unit was disbanded.


Other Sites of Interest:

On The Ground Glass ~ 7th Photo Technical Squadron

Table of Contents



9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron


The lightning bolt represents the F-5, Photo Recon version of the P-38 Lightning.
The tiger (Burmese) represents the Theatre of Operation, China-Burma-India.
The Camera represents what they did, Photo Reconnaissance.


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 9 Photographic Squadron on 19 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Feb 1942. Redesignated as: 9 Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 9 Jun 1942; 9 Photographic Squadron (Light) on 6 Feb 1943; 9 Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 13 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 4 Dec 1945. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 9 Air Refueling Squadron, Medium, which was constituted on 24 Jul 1951. Activated on 1 Aug 1951. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 15 Dec 1965. Redesignated as 9 Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, on 12 Dec 1969. Activated on 1 Jan 1970. Inactivated on 27 Jan 1982. Activated on 1 Aug 1982. Redesignated as 9 Air Refueling Squadron on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  First Air Force, 1 Feb 1942; Tenth Air Force, 29 Mar 1942 (flight attached to Fourteenth Air Force, 10 Mar-12 Jul 1943); Army Air Forces, India-Burma Sector, 30 Oct 1943 (attached to 5306 Photographic and Reconnaissance Group [Provisional], 30 Oct 1943-17 Jan 1944, and to Tenth Air Force, 17 Jan-6 Mar 1944); Tenth Air Force, 7 Mar 1944; 8th Photographic (later, 8 Reconnaissance) Group, 25 Apr 1944; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, c. Oct-4 Dec 1945. 9 Bombardment Group, 1 Aug 1951 (attached to 43 Bombardment Wing, 1 Aug-3 Sep 1951; 36th Air Division, 4 Sep 1951-14 Jan 1952; 303 Bombardment Wing, 15 Jan 1952-); 9 Bombardment (later, 9 Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-15 Dec 1965 (remained attached to 303 Bombardment Wing, to 30 Apr 1953; attached to 5 Air Division, 18 Apr-16 Jul 1955; SAC Liaison Team, 2 May-1 Jul 1956). 456 Strategic Aerospace (later, 456th Bombardment) Wing, 1 Jan 1970; 17 Bombardment Wing, 30 Sep 1975; 100 Air Refueling Wing, 30 Sep 1976-27 Jan 1982. 22 Bombardment (later, 22 Air Refueling) Wing, 1 Aug 1982; 22 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991; 722 Operations Group, 1 Jan 1994; 60 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1994-.

Stations:  Mitchel Field, NY, 1 Feb 1942; Bradley Field, CT, 10 Mar 1942; Felts Field, WA, 16 Apr-18 May 1942; Karachi, India, 24 Jul 1942 (flight at Kunming, China, Nov 1942-12 Jul 1943, with detachment thereof operating from Kweilin, China, c. Feb-12 Jul 1943); Chakulia, India, 30 Nov 1942 (detachment operated from Dinjan, India, 18 Mar-Jul 1943); Pandaveswar, India, 3 Jan 1943 (detachment operated from Dinjan, India, c. Sep 1943-20 May 1944); Barrackpore, India, 29 Oct 1943 (detachment operated from Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 16 Aug-30 Nov 1944, and from Myitkyina, Burma, 27 Nov-c. 5 Dec 1944; another detachment operated from Chittagong, India, c. 9 Oct-21 Dec 1944); Myitkyina, Burma, c. 5 Dec 1944; Piardoba, India, c. 1 May 1945; Malir, India, c. Oct-c. 14 Nov 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 3-4 Dec 1945. Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, 1 Aug 1951; Mountain Home AFB, ID, 1 May 1953-15 Dec 1965 (deployed at Benguerir AB, French Morocco, 18 Apr-16 Jul 1955; Elmendorf AFB, AK, 2 May-1 Jul 1956). Beale AFB, CA, 1 Jan 1970-27 Jan 1982. March AFB, CA, 1 Aug 1982; Travis AFB, CA, 1 Sep 1994-.

Commanders:  2Lt Vincent P. Keenan (Acting), 20 Jan 1942; Capt Edwin Kessler, 28 Feb 1942; Capt Dale L. Swartz, 10 Mar 1942; Capt Edwin Kessler (Acting), 12 Apr 1942; Capt Dale L. Swartz, 16 Apr 1942; Capt Edwin Kessler, 18 May 1942; Col Jerald W. McCoy, 1 Aug 1942; Maj Dale L. Swartz, 4 Jan 1943; Maj Henry E. Miller Jr., 7 Dec 1943; Capt John E. Buffin, 17 Jun 1944; Maj Paul Turner Jr., 27 Jun 1944; Maj MacArthur Gorton Jr., 25 Jan 1945; Capt Walter R. Thompson, 21 Mar 1945; Maj MacArthur Gorton Jr., 31 Mar 1945; Maj Paul H. Ponder Jr., 15 May 1945; Capt Joseph P. Lezon Jr.,25 Aug-4 Dec 1945. Lt Col Russell F. Ireland, 1 Aug 1951; Maj Jack N. Fancher, 11 Oct 1951; Lt Col John B. Stokes, 2 Nov 1951; Maj C. C. Gifford, by May 1953; Maj Edward H. Dvorak, by 30 Sep 1953; Lt Col Max W. Rogers, 19 Mar 1954; Lt Col William B. Becklund, 1 Sep 1958; Lt Col Donald S. Seeley, 27 Apr 1959; Lt Col William B. Becklund, by 30 Sep 1960; Lt Col Roy J. Sousley Jr., by 31 Jul 1962; Lt Col Carl E. Rice, by 30 Sep 1964-15 Dec 1965. Lt Col Clarence W. Thomas, c. 1 Jan 1970; Lt Col Richard D. Jenkins, 4 Jan 1971; Lt Col Allan J. Surridge, 1 Apr 1971; Lt Col William C. Walker, 15 Aug 1971; l Lt Col Louis C. Wagner, 9 Oct 1971; Lt Col James G. Dunham, 6 Jun 1972; Lt Col Joe H. Snow, 3 Mar 1973; Lt Col Douglas A. Jewett, 1 Feb 1974; Lt Col William R. Borlowski, 1 Sep 1976; Lt Col Melvin U. Edens, 20 Sep 1977; Lt Col Curtis R. Archer Jr., 8 Oct 1978; Lt Col Larry D. Sykes, 30 Nov 1979; Lt Col Donald E. Brice, 1 Aug 1980; Lt Col. Charles P. Rushforth III, 13 Mar 1981- 27 Jan 1982. Lt Col. Donald E. Bruce, 1 Aug 1982; Lt Col. Joseph M. Hudson, 19 Nov 1982; Lt Col. Stephen L. Toles, 12 Aug 1984; Lt Col. Arthur J. Lichte, 26 Jun 1986; Lt Col. Thomas Dooley, 1 Jul 1988; Lt Col. James N. Christian, 23 Mar 1990; Lt Col. Leo A. Brownyard, 28 Mar 1991; Lt Col. Bernard H. Fullenkamp, 27 May 1992, Lt Col. Ronald D. Jones, 2 Jun 1993; Lt Col. Paul J. Selva, 1 Sep 1994; Lt Col. Daniel A. Hale, 24 Apr 1995; Lt Col. Michelle D. Johnson, 18 Jun 1996; Lt Col. Richard Trasker, 18 Jun 1998; Lt Col. Martin J. Wojtysiak, 11 Jun 1999; Lt Col. Mark Simon, 21 Jun 2000; Lt Col. Bruce A. VanSkiver, 21 Jun 2001; Lt Col. Marshall T. Morrison, 30 Jun 2003; Lt Col. Kurt W. Meidel, 16 Jun 2005; Lt Col. Matt J. Lloyd, 7 Jun 2007; Lt Col. Johnny L. Barnes II, 10 Apr 2009-.

Aircraft:  In addition to F-4, 1942-1944, and F-5, 1943-1945, included B-25, 1943-1945. KB-29, 1951-1954; KC-97, 1954-1965. KC-135, 1970-1982. KC-10, 1982-.

Operations:  Combat photo reconnaissance in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater of Operations, 1 Dec 1942-14 Apr 1945. Worldwide air refueling, Aug 1951-Dec 1965, Jan 1970-Jan 1982, and Aug 1982-, including support during the rescue of US nationals in Grenada in 1983, support for deployments to Southwest Asia, 1990-1991, and humanitarian airlift missions to Somalia in support of Operation Restore Hope, 1992-1993. Worldwide air refueling and airlift to Southwest Asia, 2001-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: New Guinea; Central Pacific; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive. Kosovo: Kosovo Air.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  1 Jul 2005-30 Jun 2007. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1957-31 Jan 1958; 1 Aug 1982-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Aug 1995-30 Jul 1997;1 Jul 1997-30 Jun 1999; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jul 2005; 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2009.

Emblem (9th ARS):  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Blue border fimbriated Red, a Red elliptical globe, rimmed and grid lined White. Issuing from the rim in sinister and arced to form the figure 9, a spiraling White contrail terminating below a Red and White ascending flight symbol. MOTTO: UNIVERSAL. Approved on 19 Jul 1971 (KE 42628); replaced emblem approved on 2 Dec 1954 (K 8810).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Aircraft, Commanders, Operations and Honors through 25 May 2010.


Source:


Unsubmitted Insignia

"Official" Unofficial Insignia

As indicated in the official squadron lineage, the squadron never had an official emblem.

There is some evidence that someone asked the Walt Disney Studios to design a squadron emblem, and the result was a fire breathing green dragon on a stylized sun orb, holding a camera, with a Japanese flag in the lower foreground. It was very complicated and not easily reproduced for such use as aircraft markings and jacket patches. In any event, it apparently never was submitted for approval or presented to the squadron.

Several of the squadron members had ideas for what they would like the squadron emblem to be, but no one came up with a suggestion that pleased all. Lt. Bill Tucker, working in the operations office, took several of the many suggestions and produced a rough sketch of an emblem. The Indian embroidery and leather merchants then produced what would become the squadron emblem, used on at least one aircraft and on flying jackets and elsewhere. No written description has been found, so it must be assumed that on a sky blue background, a caricature of a tiger (for India or Bengal) rides a lightning bolt (for the F-4/F-5 Lightning aircraft) carrying a camera (for the photo mission). Three bursts of antiaircraft fire speak for the Japanese opposition. The emblem apparently never was submitted for official approval.

Because no approved original exists, subsequent versions of the emblem have differed somewhat, although the basic features remained largely unchanged. Prior to the seventh annual unit reunion in October 1991, John Buffin had a commercial artist develop a finished version of the emblem, and that version is reproduced with this history. It will henceforth be the "official" unofficial unit emblem.

-- Mr. William H. Greenhalgh


Source:  9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron Online

9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron Designations:

  • 30 January 1942: Activated as 9th Photographic Squadron (Reconn). G.O. No. 12, Air Base Hq., Mitchel Field, NY, 30 Jan 42.

  • 9 June 1942: Redesignated 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Ltr., War Dept,. Adj. Gen. Office, 1 Mar 43.

  • 1 March 1943: Redesignated 9th Photographic Squadron. G.O. 12, Hw., 10th U.S. Air Force, 1 March 43.

  • 17 July 1943: Redesignated 9th Photographic Squadron (Light), G.O. #66, Hw., 10th U.S. Air Force, 17 Jul 43.

  • 13 November 1943: Redesignated 9th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron.

  • 4 December 1943: Redesignated 9th Photographic Squadron. G.O. #11, Hq., AAF, IBS, CBI, 4 Dec 43.

  • 4 December 1945: Inactivated.

Table of Contents



10th Combat Camera Unit

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Active by Nov 44, inactivated after 1 May 45, (if inactivated) activated by 1946, inactivated 7 Jan 50; consolidated 16 Oct 84 with 452nd Reconnaissance Technical Sq as 6th Reconnaissance Technical Sq.

Assignments:  XX Bomber Cd -unknown; Unknown 1946-18 Aug 48; 32 Composite Wg -1 Apr 49; Unknown -7 Jan 50.

Stations:  Hijli -unknown; Kharagpur -after May 45; Kadena AB 1946-1950.

Table of Contents



17th AAF Photo Intelligence Detachment

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated c. Nov 43; disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  Army Air Forces, CBI

Stations:  Bally Seaplane Base.
Det, 10th AF Hq - Tinsukia, Myitkyina, Bhamo
Det - Dinjan, India

Table of Contents



20th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron


20th HS

20th HS


Bench located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 20 Observation Squadron (Light) on 5 Feb 1942. Activated on 2 Mar 1942. Redesignated as: 20 Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 20 Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter) on 2 Apr 1943; 20 Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 27 Nov 1945. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 20 Helicopter Squadron, which was constituted on 24 Feb 1956. Activated on 9 Jul 1956. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 8 Mar 1960. Activated on 24 Sep 1965. Organized on 8 Oct 1965. Redesignated as 20 Special Operations Squadron on 1 Aug 1968. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1972. Activated on 1 Jan 1976.

Assignments:  Air Force Combat Command, 2 Mar 1942; Army Air Forces, 9 Mar 1942; 76 Observation (later, 76 Reconnaissance; 76 Tactical Reconnaissance) Group, 12 Mar 1942; III Reconnaissance Command, 23 Aug 1943; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Sector, 26 Dec 1943 (attached to 5306 Photographic and Reconnaissance Group [Provisional], 26 Dec 1943-17 Jan 1944, and to Tenth Air Force, 17 Jan-7 Mar 1944); Tenth Air Force, 7 Mar 1944 (attached to 5320 Air Defense Wing [Provisional], Mar-May 1944); 8 Photographic (later, 8 Reconnaissance) Group, 25 Apr 1944; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, Oct-27 Nov 1945. Eighteenth Air Force, 9 Jul 1956 (attached to 314 Troop Carrier Wing, 9 Jul 1956-); Ninth Air Force, 1 Sep 1957-8 Mar 1960 (remained attached to 314 Troop Carrier Wing to 16 Jul 1959; attached to 354 Tactical Fighter Wing, 16 Jul 1959-8 Mar 1960). Pacific Air Forces, 24 Sep 1965; 2 Air Division, 8 Oct 1965 (attached to 6250 Combat Support Group, c. 10 Dec 1965-8 Mar 1966); 14 Air Commando (later, 14 Special Operations) Wing, 8 Mar 1966; 483 Tactical Airlift Wing, 1 Sep 1971-1 Apr 1972. 1 Special Operations Wing, 1 Jan 1976; 1 Special Operations (later, 16 Operations; 1 Special Operations) Group, 22 Sep 1992; 27 Special Operations Group, 1 Dec 2009-.

Stations:  Savannah AB, GA, 2 Mar 1942; Pope Field, NC, 28 Mar 1942; Vichy AAFld, MO, 14 Dec 1942; Morris Field, NC, 8 May 1943; Key Field, MS, 31 Aug-8 Nov 1943; Camp Anza, CA, 11-c. 17 Nov 1943; Bombay, India, 26 Dec 1943; Camp Deolali, India, 28 Dec 1943; Gushkara, India, 5 Jan 1944 (flight operated from Kisselbari, India, 6-25 Mar 1944); Kisselbari, India, 26 Mar 1944 (operated from Dinjan, India, 1 May-20 Jun 1944; detachment at Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 21 May-20 Jun 1944; Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 21 Jun-c. 10 Nov 1944; detachment at Myitkyina, Burma, 10 Jul-c. 25 Aug 1944); Myitkyina, Burma, c. 9 Nov 1944 (flight operated from Akyab, Burma, 12 Apr-22 May 1945); Nagaghuli, India, c. 20 Apr 1945; Dergaon, India, 6 Jul 1945; Piardoba, India, Sep-4 Nov 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 26-27 Nov 1945. Sewart AFB, TN, 9 Jul 1956; Myrtle Beach AFB, SC, 16 Jul 1959-8 Mar 1960. Tan Son Nhut AB, South Vietnam, 8 Oct 1965; Nha Trang AB, South Vietnam, 15 Jun 1966; Tuy Hoa AB, South Vietnam, 5 Sep 1969; Cam Ranh Bay AB, South Vietnam, 25 Sep 1970-1 Apr 1972. Eglin AF Auxiliary Field No. 9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 1 Jan 1976; Cannon AFB, NM, 1 Dec 2009 -.

Commanders:  Unkn, 2 Mar 1942; Capt Thomas H. Verdel Jr., 20 Apr 1942; Capt Kenneth T. Rooney, 2 May 1942; Maj Andre T. McMillin, 24 Aug 1942-unkn; Maj William R. Fornof, c. Aug 1943; Maj John D. Reid, c. Apr-c. Aug 1945; unkn, Aug-27 Nov 1945. Maj James F. Fowler, 9 Jul 1956; Maj Gregg D. Hartley, 28 Aug 1956; Lt Col Oscar N. Tibbetts, 7 Oct 1958; Maj Gregg D. Hartley, 25 Jan 1959; Capt Bennie F. Lemoine, 25 Jan-8 Mar 1960. None (not manned), 8 Oct-9 Dec 1965; Lt Col Lawrence R. Cummings, c. 10 Dec 1965; Lt Col Charles O. Smith, Nov 1966; Lt Col Johnny T. Williams, 25 Nov 1966; Lt Col John W. Amidon, Feb 1967; Lt Col John M. Steen, Oct 1967; Lt Col William B. Skinner, May 1968; Lt Col James A. McMullen, 14 Nov 1968; Lt Col Frank A. DiFiglia, 1 Dec 1968; Lt Col David K. Sparks, 26 Mar 1969; Lt Col Stephen Von Phul, 18 Nov 1969; Lt Col Alexander G. Edgar, 3 Jan 1970; Lt Col Harmon M. Brotnov, 6 Nov 1970; Lt Col Alfred G. Houston, Aug 1971; Maj Alan L. Taylor, 13 Oct 1971; Lt Col Meredith S. Sutton, 24 Nov 1971-1972. Lt Col Robert E. Mayo, Jan 1976; Lt Col John R. Roberts, 1 Jan 1978; Lt Col G. E. Borinski, 1 Jan 1980; Lt Col W. E. Takacs, 18 Aug 1980; Lt Col W. D. Corder, 10 Aug 1982; Lt Col W. W. Grant, 16 Jul 1984; Lt Col H. E. Johnson, 2 Jul 1986; Lt Col G. L. Weikel, 10 Jul 1988; Lt Col Richard Comer, 11 Jun 1990; Lt Col Russell E. Rakip, 8 Jun 1992; Lt Col Donald L. Hoover, 10 Jun 1994; Lt Col Michael C. Homan, 26 Jun 1995; Lt Col Thomas E. Hull, 30 Aug 1996; Lt Col John S. Hester III, 30 Jul 1998; Lt Col Thomas J. Trask, 16 Jul 1999; Lt Col Michael J. Kingsley, 1 Feb 2001; Lt Col Marshall B. Webb, 27 Jun 2002; Lt Col Richard Williams, 30 Jun 2003; Lt Col Scott A. Howell, 1 Jun 2005; Lt Col Vincent K. Becklund, 11 Jan 2007-unkn; none (not manned), 2009-14 Jan 2010; Lt Col Matthew D. Smith, 15 Jan 2010; Lt Col Thomas B. Palenske, 29 Apr 2011-.

Aircraft:  A-20, DB-7, L-1, L-4, and P-43, 1942-1943; P-40, 1942-1945; L-5, 1942-1945; B-25, 1942-1945; P-51/F-6, 1945. H-21, 1956-1960. CH-3, 1965-1969; UH-1, 1967-1972. UH-1, 1976-1985; CH-3, 1976-1980; MH-53, 1980-2008; CV-22, 2009-.

Operations:  Trained in aerial reconnaissance, Mar 1942-Nov 1943. Combat in China-Burma-India (CBI), 31 Jan 1944-5 May 1945. Trained using special operations helicopters, 1956-1960. Combat in Southeast Asia, Dec 1965-Mar 1972. Trained in special operations and conducted humanitarian missions, 1976-. Combat in Panama, Dec 1989-Jan 1990, and Kuwait, Jan-Feb 1991. Performed conventional and unconditional warfare missions as well as psychological operations, 1992-. Responded to initial recovery efforts on 11 Sep 2001 when terrorist attacked the Pentagon and the World Trade Center in New York City, NY. Deployed personnel to Operation Iraqi Freedom; provided adverse weather infiltration/exfiltration, fire support, combat search and rescue (CSAR), and transported cargo to coalition forces in the field, c. 2000-2008. Operated CV-22 Osprey aircraft in support of special operations, 2009-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive. Vietnam: Vietnam Defensive; Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII; Vietnam Ceasefire. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait. Kosovo: Air Campaign.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citations: (Southeast Asia), 8 Mar 1966-7 Mar 1967; 1 Jun 1967-31 Mar 1972; 21 Jun 1968-30 Jun 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 10 Jan-12 Mar 1966; 1 Nov 1966-1 Apr 1967; 16 Jun 1967-20 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1970-30 Jun 1971; 1 Sep 1971-31 Dec 1971; 1 May 1982-30 Apr 1984; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2005; 1 Sep 2006-30 Jun 2007. Gallant Unit Citation: 6 Oct 2001-30 May 2003. Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Jul 2007-31 Mar 2009. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1976-31 Mar 1977; 6 Nov 1978-2 Mar 1979; 15 Jul 1979-15 May 1980; 16 May 1980-30 Apr 1982; 1 May 1985-30 Apr 1987; 1 May 1988-30 Apr 1990; 16 Apr 1992-15 Apr 1994; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Sep 2004-31 Aug 2006. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Crosses with Palm: 1 Jan-30 Aug 1968; 16 Jun 1967-1 Apr 1972.

20th TRS Emblem:  On a disc white, bordure light magenta, a blue cloud formation in chief, emitting a stroke of lightning orange to sinister base; a caricatured figure wearing work clothes brown, boxing gloves tan, aviator's helmet red, and goggles white, black binoculars on string around neck, flowering to rear; astride a large aerial bomb blue, banded light green, falling diagonally across base to dexter. (Approved 31 Oct 1942.)

20th SOS Emblem:  Sable, a bend sinister Azure, charged on the sinister with nine mullets in bend sinister, eight Or above one Gules, debruised by a hornet Vert; each segment fimbriated of the third; all within a diminished bordure of the first. MOTTO: GREEN HORNETS. Approved on 9 Dec 1993 (DFSC 94-02308); replaced emblems approved on 7 Jul 1958 (K 10549), 22 May 1957 (9304 A.C.), and 31 Oct 1942 (K 2883).

20th SOS Emblem Significance:  Blue background represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The black disc denotes the night sky, which is the theater of operations of special operations units. The band represents the unit's heritage when organized in 1976 in tri-service support of an unconventional warfare mission. The stars reflect the nine primary functions of the unit and the nine aerospace employment principles of war. The red star signifies the unit's participation in Operation J-CATCH. The green hornet symbolizes the hovering capabilities of the rotary wing aircraft that the unit utilizes in a low-level environment. The hornet’s "stinger" denotes the gunship weaponry.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Aug 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2004.

Table of Contents



24th Combat Mapping Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 24th Photographic Mapping Squadron on 14 Jul 1942. Activated on 2 Sep 1942. Redesignated: 24th Photographic Squadron (Heavy) on 6 Feb 1943; 24th Combat Mapping Squadron on 11 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 15 Jun 1946. Redesignated 24th Reconnaissance Squadron (Very Long Range, Photographic-RCM) on 13 May 1947. Activated in the reserve on 12 Jul 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 24th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium, Photographic). Activated on 10 Oct 1951. Redesignated 24th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated 24th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium), and inactivated on 16 Jan 1953. Constituted 24 Feb 56 as 24th Helicopter Squadron, activated 9 Jul 56, discontinued and inactivated 8 Mar 60. Redesignated 24th Special Operations Squadron, activated 18 Mar 69, inactivated 1 Jul 75. Redesignated 24th Composite Squadron, activated 1 Jan 76, consolidated 19 Sep 85 with 24th Photographic Mapping Sq (later 24th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) (not activated) and 24th Attack-Bombardment Sq (Light), redesignated 24th Tactical Air Support Squadron unknown, inactivated 31 Mar 91.

Assignments:  5th Photographic (later Photographic Reconnaissance and Mapping; Photographic Reconnaissance) Group, 2 Sep 1942; Third Air Force, 9 Oct 1943; III Reconnaissance Command, 12 Oct 1943; AAF, India-Burma Sector, 26 Dec 1943 (attached to 5306th Photographic and Reconnaissance Group [Prov], 26 Dec 1943-17 Jan 1944, and to Tenth Air Force, 17 Jan-7 Mar 1944); Tenth Air Force, 7 Mar 1944; 8th Photographic (later Reconnaissance) Group, 25 Apr 1944; AAF, India-Burma Theater, 20 Sep 1945; Thirteenth Air Force, 28 Jan 1946; 313th Bombardment Wing, 1 Apr-15 Jun 1946. 68th Reconnaissance Group, 12 Jul 1947-27 Jun 1949. 68th Strategic Reconnaissance Group, 10 Oct 1951; 68th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952-16 Jan 1953. 18th Air Force 1956-12 Oct 56 (attached to 314th Troop Carrier Wing 1956-Oct 56), 315th Air Division -1960. 24th Special Operations Wing/Special Operations Group/Composite Group 1969-1975. 24th Composite Group/Composite Wing -1 Jan 87, 830th Air Division -1991.

Stations: Colorado Springs, Colo, 2 Sep 1942; Will Rogers Field, Okla, 13 Oct-8 Nov 1943; Guskhara, India, 5 Jan 1944 (detachments operated from Hsinching, China, 17 Mar-9 Apr 1944; Jorhat, India, 9-22 Apr 1944; Hsinching, China, 27 Apr-c. 1 Jul 1944; Liuchow, China, 10 Jul-22 Sep 1944; Chanyi, China, 22 Sep 1944-17 Feb 1945 [elements at Hsinching, China, Oct-Nov 1944, and at Pengshan, China, Nov 1944]; Tulihal and Cox's Bazaar, India, Feb-c. Apr 1945; air echelon at Clark Field, Luzon, after 18 Dec 1945; Kanchrapara, India, 27 Dec 1945-17 Jan 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 29 Jan-15 Jun 1946 (detachment operated from Sydney, Australia, Jan-15 Jun 1946). Hamilton Field, Calif, 12 Jul 1947-27 Jun 1949. Lake Charles AFB, La, 10 Oct 1951-16 Jan 1953. Sewart AFB, TN 1956-12 Oct 56, Tachikawa AB, Honshu, Japan -1960. Howard AB, Canal Zone (Panama) 1969-1975. Howard AB, Canal Zone (Panama) 1976-1991.

Aircraft:  B-24/F-7, 1943; in addition to F-7, 1944-1946, included B-25, 1944, and F-13, 1946. B-29, 1952-1953.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, Mar 1944-19 Apr 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Over and through a medium blue disc, wide border yellow orange, edged black, a caricatured wolf wearing rown aviator's helmet and shoes, yellow sweater, red gloves and trousers, and having brown revolver in holster about waist, running toward dexter, in front of a large, white cloud formation, holding a sheet of white paper in the right hand, pointing a black aerial camera toward base with the left forepaw, and leaving black horizontal speed lines to rear. (Approved 2 Apr 1945.)

Table of Contents



40th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated in NG as 103d Observation Squadron on 27 Jun 1924. Ordered to active service on 17 Feb 1941. Redesignated: 103d Observation Squadron (Medium) on 13 Jan 1942; 103d Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 103d Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter) on 2 Apr 1943; 103d Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Aug 1943; 40th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 21 Oct 1943. Inactivated on 2 Nov 1945. Redesignated 103d Bombardment Squadron, Light and allotted to the Air National Guard 24 May 46, activated 20 Dec 48, redesignated 103d Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Medium, Photographic 1 Aug 51, 103d Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Medium 16 Jun 52, 103d Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Heavy 16 Oct 52, inactivated 1 Jan 53. Reallocated to the ANG and redesignated 103d Fighter-Bomber Squadron, activated 1 Jan 53, redesignated 103d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 1 May 55, 103d Air Transport Squadron, Heavy 1 Apr 62, 103d Military Airlift Squadron 1 Jan 66, 103d Tactical Air Support Squadron 27 May 69, 103d Tactical Fighter Squadron unknown, 103d Fighter Squadron 31 Mar 92.

Assignments:  Pennsylvania NG (division aviation, 28th Division), 27 Jun 1924; II Army Corps, 17 Feb 1941; 59th Observation Group, 1 Sep 1941 (attached to 26th Observation Group after Dec 1941); 26th Observation (later Reconnaissance; Tactical Reconnaissance) Group, 29 Mar 1942; III Reconnaissance Command, 21 Oct 1943; I (later III) Tactical Air Division, 18 Apr 1944; AAF, India-Burma Sector, 3 Jun 1944; Tenth Air Force, 5 Jul 1944; 8th Photographic (later Reconnaissance) Group, 18 Jul 1944-2 Nov 1945. 111th Bombardment Gp (later 111th Composite Gp, 111th Bombardment Gp, 111th Strategic Reconnaissance Gp) 1948-16 Jun 52, 111th Strategic Reconnaissance Wg -1953. 111th Fighter-Bomber Gp (later 111th Fighter-Interceptor Gp, 111th Fighter Gp (Air Def), 111th Air Transport Gp, 111th Military Airlift Gp, 111th Tactical Air Support Gp, 111th Tactical Fighter Gp, 111th Fighter Gp, 111th Operations Gp) 1953-.

Stations:  Philadelphia, Pa, 27 Jun 1924; Harrisburg Muni Aprt, Pa, 27 Feb 1941; Hillsgrove, RI, 23 Dec 1941; Hyannis, Mass, 9 Jun 1942; Ft. Devens AAFld, Mass, 20 Aug 1942; Reading AAFld, Pa, 8 Jun 1943; Birmingham AAFld, Ala, 20 Nov 1943; Will Rogers Field, Okla, 11 Feb-11 May 1944; Guskhara, India, 10 Jul 1944; Alipore, India, 9 Aug 1944 (detachment at Cox's Bazaar, India, after c. 10 Dec 1944); Cox's Bazaar, India, 18 Jan 1945; Akyab, Burma, 14 Feb 1945; Alipore, India, c. 15 May 1945; Kanchrapara, India, Sep - c. 4 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-2 Nov 1945. Philadelphia Apt, PA 1948-Apr 51, Fairchild AFB, WA -1953. Philadelphia Intl Apt, PA -Jan 63, Willow Grove NAS JRB, PA.

Aircraft:  Evidently not equipped, 1924-1926; included JNS-1, PT-1, BT-1, O-1, O-2, O-11, and O-17 during period 1926-1932; primarily O-38 during period 1932-1937; in addition to O-46, c. 1937-c. 1942, O-47, c. 1938-c. 1943, and O-52, c. 1942- c. 1943, included O-38, 1937-1941, and O-49 and O-57, 1941-1942; evidently included P-39, P-40, and B-25 during period 1943-1944; primarily F-5, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Emergency operations while under state control included flood-relief in Pennsylvania, 19-22 mar 1936. Antisubmarine patrols, 27 Dec 1941-19 Aug 1942; combat in CBI, 6 Sep 1944-10 May 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a hurt a Pegasus salient or. (Approved 10 Apr 1931.)

Table of Contents



12th Bombardment Group


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 12 Bombardment Group, Light, on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 12 Bombardment Group (Medium) on 30 Dec 1941; 12 Bombardment Group, Medium, on 20 Aug 1944. Inactivated on 22 Jan 1946. Redesignated 12 Bombardment Group, Light, on 29 Apr 1947. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated 12 Fighter-Escort Group on 27 Oct 1950. Activated on 1 Nov 1950. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated: 12 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985; 12 Operations Group on 9 Dec 1991. Activated on 15 Dec 1991.

Assignments:  Northwest Air District (later, Second Air Force), 15 Jan 1941; IV Air Support Command, 3 Sep 1941; V Air Support Command, 21 Jan 1941; III Bomber Command, 18 Apr 1942; Ninth Air Force, 16 Aug 1942; Twelfth Air Force, 22 Aug 1943; XII Air Support Command, 1 Sep 1943; XII Bomber Command, 2 Jan 1944; Tenth Air Force, c. 21 Mar 1944; unkn, c. 24 Dec 1945-22 Jan 1946. Tactical Air Command, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 12 Fighter-Escort Wing, 1 Nov 1950-16 Jun 1952. 12 Flying Training Wing, 15 Dec 1991-.

Components

Squadron:  Squadron. 1 Flight Screening (later, Flying Training): 15 Dec 1991-1 Apr 1994. 3 Flying Training: 1 Apr 1994-7 Apr 2000. 21 Test and Evaluation: 15 Sep 1992-31 Mar 1994. 81 Bombardment (later, 559 Fighter-Escort; 559 Flying Training): 15 Jan 1941-22 Jan 1946; 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948; 1 Nov 1950-16 Jun 1952; 15 Dec 1991-. 82 Bombardment (later, 560 Fighter-Escort): 15 Jan 1941-22 Jan 1946; 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948; 1 Nov 1950-16 Jun 1952. 83 Bombardment (later, 561 Fighter-Escort): 15 Jan 1941-22 Jan 1946; 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948; 1 Nov 1950-16 Jun 1952. 19 Reconnaissance (later, 94 Bombardment; 94 Reconnaissance; 434 Bombardment): attached 15 Jan-13 Aug 1941, assigned 14 Aug 1941-22 Jan 1946. 99 Flying Training: 14 May 1993-. 435 Flying Training: 14 May 1998-1 Oct 2001. 557 Flying Training: 1 Jul 1993-1 Oct 2000. 558 Flying Training: 15 Dec 1992-1 Oct 1996; 16 Jan 2002-. 560 Flying Training: 15 Dec 1991-. 562 Flying Training: 14 May 1993-. 563 Flying Training: 14 May 1993-3 Jun 1996; 30 Apr 1999-. 3307 Test and Evaluation: 15 Dec 1991-15 Sep 1992.

Flight:  Flight. 332 Airlift: 15 Apr 1993-1 Apr 1997.

Stations:  McChord Fld, WA, 15 Jan 1941; Esler Fld, LA, c. 21 Feb-3 Jul 1942; Deversoir, Egypt, c. 31 Jul 1942; Egypt and Libya, Oct 1942; Medenine, Tunisia, 3 Apr 1943; Sfax, Tunisia, c. 15 Apr 1943; Hergla, Tunisia, 2 Jun 1943; Ponte Olivo, Sicily, c. 2 Aug 1943; Gerbini, Sicily, c. 22 Aug 1943; Foggia, Italy, c. 2 Nov 1943; Gaudo Afld, Italy, 19 Jan-6 Feb 1944; Tezgaon, India, c. 21 Mar 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 13 Jun 1944; Fenny, India, 16 Jul 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 8 Jun 1945; Karachi, India, 15 Nov-24 Dec 1945; Ft Lawton, WA, 21-22 Jan 1946. Langley Fld (later, AFB), VA, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Turner AFB, GA, 1 Nov 1950; Bergstrom AFB, TX, Dec 1950-16 Jun 1952. Randolph AFB, TX, 15 Dec 1991-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 15 Jan-5 May 1941; Col Charles G. Goodrich, 6 May 1941; Lt Col Curtis R. Low, 13 Sep 1942; Col Edward N. Backus, 16 Sep 1942; Lt Col William W. Wilcox, 21 Sep 1943; Col Lloyd H. Dalton, 29 Sep 1944; Lt Col Jack F. Marr, 1 Sep 1945; Lt Col Samuel C. Galbreath, 4 Sep 1945; Lt Col Lewis B. Wilson, 23 Sep 1945-22 Jan 1946. None (not manned), 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Unkn, 1-19 Nov 1950; Col Charles E. Gayle, 20 Nov 1950; none (not manned), 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952. Col Maurice L. McFann Jr., by 18 Dec 1991; Col David L. Hayes, 23 Oct 1992; Col Jeffrey B. Kohler, 27 Jul 1993; Col Johnny A. Weida, 21 Apr 1995; Col Daniel J. Darnell, 19 May 1997; Col Ted A. Hilbun, 23 Oct 1998; Col Stephen L. Hoog, 17 Feb 1999; Col James E. Moschgat, 18 Jul 2000; Col Margaret H. Woodward, 3 Jul 2002-.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; B-23, 1941-1942; PT-17, 1941-1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945. F-84, 1950-1951. T-37, 1991-; T-38, 1991-; T-39, 1991; T-41, 1992-1994; T-43, 1992-; C-21, 1993-1997; AT-38, 1993-2002; T-1, 1993-; T-3, 1994-1998; T-6, 2000-.

Operations:  After activation at McChord Fld, WA, in Jan 1941, the 12 Bombardment Group trained with B-18, B-23, and PT-17 aircraft. Patrolled west coast of United States after the Japanese attack on Hawaii. In Feb 1942, group moved to Esler Fld, LA, where it trained with B-25s for duty overseas. The group moved to North Africa in Jul and Aug 1942 and supported the Allied drive from Egypt to Tunisia. From Apr 1943, raided enemy-held islands in Mediterranean, including Pantelleria, Lampedusa, and Sicily. In Aug 1943, the group began to attack enemy targets on Italian mainland. From Nov until early Feb, group bombed airdromes, docks, marshalling yards, bridges, and other targets in Italy, Yugoslavia, and Albania. In Feb, Mar, and Apr 1944, moved to India and flew most of its missions in Burma between Apr 1944 and May 1945, supporting the British Fourteenth Army. When Allied forces at Imphal, India, were threatened by a Japanese offensive, the group delivered ammunition. Began training with A-26 aircraft in summer 1945. On return to United States in 1946, it was immediately inactivated. The 12 Bombardment Group, Light, was not manned, May 1947-Sep 1948. Briefly, 12 Fighter-Escort Group trained with F-84s, Dec 1950-Feb 1951, before being stripped of personnel and equipment. 12 Operations Group performed flight screening and undergraduate pilot training. Due to impending closure of Mather AFB, California, in 1992 group assumed undergraduate navigator training. Also, conducted specialized undergraduate pilot training. In 1995, began transition to joint navigator training.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Egypt-Libya; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: North Africa and Sicily, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 15-31 Dec 1991; 1 Jan 1992-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000.

Emblem:  Shield: Azure, a sword point to base or, hilt flamant proper; a bordure gyronny of twelve of the second and the first. Motto: Spiritus Omnia Vincit - Spirit Conquers All. Approved for 12 Group on 3 Feb 1942; slightly modified for 12 Wing on 15 Mar 1963.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 21 Oct 2004.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2002.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (12th Flying Training Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 12 Fighter-Escort Wing on 27 Oct 1950. Activated on 1 Nov 1950. Redesignated: 12 Strategic Fighter Wing on 20 Jan 1953; 12 Fighter-Day Wing on 1 Jul 1957. Inactivated on 8 Jan 1958. Redesignated 12 Tactical Fighter Wing, and activated, on 17 Apr 1962. Organized on 25 Apr 1962. Inactivated on 17 Nov 1971. Redesignated 12 Flying Training Wing on 22 Mar 1972. Activated on 1 May 1972.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 1 Nov 1950; Eighth Air Force, 5 Dec 1950; 42 Air Division, 9 Apr 1951-8 Jan 1958 (attached to 7 Air Division, 20 Jul-30 Nov 1951; 39 Air Division, 18 May-10 Aug 1953 and 10 May-7 Aug 1954). Tactical Air Command, 17 Apr 1962; Ninth Air Force, 25 Apr 1962; 836 Air Division, 1 Jul 1962; 2 Air Division, 8 Nov 1965; Seventh Air Force, 1 Apr 1966-17 Nov 1971. Air Training Command, 1 May 1972; Nineteenth Air Force, 1 Jul 1993-.

Components

Groups:  12 Fighter-Escort (later, 12 Operations): 1 Nov 1950-16 Jun 1952; 15 Dec 1991-.

Squadrons:  1 Flight Screening: 15 Jul-15 Dec 1991. 27 Air Refueling: attached 1 Apr-1 Sep 1955. 43 Tactical Fighter: attached 8 Nov 1965-c. 4 Jan 1966. 45 Tactical Fighter: attached 8 May-1 Jul 1962. 389 Tactical Fighter: 31 Mar 1970-15 Oct 1971. 391 Tactical Fighter: attached 26 Jan-22 Jun 1966, assigned 23 Jun 1966-22 Jul 1968. 480 Tactical Fighter: 31 Mar 1970-17 Nov 1971. 506 Air Refueling: attached 8 Aug 1955-1 Jul 1957. 555 Tactical Fighter: 8 Jan 1964-25 Mar 1966 (detached 8 Dec 1964-18 Mar 1965, 6 Nov 1965-25 Mar 1966). 557 Tactical Fighter: 25 Apr 1962-8 Nov 1965; 1 Dec 1965-31 Mar 1970. 558 Tactical Fighter: 25 Apr 1962-31 Mar 1970 (detached 9 Mar-16 Jun 1965, 3 Feb-22 Jul 1968). 559 Fighter-Escort (later, Strategic Fighter; Fighter-Day; Tactical Fighter): attached 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-8 Jan 1958; assigned 25 Apr 1962-8 Nov 1965 (detached 9 Jun-7 Sep 1965); assigned 27 Dec 1965-31 Mar 1970; assigned 1 May 1972-15 Dec 1991. 560 Fighter-Escort (later, Strategic Fighter; Fighter-Day): attached 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-8 Jan 1958. 560 Flying Training: 1 May 1972-15 Dec 1991. 561 Fighter-Escort (later, Strategic Fighter; Fighter-Day; Tactical Fighter): attached 10 Feb 1951-1 Apr 1952; assigned 16 Jun 1952-8 Jan 1958 (detached 16 Jun-16 Dec 1952).

School:  USAF Navigator: 14 May 1993-.

Stations:  Turner AFB, GA, 1 Nov 1950; Bergstrom AFB, TX, 5 Dec 1950-8 Jan 1958. MacDill AFB, FL, 25 Apr 1962-31 Oct 1965; Cam Ranh Bay AB, South Vietnam, 8 Nov 1965; Phu Cat AB, South Vietnam, 31 Mar 1970-17 Nov 1971. Randolph AFB, TX, 1 May 1972-.

Commanders:  Capt James M. Ross, 1 Nov 1950; Col Cy Wilson, 20 Nov 1950; Col Charles A. Gayle, 1 Apr 1952; Col Richard O. Hunziker, 4 Aug 1952; Col Howard G. Cook, 23 Apr 1954; Col Robert W. Stephens, 20 Jul 1956; Col William D. Dunham, 10 Aug 1956-8 Jan 1958. None (not manned), 17 Apr-13 May 1962; Col Harold M. McClelland, 14 May 1962; Col Raymond A. Bradley, 17 Jul 1965; Col Levi R. Chase, 8 Oct 1965; Col Jones E. Bolt, 18 Oct 1966; Col Joel D. Thorvaldson, Mar 1967; Col Woodard E. Davis Jr., 9 Apr 1967; Col Floyd White, 5 Apr 1968; Col Ramon R. Melton, 7 Apr 1969; Col Harry B. Trimble, 31 Mar 1970; Col Larry M. Killpack, 13 Apr 1970; Col Ralph S. Parr, 4 Oct 1970; Col Richard H. Schoeneman, 19 Feb 1971; Col Albert L. Melton, 4 Oct-17 Nov 1971. Col Hoyt S. Vandenberg Jr., 1 May 1972; Brig Gen Malcolm E. Ryan, 14 Aug 1972; Col John P. Rollston, 1 Nov 1973; Col Kenneth R. Fleenor, 30 Jun 1975; Brig Gen Edward N. Giddings, 10 Apr 1978; Brig Gen Wilson C. Cooney, 18 Jun 1980; Brig Gen Billy J. Rhoten, 10 Jul 1981; Col Hector M. Cuellar, 10 Feb 1983; Col Ralph R. Rohatsch Jr., 5 Feb 1985; Col Nicholas B. Kehoe III, 18 Mar 1987; Col Ronnie K. Morrow, 4 Aug 1988; Col Lloyd W. Newton, 25 May 1990; Brig Gen Donald L. Peterson, 31 Jul 1991; Brig Gen Robert E. Gatliff, 28 Jan 1993; Brig Gen Thomas O. Fleming Jr., 18 Jan 1994; Brig Gen Garry R. Trexler, 21 Aug 1995; Brig Gen Richard A. Mentemeyer, 20 Jun 1997; Brig Gen Lawrence H. Stevenson, 12 May 1999; Brig Gen Peter U. Sutton, 27 Jun 2000; Col Mark W. Graper, 5 Aug 2002; Col John W. Hesterman III, 28 May 2004; Col Richard M. Clark, 20 Jan 2006-.

Aircraft:  F-84, 1950-1957; KB-29, 1955-1957. F-84, 1962-1964; F-4, 1964-1970, 1970-1971. TH-1, 1972-1977; T-29, 1972-1974; T-37, 1972-; T-38, 1972-; T-39, 1972-1978, 1990-1991; T-41, 1972-1973, 1992-1994; T-43, 1992-; C-21, 1993-1997; AT-38, 1993-2002; T-1, 1993-; T-3, 1994-1998; T-6, 2000-.

Operations:  Provided fighter escort, air defense for SAC bomber forces, 1950-1957. Deployed at Manston RAF Station, England, 20 Jul-30 Nov 1951, and at Misawa AB, Japan, 15 May-10 Aug 1953 and 10 May-11 Aug 1954. Provided air refueling support, 1955-1957. Engaged in aerial combat in Southeast Asia, 19 Nov 1965-21 Oct 1971. Provided close air support, interdiction, rescue combat patrol, MiG patrol, and other activities. Supported the South Vietnamese attack on enemy sanctuaries in Cambodia and Laos in 1971. Replaced, and absorbed resources of, the 3510 Flying Training Wing at Randolph AFB, TX, in May 1972. Responsible for operation and maintenance of Randolph AFB and operation of the USAF Instrument Flight Center. The Center was responsible also for development, testing, and evaluation of flight instruments and flight instrument systems. From 2 May 1973 to 12 Nov 1976, wing provided T-37, T-38, and T-39 pilot requalification training for more than 150 USAF ex-prisoners of war. Trained instructor pilots for Air Training Command's undergraduate pilot training program wings and for foreign countries under the Joint Security Assistance Program. Beginning in 1985, supported the Accelerated Copilot Enrichment program at various operating locations. Designed and fabricated F-16 aircraft simulation training systems for USAF bases and several NATO nations during 1983-1988; after 1986, undertook similar efforts for the B-1 bomber program. Deployed support personnel during operations in Southwest Asia, 1990-1991. From 1991, engaged in flight screening and undergraduate pilot training. Due to impending closure of Mather AFB, California, in 1992 wing assumed undergraduate navigator training. Also, conducted specialized undergraduate pilot training. In 1995, began transition to joint navigator training. Produced joint and international instructor pilots and navigators, 1996-. Served as host unit for Randolph AFB, TX including Air Force Personnel Center (AFPC), Air Force Services Agency, Air Education and Training Command, Nineteenth Air Force and 340 Flying Training Group, 1996-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Vietnam: Vietnam Defensive; Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation: Southeast Asia, 8 Feb-8 Apr 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 15 Oct 1965-30 May 1966; 1 Jun 1966-31 May 1967; 1 Jun 1967-31 May 1968; 1 Jun 1968-31 May 1969; 1 Jun 1969-31 Mar 1970; 1 Apr 1970-21 Oct 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 May 1972-28 Feb 1973; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1975; 1 Jan 1987-31 Dec 1988; 1 Jan 1990-31 Dec 1991; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2004. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Crosses with Palm: 15 Oct 1965-10 Nov 1971; 1 Apr 1966-17 Nov 1971.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 12 Operations Group prior to 1 Nov 1950. Service Streamers. None. Campaign Streamers. World War II: Egypt-Libya; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citation: North Africa and Sicily, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943.

Emblem:  Approved for 12 Group on 3 Feb 1942; slightly modified for 12 Wing on 15 Mar 1963.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 23 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 20 Apr 2007.

Table of Contents



81st Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


559 Fighter Escort Sq
559 Strategic Fighter Sq
559 Fighter-Day Sq

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 81 Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 81 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 30 Dec 1941; 81 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 9 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 22 Jan 1946. Redesignated 81 Bombardment Squadron, Light, on 29 Apr 1947. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated 559 Fighter-Escort Squadron on 27 Oct 1950. Activated on 1 Nov 1950. Redesignated: 559 Strategic Fighter Squadron on 20 Jan 1953; 559 Fighter-Day Squadron on 1 Jul 1957. Inactivated on 8 Jan 1958. Redesignated 559 Tactical Fighter Squadron, and activated, on 17 Apr 1962. Organized on 25 Apr 1962. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1970. Redesignated 559 Flying Training Squadron on 22 Mar 1972. Activated on 1 May 1972.

Assignments:  12 Bombardment Group, 15 Jan 1941-22 Jan 1946. 12 Bombardment Group, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 12 Fighter-Escort Group, 1 Nov 1950 (attached to 12 Fighter-Escort Wing, 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952); 12 Fighter-Escort (later, 12 Strategic Fighter; 12 Fighter-Day) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-8 Jan 1958. Tactical Air Command, 17 Apr 1962; 12 Tactical Fighter Wing, 25 Apr 1962 (attached to 51 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, 12 Jun-c. 7 Sep 1965); 836 Air Division, 8 Nov 1965; 12 Tactical Fighter Wing, 27 Dec 1965-31 Mar 1970. 12 Flying Training Wing, 1 May 1972; 12 Operations Group, 15 Dec 1991-.

Stations:  McChord Field, WA, 15 Jan 1941; Esler Field, LA, 27 Feb-3 Jul 1942 (operated from Stockton Field, CA, 24 May-24 Jun 1942); Deversoir, Egypt, 30 Jul 1942; LG 88, Egypt, 18 Oct 1942; Gambut, Libya, 6 Dec 1942; Magrun LG, Libya, 14 Dec 1942; Gambut, Libya, 17 Dec 1942; Tmed El Chel, Libya, 11 Jan 1943; Berteaux, Algeria, 3 Feb 1943; Canrobert, Algeria, 15 Mar 1943; Thibar, Tunisia, 1 May 1943; Hergla, Tunisia, 2 Jun 1943; Ponte Olivo, Sicily, c. 2 Aug 1943; Gerbini, Sicily, 22 Aug 1943; Foggia, Italy, 5 Nov 1943; Gaudo Airfield, Italy, 18 Jan-6 Feb 1944; Tezgaon, India, c. 20 Mar 1944; Madhaiganj Airfield, India, 13 Jun 1944; Fenny, India, 17 Jul 1944 (operated from Meiktila, Burma, 21-29 Apr 1945); Madhaiganj Airfield, India, 7 Jun 1945; Karachi, India, 15 Nov-24 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, WA, 21-22 Jan 1946. Langley Field, VA, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Turner AFB, GA, 1 Nov 1950; Bergstorm AFB, TX, 5 Dec 1950-8 Jan 1958 (deployed at Manston RAF Station, England, 18 Jul-30 Nov 1951; Chitose AB, Japan, 15 May-10 Aug 1953; and Misawa AB, Japan, 12 May-11 Aug 1954). MacDill AFB, FL, 25 Apr 1962-27 Dec 1965 (deployed at Naha AB, Okinawa, 12 Jun-7 Sep 1965); Cam Ranh Bay AB, South Vietnam, 27 Dec 1965-31 Mar 1970. Randolph AFB, TX, 1 May 1972-.

Commanders:  Maj John J. O'Hara, 15 Jan 1941; Capt Curtis R. Low, 23 Jan 1941; Maj John J. O'Hara, 30 Jan 1941; Capt Curtis R. Low, Unknown; 1Lt William Lanford, Unknown; Capt William W. Wilcox, c. 10 Jun 1942; Maj Gilmore J. P. Lundquist, 29 Aug 1943; Maj R. L. Patterson, Nov 1943; Maj Warren W. Sutton, 30 Dec 1943; Capt Charles S. Thompson Jr., 14 Aug 1944; Maj Samuel C. Gailbraith, 23 Apr 1945; Capt Charles S. Thompson Jr., 4 Jul 1945; Capt John A. Woodward, Sep 1945-22 Jan 1946. Not manned, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Unknown, 1 Nov 1950; Lt Col Joseph T. McKeon, c. 15 Feb 1951; Lt Col Paul M. Hall, Aug 1952; Maj William F. Nuding Jr., 12 Jun 1953; Maj William C. Davis, Oct 1954-c. 8 Jan 1958. Unknown, 17 Apr 1962; Lt Col James M. Hollingsworth, by 31 Dec 1962; Maj Hermon D. Wells, 24 Feb 1966; Maj David T. Stockman, 17 Jun 1966; Lt Col William J. Quinn, Oct 1966; Lt Col John F. Barnes, by Dec 1966; Lt Col David E. Rippetoe Jr., by 1 Apr 1967; Lt Col Ross L. Carson, 13 Sep 1967; Lt Col Harry Andonian, 18 Jun 1968; Lt Col Paul A. Kauttu, 20 Sep 1968; Lt Col Harry Falls Jr., c. Dec 1968; Lt Col Allan K. Andreason, 21 Apr 1969; Lt Col Lowell E. Shearer, 10 Dec 1969-31 Mar 1970. Unknown, 1 May 1972; Lt Col James K. McPherson, 22 Jun 1972; Lt Col Robert H. Hermanson, 1 Jul 1974; Lt Col Charles W. Reed, 2 Jul 1976; Lt Col Charles L. Dodds Jr., 31 Mar 1978; Lt Col William G. Bookout, 12 Feb 1980; Lt Col Jack C. Rogers, 16 Mar 1981; Lt Col Thomas D. Bost, 14 Feb 1983; Lt Col Paul H. Rowcliffe, 25 Jun 1984; Lt Col Thomas M. Pratt, 25 Nov 1985; Lt Col Robert L. Brooks, 19 Jun 1987; Lt Col John E. Miller, 9 Jun 1989; Lt Col Michael J. Robinson, 28 Jun 1991; Lt Col John N. McLean Jr., Jul 1993; Lt Col James E. McClain, 26 Jan 1995; Lt Col Margaret D. Carnahan, 13 May 1997; Lt Col David P. Britton, 14 May 1999; Lt Col Daniel H. Craft, 31 May 2000; Lt Col Dana L. Gunter, 9 Mar 2001; Lt Col William W. Francis; 8 Jan 2003; Lt Col Pete D'Amico, 1 Jul 2004-.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945. None, 1947-1948. F-84, 1950-1957. F-4, 1964-1970. T-37, 1972-. T-6, 2000-.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific from the West Coast, Dec 1941-Feb 1942 and May-Jun 1942; combat in Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO), 16 Aug 1942-30 Jan 1944, and China-Burma-India theater (CBI), 16 Apr 1944-23 May 1945. Awarded the Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for support of the British Eighth Army in Middle East campaigns, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943. Not manned, 1947-1948. Fighter escort and air defense, 1950-1957. Augmented air defenses of Okinawa, Jun-Sep 1965. Combat in Southeast Asia, 2 Jan 1966-23 Mar 1970. Trained US and friendly nation instructor aircrews, May 1972-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Egypt-Libya; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma. Vietnam: Vietnam Defensive; Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; Tet 69/Counter-offensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring 1970.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: North Africa and Sicily, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 27 Dec 1965-30 May 1966; 1 Jun 1966-31 May 1967; 1 Jun 1967-31 May 1968; 1 Jun 1968-31 May 1969; 1 Jun 1969-31 Mar 1970. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 May 1972-28 Feb 1973; 1 Jan 1976-30 Apr 1977; 1 Apr 1985-31 Mar 1986; 1 Jan 1987-31 Dec 1988; 1 Jan 1990-31 Dec 1991; 1 Jan 1992-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2004. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: [27 Dec] 1965-31 Mar 1970.

Emblem:  On a White disc, a butting goat (Light Brown with Black markings) within a Black border. Approved on 6 Jan 1942 (153872 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 30 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2005.

Table of Contents



82nd Bombardment Squadron


"Dog Daize" B-25H 43-4381 of the 82 BS. Squadron numbers were 26-50. -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


-- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 82nd Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated 82nd Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 30 Dec 1941. Inactivated on 22 Jan 1946. Redesignated 82nd Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 29 Apr 1947. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated 560th Fighter-Escort Squadron on 27 Oct 1950. Activated on 1 Nov 1950. Redesignated: 560th Strategic Fighter Squadron on 20 Jan 1953; 560th Fighter-Day Squadron on 1 Jul 1957. Inactivated on 8 Jan 1958.

Assignments:  12th Bombardment Group, 15 Jan 1941-22 Jan 1946. 12th Bombardment Group, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 12th Fighter-Escort Group, 1 Nov 1950; 12th Fighter Escort (later Strategic Fighter; Fighter-Day) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-8 Jan 1958.

Stations:  McChord Field, Wash, 15 Jan 1941; Esler Field, La, 27 Feb-3 Jul 1942 (operated from Stockton Field, Calif, 24 May-24 Jun 1942); Deversoir, Egypt, 2 Aug 1942; LG 88, Egypt, 15 Oct 1942; Gambut, Libya, 5 Dec 1942; Magrun LG, Libya, 14 Dec 1942; Gambut, Libya, 16 Dec 1942; Tmed El Chel, Libya, 10 Jan 1943; Berteaux, Algeria, 4 Feb 1943; Canrobert, Algeria, 15 Mar 1943; Thibar, Tunisia, 1 May 1943; Hergla, Tunisia, 2 Jun 1943; Ponte Olivo, Sicily, c. 2 Aug 1943; Gerbini, Sicily, 22 Aug 1943; Foggia, Italy, 3 Nov 1943; Gaudo Airfield, Italy, 19 Jan-6 Feb 1944; Tezgaon, India, 19 Mar 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 15 Jun 1944; Fenny, India, 20 Jul 1944 (operated from Meiktila, Burma, 10-28 Apr 1945); Madhaiganj Airfield, India, 8 Jun 1945; Karachi, India, 18 Nov-24 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 21-22 Jan 1946. Langley Field, Va, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Turner AFB, Ga, 1 Nov 1950; Bergstrom AFB, Tex, 5 Dec 1950-8 Jan 1958.

Aircraft:  PT-17, 1941-1942; B-18, 1941-1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945. F-84, 1951-1957.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific from the west coast, Dec 1941-Feb 1942 and 24 May-24 Jun 1942; combat in MTO, 16 Aug 1942-30 Jan 1944, and in CBI, 21 Apr 1944-26 May 1945. Not manned, 1947-1948.

Service Steamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Egypt-Libya; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: North Africa and Sicily, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943.

Emblem:  On an arrowhead or, a gunsight azure, banded gules, thereon a lightning flash argent aimed at the pipper of the sight gules, over a stylized aircraft argent, a ribbon azure encircling the base of the head of the arrow. (Approved 22 May 1951.)


82nd BS Personnel (date unknown)
Photo courtesy of Mr. Rob Getz


Crew of "The Black Widow" (date unknown)
Photo courtesy of Mr. Rob Getz


82nd BS Photo Section (date unknown)
Photo courtesy of Mr. Rob Getz

Table of Contents



83d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 83d Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated 83d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 30 Dec 1941. Inactivated on 22 Jan 1946. Redesignated 83d Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 29 Apr 1947. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated 561st Fighter-Escort Squadron on 27 Oct 1950. Activated on 1 Nov 1950. Redesignated: 561st Strategic Fighter Squadron on 20 Jan 1953; 561st Fighter-Day Squadron on 1 Jul 1957. Inactivated on 8 Jan 1958.

Assignments:  12th Bombardment Group, 15 Jan 1941-22 Jan 1946. 12th Bombardment Group, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 12th Fighter-Escort Group, 1 Nov 1950; 12th Fighter-Escort (later Strategic Fighter; Fighter-Day) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-8 Jan 1958.

Stations:  McChord Field, Wash, 15 Jan 1941; Esler Field, La, 27 Feb-3 Jul 1942 (operated form Stockton Field, Calif, 24 May-24 Jun 1942); Ismailia, Egypt, 13 Aug 1942; LG 88, Egypt, 18 Oct 1942; Gambut, Libya, 6 Dec 1942; Magrun LG, Libya, 14 Dec 1942; Gambut, Libya, 22 Dec 1942; Castel Benito, Libya, 16 Feb 1943; El Assa, Libya, 3 mar 1943; Medenine, Tunisia, 3 Apr 1943; Sfax, Tunisia, 16 Apr 1943; Hergla, Tunisia, 3 Jun 1943; Ponte Olivo, Sicily, 2 Aug 1943; Gerbini, Sicily, 22 Aug 1943; Foggia, Italy, 5 Nov 1943; Gaudo Airfield, Italy, 19 Jan-6 Feb 1944; Kurmitola, India, 21 Mar 1944; Pandaveswar, India, 13 Jun 1944; Fenny, India, 18 Jul 1944 (operated from Magwe, Burma, 4-25 May 1945); Pandaveswar, India, 9 Jun 1945; Karachi, India, 21 Nov-24 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 21-22 Jan 1946. Langley Field, Va, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Turner AFB, Ga, 1 Nov 1950; Bergstrom AFB, Tex, 5 Dec 1950-8 Jan 1958.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; B-23, 1941-1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945; F-84, 1951-1957.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific from the west coast, Dec 1941-Feb 1942 and 24 May-24 Jun 1942; combat in MTO, 16 Aug 1942-30 Jan 1943, and in CBI, 27 Apr 1944-24 May 1945. Not manned, 1947-1948.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Egypt-Libya; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: North Africa and Sicily, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943.

Emblem:  On a red disk, border white, edged black, charged with an annulet of the last, a skeleton proper, robed and winged black, diving toward dexter base, while holding a black shield, edged white in the left hand and brandishing a white sword in the right hand. (Approved 8 Aug 1944.)


Courtesy of Mr. Ray Carpenter

Table of Contents



434th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 19th Reconnaissance Squadron (Light) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 94th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 14 Aug 1941; 94th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium) on 30 Dec 1941; 434th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 Apr 1942. Inactivated on 22 Jan 1946.

Assignments:  12th Bombardment Group: attached 15 Jan 1941; assigned 14 Aug 1941-22 Jan 1946.

Stations:  McChord Field, Wash, 15 Jan 1941; Esler Field, La, 27 Feb-3 Jul 1942 (operated from Stockton Field, Calif, 24 May-24 Jun 1942); Ismailia, Egypt, 14 Aug 1942; LG 88, Egypt, 29 Sep 1942; Gambut, Libya, 5 Dec 1942; Magrun LG, Libya, 14 Dec 1942; Gambut, Libya, 17 Dec 1942; Castel Benito, Libya, 16 Feb 1943; El Assa, Libya, 8 Mar 1943; Medenine, Tunisia, 3 Apr 1943; Sfax, Tunisia, 17 Apr 1943; Hergla, Tunisia, 2 Jun 1943; Ponte Olivo, Sicily, 2 Aug 1943; Gerbini, Sicily, 22 Aug 1943; Foggia, Italy, 2 Nov 1943; Gaudo Airfield, Italy, 18 Jan-6 Feb 1944; Kurmitola, India, 21 Mar 1944; Madhaiganj Airfield, India, 13 Jun 1944; Comilla, India, 21 Jul 1944; Fenny, India, 27 Nov 1944 (operated from Magwe, Burma, 5-24 May 1945); Pandaveswar, India, 17 Sep 1945; Karachi, India, 22 Nov-24 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 21-22 Jan 1946.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; B-23, 1941-1942; B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific from west coast, Dec 1941-Feb 1942 and 24 May-24 Jun 1942; combat in MTO, 28 Aug 1942-30 Jan 1944, and in CBI, 27 Apr 1944-21 May 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Egypt-Libya; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: North Africa and Sicily, Oct 1942-17 Aug 1943.

Emblem:  On a yellow disc with blue and white border a black tornado issuing from the ground, in brown, over all a red lightning flash bend sinister-wise, fimbriated yellow. (Approved 18 Feb 1942.)

Table of Contents



33d Fighter Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 33 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated 33 Fighter Group on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1945. Activated on 20 Aug 1946. Redesignated 33 Fighter-Interceptor Group on 20 Jan 1950. Inactivated on 6 Feb 1952. Redesignated 33 Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 20 Jun 1955. Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Inactivated on 18 Aug 1957. Consolidated (31 Jul 1985) with the 33 Tactical Group, which was established, and activated on 19 Jun 1963. Organized on 8 Jul 1963. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 8 Jul 1965. Redesignated 33 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985. Redesignated 33 Operations Group, and activated, on 1 Dec 1991.

Assignments:  7 Pursuit Wing, 15 Jan 1941; 1 Interceptor (later, I Interceptor, I Fighter) Command, 2 Oct 1941; Philadelphia Air Defense Wing, 11 Aug 1942; XII Air Support Command, Nov 1942; XII Fighter Command, 6 Dec 1942; XII Air Support Command, 13 Jan 1943; XII Air Force Service Command, 18 Feb 1943; XII Bomber Command, 1 Mar 1943; 47 Bombardment Wing, 3 Mar 1943; XII Air Support Command, 14 Mar 1943; 3 Air Defense (later, 64 Fighter) Wing, 24 Jul 1943; XII Air Support Command, 21 Dec 1943 (under operational control of 64 Fighter Wing, 21 Dec 1943-Feb 1944); AAF India-Burma Sector, c. 20 Feb 1944 (attached to CBI Air Forces Training Command, 5 Mar-14 Apr 1944); Fourteenth Air Force, 15 Apr 1944; 312 Fighter Wing, 11 May 1944; Tenth Air Force, 24 Aug 1944-Nov 1945. 70 Fighter Wing, 20 Aug 1946; Strategic Air Command, 25 Aug 1947; Eighth Air Force, 16 Sep 1947; 33 Fighter (later, 33 Fighter-Interceptor) Wing, 5 Nov 1947-6 Feb 1952 (attached to 509 Bombardment Wing, 17 Nov 1947-15 Nov 1948). 4707 Air Defense Wing, 18 Aug 1955; 33 Fighter Wing, 18 Oct 1956-18 Aug 1957. Pacific Air Forces, 19 Jun 1963; 2 Air Division, 8 Jul 1963-8 Jul 1965. 33 Fighter Wing, 1 Dec 1991-.

Components:  Squadron.58 Pursuit (later, 58 Fighter): 15 Jan 1941-8 Dec 1945; 20 Aug 1946-6 Feb 1952; 18 Aug 1955-18 Aug 1957; 1 Dec 1991-. 59 Pursuit (later, 59 Fighter): 15 Jan 1941-8 Dec 1945; 20 Aug 1946-6 Feb 1952; 1 Dec 1991-15 Apr 1999. 60 Pursuit (later, 60 Fighter): 15 Jan 1941-8 Dec 1945; 20 Aug 1946-6 Feb 1952; 18 Aug 1955-18 Aug 1957; 1 Dec 1991-.

Stations:  Mitchel Field, NY, 15 Jan 1941; Philadelphia, PA, 13 Dec 1941-Oct 1942; Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 10 Nov 1942; Casablanca, French Morocco, c. 13 Nov 1942; Telergma, Algeria, 24 Dec 1942; Thelepte, Tunisia, 7 Jan 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 8 Feb 1943; Telergma, Algeria, c. 20 Feb 1943; Berteaux, Algeria, c. 2 Mar 1943; Ebba Ksour, Tunisia, c. 12 Apr 1943; Menzel Temime, Tunisia, 20 May 1943; Sousse, Tunisia, 9 Jun 1943; Pantelleria, 19 Jun 1943; Licata, Sicily, c. 18 Jul 1943; Paestum, Italy, 13 Sep 1943; Santa Maria, Italy, 18 Nov 1943; Cercola, Italy, c. 1 Jan-Feb 1944; Karachi, India, c. 20 Feb 1944; Shwangliu, China, c. 18 Apr 1944; Punchacheng, China, 9 May 1944; Nagaghuli, India, 3 Sep 1944; Sahmaw, Burma, 26 Dec 1944; Piardoba, India, 4 May-c. 15 Nov 1945; Camp Shanks, NY, 7-8 Dec 1945. Neubiberg, Germany, 20 Aug 1946; Bad Kissengen, Germany, Jul-25 Aug 1947; Andrews Field, MD, 25 Aug 1947; Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 16 Sep 1947; Otis AFB, MA, 16 Nov 1948-6 Feb 1952. Otis AFB, MA, 18 Aug 1955-18 Aug 1957. Tan Son Nhut AB, South Vietnam, 8 Jul 1963-8 Jul 1965. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Dec 1991-.

Commanders:  Maj Minthorne W. Reed, c. Jan 1941; Col Elwood R. Quesada, 7 Oct 1941; Col William W. Momyer, 29 Jun 1942; Col Loring F. Stetson Jr., 17 Oct 1943; Lt Col Oliver G. Cellini, 7 Jun 1944; Col David D. Terry Jr., 9 Sep 1944; Col Frank L. Dunn, 2 Mar 1945-unkn. Col Barton M. Russell, 20 Aug 1946; Lt Col Albert A. Cory, c. 1946; Col William H. Blanchard, 1947; Col Gwen G. Atkinson, Jan 1948; Lt Col Woodrow W. Korges, 4 Mar 1949; Col Charles H. MacDonald, 29 Jul 1949; Col Harrison R. Thyng, 15 Jun 1950; Lt Col Willard W. Millikan, c. Aug 1951-6 Feb 1952. Col Fred G. Hook Jr., 1955; Col David B. Tudor, c. early 1957-unkn. Col Richard C. Bender, 8 Jul 1963; Col Frank H. Wilcox Jr., 22 Feb 1964; Col George Budway, 16 May-8 Jul 1965. Col Thomas W. Dobson Jr., 2 Dec 1991; Col T. Michael Mosely, 23 Oct 1992; Col John D.W. Corley, 19 Jan 1994; Col James G. Boehm, 7 Aug 1995; Col David A. Deptula, 3 Oct 1995; Col Dennis G. Krembel, Feb 1997; Col Mark W. Debolt, 5 Mar 1999; Col Thomas A. McCarthy, 9 Feb 2001; Col Jay T. Denney, 13 Dec 2002-.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1941; P-40, 1941-1944; P-38, 1944-1945; P-47, 1944-1945. P-47, 1947-1948; F-84, 1948; F-86, 1949-1952. C-54, 1963-1965; RB-26, 1963-1964; RB-57, 1963-1965; RF-101, 1963-1965; U-3B, 1963-1965; VC-47, 1964-1965; VC-123, 1963-1965. F-15, 1991-.

Operations:  Trained with P-39s in 1941, but soon changed to P-40s and served as part of the defense force for the east coast after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The group moved to North Africa as part of the invasion force on 8 Nov 1942 and operated with Twelfth Air Force in the Mediterranean theater until Feb 1944, providing close support for ground forces, and bombing and strafing personnel concentrations, port installations, fuel dumps, bridges, highways, and rail lines. The 33d received a DUC for action on 15 Jan 1943 when enemy aircraft attempted to knock out the group's base in Tunisia. The group drove off the enemy's escort and destroyed most of its bombers. It took part in the reduction of Pantelleria and flew patrol missions while Allied troops landed after surrender of the enemy's garrison. It also participated in the invasion and conquest of Sicily by supporting landings at Salerno, southern Italy, and the beachhead at Anzio. Moving to India in Feb 1944, the group trained with P-38s and P-47s. It then moved to China where it continued training and flew patrol and intercept missions. Returning to India in Sep 1944, it flew dive-bombing and strafing missions in Burma until the Allied campaigns in that area had been completed. From Aug 1946, the 33d served as part of the US occupation force in Germany until transferred back to the US, less personnel and equipment in Aug 1947. Moving to New Mexico, it was remanned and equipped with P-51s in Sep 1947, transitioned to F-84s in Jun 1948, and by mid-Nov, moved to the east coast. There it trained to maintain tactical proficiency and participated in exercises and aerial demonstrations. In Feb 1949, transitioned to F-86s and in Dec assumed an air defense mission, providing air defense in the northeastern US until inactivation in Feb 1952. Again, it provided air defense in northeastern US, Aug 1955-Aug 1957. In South Vietnam, the group was equipped primarily with cargo aircraft , C-54, U-3B, VC-47, and VC-123. Its mission was to maintain and operate base support facilities at Tan Son Nhut AB, supporting the 2d Air Division and subordinate units by performing reconnaissance of Vietnam from various detachments flying RB-26, RB-57, and RF-101 aircraft, Jul 1963-Jul 1965. From its activation in Dec 1991, as part of the 33d Fighter Wing, it deployed aircraft and personnel to Saudi Arabia, Canada, the Caribbean, South America, Jamaica, Iceland, Italy, and Puerto Rico and participated in operations SOUTHERN WATCH, CORONET MACAW; RESTORE HOPE, SUPPORT JUSTICE IV; UPHOLD DEMOCRACY. These included combat as well as deployments to assist in the US drug war. It lost 13 members in the bombing of Khobar Towers, Saudi Arabia on 25 Jun 1996.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive. Vietnam: Vietnam Advisory; Vietnam Defensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Central Tunisia, 15 Jan 1943. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 2 Dec 1991-31 Mar 1992; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 1999.

Emblem:  Shield: Azure, on a pale nebuly or a sword point to chief in pale of the field, flammant gules, all within a border of the second. Motto: Fire From The Clouds. (Approved 21 Feb 1942.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 20 May 2005.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 2004.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (33d Fighter Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 33 Fighter Wing on 15 Oct 1947. Organized on 5 Nov 1947. Redesignated 33 Fighter-Interceptor Wing on 20 Jan 1950. Inactivated on 6 Feb 1952. Redesignated 33 Fighter Wing (Air Defense) on 14 Sep 1956. Activated on 18 Oct 1956. Inactivated on 18 Aug 1957. Redesignated 33 Tactical Fighter Wing, and activated, on 9 Feb 1965. Organized on 1 Apr 1965. Redesignated 33 Fighter Wing on 1 Oct 1991.

Assignments:  Eighth Air Force, 5 Nov 1947 (attached to 509 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, 17 Nov 1947-15 Nov 1948); First Air Force, 1 Dec 1948 (attached to Eastern Air Defense Force, 10 Nov 1949-31 Aug 1950, and further attached to 32 Air Division [Defense], 20 Feb 1950-); Eastern Air Defense Force, 1 Sep 1950-6 Feb 1952 (remained attached to 32 Air Division [Defense] to 1 Feb 1952). 26 Air Division (Defense), 18 Oct 1956 (attached to 4622d Air Defense Wing [SAGE], 18 Oct 1956-7 Jan 1957); Boston Air Defense Sector, 8 Jan-18 Aug 1957. Tactical Air Command, 9 Feb 1965; 836 Air Division, 1 Apr 1965; Ninth Air Force, 30 Jun 1971-1 Oct 2009; 19th Air Force (Air Education and Training Command), 1 Oct 2009-.

Components

Wing:  50 Fighter (later, 50 Fighter-Interceptor): attached 1 Jun 1949- 2 Jun 1951.

Groups:  33 Fighter (later, 33 Fighter-Interceptor; 33 Fighter; 33 Operations): 5 Nov 1947-6 Feb 1952 (detached 5 Nov 1947-15 Nov 1948); 18 Oct 1956-18 Aug 1957 (detached 1 Jul-18 Aug 1957); 1 Dec 1991-.

Squadrons:  4 Tactical Fighter: 20 Jun 1965-12 Apr 1969. 16 Tactical Fighter: 20 Jun 1965-1 Nov 1970 (detached 27 Aug-13 Sep 1966, 13-31 Oct 1967, 26 May-9 Sep 1970). 25 Tactical Fighter: 20 Jun 1965-28 May 1968. 40 Tactical Fighter: 20 Jun 1965-15 Oct 1970. 58 Tactical Fighter: 1 Sep 1970-1 Dec 1991 (detached 29 Apr-14 Oct 1972, 8 Jun-14 Sep 1973, 8- 22 Aug 1975, 31 Jan-14 Feb 1977; 28 Aug 1990-1 Dec 1991). 59 Tactical Fighter (later 59 Fighter): 1 Sep 1970-1 Dec 1991 (detached 24-29 Mar 1974). 60 Tactical Fighter (later 60 Fighter): 1 Sep 1971-1 Dec 1991. 133 Fighter: attached 21 Jul 1951-6 Feb 1952. 786 Tactical Fighter: 1 Apr-20 Jun 1965. 787 Tactical Fighter: 1 Apr-20 Jun 1965. 788 Tactical Fighter: 1 Apr-20 Jun 1965. 789 Tactical Fighter: 1 Apr-20 Jun 1965. 4533 Tactical Training Squadron (Test): 7 Dec 1967-12 Apr 1971.

Stations:  Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 5 Nov 1947; Otis AFB, MA, 16 Nov 1948-6 Feb 1952. Otis AFB, MA, 18 Oct 1956-18 Aug 1957. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Apr 1965-.

Commanders:  Lt Col Joseph C. Smith, 5 Nov 1947 (additional duty); Col Gwen G. Atkinson, Jan 1948 (additional duty to 16 Nov 1948); Col Arthur C. Agan Jr., 23 May 1949; Col Harrison R. Thyng, Apr 1951; Col Leon W. Gray, Oct 1951-6 Feb 1952. Col Hilmer C. Nelson, 18 Oct 1956; Col Delbert H. Hahn, (by May)-c. 30 Jun 1957; none (not manned), 1 Jul-18 Aug 1957. None (not manned), 9 Feb-31 Mar 1965; Col David C. Jones, 1 Apr 1965; Col George I. Ruddell, 1 Oct 1965; Col Robert W. Maloy, 26 Aug 1966; Col Abner M. Aust Jr., 12 May 1967; Col Franklin L. Fisher, 15 Jun 1967; Col Richard C. Henry, 30 Sep 1970; Col William E. Skinner, 24 Mar 1972; Col Gordon B. Mickelson, 10 May 1973; Col Donald C. Hanto, 15 Feb 1975; Col David L. Nichols, 29 Apr 1977; Brig Gen Charles R. Hamm, 20 Jul 1979; Col Stanton R. Musser, 21 Apr 1980; Col Jack R. Petry, 22 Jan 1982; Col Robert K. Wagner, 19 Aug 1983; Col George J. Forster, 14 May 1985; Col John P. Jumper, 19 Feb 1987; Col Robert W. Mendell, 19 Jan 1988; Col Rick N. Parsons, 30 May 1989; Col David L. Yates, 25 Aug 1990; Col Richard F. Hardy, 1 Mar 1991; Col Rick N. Parsons, c. 12 Apr 1991; Col Gregory S. Martin, 2 Aug 1991; Col William R. Looney III, 4 Jun 1993; Col Carrol H. Chandler, 15 May 1995; Col Gary R. Dylewski, 28 Mar 1996; Col Felix Dupre, 3 Oct 1997; Col John T. Brennan, 5 Apr 1999; Col Herbert J. Carlisle, 2 Mar 2001; Col Stanley T. Kresge, 14 Feb 2003; Col Brett Williams, 30 Jul 2004-1 Oct 2009; Col David A. Hlatky, 1 Oct 2009-.

Aircraft:  F-51, 1948-1950; F-84, 1948-1950; F-86, 1950-1952; F-94, 1951-1952; F-47, 1951-1952. F-89, 1956-1957; F-94, 1956-1957. F-4, 1965-1979; F-15, 1978-2009; F-35, 2010-.

Operations:  The 33d wing headquarters was not operational and all of its components were detached, Nov 1947- Nov 1948, with the 509th Bombardment Wing at Walker AFB, NM, controlling the wing's tactical units. Headquarters of the 33d Fighter Wing became operational upon movement to Otis AFB, MA, in mid-Nov 1948. The wing trained to maintain tactical proficiency and participated in exercises and aerial demonstrations Nov 1948-Nov 1949. It assumed an air defense mission in Dec 1949 and provided air defense in the northeastern United States until inactivated in Feb 1952. Once again it provided air defense in the northeastern United States, Oct 1956-Jun 1957, but was non-operational, 1 Jul-18 Aug 1957. In Apr 1965 the wing activated at Eglin AFB, FL, and embarked on a program of tactical training operations to maintain proficiency. Operated a test support division, Jul 1965-Dec 1967, and a special test squadron, Dec 1967-Apr 1971, in support of tests for weapon systems, aircraft armament and munitions, and tactical procedures of the Tactical Air Warfare Center. The wing also provided F-4 replacement training, 15 Dec 1966-28 Feb 1967. Through deployment of combat-ready tactical components, with personnel and equipment transferred to PACAF units upon arrival, the wing provided fresh aircraft and aircrews for the forces in Southeast Asia and in Korea. Entire resources of squadrons were released as follows: 40th TFS, May 1967, Nov 1968, and May 1969; 4th TFS, Jul 1967; and 16th TFS, Oct 1967 and Apr 1969. In all cases except for the 40th, in May 1969, the squadrons were immediately remanned and reequipped. The wing also transferred two of its combat-ready squadrons to PACAF, the 25th TFS in May 1968 and the 4th TFS in Apr 1969. The wing's last combat-ready squadron, the 58th TFS, deployed to Southeast Asia for combat operations from Apr to Oct 1972 and again from Jun to Sep 1973. The wing supported the 4485th Test Squadron of the Tactical Air Warfare Center in weapon systems evaluation program tests, Jan-Dec 1973, and periodically thereafter until Jul 1978. Aircrews ferried F-4Es to Israel in Oct 1973. The Wing augmented intercept defense forces of the North American Air Defense Command (NORAD), 1 Jan 1976-15 Jan 1979 and 4 Jan-5 Apr 1982. While awaiting delivery of F-15s, the 60 FS conducted F-15 mission qualifications training for the 18 TFW, 15 July 1979-30 April 1980. The wing provided personnel and equipment to fly combat air patrols and air intercept missions for contingency operations in Grenada, Oct-Nov 1983, and Panama, Dec 1989-Jan 1990. During combat operations while deployed in Southwest Asia, 26 Aug 1990-12 Apr 1991, wing personnel were credited with sixteen air-to-air victories. Wing personnel and aircraft continued rotations to Saudi Arabia to protect coalition assets and to ensure that Iraq complied with treaty terms. From 1992-2002, continued to deploy aircraft and personnel to Saudi Arabia, Canada, the Caribbean, South America, Jamaica, Iceland, Italy, and Puerto Rico and participated in operations SOUTHERN WATCH, CORONET MACAW; RESTORE HOPE, SUPPORT JUSTICE IV; UPHOLD DEMOCRACY. It lost 13 members in the bombing of Khobar Towers, Saudi Arabia on 25 Jun 1996.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1968- 30 Jun 1969; 1 Oct 1978-30 April 1980; 1 May 1984-30 April 1986; 1 Apr 1990-31 Mar 1992; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 33d Operations Group prior to 5 Nov 1947. Service Streamers. None. Campaign Streamers. World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citation: Central Tunisia, 15 Jan 1943.

Emblem:  Approved for 33 Operations Group on 21 Feb 1942 and for 33 Fighter Wing on 5 Oct 1965.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 23 May 2005.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Jul 2004.


Other Sites of Interest:

Factsheets 33rd Fighter Wing

Table of Contents



58th Fighter Squadron


WWII version

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 58 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated as: 58 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 58 Fighter Squadron, Two Engine, on 8 Feb 1945. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1945. Redesignated as 58 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 17 Jul 1946. Activated on 20 Aug 1946. Redesignated as: 58 Fighter Squadron, Jet, on 14 Jun 1948; 58 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jan 1950. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Dec 1960. Redesignated as 58 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 16 Mar 1970. Activated on 1 Sep 1970. Redesignated as 58 Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991.

Assignments:  33 Pursuit (later, 33 Fighter) Group, 15 Jan 1941-8 Dec 1945. 33 Fighter (later, 33 Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 20 Aug 1946; 4707 Defense Wing, 6 Feb 1952; 564 Air Defense Group, 16 Feb 1953; 33 Fighter Group, 18 Aug 1955; 4735 Air Defense Group, 18 Aug 1957; 34 Air Division, 1 Aug 1959; Albuquerque Air Defense Sector, 1 Jan 1960; Oklahoma City Air Defense Sector, 15 Sep-25 Dec 1960. 33 Tactical Fighter (later, 33 Fighter) Wing, 1 Sep 1970 (attached to 432 Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, 29 Apr-14 Oct 1972; 8 Tactical Fighter Wing, 8 Jun-14 Sep 1973; 33 Tactical Fighter Wing, Provisional, 28 Aug 1990-12 Apr 1991); 33 Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-.

Stations:  Mitchel Field, NY, 15 Jan 1941 (operated from Farmingdale, NY, 7-14 Dec 1941); Philadelphia, PA, 13 Dec 1941; Norfolk, VA, 16 Jan 1942 (operated from San Francisco, CA, May-Jun 1942); Langley Field, VA, 22 Sep-14 Oct 1942; Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 10 Nov 1942; Thelepte, Tunisia, 12 Dec 1943; Telergma, Algeria, 7 Feb 1943; Berteaux, Algeria, 2 Mar 1943; Ebba Ksour, Tunisia, 13 Apr 1943; Menzel Temime, Tunisia, 15 May 1943; Pantelleria Island, c. 28 Jun 1943; Licata, Sicily, 18 Jul 1943; Paestum, Italy, 14 Sep 1943; Santa Maria, Italy, 18 Nov 1943; Cercola, Italy, 1 Jan-c. 6 Feb 1944; Karachi, India, c. 18 Feb 1944; Pungchacheng, China, c. 30 Apr 1944; Moran, India, 31 Aug 1944; Sahmaw, Burma, 26 Dec 1944; Dudhkundi, India, c. 15 May-15 Nov 1945; Camp Shanks, NY, 7-8 Dec 1945. Neubiberg, Germany, 20 Aug 1946; Bad Kissingen, Germany, Jul-25 Aug 1947; Andrews Field, MD, 25 Aug 1947; Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 16 Sep 1947; Otis AFB, MA, 16 Nov 1948; Walker AFB, NM, 2 Aug 1959-25 Dec 1960. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Sep 1970 (deployed at Udorn RTAFB, Thailand, 29 Apr-18 Oct 1972 and 1 Jun-14 Sep 1973; Tabuk, Saudi Arabia, 28 Aug 1990-12 Apr 1991; Dhahran AB, Saudi Arabia, 9 Dec 1992-17 Mar 1993; 2 Dec 1994-2 Mar 1995 and 15 Apr-28 Jun 1996; Shaikh Isa AB, Bahrain, 20 Nov 1997-20 Jun 1998; Incirlik AB, Turkey, 12 Sep-5 Nov 1998 and 23 Sep-c. 20 Dec 1999; Prince Sultan AB, Saudi Arabia, 7 Jan-20 Feb 1999 and 8 Dec 2000-12 Mar 2001)-.

Commanders:  1 Lt George W. Hazlett, 15 Jan 1941-unkn; Capt William W. Momyer, 23 Mar 1942; Capt Robert H. Christman, c. Jul 1942; Lt William Hawkes, 19 Oct 1942 (ground echelon); Maj Phillip Cochran, c. 13 Dec 1942 (acting); Maj John L. Bradley, 6 Feb 1943; Capt Richard R. Coulter, 30 Jul 1943; Capt William Shelton, 24 Oct 1943; Capt Elmer C. Beach Jr., by 1 Mar 1944; Maj Roger B. Ludeman, c. Jul-20 Aug 1944; Maj Minar M. Dervage, by Sep 1944; Maj James E. Ward, by Oct 1944; Maj Sidney M. Newcomb, 27 Dec 1944; Maj Clarence T. Baker, 22 Mar 1945; Lt Col Harley C. Vaughn, 10 Jul 1945; Maj Everett H. Anglin, 31 Aug 1945-unkn. Maj James F. Hackler Jr., 20 Aug 1946; unkn, 1946-Apr 1948; Maj Leland R. Raphun, by 1 May 1948; Lt Col Joseph C. Smith, c. 31 May 1948; Maj Frank Q. O'Connor, 24 Jun 1948; Capt Ernest R. Wilson, by Nov 1948; Capt Jack Stevens, c. 1 Oct 1949; Lt Col William J. Grumbles, 17 Nov 1949; Capt Glenwood W. Eaton, 10 Dec 1949-unkn; unkn, 1950-5 Feb 1952; Lt Col Edgar S. Beam, 6 Feb 1952; Maj Curtis N. Metcalf, c. Jan 1953-c. Jun 1954; unkn, Jul 1954-25 Dec 1960. Lt Col John C. Downey, 1 Nov 1970; Lt Col Lee E. Williams, 3 Jul 1972; Lt Col Roger E. Johnson, 17 Oct 1972; Lt Col John S. Hardy, 18 May 1973; Lt Col Paul D. Lambrides, 1 Sep 1974; Lt Col William F. Cummings, 28 Apr 1975; Lt Col Henry Viccellio Jr., 1 Dec 1976; Lt Col Stanley S. Gunnerson, 22 May 1977; Lt Col Walter T. Worthington, 1 Jan 1979; Lt Col Wayne I. Yohe, 14 Nov 1980; Lt Col Joseph D. Gorecki, 4 Jun 1982; Lt Col William J. Meeboer Jr., 18 Jun 1984; Lt Col Danny M. Reisinger, 1 Jul 1986; Lt Col Francis K. Geisler, 5 Jul 1988; Lt Col William E. Thiel, 9 Apr 1990; Lt Col Mark P. Lennon, 29 Nov 1991; Lt Col Gary A. Baldwin, 9 Nov 1992; Lt Col Delbert W. Pemberton, 22 Oct 1993; Lt Col Douglas Cochran, 3 May 1995; Lt Col Steven D. Carey, 19 Sep 1996; Lt Col Vincent P. DiFronzo, 4 Jun 1998; Lt Col Dean N. Trudeau, 19 May 2000; Lt Col Russell J. Handy, 5 Oct 2000; Lt Col Thomas W. Hampton, 27 Jun 2002; Lt Col Steven L. Thompson, May 2004; Lt Col Matthew C. Isler, May 2006; Lt Col Todd A. Jaax, 31 Oct 2007; Lt Col Mark L. O'Laughlin, 17 Oct 2008; Lt Col John B. Wilbourne, 2 Oct 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1941; P-40, 1941-1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-38, 1944-1945. P (later F)-51, 1946-1949; F-84, 1948-1950; F-86, 1950-1952; F-94, 1952-1955; F-89, 1955-1960. F-4, 1970-1979; F-15, 1979-2009; F-35, 2010-.

Operations:  Air defense of US, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Combat in Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO), 10 Nov 1942-2 Feb 1944, and in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 10 May 1944-12 May 1945. Part of US occupation forces in Germany 1946-1947. Air defense of US, 1947-1960. Combat in Southeast Asia, 6 May-8 Oct 1972 and 6-30 Jun 1973; Panama, Dec 1989-Jan 1990 and Southwest Asia (SWA), Jan-Feb 1991. Flew combat air patrols in SWA, 1992-1993. Rotated aircraft and personnel to SWA to enforce no fly zone over Iraq, 1994-2001. Twelve members died in terrorist bombing of Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia, 25 Jun 1996. Supported Operation NOBLE EAGLE after 11 Sep 2001 terrorist attack on the US. Transitioned to F-35 aircraft; trained operators and maintainers of the F-35 aircraft in support of Air Force and international partners pilot training requirements, 2010-.

Service Streamers:  World War II, American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco with Arrowhead; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma. Vietnam: Vietnam Ceasefire. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait; Southwest Asia Ceasefire.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Central Tunisia, 15 Jan 1943. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 25 Apr-16 Oct 1972. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1978-30 Apr 1980; 1 May 1984-30 Apr 1986; 1 Apr 1990-31 Mar 1992; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 1999. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 29 Apr-18 Oct 1972.

Emblem (FIS):  On a light azure disc, piped dark azure, a demi sphere issuing from base of the last, surmounted by a conventionalized jet speeding through space proper, bendwise, on its nose an eagle's head erased, flames issuing from its tail, all between a circle of stars, five and eight, all gules. (Approved 30 Mar 1951.)

Emblem (Current):  On a disc composed of a Light Blue sky and White cloud formations, within a band divided into four segments, top and bottom segments Blue, dexter and sinister segments chequey, alternating Blue and White, a Brown gorilla (eyes and tongue Red, pupils Dark Brown, teeth White) rising above a White cloud formation issuing from base on which are two Red flight symbols each trailing an arced Light Blue vapor trail. Approved on 14 Jul 1971 (KE 42615); replaced emblems approved on 30 Mar 1951 (K 65156) and 18 Jan 1944 (27753 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 12 Apr 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Dec 2010.

Other Sites of Interest:

33d Fighter Group Reunion Site

Table of Contents



59th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 59 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 59 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 59 Fighter Squadron, Two Engine, on 8 Feb 1945. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1945. Redesignated 59 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 17 Jul 1946. Activated on 20 Aug 1946. Redesignated: 59 Fighter Squadron, Jet, on 14 Jun 1948; 59 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jan 1950. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 2 Jan 1967. Activated on 30 Sep 1968. Inactivated on 17 Dec 1969. Redesignated 59 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 16 Mar 1970. Activated on 1 Sep 1970. Redesignated 59 Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1999. Redesignated 59 Test and Evaluation Squadron on 28 Oct 2004. Activated on 3 Dec 2004.

Assignments:  33 Pursuit (later, 33 Fighter) Group, 15 Jan 1941-8 Dec 1945. 33 Fighter (later, 33 Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 20 Aug 1946; 4707 Defense (later, 4707 Air Defense) Wing, 6 Feb 1952 (attached to Northeast Air Command, 28-31 Oct 1952; 64 Air Division, 1 Nov 1952-31 Jan 1953); 64 Air Division, 1 Feb 1953; 4732 Air Defense Group, 1 Apr 1957; Goose Air Defense Sector, 1 Apr 1960; 37 Air Division, 1 Apr 1966-2 Jan 1967. 408 Fighter Group, 30 Sep 1968-17 Dec 1969. 33 Tactical Fighter (later, 33 Fighter) Wing, 1 Sep 1970; 33 Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-15 Apr 1999. 53 Test Management Group, 3 Dec 2004-.

Stations:  Mitchel Field, NY, 15 Jan 1941 (operated from Groton, CT, 7-14 Dec 1941); G. L. Martin Aprt, MD, 15 Dec 1941; Philadelphia, PA, 10 May-12 Oct 1942 (operated from Paine Field, WA, May-Jun 1942); Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 10 Nov 1942; Casablanca, French Morocco, 17 Nov 1942; Thelepte, Tunisia, c. 8 Jan 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 10 Feb 1943; Telergma, Algeria, 13 Feb 1943; Berteaux, Algeria, 2 Mar 1943 (operated from Thelepte, Tunisia, 20 Mar-12 Apr 1943); Ebba Ksour, Tunisia, 12 Apr 1943; Menzel Temime, Tunisia, 20 May 1943; Sousse, Tunisia, 9 Jun 1943; Pantelleria, 18 Jun 1943; Licata, Sicily, 16 Jul 1943; Paestum, Italy, 13 Sep 1943; Santa Maria, Italy, 18 Nov 1943 (operated from Paestum, Italy, 1-31 Dec 1943); Cercola, Italy, c. 1 Jan-c. 5 Feb 1944; Karachi, India, 12 Feb 1944; Fungwanshan, China, 19 Mar 1944; Moran, India, 5 Sep 1944; Nagaghuli, India, 21 Nov 1944; Piardoba, India, 2 May 1945; Dudhkundi, India, 15 May-15 Nov 1945; Camp Shanks, NY, 7-8 Dec 1945. Neubiberg, Germany, 20 Aug 1946; Bad Kissingen, Germany, Jul-25 Aug 1947; Andrews Field, MD, 25 Aug 1947; Roswell AAFld (later Walker AFB), NM, 16 Sep 1947; Otis AFB, MA, 16 Nov 1948; Goose Bay Aprt, Labrador, 28 Oct 1952; Bergstrom AFB, TX, 1-2 Jan 1967. Kingsley Field, OR, 30 Sep 1968-17 Dec 1969. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Sep 1970-15 Apr 1999. Nellis AFB, NV, 3 Dec 2004-.

Commanders:  Maj Mark E. Hubbard, by Nov 1942; Capt J. P. Crowder, 8 Feb 1943; Capt Donald A. Halliday, 10 Feb 1943; Maj Mark E. Hubbard, 28 Feb 1943; Capt J. P. Crowder, 8 Mar 1943; Maj Mark E. Hubbard, 12 Mar 1943; Lt (unkn) Holcombe, 9 Apr 1943; Maj Mark E. Hubbard, 10 Apr 1943; Lt (unkn) Holcombe, 19 Apr 1943; Maj Mark E. Hubbard, 25 Apr 1943; Maj Charles H. Duncan, 4 May 1943; Lt (unkn) Watts, 5 Aug 1943; Maj Charles H. Duncan, by 26 Aug 1943; Maj Blanchard K. Watts, c. 21 Jan 1944; Capt Walter L. Moore Jr., 2 Feb 1944; Capt Richard K. Turner, 2 Mar 1945; Capt Frank A. Duncan, c. 1 Apr 1945; Capt Charles R. Langdon, 20 Apr 1945; Capt John W. Sognier, c. 23 May 1945; Capt Edward R. Tyler, 12 Jun 1945; Capt Howard Schulte, 26 Aug-20 Sep 1945; unkn, 21 Sep-8 Dec 1945. Maj Chester L. Van Etten, 20 Aug 1946-31 Mar 1947; unkn, 1 Apr-5 Jul 1947; none (not manned), 5 Jul-6 Nov 1947; Maj Frank Q. O'Connor, 7 Nov 1947; Maj Jerold J. Quandt, 2 Jun 1948; Lt Col Woodrow W. Korges, 27 Jul 1948; Maj Jack C. West, 4 Mar 1949; Lt Col Oscar H. Coen, 17 Jan 1950; Lt Col Robert Dow, c. Jan 1951; Maj Morris F. Wilson, c. Aug 1951; Lt Col Robert Dow, Dec 1951; Lt Col Fergus C. Fay, c. Oct 1953; Maj Voy A. Winders, 1954; Maj Francis R. Davison, c. Jul 1954; Maj Victor H. Prarat, 10 Jan 1955; Lt Col Victor E. Walton, 10 Feb 1955; Lt Col William A. Shomo, 4 May 1955; Lt Col Leonard F. Koehler, 1957; Lt Col Frank R. Jones, 1 Apr 1961; Col Edward R. Haydon, 8 Jun 1963; Col William J. Murphy Jr., 1 Jul 1965; Maj Robert J. Skinner, 15 Jun 1966; Col Dale L. Flowers, 29 Jun 1966-unkn. Lt Col William Savidge Jr., c. 30 Sep 1968; Lt Col Ronald J. Layton, by 30 Jun 1969-unkn. None (not manned), 1 Sep 1970; Lt Col Peter K. Nicolos, 1 Jul 1973; Lt Col Robert D. Rasmussen, c. 1 Jul 1975; Lt Col John P. Heffernan, 1 Apr 1977; Lt Col Jerry Cox, 23 Mar 1979; Lt Col John R. Lippolt, 13 Mar 1981; Lt Col Rudolph U. Zuberbuhler, 31 Jul 1981; Lt Col William K. Matthews, 1 Jun 1983; Lt Col James D. Woodall, 29 May 1985; Lt Col Steven G. Wilson, 29 May 1987; Lt Col Michael E. Fain, 20 Jan 1989; Lt Col James H. Davis, 19 Feb 1991; Lt Col James G. Boehm, 6 Jul 1992; Lt Col Michael J. Kosor Jr., 8 Jul 1994; Lt Col Mark A. Morris, 8 Jul 1995; Lt Col Thomas A. McCarthy, 2 May-14 Dec 1997; none (not manned), 15 Dec 1997-15 Apr 1999. Lt Col David J. Raggio, 3 Dec 2004; Lt Col Daniel F. Holmes, 11 Aug 2006; Lt Col William R. Tracy, 1 Aug 2008; Lt Col Michael E. Kensick, 30 Jul 2010-.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1941; P-40, 1941-1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-38, 1944-1945. P (later F)-51, 1946-1949; F-84, 1948-1950; F-86, 1950-1952; F-94, 1952-1956; F-89, 1955-1960, F-102, 1960-1966. F-101, 1968-1969. F-4, 1973-1979; F-15, 1979-1996, 1996-1997.

Operations:  Air defense of US, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Combat in MTO, 10 Nov 1942-2 Feb 1944, and CBI, 5 Jun 1944-18 Jun 1945. Part of US occupation forces in Germany, 1946-1947. Air defense of US and North America, 1947-1969. From 1973-1997, trained for offensive and defensive counter air missions; from Jan-Mar 1996, aircraft and personnel deployed to Saudi Arabia. Served at Nellis for test and evaluation since Dec 2004.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Combat, EAME Theater; Algeria-French Morocco with Arrowhead; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma. Southwest Asia: Ceasefire.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Central Tunisia, 15 Jan 1943. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Dec 1960-1 Dec 1961; 30 Sep 1968-30 Jun 1969; 1 Jul-30 Nov 1969; 1 Oct 1978-30 Apr 1980; 1 May 1984-30 Apr 1986; 1 Apr 1990-31 Mar 1992; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 2004-31 May 2006.

Emblem (WWII):  On a medium blue disc, border black, a caricatured tan lion with claws and teeth white, leaping through the air over a large white cloud formation and five yellow stars in dexter base. (Approved 24 Jul 1944.)

Emblem (Current):  On a disc quartered saltire-wise, Yellow at top and bottom and chequey Yellow and White on the sides, a Blue disc bearing a Yellow leaping lion with Brown mane and body, White teeth and claws, head and claws detailed Black, and Red mouth, in front of two White clouds and above five White stars; all within a narrow Yellow border. Approved on 19 Dec 1942 (K 2813) modified on 6 Aug 1986. MOTTO: GOLDEN PRIDE. Approved on 6 Aug 1986.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 29 Aug 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 29 Aug 2011.

Other Sites of Interest:

33d Fighter Group Reunion Site

Table of Contents



60th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 60th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 60th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 60th Fighter Squadron, Two Engine, on 8 Feb 1945. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1945. Redesignated 60th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 17 Jul 1946. Activated on 20 Aug 1946. Redesignated: 60th Fighter Squadron, Jet, on 14 Jun 1948; 60th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jan 1950. Inactivated on 30 Apr 1971. Redesignated 60th Tactical Fighter Squadron on 18 May 1971. Activated on 1 Sep 1971. Redesignated 60th Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated 1 Oct 2009 per DAF/A1M 141t, 23 Sep 2009; SO #GB-122, Hq ACC, 29 Sep 2009.

Assignments:  33d Pursuit (later, 33d Fighter) Group, 15 Jan 1941-8 Dec 1945. 33d Fighter (later, 33d Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 20 Aug 1946; 4707th Defense (later, 4707th Air Defense) Wing, 6 Feb 1952; 33d Fighter Group, 18 Aug 1955; 4735th Air Defense Group, 18 Aug 1957; Boston Air Defense Sector, 1 Aug 1959; 35th Air Division, 1 Apr 1966; 21st Air Division, 19 Nov 1969-30 Apr 1971. 33d Tactical Fighter (later, 33d Fighter) Wing, 1 Sep 1971; 33d Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-1 Oct 2009.

Stations:  Mitchell Field, NY, 15 Jan 1941; Bolling Field, DC, 8 Dec 1941-12 Oct 1942; Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 10 Nov 1942; Casablanca, French Morocco, 17 Nov 1942; Oujda, Algeria, 6 Dec 1942; Telergma, Algeria, 26 Dec 1942; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, c. 6 Jan 1943; Telergma, Algeria, 17 Feb 1943; Berteaux, Algeria, 2 Mar 1943; Ebba Ksour, Tunisia, 12 Apr 1943; Menzel Temime, Tunisia, 22 May 1943; Sousse, Tunisia, 10 Jun 1943; Pantelleria, 21 Jun 1943; Licata, Sicily, 17 Jul 1943; Paestum, Italy, 13 Sep 1943; Santa Maria, Italy, 18 Nov 1943 (operated from Paestum, Italy, 1-31 Dec 1943); Cercola, Italy, c. 1 Jan-c. 5 Feb 1944; Karachi, India, c. 20 Feb 1944; Shwangliu, China, c. 17 Apr 1944; Nagaghuli, India, c. 1 Sep 1944; Sahmaw, Burma, 20 Nov 1944; Myitkyina, Burma, 8 May 1945; Piardoba, India, 1 Oct-15 Nov 1945; Camp Shanks, NY, 7-8 Dec 1945. Neubiberg, Germany, 20 Aug 1946; Bad Kissingen, Germany, Jul-25 Aug 1947; Andrews Field, MD, 25 Aug 1947; Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 16 Sep 1947; Otis AFB, MA, 16 Nov 1948; Westover AFB, MA, 10 Aug 1950; Otis AFB, MA, 18 Aug 1955-30 Apr 1971. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Sep 1971-.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1941; P-40, 1941-1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-38, 1945. P(later F)-51, 1946-1949; F-84, 1948-1950; F-86, 1950-1955; F-94, 1955-1959; F-101, 1959-1971. F-15, 1979-1980, 1981-.

Operations:  Air defense of US, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Combat in MTO, 10 Nov 1942-2 Feb 1944, and CBI, 29 Apr 1944-2 Aug 1945. Part of US occupation forces in Germany, 1946-1947. Air defense of US, 1947-1971. Not operational, 1 Sep 1971-15 Jun 1979. F-15 training of PACAF crews, 15 Jun 1979-16 Apr 1980. Not operational, 17 Apr 1980-1 Jul 1981. Supported combat operations in Panama, Dec 1989-Jan 1990 and Southwest Asia, 26 Aug 1990-12 Apr 1991.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco with Arrowhead; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Central Tunisia, 15 Jan 1943. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 15 Jun 1979-22 Apr 1980; 1 May 1984-30 Apr 1986; 1 Apr 1990-31 Mar 1992.

Emblem (WWII):  On a disc of green within a border of black, piped blue, a caricatured crow of black; feet, beak, and tie yellow, wearing an aviator's helmet of blue, goggles white, and a checkered vest of alternate blue and white checks, holding in his wings a "tommy" gun of red. (Approved 15 May 1942.)

Emblem (Current):  On a disc quartered saltire-wise, Red at top and bottom and chequey Red and White on the sides, a Green disc bearing a Black caricatured crow with White eye, Black pupil, Yellow beak, feet and bow tie detailed and fimbriated Black, wearing a Blue aviator's helmet, with White goggles and a Blue and White checkered vest holding in his wings a Red tommy gun all fimbriated with Black and all within a narrow Red border. MOTTO: FIGHTING CROWS. Approved on 15 May 1942 (49003 A.C.); slightly modified in 1986.

Other Sites of Interest:

33d Fighter Group Reunion Site

Table of Contents



51st Fighter Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 51 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 51 Pursuit Group (Fighter) on 12 Mar 1941; 51 Fighter Group on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 13 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated 51 Fighter-Interceptor Group on 1 Feb 1950. Inactivated on 25 Oct 1957. Redesignated: 51 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985; 51 Fighter Group on 10 Sep 1990. Activated on 1 Oct 1990. Redesignated 51 Operations Group on 7 Feb 1992.

Assignments:  Southwest Air District (later, 4 Air Force), 15 Jan 1941; 9 Pursuit Wing, 2 Jun 1941 (attached to 4 Air Force until 20 Jun 1941); 4 Bomber Command, 19 Sep 1941-Jan 1942 (attached to 4 Interceptor Command, 14 Oct 1941-unkn); 10 (later, Tenth) Air Force, c. 14 Mar 1942; Fourteenth Air Force, 12 Sep 1943 (attached to Tenth Air Force until 1 Oct 1943); 69 Bombardment (later, 69 Composite) Wing, Oct 1943; Fourteenth Air Force, 25 Aug 1945; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, Sep-Nov 1945. 301 Fighter Wing, 15 Oct 1946; 51 Fighter (later, 51 Fighter-Interceptor) Wing, 18 Aug 1948-25 Oct 1957 (attached to 8 Fighter-Bomber Wing, 26 Sep-12 Oct 1950; Detachment 1, Twentieth Air Force, 16 Aug 1954-1 Mar 1955; Detachment 1, 313 Air Division, 1-15 Mar 1955). 51 Tactical Fighter (later, 51; 51 Fighter) Wing, 1 Oct 1990-.

Components

Squadrons:  4 Fighter: attached 20 Feb 1947-20 Sep 1950. 16 Pursuit (later, 16 Fighter; 16 Fighter-Interceptor): 15 Jan 1941-7 Dec 1945 (detached Jul 1942-19 Oct 1943); 15 Oct 1946-15 Oct 1957 (detached 3-28 Apr 1955, 1 Jun-1 Jul 1955, and 1 Jul-25 Oct 1957). 19 Tactical Air Support: 1 Oct 1990-1 Oct 1993. 25 Pursuit (later, 25 Fighter; 25 Fighter-Interceptor; 25 Fighter): 15 Jan 1941-12 Dec 1945; 15 Oct 1946-25 Oct 1957 (detached 28 Apr-1 Jun 1955 and 1 Jul-25 Oct 1957); 1 Oct 1993-. 26 Pursuit (later, 26 Fighter; 26 Fighter-Interceptor): 15 Jan 1941-13 Dec 1945; 15 Oct 1946-1 Oct 1957 (detached 20 Sep 1950-31 Jul 1954, 10 Nov-11 Dec 1954, and 11 Jul 1955-1 Oct 1957). 36 Tactical Fighter (later, 36 Fighter): 1 Oct 1990-. 38 Rescue (later, 38 Rescue Flight): 1 Feb 1993-15 Feb 1996. 39 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 1 Jun 1952-14 Jul 1954. 68 Fighter-All Weather: attached 25 Sep-9 Oct 1950. 80 Fighter-Bomber: attached 25 Sep-20 Dec 1950. 449 Fighter: 26 Aug 1943-13 Dec 1945 (detached 26 Aug-19 Oct 1943).

Flights:  55 Airlift: 1 Jul 1992-15 Dec 2007.

Stations:  Hamilton Field, CA, 15 Jan 1941; March Field, CA, 20 Jun 1941-11 Jan 1942; Karachi, India, 14 Mar 1942; Dinjan, India, 10 Oct 1942; Kunming, China, 2 Oct 1943; India, Sep-16 Nov 1945; Ft Lewis, WA, 12-13 Dec 1945. Yontan Adrm, Okinawa, 15 Oct 1946; Naha Afld (later, Naha AB), Okinawa, 22 May 1947; Itazuke AB, Japan, 22 Sep 1950; Kimpo AB, South Korea, 24 Oct 1950; Itazuke AB, Japan, 3 Jan 1951; Tsuiki AB, Japan, 22 Jan 1951; Suwon AB, South Korea, 31 Jul 1951; Naha AB, Okinawa, 1 Aug 1954-25 Oct 1957. Osan AB, South Korea, 1 Oct 1990-.

Commanders:  Col Homer L. Sanders, 1941; Lt Col McElroy (acting), 9 Apr 1942; Col Homer L. Sanders, 25 Apr 1942; Lt Col John E. Barr (acting), 27 May 1942; Col Homer L. Sanders, 14 Jul 1942; Col John F. Egan, 23 Mar 1943; Lt Col David W. Wallace, 15 Sep 1943; Col Samuel B. Knowles Jr., 20 Sep 1943; Maj Howard T. Wright (acting), 12 Dec 1943; Col Samuel B. Knowles Jr., 24 Dec 1943; Lt Col Robert L. Liles (acting), 31 Mar 1944; Col Samuel B. Knowles Jr., 9 Apr 1944; Col Louis R. Hughes Jr., 27 May 1944; Lt Col John C. Habecker, 15 Feb 1945; Lt Col William E. Blankenship, c. 22 Feb 1945; Col Edmund P. Gaines, 4 Apr 1945; Lt Col William E. Blankenship, c. Sep-13 Dec 1945. Col Loring F. Stetson Jr., 15 Oct 1946; Col Homer A. Boushey, 12 Apr 1947; Lt Col James F. McCarthy, 1 Aug 1947; Col Homer A. Boushey, 1947; Lt Col Bruce D. Biddlecome, Jun 1948; Lt Col Kenneth L. Garrett, 7 Mar 1949; Lt Col Robert F. Worley, 24 May 1949; Col John T. Shields, 1 Jul 1949; Lt Col Irwin H. Dregne, Jun 1950; Col Oliver G. Cellini, c. 25 Jul 1950; Lt Col Irwin H. Dregne, 7 Nov 1950; Col Oliver G. Cellini, 16 Dec 1950; Col Irwin H. Dregne, 24 Apr 1951; Lt Col John M. Thacker, 21 Jul 1951; Lt Col George L. Jones, 13 Nov 1951; Lt Col William M. Shelton, c. 17 Mar 1952; Lt Col Albert S. Kelly, Jun 1952; Col Robert P. Baldwin, Jan 1953; Lt Col Harold C. Gibson, Aug 1953; Col Malcolm E. Norton, Oct 1953; Lt Col Harold G. Shook, 23 Mar 1954; Col Paulett Spivey, 22 May 1954; Lt Col Harold G. Shook, 24 Jun 1954; Lt Col William A. Campbell, 9 Jul 1954; Col George V. Williams, 10 Aug 1954; Lt Col Donald V. Miller (acting), 26 Aug 1955; Col George V. Williams, 17 Oct 1955; Col Robert L. Cardenas, 2 Jul 1956; Lt Col George C. Farr, 4 May 1957-unkn. Col Raymond L. Head Jr., c. 1 Oct 1990; Col Hugh C. Cameron, 18 Jun 1991; Col Michael P. O'Conner, 2 Aug 1993; Col Bob D. DuLaney, 10 Jul 1995; Col Thomas Poulos Jr., 18 Jul 1997; Col Lawrence Wells, 25 Jun 1999; Col Paul K. White, 6 Jul 2001; Col Mark A. Bucknam, 8 Aug 2003; Col Terry M. Featherson, 29 Jul 2005; Lt Col Michael E. Newman, 13 Aug 2007-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1941-1945; P-38, 1943-1945; P-51, 1944-1945. P-47, 1946-1947; F-80, 1947-1951; F-61, 1947-1950; F-82, 1949-1950; F-86, 1951-1957; F-94, 1954. F-16, 1990-; OA-10, 1990-; C-12, 1992-2007; HH-60, 1993-1995; A-10, 1998-.

Operations:  During 1941, trained in the United States for fighter operations. After the Pearl Harbor attack of 7 Dec 1941, served as part of the defense force for the west coast. Moved to India via Australia and Ceylon, Jan-Mar 1942. Defended the Indian terminus of the "Hump" airlift route over the Himalaya Mountains between India and China and airfields in that area. Flew strafing, bombing, reconnaissance, and patrol missions in support of Allied ground troops during a Japanese offensive in northern Burma in 1943. After moving to China in Oct 1943, defended the Chinese end of the Hump route and air bases in the Kunming area. Attacked Japanese shipping in the Red River delta of Indochina and supported Chinese ground forces in their late 1944 drive along the Salween River. Inactivated after returning to India and then the United States in the autumn of 1945. Between 1946 and 1950, trained and served as part of the occupation force and provided air defense for Okinawa and the Ryukyu Islands. Flew armed reconnaissance and close air support missions over Korea from Japan, Sep-Oct 1950 and from South Korea Oct 1950-Jan 1951, when it moved back to Japan. The group continued to fly combat missions over Korea, staging through air bases at Taegu and Suwon. Flew air support, patrol, escort, interdictory, and reconnaissance missions, frequently engaging enemy jet fighters in air-to-air combat. After the Korean armistice on 27 Jul 1953, the group remained on alert, flew patrol missions, and participated in air defense exercises. After returning to Okinawa in Aug 1954, resumed air defense missions over the Ryukyu Islands. Frequently deployed squadrons to Taiwan and the Philippines on alert and air defense exercises. Became non-operational on 1 Jul 1957 and remained so until inactivation on 25 Oct 1957. Since 1990, trained and took part in a series of exercises to maintain combat readiness for the air defense of South Korea.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive. Korea: UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Korea, 28 Nov 1951-30 Apr 1952. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1992-30 Sep 1994; 1 Nov 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Oct 2002-30 Sep 2004. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations: [22] Sep 1950-30 Jun 1951; 1 Jul 1951-31 Mar 1953.

Emblem (WWII):  Shield: Per fess nebuly abased azure and or, issuing from partition line a demi-pegasus argent with a machine gun in each wing bendwise sable, gun fire proper. Motto: Deftly And Swiftly. (Approved 5 Feb 1942. This emblem was modified 2 May 1956.)

Emblem (51st Operations Gp):  Group will use the wing emblem with the group designation in the scroll.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 5 Dec 2008.

Commanders through 3 Dec 2008; Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2006.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (51st Fighter Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 51 Fighter Wing on 10 Aug 1948. Activated on 18 Aug 1948. Redesignated 51 Fighter-Interceptor Wing on 1 Feb 1950. Inactivated on 31 May 1971. Redesignated 51 Air Base Wing on 20 Oct 1971. Activated on 1 Nov 1971. Redesignated: 51 Composite Wing (Tactical) on 30 Sep 1974; 51 Tactical Fighter Wing on 1 Jul 1982; 51 Wing on 7 Feb 1992; 51 Fighter Wing on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  1 Air Division, 18 Aug 1948; Thirteenth Air Force, 1 Dec 1948; Twentieth Air Force, 16 May 1949 (attached to Fifth Air Force, 25 Sep 1950-1 Aug 1954 and further attached to 8 Fighter-Bomber Wing, 25 Sep-12 Oct 1950); 313 Air Division, 1 Mar 1955-31 May 1971. 314 Air Division, 1 Nov 1971; Seventh Air Force, 8 Sep 1986-.

Components

Groups:  5 Tactical Air Control (later, 5 Tactical Control; 5 Air Control): 8 Jan 1980-20 Jun 1982; 1 Oct 1990-1 Jul 1993. 51 Fighter (later, 51 Fighter-Interceptor, 51 Fighter, 51 Operations): 18 Aug 1948-25 Oct 1957 (detached 26 Sep-12 Oct 1950, 16 Aug 1954-15 Mar 1955); 1 Oct 1990-.

Squadrons:  16 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 1 Jul-24 Oct 1957, assigned 25 Oct 1957-24 Dec 1964. 19 Tactical Air Support: 30 Sep 1974-8 Jan 1980. 25 Fighter-Interceptor (later, 25 Tactical Fighter): attached 1 Jul-24 Oct 1957, assigned 25 Oct 1957-8 Jun 1960; 1 Feb 1981-31 Jun 1990. 36 Tactical Fighter: 30 Sep 1974-1 Oct 1990. 82 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 17 Feb-24 Jun 1966, assigned 25 Jun 1966-31 May 1971 (detached 30 Jan-20 Feb 1968). 318 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 11-18 Feb 1968. 497 Tactical Fighter: 1 Jan 1982-24 Jan 1989. 555 Tactical Fighter: attached 11 Dec 1964-15 Mar 1965 and 11 Nov 1965-25 Feb 1966. 558 Tactical Fighter: attached 12 Mar-15 Jun 1965. 559 Tactical Fighter: attached 12 Jun-15 Nov 1965.

Stations:  Naha Afld (later, AB), Okinawa, 18 Aug 1948; Itazuke AB, Japan, 22 Sep 1950; Kimpo AB, South Korea, 10 Oct 1950; Itazuke AB, Japan, 10 Dec 1950; Tsuiki AB, Japan, 15 Jan 1951; Suwon AB, South Korea, 1 Oct 1951- 26 Jul 1954; Naha AB, Okinawa, 1 Aug 1954-31 May 1971. Osan AB, South Korea, 1 Nov 1971-.

Commanders:  Brig Gen Hugo P. Rush, 18 Aug 1948; Col John W. Egan, 25 Mar 1949; Col Richard M. Montgomery, 1 Apr 1949; Col John W. Weltman, 19 Sep 1949; Col Oliver G. Cellini, 24 Apr 1951; Col William P. Litton, c. 1 Nov 1951; Col George R. Stanley, 2 Nov 1951; Col Francis S. Gabreski, 6 Nov 1951; Col John W. Mitchell, 13 Jun 1952; Col William C. Clark, 31 May 1953; Col Ernest H. Beverly, 9 Aug 1953; Col William C. Clark, 11 Sep 1953; Col Benjamin O. Davis Jr., Nov 1953; Col Barton M. Russell, 2 Jul 1954; Col Travis Hoover, 1 Aug 1954; Col Hilmer C. Nelson, 9 Aug 1954; Col Edwin C. Ambrosen, 16 Aug 1954; Col John H. Bell, 15 Nov 1955; Col Paul E. Hoeper, 2 Feb 1957; Col Robert L. Cardenas, 4 May 1957; Col Walter V. Gresham Jr., 15 Jul 1957; Col Elliott H. Reed, 1 Aug 1957; Col Walter V. Gresham Jr., 15 Aug 1957; Col Lester J. Johnson, 22 Nov 1957; Col William W. Ingenhutt, 25 Mar 1960; Col Lester C. Hess, 24 Jul 1962; Col Lloyd R. Larson, 11 Jun 1965; Col Frank E. Angier, 8 Apr 1967; Col John B. Weed, 13 Jun 1968; Col Roy D. Carlson, 30 Jun 1968-31 May 1971. Col Hewitt E. Lovelace Jr., 1 Nov 1971; Col John H. Allison, 1 Aug 1972; Col Billie J. Norwood, 7 Jun 1973; Col Alonzo L. Ferguson, 1 May 1974; Col Glenn L. Nordin, 30 Sep 1974; Brig Gen Vernon H. Sandrock, 12 Aug 1975; Col Frederick B. Hoenniger, 15 Jun 1977; Col James T. Boddie Jr., 18 Jun 1979; Col John C. Scheidt Jr., 16 May 1980; Col Eugene G. Myers, 20 Feb 1981; Col Thomas R. Olsen, 16 Jul 1982; Col Marcus F. Cooper Jr., 26 May 1983; Col Barry J. Howard, 18 Oct 1983; Col Charles D. Link, 20 Jul 1984; Col Henry J. Cochran, 12 Aug 1985; Col John C. Marshall, 12 Jun 1987; Col James J. Winters, 30 Jun 1989; Col Thomas R. Case, 17 Jul 1990; Brig Gen Robert G. Jenkins, 23 Jun 1992; Brig Gen Robert H. Foglesong, 31 Jan 1994; Brig Gen Steven R. Polk, 21 Nov 1995; Brig Gen Paul R. Dordal, 16 May 1997; Brig Gen Robert R. Dierker, 15 Sep 1998; Brig Gen David E. Clary, 22 May 2000; Brig Gen William L. Holland, 18 Mar 2002; Brig Gen Maurice H. Forsyth, 23 Sep 2003; Brig Gen Joseph Reynes Jr., 8 Jul 2005; Col Jon A. Norman, 15 Jun 2007; Col Thomas H. Deale, 15 Oct 2008-.

Aircraft:  F-61, 1948-1950; F-80, 1948-1951; F-82, 1949-1950; F-86, 1951-1960; F-94, 1954-1955; F-102, 1959-1964, 1966-1971; F-4, 1964-1965, 1965-1966; F-106, 1968. F-4, 1974-1989; OV-10, 1974-1982; A-10, 1982-1989; F-16, 1988-; OA-10, 1990-; C-12, 1992-2007; HH-60, 1993-1995; A-10, 1998-.

Operations:  In 1948, assumed air defense of Ryukyu Islands. Commenced combat operations over Korea in Sep 1950 with combat air patrols, close air support, and armed reconnaissance missions in support of UN forces. Operated a detachment at Suwon AB, Korea, beginning in May 1951, and relocated there in Oct 1951, with maintenance and supply elements remaining in Japan until Aug 1954. Ceased combat 27 Jul 1953. Wing pilots claimed 312 victories against enemy MiG jet fighters, including the first USAF victory in the first all-jet aerial battle on 8 Nov 1950. Following the cease-fire, resumed air defense of the Ryukyu Islands. From Aug 1954 through early 1971, frequently deployed aircraft, crews, and support personnel throughout the Far East, including Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines. Stationed one squadron (16 Fighter-Interceptor) at Tainan, Taiwan, 29 Aug 1958-26 Jan 1959 during the Quemoy-Matsu Crisis to fly combat air patrol for Nationalist Chinese Air Force supply flights. Following the seizure of the USS Pueblo by North Korea, deployed one squadron (82 Fighter-Interceptor) and support personnel to Suwon AB, Korea, 30 Jan-20 Feb 1968, and sent other personnel to Osan AB, South Korea, to support the 314 Air Division. Deployed an interceptor detachment to Suwon AB, South Korea, from Jun 1968 through 1970. In Nov 1971, served primarily as a support wing for Osan AB and the Koon-Ni range complex, and, after 15 Apr 1975, for Taegu AB, South Korea. Added a tactical mission on 30 Sep 1974. The wing lost control of Taegu AB from Oct 1978 to Jan 1982. In 1982, the wing gained a close air support capability to complement its air superiority role. Frequently deployed aircraft and crews to participate in training exercises throughout the Far East during this period. In addition, aircrews trained to perform fast forward air control missions beginning in 1984. In 1988-1989, mission shifted to offensive counterair and all-weather air interdiction. Restored tactical air control capabilities in Oct 1990, and, in Sep 1991, became the first operational F-16 unit to employ laser targeting with the LANTIRN navigation and targeting system. Airlift support operations were augmented with the addition of a flight of light transports in Aug 1992. Took part in a series of joint and combined training exercises for the defense of the Republic of Korea (ROK).

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Korea: UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea Summer-Fall, 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea Summer, 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 29 Aug 1958-19 Jan 1959; 26 Mar 1962-30 Sep 1963; 1 Jan 1965-31 Dec 1966; 1 Jan 1969-31 Dec 1970; 30 Sep 1974-31 Mar 1976; 1 Apr 1983-30 Apr 1984; 1 May 1984-30 Apr 1985; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989; 1 Oct 1992-30 Sep 1994; 1 Nov 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Oct 2002-30 Sep 2004. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations: 20 Sep 1950-30 Jun 1951; 1 Jul 1951-31 Mar 1953; 19-20 Aug 1972.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 51st Operations Group prior to 18 Aug 1948.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Per fess nebuly abased Azure and Or issuing from partition line a demi-Pegasus Argent with a machine gun in each wing bendwise Sable, gun fire proper, all within a diminished bordure of the second. Approved for 51st Group on 5 Feb 1942 and for 51st Wing on 2 May 1956 (K 707), revised on 3 Nov 2010. Motto: LEADING THE CHARGE. Approved c. Jun 1993.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 3 Dec 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Nov 2008.

Table of Contents



16th Fighter Squadron


P-51C at Chengkung in 1944. The 16th used numbers 350-399. (Courtesy of Mr. Nick King)


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 16 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 16 Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 12 Mar 1941; 16 Fighter Squadron (Twin Engine) on 15 May 1942; 16 Fighter Squadron (Single Engine) on 1 Jun 1942; 16 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine on 20 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 7 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated: 16 Fighter Squadron, Jet Propelled on 19 Feb 1947; 16 Fighter Squadron, Jet on 19 Aug 1948; 16 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 1 Feb 1950. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 24 Dec 1964. Redesignated 16 Tactical Fighter Squadron, and activated, on 18 Jun 1965. Organized on 20 Jun 1965. Inactivated on 1 Nov 1970. Redesignated 16 Tactical Fighter Training Squadron on 3 Oct 1978. Activated on 1 Jan 1979. Redesignated 16 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Apr 1983. Inactivated on 30 Jun 1986. Redesignated 16 Weapons Squadron on 24 Jan 2003. Activated on 3 Feb 2003.

Assignments:  51 Pursuit (later, 51 Fighter) Group, 15 Jan 1941-7 Dec 1945 (attached to 23 Fighter Group, Jul 1942-Oct 1943). 51 Fighter (later, 51 Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 15 Oct 1946 (attached to 51 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, 1 Jul-24 Oct 1957); 51 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, 25 Oct 1957-24 Dec 1964. 33 Tactical Fighter Wing, 20 Jun 1965-1 Nov 1970 (attached to Tactical Air Forces Norway [NATO], 27 Aug-13 Sep 1966; 1 Tactical Air Forces [Turkish] [NATO], 13-31 Oct 1969; 354 Tactical Fighter Wing, 26 May-14 Jun 1970; and 54 Tactical Fighter Wing, 15 Jun-7 Sep 1970). 388 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Jan 1979-30 Jun 1986. USAF Weapons School, 3 Feb 2003-.

Stations:  Hamilton Field, CA, 15 Jan 1941; March Field, CA, 10 Jun 1941-11 Jan 1942; Karachi, India, 12 Mar 1942; Kunming, China, 27 Jun 1942 (detachment operated from Lingling, China, 10 Jul-Aug 1942); Chungking, China, 17 Aug 1942; Kweilin, China, 27 Oct 1942; Chenyi, China, 29 Nov 1942 (detachment operated from Yunnani, China, 26 Dec 1942-Mar 1943) Kweilin, China, 31 Mar 1943; Hengyang, China, 20 Sep 1943; Chengkung, China, 25 Nov 1943 (detachments operated from Tsuyung, China, 25 Nov 1943-Apr 1944; Nanning, China, Feb 1944; Szemao, China, Apr 1944; Yunnani, China, May-Jul 1944; Liangshan, China, 16-31 Dec 1944; Kwanghan, China, 24 Dec 1944-30 Jan 1945; Laohokow, China, 1 Jan-16 Mar 1945; Poseh, China, 1 Feb-13 Apr 1945; Pakhoi, China, 7-19 Aug 1945); Nanning, China, 19 Aug 1945; Loping, China, Sep-Nov 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 6-7 Dec 1945. Yontan AB, Okinawa, 15 Oct 1946; Naha AB, Okinawa, 22 May 1947; Itazuke AB, Japan, 22 Sep 1950; Kimpo AB, South Korea, 22 Oct 1950; Itazuke AB, Japan, 3 Jan 1951; Tsuiki AB, Japan, 22 Jan 1951 (detachment operated from Suwon AB, South Korea, 20 May-29 Jul 1951); Suwon AB, South Korea, 29 Jul 1951; Misawa AB, Japan, Jul 1954; Naha AB, Okinawa, 1 Aug 1954-24 Dec 1964 (deployed at Chia-Li Afld, Formosa, 4-28 Apr 1955 and 1-30 Jun 1955). Eglin AFB, FL, 20 Jun 1965-1 Nov 1970 (deployed at Bodo AS, Norway, 27 Aug-13 Sep 1966; Cigli AB, Turkey, 13-31 Oct 1969; and Kunsan AB, South Korea, 26 May-7 Sep 1970). Hill AFB, UT, 1 Jan 1979-30 Jun 1986. Nellis AFB, NV, 3 Feb 2003-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1941-1944; P-51, 1944-1945. P-57, 1946-1947; F-80, 1947-1951; F-86, 1951-1959; F-102, 1959-1964. F-4, 1965-1970. F-16, 1979-1986.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, Jul 1942-25 Jul 1945. Combat in Korea, 22 Sep 1950-27 Jul 1953. Air defense in Okinawa and the Far East, 1954-1964. Became combat ready in the F-4 aircraft in Dec 1965. Participated in numerous airpower demonstrations, provided close air support of Army troops during tactical exercises, and prepared for overseas deployments. From Dec 1966 to mid 1967 performed F-4 replacement training. Twice relinquished all its resources for combat in SEA and remanned in Oct 1967 and Apr 1969. Deployed to South Korea, and assumed alert status at Kunsan and Osan ABs Jun-Sep 1970, providing air defense, participating in exercises, and maintaining combat readiness. Provided F-16 instructor pilot training, aircrew academics, and flight training tactics, 1979-1983. From Apr 1983 to Jun 1986, trained for combat operations.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: New Guinea; India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive. Korean War: UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; 1st UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea Summer 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Korea, 28 Nov 1951-30 Apr 1953. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 29 Aug 1958-19 Jan 1959; 26 Mar 1962-30 Sep 1963; 1 Jan 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1968-30 Jun 1969; 4 May 1984-3 May 1986. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations: [22] Sep 1950-30 Jun 1951; 1 Jul 1951-31 Mar 1953.

Emblem:  On a five-sided geometrical figure, per fess enhanced, Air Force golden yellow and Air Force blue, an American Indian ceremonial stake issuing from dexter base and extending beyond the perimeter of the emblem in chief, striped palewise of four, black and red; the stake pierced by a tomahawk bendwise, handle brown, blade white, border and thongs black; all within a narrow black border. (Approved 16 Nov 1961.)

Table of Contents



25th Fighter Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


-- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 25 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 25 Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 12 Mar 1941; 25 Fighter Squadron (Twin Engine) on 15 May 1942; 25 Fighter Squadron on 1 Jun 1942; 25 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 28 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 12 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated: 25 Fighter Squadron, Jet Propelled, on 19 Feb 1947; 25 Fighter Squadron, Jet, on 10 Aug 1948; 25 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 1 Feb 1950. Discontinued on 8 Jun 1960. Redesignated 25 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 18 Jun 1965. Organized on 20 Jun 1965. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1990. Redesignated 25 Fighter Squadron, and activated, on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  51 Pursuit (later, 51 Fighter) Group, 15 Jan 1941-12 Dec 1945. 51 Fighter (later, 51 Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 15 Oct 1946 (attached to 51 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, 1 Jul-24 Oct 1957); 51 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, 25 Oct 1957-8 Jun 1960. Tactical Air Command, 18 Jun 1965; 33 Tactical Fighter Wing, 20 Jun 1965; 8 Tactical Fighter Wing, 28 May 1968; 432 Tactical Reconnaissance (later, 432 Tactical Fighter) Wing, 5 Jul 1974; 3 Tactical Fighter Wing, 18 Dec 1975; 18 Tactical Fighter Wing, 19 Dec 1975; 18 Tactical Fighter Group, 1 May 1978; 51 Composite Wing (Tactical) (later, 51 Tactical Fighter Wing), 1 Feb 1981-31 Jul 1990. 51 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1993-.

Stations:  Hamilton Field, CA, 15 Jan 1941; March Field, CA, 11 Jun 1941-10 Jan 1942; Karachi, India, 12 Mar 1942; Dinjan, India, 22 Nov 1942 (detachment operated from Sadiya, India, 6 Nov 1942-2 Apr 1943; Jorhat, India, 2 Apr-14 Sep 1943); Yunnani, China, 14 Sep 1943 (detachment operated from Paoshan, China, 30 Nov 1944-Jan 1945; Liangshan, China, 10 Jan-Feb 1945; Poseh, China, 4 Feb-28 May 1945); Loping, China, Sep-Nov 1945; Fort Lewis, WA, 11-12 Dec 1945. Yontan Afld, Okinawa, 15 Oct 1946; Naha Afld, Okinawa, 22 May 1947; Itazuke AB, Japan, 22 Sep 1950; Kimpo AB, South Korea, 23 Oct 1950; Itazuke AB, Japan, 4 Jan 1951; Tsuiki AB, Japan, 22 Jan 1951; Suwon AB, South Korea, 20 Jul 1951; Naha AB, Okinawa, 1 Aug 1954-8 Jun 1960. Eglin AFB, FL, 20 Jun 1965-25 May 1968; Ubon RTAFB, Thailand, 28 May 1968; Udorn RTAFB, Thailand, 5 Jul 1974; Clark AB, Philippines, 18 Dec 1975; Kadena AB, Japan, 19 Dec 1975; Suwon AB, South Korea, 1 Feb 1981; Osan AB, South Korea, c. 10 Nov 1989-31 Jul 1990. Osan AB, South Korea, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  2Lt Tolan, 15 Jan 1941; Lt Col Paul C. Droz, 30 Apr 1941; Maj Earl J. Harrington, 14 Nov 1943; Lt Col Henry J. Amen, 3 Jun 1944; Lt Col John C. Habecker, Oct 1944; Maj Albert Criz, 30 Nov 1944; Maj Stanley C. Birkhold, Mar-12 Dec 1945. Unkn, 15 Oct 1946; Capt Louis A. Green, 1947; Maj Benjamin F. Long, Jun 1947; Maj Willie G. Walker, Nov 1947; Lt Col James F. Reed, 6 Feb 1948; Lt Col Clyde B. Slocumb Jr., Aug 1948; Maj Robert Mallory, 11 Jul 1949; Lt Col Clure E. Smith Jr., 1 Nov 1949; Lt Col Charles A. Appel, 10 Feb 1951; Maj Edward E. Sharp, May 1951; Maj William T. Whisner, 2 Dec 1951; Lt Col James B. Raebel, Mar 1952; Maj Louis E. Andre Jr., May 1952-unkn; Lt Col William A. Campbell, 11 Mar 1954; Maj Glenroy G. Crewe, 4 Feb 1955; Lt Col Donald V. Miller, 21 Jun 1955; Lt Col Hugh C. Slater, 4 May 1956; Maj Robert W. Denman, Dec 1957; Lt Col Albert M. Christopher, 1 May 1959-8 Jun 1960. Lt Col Russell E. Taliaferro, 4 Aug 1965; Lt Col Ethan A. Grant, 10 Feb 1966; Lt Col Lloyd C. Ulrich, 8 Dec 1967; Lt Col Richard E. Skelton, 23 May 1969; Lt Col Donald D. Brown, 21 Nov 1969; Lt Col Earl Anderson, 1 Jun 1970; Lt Col Robert L. Standerwick, 29 Jan 1971; Lt Col Chester L. Eby, 10 Feb 1971; Lt Col Richard E. French, 6 Sep 1971; Lt Col Bradford L. Sharp, 22 Apr 1972; Lt Col George S. Fulgham, 16 Jul 1972; Maj Albert S. Munsch Jr., 12 Nov 1972-unkn; Lt Col George S. Fulgham, c. Dec 1972; Lt Col Edward W. Owen, 3 May 1973; Lt Col Albert L. Pruden Jr., 20 Oct 1973; Lt Col Richard P. Moore, 23 Feb 1974; Lt Col George W. Acree II, 5 Jul 1974; Lt Col Clark R. Morgan, 1 Oct 1974; Lt Col Jay A. Whitney, 21 Jun 1975; Lt Col James D. Brecher, 5 Nov 1975; Lt Col Carl M. Smith, 17 May 1976; Lt Col James E. Cvik, 12 Jun 1978; Lt Col Jay N. Mitchell, 20 Jun 1979-22 Aug 1980; None (not manned), 23 Aug 1980-31 Dec 1981; Lt Col Harry J. Kieling Jr., 1 Jan 1982; Lt Col Christopher W. DeArmond, 31 Aug 1982; Lt Col Gerald W. Fulaytar, 19 Nov 1983; Lt Col Eugene Korotky, 30 Nov 1984; Lt Col Robert H. Haden, 4 Dec 1985; Col Richard H. Godeke, 29 Dec 1986; Lt Col Thomas G. Sheppard Jr., 23 Nov 1988; Lt Col Kevin D. Phillips, 27 Nov 1989; Lt Col Raymond W. Reher, 29 Dec 1989; None (not manned), c. Jan-31 Jul 1990. Lt Col Sydney McPherson, 1 Oct 1993; Lt Col John P. Rogers, 25 Jul 1995; Lt Col Lawrence D. Garrison Jr., 3 Jun 1997; Lt Col Kenneth G. Block, 10 Jun 1999; Lt Col Randy J. Petyak, 9 May 2000; Lt Col Brian R. Foley, 17 May 2002; Lt Col Thomas H. Deale, 6 Jun 2003; Lt Col Bruce H. McClintock, 25 May 2004; Lt Col Scott E. Caine, 16 Dec 2005; Lt Col Rodney J. Stokes, 6 Jul 2007-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1941-1945; P-38, 1944; P-51, 1944-1945. P-47, 1946-1947; F-80, 1947-1951; F-86, 1951-1960. F-4, 1965-1980; A-10, 1982-1989. OA-10, 1993-; A-10, 1998-.

Operations:  Combat in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 2 Sep 1942-28 May 1945. Combat in Korea, 22 Sep 1950-27 Jul 1953. Combat in Southeast Asia, c. 29 May 1968-28 Jan 1973. Supported the evacuation of US personnel from Phnom Penh, Cambodia and Saigon, South Vietnam, Apr 1975. Flew strike missions against Koh Tang Island and Khmer Rouge gunboats during the Mayaguez incident, 13-15 May 1975. Not operational, Aug 1980-Jan 1982 and Nov 1989-Jul 1990. Trained combat ready pilots in forward air control (FAC), air strike control, combat search and rescue, close air support, and air interdiction in the defense of the Republic of Korea (ROK), 1993-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive. Korea: UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII; Vietnam Ceasefire.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Korea, 28 Nov 1951-30 Apr 1952. Presidential Unit Citation: Southeast Asia, 1 Jan-1 Apr 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jan 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jun-30 Sep 1968; 22 Oct 1968-30 Jun 1970; 1 Oct 1971-31 Mar 1972; 1 Apr-22 Oct 1972; 18 Dec 1972-15 Aug 1973. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 29 Aug 1958-19 Jan 1959; 1 Sep 1978-30 Sep 1979; 1 Oct 1979-31 May 1980; 1 Apr 1983-30 Apr 1984; 1 May 1984-30 Apr 1985; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989; [1 Oct 1993]-30 Sep 1994; 1 Nov 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Oct 2002-30 Sep 2004. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations: [22 Sep 1950]-30 Jun 1951; 1 Jul 1951-31 Mar 1953. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: [28 May 1968]-28 Jan 1973.

Emblem: Vert, a dragon erect Or eyed and enflamed Gules armed Argent and grasping in its forelegs an aircraft cannon fesswise Sable smoking Azure; all within a diminished bordure White. Approved on 22 May 1996; replaced emblem approved on 1 Aug 1947 (49003 A.C.). Motto: "Assam Dragons" Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 Dec 2008.

Commanders through 11 Dec 2008, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2006.

P-40 Carries Bomb to Tojo

ALTHOUGH STILL FINLESS, the slogan-inscribed 1000-pound demolition bomb looms large before the Curtis P-40 that will drop the chalk-scribbled threats on enemy installations. Next to plane are Ordnance men, Pfc. Paul F. Farmer and Pvt. Anthony Zinkevish. Photo taken at Dinjan Airfield, India, April 14, 1943. Photo by U.S. Army.
Ex-CBI Roundup, January 1952 Issue


Other Sites of Interest:  25th Fighter Squadron (CBI)

Table of Contents



26th Fighter Squadron

In subsequent years after operations in the CBI theater, the 26th Fighter Squadron was reactivated at Naha, Okinawa and the 2nd logo above (depicting the "Lancers") was the new squadron insignia. In the mid-fifties, the 26th was transferred to Clark Field and an old previous design by Walt Disney depicting a Tiger atop a Mustang was resurrected and was deemed the new squadron logo in keeping with its heritage in the CBI.  -- 26th Fighter Squadron (CBI)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 26 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 26 Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 12 Mar 1941; 26 Fighter Squadron (Twin Engine) on 15 May 1942; 26 Fighter Squadron on 1 Jun 1942. Inactivated on 13 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated: 26 Fighter Squadron, Jet-Propelled, on 19 Feb 1947; 26 Fighter Squadron, Jet, on 10 Aug 1948; 26 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 1 Feb 1950. Inactivated on 9 Apr 1959. Redesignated 26 Flying Training Squadron on 13 Dec 1989. Activated on 19 Jan 1990. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1992. Redesignated 26 Weapons Squadron 18 Sep 2008 per DAF/A1M 030t, 18 Sep 2008 and activated 30 Sep 2008 per DAF/A1M 030t, 18 Sep 2008; SO #GB-144, Hq ACC, 19 Sep 2008.

Assignments:  51 Pursuit (later, 51 Fighter) Group, 15 Jan 1941-13 Dec 1945. 51 Fighter (later, 51 Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 15 Oct 1946 (attached to 6302 Air Base Group, 20 Sep 1950; 6351 Air Base Wing, 25 Jun 1951; Thirteenth Air Force, 11 Nov 1954); Thirteenth Air Force, 1 Oct 1957; 6200 Air Base Wing, 5 Jun 1958-9 Apr 1959. 71 Flying Training Wing, 19 Jan 1990; 71 Operations Group, 15 Dec 1991-1 Oct 1992. USAF Weapons School, 30 Sep 2008-.

Stations:  Hamilton Field, CA, 15 Jan 1941; March Field, CA, 10 Jun 1941-11 Jan 1942; Karachi, India, 13 Mar 1942; Dinjan, India, 10 Oct 1942; Kunming, China, c. 7 Oct 1943 (detachments operated from Nanning, China, c. 8 Mar-Nov 1944; Liangshan, China, May-20 Jun 1944; Kweilin, China, 20-30 Jun 1944; Poseh, China, Jan 1945; Liangshan, China, Jan and Mar 1945; Laohokow, China, Jan-Feb 1945); Nanning, China, 1 Aug 1945; Loping, China, Sep-Nov 1945; Ft Lewis, WA, 12-13 Dec 1945. Yontan, Okinawa, 15 Oct 1946; Naha, Okinawa, 22 May 1947; Clark AFB, Philippines, 11 Jul 1955-9 Apr 1959. Vance AFB, OK, 19 Jan 1990-1 Oct 1992. Nellis AFB, NV, 30 Sep 2008-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 15 Jan 1941; Maj Francis E. Brenner, by 1 Jan 1942; Capt Herbert W. Davis, 1 Sep 1942; Maj Francis E. Brenner, 1 Oct 1942; Capt Herbert W. Davis, 1 Jul 1943; Maj Edward M. Nollmeyer, 23 Oct 1943; Maj Robert L. Van Ausdall, 1 May 1944; Maj W. E. Blankenship, 1 Nov 1944; Capt Claude C. Beck, 15 Feb 1945; Capt Max Hernandez, 1 Mar 1945; Maj Robert L. Van Ausdall, 1 Apr 1945; Maj John S. Craig, 1 Jul 1945; Maj Max Hernandez, c. Nov-13 Dec 1945. Maj John M. Etchemendy, unkn; Maj Frank J. Keller, Aug 1949; Lt Col Edward F. LaClare, by Apr 1950; Lt Col Clayton M. Isaacson, 19 Feb 1951; Lt Col Bernard McCaskill Jr., by Jun 1951; Maj Claude W. Hanley Jr., 5 Feb 1952; Lt Col Francis B. Gallagher, 5 Mar 1952; Maj Claude W. Hanley Jr., May 1952; Lt Col Frederick F. Ploetz, c. May 1953; Lt Col Homer W. Morris, 26 Jun 1955; Lt Col I. B. Jack Donalson, by Jun 1956; Lt Col Richard A. Toole, 2 Jul 1958-9 Apr 1959. Lt Col Alan D. Minkel, 19 Jan 1990; Lt Col Leonard L. Jarman, 27 Jul 1990; Lt Col James C. Thomas, 24 Jul-1 Oct 1992. Lt Col Daniel J. Turner, 30 Sep 2008-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1941-1944; P-51, 1944-1945. P-47, 1946-1947; F-80, 1947-1953; F-86, 1953-1959. T-38, 1990-1992. MQ-1, 2008-; MQ-9, 2008-.

Operations:  Served in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 1942-1945. Air defense of Ryukyu Islands and later the Philippines, 1946-1959. Pilots took part in Korean conflict, 1950-1953. Conducted undergraduate pilot training, 1990-1992. Weapons Officer and Sensor Operator Advanced Tactics Course training, 2008-.

Service Steamers:  Korean Theater.

Campaigns:  China Defensive; China Offensive; India-Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: China, 20 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Apr 1990-31 Mar 1992.

Emblem:  A caricatured, pugnacious, orange and black tiger, with yellow orange muzzle, stomach, and feet, riding on back of a caricatured, tan and brown mustang running toward sinister, all emitting gray speed lines to rear. (Approved 20 Mar 1945.) Updated rendition approved on 31 Mar 1995. Newest rendition approved on 28 Jan 2009.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 16 Mar 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 16 Mar 2008.

Supersedes statement prepared on 23 Feb 1990.


Source:  Fact Sheets - History of the 71st Flying Training Wing  (Excerpt)

Throughout the early 1990s, the wing underwent several organizational changes. Headquarters Air Training Command directed a significant organizational change in its undergraduate pilot training wings in 1990. The 71st Flying Training Wing reorganized into five flying training squadrons, adding the 5th, 7th and 26th Flying Training Squadrons to the already existing operational squadrons, the 8th and 25th. Air Training Command activated the 7th and 26th Flying Training Squadrons on 19 January 1990 and the 5th Flying Training Squadron on 16 February 1990 . Also on this date, the wing inactivated the 71st Student Squadron, and the 5th gained the responsibility for the ACE program and fixed-wing qualification training. The 7th and 8th squadrons trained students during the T-37 aircraft phase of undergraduate pilot training and the 25th and 26th during the T-38 aircraft phase.

After an organizational review of the flying training squadrons, ATC consolidated the T-37 squadrons and T-38 squadrons into one squadron per aircraft system at each UPT base. This action was a result of the drastic decrease in pilot production. Vance held ceremonies on 1 October 1992 to inactivate the 7th and 26th Flying Training Squadrons. The 8th and 25th Flying Training Squadrons remained as the T-37 and T-38 flying squadrons.

The ATC, now known as Air Education and Training Command, directed the activation of the 26th Flying Training Squadron (Provisional) on 1 October 1994 as the wing's T-1A squadron. Plans called for the provisional squadron to inactivate and the 26th Flying Training squadron to activate in June 1995. It would provide Phase III tanker-transport training for the specialized undergraduate training program beginning with Class 96-04 in September 1995. The wing received its first T-1A "Jayhawk" on 8 December 1994. It was used as a maintenance trainer. The 71st estimated it would receive three aircraft per month until it had its total complement of 41. On 1 June 1995 , AETC inactivated the 26th (Provisional) and, instead, activated the 32d Flying Training Squadron, a unit with a history more attuned to the current mission.


Source:  26 Weapons Squadron Activates - Nellis AFB News

U.S. Air Force Weapons School Reactivates Historic Squadron for Unmanned Aerial Systems

by Airman 1st Class Ryan Whitney
Nellis AFB Public Affairs

10/2/2008 - NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- Airmen at Creech Air Force Base will soon be seeing Weapons School graduates joining the ranks in the 432nd Wing and Air Expeditionary Wing after the U.S. Air Force Weapons School reactivated the 26th Flying Training Squadron as the 26th Weapons Squadron here, Sept. 30.

The 26th WPS is the first Unmanned Aerial Systems Weapons Squadron, and will specialize in training and producing MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper pilots and sensor operators to help fill what Secretary of Defense Robert Gates says is an "insatiable appetite" for UAS platforms, said Col. Scott Kindsvater, USAFWS commandant.

The 26th WPS is the seventeenth active WPS currently and is scheduled to begin its first class in January 2009.

"This marks the first activation of a squadron at the Weapons School since the stand-up of the F-117 and B-2 Divisions in 2002," said Colonel Kindsvater. "This is a momentous occasion for a community of aviators that have been without this level of tactical integration and training in their history."

Taking the stick of the newly activated squadron is Lt. Col. Daniel Turner, a command pilot with more than 3,600 flight hours in the MQ-1B, C-130, and AC-130. The colonel returns to the Weapons School from the 3rd Special Operations Squadron. Earlier in his career, then-Major Turner took part in WPS activation, when he was selected as one of the initial instructors of the 14th Weapons Squadron, the special operations division of the USAFWS.

Colonel Turner awarded the new squadron patch to the cadre that will be instructing the first class. Maj. Joe Campo, Maj. Bryan Callahan, Capt. Andy Beitz, Capt. Mike Stolley, Maj. Lichen Pursley are the pilots, and Tech. Sgt. Christopher Bluto, Staff Sgt. Aaron Aguilar, and Senior Airman John Rourke are the sensor operators for the course.

"I couldn't have asked for a better group of Airmen for this squadron, they were on the fast track and they have put all that on hold to come down here and better the Air Force, and that is very commendable," the colonel said about his cadre. "All of their packages had somewhere in it that they were the best their units had to offer, and I couldn't agree more."

The cadre was then given unit patches, which have not changed since Walt Disney designed the patch in 1940 when the squadron was activated. It depicts a Tiger, representing the famed American volunteer group, the "Flying Tigers," riding on a mustang, which is symbolic of the P-51, the squadron's aircraft at the time of the Patches creation.

Missions for the 26th Weapons Squadron will be flown from Nellis Air Force Base, as opposed to Creech Air Force Base, where most UAS operations are currently underway.


Other Sites of Interest:

26th Fighter Squadron (CBI)

Memoir of Capt. Charles Evans

Table of Contents



36th Fighter Control Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Organized 13 Feb 42, Losey Field, Puerto Rico. Redesignated 36 Fighter Control Squadron, 5 Jun 42. Divided into two detachments as follows: organized at Henry Barracks, Cayey, Puerto Rico, 2 Sep 43; and organized at Hato Field, Willemstad, Curacao, Netherlands West Indies, and assigned to Dakota Field, Aruba, Netherlands West Indies. Headquarters later stationed in Curacao, Netherlands West Indies. Move to CBI (date unknown). Disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  I Fighter Command -Jan 45, 10th Air Force.


Source:  Mr. Charles Ridge, Jr.

I served in the 14th Army Air Force as a member of the 36th Fighter Control Squadron. We were assigned to the 51st Fighter Group based in China, to provide communications to P-51's at airstrips north of Kunming.

Table of Contents



51st Fighter Control Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  35th Interceptor Control Squadron activated 18 Dec 41 at Hamilton Fld, CA. Redesignated 51st Interceptor Control Squadron 12 Mar 1941. Redesignated 51st Fighter Control Squadron 29 May 42 per AG 320. 2 letter dated 23 May 1942. Inactivated after 29 Nov 45, disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  51st Pursuit Gp (later Fighter Gp) -Jan 44, 10th Air Force -Apr 45, North Burma Task Force.

Stations:  March Field -12 Mar 42, Karachi -10 Sep 42, Dinjan -Sep 42, Kanjikoah -7 Jan 45, Myitkyina -Sep 45, Dinjan -Sep 45, Piardoba -29 Nov 45, Karachi.

Table of Contents



322nd Fighter Control Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated 1 Apr 43, active through Aug 45, disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  51st Fighter Gp to 1944, 14th Air Force -Aug 45 10th Air Force.

Stations:  Bradley Field, CT, Dinjan, and Kunming.

Table of Contents



449th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 449th Fighter Squadron on 2 Aug 1943. Activated on 26 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 25 Dec 1945. Activated on 1 Sep 1947. Redesignated: 449th Fighter Squadron (All Weather) on 20 Jul 1948; 449th Fighter-All Weather Squadron on 20 Jan 1950; 449th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 1 Jun 1951. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Aug 1960.

Assignments:  51st Fighter Group, 26 Aug 1943-13 Dec 1945 (attached to 23d Fighter Group, 26 Aug-Oct 1943). Alaskan Air Command, 1 Sep 1947 (attached to 5001st Composite Group, 1 May 1949); 5001st Composite Wing, 1 Jul 1949; 9th Air Division, 8 Apr 1953; 5001st Air Defense Group, 20 Sep 1954; 9th Air Division, 1 Oct 1955-25 Aug 1960.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 26 Aug 1943; Lingling, China, 26 Aug 1943 (detachments operated from Hengyang and Kweilin, China, Sep 1943); Suichwan, China, Feb 1944; Kweilin, China, Jun 1944; Chengkung, China, 16 Jul 1944 (detachment operated from Yunnani, China, c. 23 Jul 1944-Mar 1945; Mengtsze, China, Mar 1945; Posek, China, 12 Apr-May 1945); Mengtsze, China, c. 13 Jul 1945; India, Sept-Nov 1945; Ft Lewis, Wash, 19-25 Dec 1945. Adak, 1 Sep 1947; Ladd AFB, Alaska, 28 Mar 1949-25 Aug 1960.

Aircraft:  P-38, 1943-1945. P-61, 1947-1949; F-82, 1948-1953; F-94, 1952-1954; F-89, 1954-1960.

Operations:  Combat in CBI Aug 1943-30 Jul 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a disc, divided horizontally by an irregular representation of a mountain range white, lined black, the upper section of the disc blue, thereon a star white, the lower section black; over the left side a half-Arctic gyrfalcon proper (white, outlined black, beak, claws and eyelid yellow, tongue red, eye black), wings rising and the left wing extending over the edge of the disc. (Approved 4 Dec 1951.)

Table of Contents



80th Fighter Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 80 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 80 Fighter Group (Single Engine) on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 80 Flying Training Wing, which was established on 23 May 1972. Activated on 1 Jan 1973.

Assignments:  III Interceptor (later, III Fighter) Command, 9 Feb 1942; First Air Force, 20 Jun 1942; I Fighter Command, 4 Jul 1942; New York Air Defense Wing, 11 Aug 1942-10 May 1943; Tenth Air Force, 28 Jun 1943; American Air Command 1 (later, 5320 Air Defense Wing [Provisional]), Sep 1943; Tenth Air Force, 20 Jun 1944; Army Air Forces, India-Burma Theater, c. 1 Aug-9 Oct 1945; New York Port of Embarkation, 1-3 Nov 1945. Air Training Command, 1 Jan 1973; Nineteenth Air Force, 1 Jul 1993-.

Components

Groups:  80 Operations: 2 Jan 1998-.

Squadrons:  88 Pursuit (later, 88 Fighter; 88 Flying Training): 9 Feb 1942-3 Nov 1945; 1 Jan 1973-2 Jan 1998. 89 Pursuit (later, 89 Fighter; 89 Flying Training): 9 Feb 1942-3 Nov 1945; 1 Jan 1973-2 Jan 1998. 90 Pursuit (later, 90 Fighter; 90 Flying Training): 9 Feb 1942-3 Nov 1945; 1 Jan 1973-2 Jan 1998. 459 Fighter: 1 Sep 1943-13 Mar 1944.

Stations:  Selfridge Field, MI, 9 Feb 1942; Bridgeport, CT, 25 Jun 1942; Farmingdale, NY, 5 Jul 1942; Mitchel Field, NY, 9 Mar-30 Apr 1943; Karachi, India, 28 Jun 1943; Kanjikoah, India, Sep 1943; Nagaghuli, India, 11 Oct 1943; Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 29 Aug 1944; Myitkyina, Burma, 20 Jan 1945; Moran, India, 4 May 1945; Dudhkundi, India, 24 May-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Sheppard AFB, TX, 1 Jan 1973-.

Commanders:  Unkn, Feb-May 1942; Col John C. Crothwaite, c. 20 May 1942; Maj Albert L. Evans Jr., 1 Jul 1942; Col Ivan W. McElroy, 14 Jul 1943; Col Albert L. Evans Jr., 13 Apr 1944; Col Sidney D. Grubbs Jr., 1 Feb 1945; Col Hiette S. Williams Jr., 29 Apr 1945-unkn. Col Robert G. Liotta, 1 Jan 1973; Col Kirk A. Brown, 28 Jun 1973; Col Spence M. Armstrong, 22 Jul 1974; Col Robert D. Caudry, 17 Jul 1976; Col William R. Deans, 1 Apr 1977; Col Jesse W. Campbell, 5 Jul 1978; Col Larry W. Pritchett, 15 Jul 1980; Col William F. Phillips, 24 Feb 1982; Col Sandor Babos, 13 Feb 1984; Col Robert K. McLeod, 24 Feb 1986; Col Travis E. Harrell, 22 Dec 1987; Col William B. Mitchell, 20 Jul 1989; Col Robert E. Gatliff, 19 Apr 1991; Col William J. Lake, 28 Jul 1992; Col James G. Ferguson, 10 Jan 1994; Col Kenneth M. Decuir, 26 Feb 1996; Col Stanley Gorenc, 6 Nov 1997; Col Kurt A. Cichowski, 15 May 1999; Col Ralph J. Jodice II, 17 Jul 2001; Col H. D. Polumbo Jr., 15 Aug 2003; Col Jeffrey B. Kendall, 29 Jan 2005; Col David P. Petersen, 10 Aug 2007; Col Kevin Schneider, 1 Jul 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1942-1943, 1944-1945; P-40, 1943-1944; P-38, 1943-1944. T-37, 1973-2009; T-38, 1973-; AT-38, 1993-; T-6, 2008-.

Operations:  Trained for combat and served as part of the defense force for the northeastern United States, 1942-1943. Sailed for India, via Brazil, Cape of Good Hope, and Ceylon, in May 1943. Began combat operations in Sep 1943. Supported Allied ground forces during the battle for northern Burma and the push southward to Rangoon, bombing and strafing troop concentrations, supply dumps, lines of communication, artillery positions, and other objectives. Defended the Indian terminus of the Hump route by striking Japanese airfields and patrolling Allied airfields to safeguard them from attack. Received a DUC for intercepting a formation of enemy aircraft and preventing its attack on a large oil refinery in Assam, India, on 27 Mar 1944. Withdrawn from combat in May 1945. Since Jan 1973, provided undergraduate pilot training, initially for USAF, German Air Force, and Vietnamese Air Force students. Although Vietnamese Air Force pilot training ceased in Sep 1974, students from other nations continued to train under the security assistance program through Apr 1980. Provided USAF rotary-wing pilots' conversion training to fixed-wing aircraft, Jun 1977-Nov 1981. Conducted undergraduate pilot training and pilot instructor training under the Euro-NATO Joint Pilot Training program, beginning Oct 1981, with participating nations contributing staff and financial support. In Jan 1994, began training Euro-NATO pilots in fighter fundamentals, using AT-38 aircraft.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: India, 27 Mar 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 10-20 Apr 1979; 30 Apr 1981-29 Apr 1983; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001.

Emblem: Per bend Azure and Sable a bend raguly Or, all within a diminished bordure of the like. Motto: ANGELS ON OUR WINGS. Approved for the group on 14 Oct 1942 (KE 51227) and for the wing on 2 Jan 1973.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, and Honors through 2 Mar 2010.


Source:  Military Shoulder Patches of the U.S. (Mr. Ray Fincham)

The 80th Pursuit Group compiled an impressive combat record, providing top cover for cargo aircraft flying "the Hump," delivering bombs on targets in Burma, and engaging Japanese aircraft in air-to-air combat. Their nickname, the "Burma Banshees," was given to them by the natives because of the high-pitched whistling noise the P-40 made during dive bomb runs.


Other Sites of Interest:

Burma Banshees

Burma Banshees - The 80th Fighter Group

Table of Contents



88th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 88 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated: 88 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 88 Fighter Squadron (Single Engine) on 1 Jul 1942; 88 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 28 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Redesignated as 88 Flying Training Squadron on 25 May 1972. Activated on 1 Jan 1973. Redesignated as 88 Fighter Training Squadron on 18 Oct 2007.

Assignments:  80 Pursuit (later, 80 Fighter) Group, 9 Feb 1942-3 Nov 1945. 80 Flying Training Wing, 1 Jan 1973; 80 Operations Group, 2 Jan 1998-.

Stations:  Selfridge Field, MI, 9 Feb 1942; Bridgeport, CT, 25 Jun 1942; Farmingdale, NY, 2 Sep 1942; Mitchel Field, NY, 9 Mar-30 Apr 1943; Karachi, India, 28 Jun 1943; Mokelbari, India, c. Oct 1943; Shingbwiyang, Burma, 3 May 1944 (detachment operated from Myitkyina, Burma, May-20 Aug 1944); Myitkyina, Burma, c. 23 Jan 1945; Moran, India, 3 May 1945; Dudhkundi, India, 29 May-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Sheppard AFB, TX, 1 Jan 1973-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 9 Feb 1942-unkn; 1Lt Theodore S. Thurston, 1942; Maj Richard A. Ames, c. 1 Jul 1942; Capt George B. Hamilton, 12 Dec 1942; Capt John E Fouts, Jr., 1 Aug 1943; Maj Earl J. Livesay, 22 Sep 1943; Maj George B. Hamilton; c. 11 Dec 1943; Maj Robert J. Becker, 17 Apr 1944; Capt Owen R. Allred, 9 Sep 1944; Lt Col Robert J. Becker, 30 Sep 1944; Maj Jack W. Ford, 16 Apr 1945; Maj Claude R. Kimbrel, 18 Jun-3 Nov 1945. Lt Col David Brandt, Jr., 1 Jan 1973; Lt Col Mylus G. Anderson, 30 Apr 1973; Lt Col Herman K. McDonald, 27 May 1975; Lt Col James E. Rousy, 1 Apr 1977; Lt Col Carroll J. Holley, 16 Apr 1979; Lt Col Theodore M. Duigon, 7 May 1979; Lt Col Jeffrey T. Ellis, 1 Jul 1980; Lt Col Dennis A. Smith, 8 Jun 1981; Lt Col William J. Hamm, 27 Jun 1983; Lt Col Mogens P. Kristensen (Denmark), 10 Jun 1985; Lt Col William J. Frey, 22 Apr 1988; Lt Col Douglas W. Smith, 9 Feb 1990; Lt Col James P. Shalko, 18 Dec 1991; Lt Col Michael W. Palmer, 8 Apr 1993; Lt Col David Atzhorn, 16 May 1994; Lt Col Bernd Heiber (Germany), 14 Jul 1995; Lt Col Michael W. Ford, 21 May 1998; Lt Col James J. Evanko, 6 Oct 1999; Lt Col Eric Bogaards (Netherlands), 8 Jan 2001; Lt Col Kevin C. Smith, 13 Jun 2003; Lt Col Richard I. McCool, 18 Mar 2005; Lt Col Rick A. Davis, 16 Nov 2006-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1942-1943; P-40, 1943-1944; P-47, 1944-1945. T-37, 1973-; T-38, 1981-.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 1 Oct 1943-28 Apr 1945. Undergraduate pilot training for USAF and students from selected nations, 1973-1981; Euro-NATO joint pilot training, Oct 1981-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaigns Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Assam, India, 27 Mar 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Mar 1975-1 Mar 1977; 10-20 Apr 1979; 1 Jul 1980-28 Feb 1982; 1 Mar 1982-30 Apr 1983; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2004.

Emblem:  On a Light Blue disc, within a border company of seventy-two segments alternate Black and White, a quatrefoil White, outlined Black, surmounted by four Red lightning bolts in cross, joined at center by an annulet of the last. Approved on 18 Jan 1943 (K 2822). Modified on 18 Jul 1995.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 4 Jun 2009.

Supersedes statement prepared on 3 Nov 1997.


Source:  Military Shoulder Patches of the U.S. (Mr. Ray Fincham)

Initially constituted as a P-47 Squadron, the 88th trained in this aircraft from June 1942 until April 1943 when it was learned that they were assigned to the Far East and not Europe as expected. At this time the squadron transitioned from the P-47 Thunderbolt to the P-40 Tigershark. In the China-Burma-India theater it compiled an impressive records as part of the "Burma Banshees".

The 88th Fighter Squadron's emblem was approved on 18 April 1943. The black and white segments of the border represent the turbine wheel of a turbo-supercharger. The four lightning bolts in cross represent the 4 bladed propeller of the P-47. The quatrefoil was added to provide symmetry to the design and contrast to the propeller.

Table of Contents



89th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 89 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated as: 89 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 89 Fighter Squadron (Single Engine) on 1 Jul 1942; 89 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 28 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Redesignated as 89 Flying Training Squadron on 25 May 1972. Activated on 1 Jan 1973.

Assignments:  80 Pursuit (later, 80 Fighter) Group, 9 Feb 1942-3 Nov 1945. 80 Flying Training Wing, 1 Jan 1973; 80 Operations Group, 2 Jan 1998-.

Stations:  Selfridge Field, MI, 9 Feb 1942; Farmingdale, NY, 23 Jun 1942; Mitchel Field, NY, 9 Dec 1942-30 Apr 1943; Karachi, India, 29 Jun 1943; Gushkara, India, c. 16 Aug 1943; Nagaghuli, India, c. 15 Oct 1943 (detachment operated from Sadiya, India, Oct 1943; Mokelbaria, India, May 1944; Dergaon, India, Aug 1944); Myitkyina, Burma, c. 15 Sep 1944; Moran, India, 8 May 1945; Dudhkundi, India, 30 May-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Sheppard AFB, TX, 1 Jan 1973-.

Commanders:  None, 9 Feb 1942-16Mar 1942; 2d Lt George C. Vanderbeke, 17 Mar 1942; Maj Gilbert L. Meyers, 1 Jul 1942; Maj Hubert A. Zemke, c. 30 Aug 1942; Capt Verl D. Luehring, 14 Sep 1942; Maj John Svenningsen, 2 Aug 1943; Maj William S. Harrell, 20 Jan 1944; Maj Garrett S. Williams, Nov 1944; Maj Allan P. Rankin, c. 6 Feb 1945; Maj Leonard W. Anderson, 20 Jun 1945; unkn, 5 Oct-3 Nov 1945. Lt Col Billy M. Mobley, 1 Jan 1973; Lt Col Richard E. Hearne, 21 Oct 1974; Lt Col Donald W. Ramsey, 21 Jul 1975; Lt Col Larry L. Wagner, 1 Apr 1977; Lt Col Louis A. Silvestri, 16 Apr 1979; Lt Col Gary J. Toy, 24 Mar 1981; Lt Col Wagn Langebek (Demark), 19 Mar 1982; Lt Col Gerhard Rudeck (GAF), 4 Mar 1985; Lt Col Victor J. Tambone, 4 Apr 1988; Lt Col Horace A. Wallace, 13 Jul 1999; Lt Col Jackie L. Foster, 14 Jan 1991; Lt Col Klaus H. Spura, 7 May 1993; Lt Col Francesco Tricomi (Italy), 10 May 1996; Lt Col Harvey D. Johnson, 14 Aug 1998; Lt Col Yusuf Enginol (Turkey), 16 Jun 2000; Lt Col Bernard Schwartze (GAF), 23 May 2002; Lt Col Jeffrey Snell, 26 Sep 2003; Lt Col John F. McDevitt Jr., 1 Apr 2005; Lt Col Vittorio Cencini (Italy), 11 Dec 2006; Lt Col Patrick Testerman, 1 Dec 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1942-1943; P-40, 1943-1944; P-47, 1944-1945. T-37, 1973-.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 8 Sep 1943-28 Apr 1945. Undergraduate pilot training for USAF and students from selected nations, 1973-1981; Euro-NATO joint pilot training, Oct 1981-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Assam, India, 27 Mar 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 10-20 Apr 1979; 1 Jan 1980-31 Dec 1981; 1 Jan 1982-30 Apr 1983; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001.

Emblem:  On a Red disc, edged Black an inverted Ace of Spades, proper, bordered White, edged Black, a skull, proper, with Red and Yellow lightning bolts emanating from the eye sockets, resting on a large, White cloud formation, outlined Medium Blue, all in front of flames of fire Red and Yellow. Approved on 5 Jun 1944 (K 2822); modified on 18 Jul 1995.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, and Honors through 2 Mar 2010.


Source:  Military Shoulder Patches of the U.S. (Mr. Ray Fincham)

The squadron history originates with the 89th Fighter Squadron, formed 17 March 1942 as part of the 80th Pursuit Group. The Group was composed of the 88th, 89th, and 90th Fighter Squadrons, and was established at Selfridge Field, Michigan on 13 January 1942. The 80th Pursuit Group moved to Mitchell Field, New York, in July 1942 to train in the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. While there, Lieutenant Freeling Clower designed the distinctive squadron patch still used today by the 89th Fighter Training Squadron; the skull and ace of spades symbolized death in the sky for the opponents, while the clouds and the thunderbolts were for the P-47 Thunderbolt, the highest flying fighter of its time. In February of 1943, orders came through for the Far East instead of Europe as previously expected, so the 80th Pursuit Group moved to Richmond, Virginia to train in the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk. In May of that year, the 80th Pursuit Group departed the United States for India where they convoyed some 2,200 miles overland to the Assam Valley of the China-Burma-India theater of operations.

Table of Contents



90th Fighter Squadron



Numbers were 70-99 for the 90th FS and cowl front in squadron colour blue. -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 90 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated as: 90th Fighter Squadron on 15 May l942; 90 Fighter Squadron (Single Engine) on 1 Jul 1942; 90 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 28 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 3 Nov 1945. Redesignated as 90 Flying Training Squadron on 25 May 1972. Activated on 1 Jan 1973.

Assignments:  80 Pursuit (later, 80 Fighter) Group, 9 Feb 1942-3 Nov 1945. 80 Flying Training Wing, 1 Jan 1973; 80 Operations Group, 2 Jan 1998-.

Stations:  Selfridge Field, MI, 9 Feb 1942; Newark, NJ, 24 Jun 1942; La Guardia Aprt, NY, 27 Aug 1942; Mitchel Field, NY, 27 Feb-30 Apr 1943; Karachi, India, 28 Jun 1943; Jorhat, India, c. 12 Sep 1943; Moran, India, Mar 1944; Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 27 Aug 1944; Myitkyina, Burma, 21 Jan 1945; Moran, India, 5 May 1945; Dudhkundi, India, 30 May-6 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-3 Nov 1945. Sheppard AFB, TX, 1 Jan 1973-.

Commanders:  Lt M. C. Feeters, 9 Feb 1942; Maj David D. Terry, c. 24 Jun 1942; Capt Walter Coss, 16 Dec 1942; Capt Richard M. Powell, 11 Jan 1943; Maj John E. Jones, 4 Aug 1943; Lt Col Richard M. Powell, 21 Jan 1944; Maj Thomas G. Bowie, 8 Apr 1945; Capt Ralph E. Ward, 23 Aug 1945-unkn. Lt Col George G. Hull, 1 Jan 1973; Lt Col Timothy L. Thomas, 20 May 1974; Lt Col Larry Dillingham, 11 Nov 1974; Lt Col George F. Baird, 21 Jun 1976; Lt Col Johnny C. Fender, 1 Apr 1977; Lt Col Eric S. Doten, 31 Mar 1978; Lt Col Ellwood P. Hinman III, 14 May 1979; Lt Col Theodore M. Duigon, 29 May 1980; Lt Col Phillip V. Maywald, 17 Apr 1981; Lt Col Mitchell D. Hopkins, 23 Jun 1981; Maj William R. Bean, 1 Dec 1981; Lt Col Henri R. Buffart (Netherlands), 1 Mar 1982; Lt Col David R. Love, 1 Mar 1982; Lt Col Daniel T. Fucci, 14 Nov 1986; Lt Col Gerhard Ballhausen (GAF), 10 Mar 1988; Lt Col Giuseppe Borgna (Italy), 12 Apr 91; Lt Col Luigi Telesca (Italy), 12 Apr 1993; Lt Col Raymond R. Lunger Jr., 29 Aug 1994; Lt Col Michael W. Steinfurth (GAF), 19 Jul 1996; Lt Col Parick R. Demortier (Belgium), 16 Jul 1999; Lt Col James D. Reed, 16 Jul 2001; Lt Col John Kreger, 21 Jan 2003; Lt Col Salvatore Romeo (Italy), 1 Jul 2004; Lt Col Harry Oostema (Netherlands), 3 Nov 2006; Lt Col Oliver Habel (GAF), 10 Apr 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1942-1943; P-40, 1943-1944; P-47, 1944-1945. T-38, 1973-.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 16 Sep 1943-29 Apr 1945. Undergraduate pilot training for USAF and students from selected nations, 1973-1981; Euro-NATO joint pilot training, Oct 1981-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Assam, India, 27 Mar 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Nov 1975-30 Oct 1977; 10-20 Apr 1979; 30 Apr 1981-29 Apr 1983; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001.

Emblem:  On a Yellow disc edged Black, a caricatured, Black and White bear, standing on hind legs, facing toward dexter, wearing Red Brown boxing gloves on the forepaws, and swinging a left uppercut punch, leaving a comet trail of Red, White, and Blue flecked with four, White, five-point stars. Approved on 19 Jan 1945 (11461 A.C.); , modified on 18 Jul 1995.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, and Honors through 2 Mar 2010.

Table of Contents



459th Fighter Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Air Force History Archive

Lineage:  Constituted as 459 Fighter Squadron (Two Engine) on 2 Aug 1943. Activated on 1 Sep 1943. Inactivated on 5 Nov 1945. 459th Fighter Squadron (Two Engine) redesignated 459th Flying Training Squadron 25 Feb 2009 per DAF/A1M 067t, 25 Feb 2009 and activated 17 Apr 2009 per DAF/A1M 067t, 25 Feb 2009; SO #G-09-10, Hq AETC, 10 Mar 2009.

Assignments:  80 Fighter Group, 1 Sep 1943; 33 Fighter Group, 12 May-5 Nov 1945. 80 Operations Group, 17 Apr 2009-.

Stations:  Karachi, India, 1 Sep 1943; Kurmitola, India, 5 Nov 1943; Chittagong, India, 4 Mar 1944; Rumkhapalong, India, 1 Feb 1945; Dudhkundi, India, 11 May-8 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 3-5 Nov 1945. Sheppard AFB, TX, 17 Apr 2009-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 1 Sep 1943; Capt John E. Fouts Jr., c. 1 Nov 1943; Maj Verl D. Luehring, by 22 Mar 1944; Maj Hampton E. Boggs, by 1 Mar 1945; Capt John W. Sognier, 11 Jun 1945; Maj William M. Shelton, 26 Jun 1945-unkn. Lt Col Scottie Zamzow, 17 Apr 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-38, 1943-1945. T-6, 2009-.

Operations:  Combat in China-Burma-India (CBI) theater, 14 Nov 1943-c. 6 May 1945. Credited with 66 aerial victory credits (AVC), 1 Dec 1943-13 Jan 1945. Awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for destroying 119 enemy aircraft between 11 Mar- 19 May 1944. Received a second DUC for defending an allied oil refinery at Assam, India on 27 Mar 1944. Conducted undergraduate flying training for EURO-NATO pilot candidates, Apr 2009-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: India-Burma, 11 Mar-19 May 1944; Assam, India, 27 Mar 1944.

Emblem (WWII):  Over and through a white disc, border yellow orange, a caricatured, three-headed, light green snake with mouths open, having black wings, entwined about a red lightning flash issuing from base and striking toward sinister chief, edged yellow orange, forming simulated fuselage and characteristics of a P-38 aircraft, and having small, jagged, red lightning forks, edged yellow orange, issuing there from. (Approved 28 Nov 1944.)

Emblem (current):  Approved on 13 Apr 2009.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, Operations and Honors through 16 Feb 2010.


Source:  Ex-CBI Roundup, January 1954 issue

The escutcheon of the "Twin Dragons" sprang innocently from hangar talk one October 1943 evening with the 80th Fighter Group in upper Assam. First Lieutenant Hampton E. Boggs, Capt. Verl D. Luehring and 1st Lt. William G. Broad-foot were mulling over the new squadron they were about to form down in Kur-mitola - this was in ancient times before the birth of Tezgaon - out of a couple of hundred men not yet rid of their sea legs.

It would be the first P-38 combat squadron in India and the four conferees, weaned on the P-40, ogled the prospect of two engines like boys with a new Lionel.

The insignia was doodled out by Lt. Curtis at the height of the breeze and days later when the four headed South, it caught between the folds of 1:1,000,000 map and made the mission. At Kurmitola it spread from revetment to revetment and from nacelles to flying jackets.

On March 28 at Chittagong when Capt. Luehring (later Lt. Col.) succeeded Major Fouts in Command, the Squadron was in the midst of the hottest series of fighter sweeps yet to run from India, destroying 128 planes in 68 days.

There had to be a name for that kind of destruction and Capt. Luehring asked everyone for his written choice. Jerome Gladstein of New York City called us the "Twin Dragons." Capt. Luehring liked it so much he flew Gladstein to Calcutta for a two-week's recovery from his labor pains.

Thereafter the Twin Dragons appeared by name in papers in CBI and Stateside and the men began to feel that they had two words identifying their achievements which alone told their story.

Table of Contents



311th Fighter Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 311th Bombardment Group (Light) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 2 Mar 1942. Redesignated 311th Bombardment Group (Dive) in Jul 1942, 311th Fighter-Bomber Group in Sep 1943, and 311th Fighter Group in May 1944. Trained with V-72 aircraft. Moved to India, via Australia, Jul-Sep 1943. Assigned to Tenth AF. Operating from India and using A-36's and P-51's, the group supported Allied ground forces in northern Burma; covered bombers that attacked Rangoon, Insein, and other targets; bombed enemy airfields at Myitkyina and Bhamo; and conducted patrol and reconnaissance missions to help protect transport planes that flew the Hump route between India and China. Moved to Burma in Jul 1944 and continued to support ground forces, including Merrill's Marauders; also flew numerous sweeps over enemy airfields in central and southern Burma. Moved to China in Aug 1944 and assigned to Fourteenth AF. Escorted bombers, flew interception missions, struck the enemy's communications, and supported ground operations, serving in combat until the end of the war. Ferried P-51's from India for Chinese Air Force in Nov 1945. Returned to the US in Dec 1945. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 101st Fighter Group. Allotted to ANG (Maine) on 24 May 1946. Extended federal recognition on 4 Apr 1947. Ordered to active service on 1 Feb 1951. Assigned to Air Defense Command. Redesignated 101st Fighter-Interceptor Group in Feb 1951. Inactivated on 6 Feb 1952. Relieved from active service, returned to ANG (Maine), and activated, on 1 Nov 1952. ANG allotment changed in 1954 (withdrawn from Maine on 30 Apr and allotted to Vt on 1 Jun). Extended federal recognition on 1 Jun 1954.

Squadrons:   136th: 1951-1952. 385th: 1942-1943. 528th (formerly 382nd, later 132nd): 1942-1946; 1951-1952. 529th (formerly 383d, later 133d): 1942-1946; 1951-1952. 530th (formerly 384th, later 134th): 1942-1946; 1951-1952.

Stations:  Will Rogers Field, Okla, 2 Mar 1942; Hunter Field, Ga, 4 Jul 1942; Waycross, Ga, 22 Oct 1942-18 Jul 1943; Nawadih, India, 14 Sep 1943; Dinjan, India, 11 Oct 1943; Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 6 Jul 1944; Pungchacheng, China, 28 Aug 1944-14 Dec 1945; Ft Lawton, Wash, 5-6 Jan 1946. Dow AFB, Maine, 1 Feb 1951; Grenier AFB, NH, 23 Apr 1951; Larson AFB, Wash, 2 Aug 1951-6 Feb 1952.

Commanders:  Lt Col Clinton U True, 1942; Lt Col John R Kelly, 10 Aug 1942; Col Harry R Melton Jr, 26 Nov 1942; Col Charles G Chandler Jr, 25 Nov 1943; Col John S Chennault, 12 Feb 1945; Col Gabriel P Disosway, 24 May 1945; Col Allen R Springer, 5 Aug 1945-unkn. Col George Labreche, 1951-1952.

Campaigns:  American Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Shield: Or a tornado issuant from base throughout azure, a demi-Indian issuant from chief proper, with war bonnet of the like and shooting from a bow sable a drop bomb gules. Motto: Fulminat - It (He) Strikes as Lightning. (Approved 13 Nov 1942.)


Source:SMSgt. David P. Anderson
ANG History Office/NGB-PAI
October 2005

(Updates courtesy of Mr. Bernie Shearon)

Partial Lineage of the 101st ARW
Maine ANG

28 Jan 42Constituted as the 311th Bombardment Group (Light).
2 Mar 42311th Bomb Group (BG) activated and assigned to Air Force Combat Command (AFCC) at Will Rogers Field, Oklahoma City, OK. Group consisted 382nd Bomb Squadron (BS) (Light); 383d BS (Light); 384th BS (Light); and 385th BS (Light).
27 Jul 42Redesignated 311th Bombardment Group (Dive).
Jul-Sep 43Moved to India via Australia. Assigned to Tenth Air Force while operating A-36's and P-51's. The 311th FG supported Allied ground forces in northern Burma; covered bombers that attacked Rangoon, Insein, and other targets; bombed enemy airfields at Myitkyina and Bhamo; and conducted patrol and reconnaissance missions to help protect transport planes that flew the "Hump" route between India and China.
Sep 43311th BG redesignated 311th Fighter Bomber Group (FBG).
May 44311th FBG redesignated 311th Fighter Group (FG).
Jul 44The 311th FG moved to Burma and continued to support ground forces including Merrill's Marauders. They also flew numerous missions over enemy airfields in central and southern Burma.
24 Aug 44311th FG transferred from India to China and relieved from Tenth Air Force and reassigned to Fourteenth Air Force. 311th FG escorted bombers, flew interception missions, attacked enemy communications, and supported ground operations until the end of World War Two.
11 Dec 44311th FG received credit for battle participation in the India-Burma campaign from 2 April 1942 to final date to be announced later.
1 Jun 45311th FG assigned to the 312th Fighter Wing (FW) permanently assigned to the Fourteenth Air Force.
Dec 45311th FG transferred back to the United States.
6 Jan 46311th FG inactivated at Ft Lawton, WA.

The 528th, 529th, and 530th Fighter squadrons (FS) were relieved from assignment to the 311th FG concurrently with inactivation of the FG.
1 Feb 46311th FG awarded battle participation credit for India-Burma, China Defensive & China Offensive.
24 May 46311th FG is redesignated 101st Fighter Group and allotted to the National Guard. The new unit designation is entitled to history, battle honors and any colors earned by unit designated as 311th Fighter Group during previous active service.

The 101st FG was allotted to the State of Maine National Guard.
4 Apr 47The 101st FG was extended Federal recognition at Camp Keyes, Augusta, ME.

The 132nd FS, 132nd Weather Station, and Utility Flight are shown as assigned to the 101st Fighter Group, ME-NG.
Jan 47First Air Force was responsible for administration and supervision of training the 101st FG per Army Air Force Plan for the Air National Guard.
1 Sep 50101st Fighter Wing (FW) is constituted and allotted to the National Guard Bureau.
25 Oct 50The 101st FW received Federal recognition at Dow AFB, ME.
1 Nov 50The 101st FG, 101st Air Base Group, 101st Maintenance & Supply Group, and 101st Medical Group are assigned to the 101st Fighter Wing (FW). The 132nd FS (ME ANG), 133d FS (NH ANG), and 134th FS (Vermont VT ANG) are also assigned to this wing.
1 Feb 51The 101st FW based at Dow Air Force Base (AFB), Bangor, ME were ordered into active duty to serve for a period of 21 consecutive months.
11 Feb 51The 101st FW was redesignated 101st Fighter Interceptor Wing (FIW).

The 101st FG was redesignated 101st Fighter Interceptor Group (FIG) with assignment to the 101st FIW.

The 132nd FS, 133d FS, and the 134th FS were redesignated Fighter Interceptor Squadrons (FIS).
28 Mar 51The 136th FIS (New York ANG) was assigned to the 101st FIG.
25 Apr 51The 101st FIG moved from Dow AFB, ME to Grenier AFB, New Hampshire (NH).
20 Jul 51The 101st FIG received orders to move from Grenier AFB, NH to Larson AFB, Moses Lake, Washington (WA).
2 Aug 51The 101st FIG, 133d FIS moved to Larson AFB, WA. 132nd FIS, 134th FIS remain in New England.
6 Feb 52The 101st FIG was inactivated at Larson AFB, WA.
11 Sep 52The 101st FIG reverted to the State of Maine in inactive status with station at Dow AFB, ME.
1 Nov 52The 101st FIG based at Dow AFB, ME, returned to State control. The 101st FIG, Maintenance & Support Group, Air Base Group, and Medical Group are assigned as elements to the 101st FIW.

The 133d Fighter Interceptor Squadron (FIS), NH ANG is assigned to the 101st FIW.

The 132nd, 133d, and 134th FIS were assigned to the 101st FIG.
30 Apr 54Allotment for the 101st FIG was withdrawn from the State of Maine.
1 Jun 54101st FIG was allotted and Federal recognition was given to the State of Vermont with station at municipal Airport, Burlington, VT.
15 Apr 56The 101st FIG was inactivated and allotment returned to NGB. NGB redesignated 101st FIG, redesignated to 101st Fighter Group-Air Defense (AD).
16 Apr 56The 101st FIW was redesignated as the 101st Air Defense Wing (ADW).

The 101st FG (AD) allotted to the State of New Hampshire (NH) and was federally recognized with station at Grenier AFB, NH.

The 133d FIS, 101st Material Squadron, 101st Air Base Squadron, and the 101st Air Force Infirmary were assigned to the 101st FG. The Group in turn was assigned to the 101st ADW.

The 132nd FIS (ME ANG), the 101st FG (NH ANG), and the 134th FIS (VT ANG) remained assigned to the 101st ADW (ME ANG).
19 Jun 60In order to keep the general pattern of numbering the Group with the same number as the "on-base" wing, the "101" numeric designation was returned to Maine because the "101" designator has been associated with the Maine ANG since it was first organized and would be lost when the NH ANG 101st FG (AD) was redesignated to 157th Air Transport Group (Heavy-H) and became assigned to the 133d Air Transport Wing (Minnesota ANG).

The transfer of the "101" numeric designator to Maine required the inactivation of all units in the New Hampshire ANG with the "101" numeric designation and return them to the control of NGB. The history of the 101st FG (AD) accumulated from 16 April 1956 to 1 Sep 1960 remained with the NH ANG because it was a new unit.
1 Dec 60The Maine ANG was allotted the 101st Fighter Group (AD) and was given Federal recognition at the same time NH ANG was allotted the 157th Air Transport Group (ATG), but the 101st FG was considered a brand new unit since it was inactivated (again) therefore its lineage began with its allotment to Maine.

Sources:  101st Air Refueling Wing Historical Data Cards, NGB-PAI Archives (ANG History Office) Arlington, VA; Air Force Combat Units of World War II, Office of Air Force History, Washington D.C., 1983, p.186.

Table of Contents



385th Fighter Squadron

385th BS was assigned to the 311th BG. The 311th was shipped to theater and two weeks later converted to Fighter. The 385th BS was discontinued (30 Sep 43) rather than converted. The 385th FS was stood up before the BS was discontinued and served as part of the 364 FG in ETO.

Table of Contents



528th Fighter Squadron

  
"Dragon Fly" flight was a code name used by the squadron in talking to ground liaison officers during the Marauder campaign. The name stuck. It was appropriate, too, when the squadron moved to the 14th Air Force in China. The dragon is an important symbol of Chinese myth. The insignia of the "Dragon Flys" was drawn by squadron members Bill Lackey and William G. Lamb. The shoulder patch of the squadron, which incorporates the drawing, is done in red, white, blue and yellow.
-- Ex-CBI Roundup, December 1995 issue.

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 382nd Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 2 Mar 1942. Redesignated: 382nd Bombardment Squadron (Dive) on 27 Jul 1942; 528th Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 30 Sep 1943; 528th Fighter Squadron on 30 May 1944. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 132nd Fighter Squadron, Single Engine and allotted to ANG, on 24 May 1946. Activated 3 Feb 47, federally recognized 5 Feb 47, redesignated 132nd Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 10 Feb 51, inactivated 1 Nov 52. Activated 1 Nov 52, redesignated 132nd Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy 1 Apr 76, 132nd Air Refueling Squadron 1994.

Assignments:  311th Bombardment (later Fighter-Bomber; Fighter) Group, 2 Mar 1942 - 6 Jan 1946. 101st Fighter Group/Fighter-Interceptor Group 1947-Jul 51, 23d Fighter-Interceptor Group -6 Feb 52 (attached to 23d Fighter- Interceptor Wing Jan 51-Feb 52), 4711th Defense Wing -1952. 101st Fighter-Interceptor Group -15 Apr 56, 101st Air Defense Wing -Sep 60, 101st Fighter Group/Fighter Interceptor Group -1 Apr 76, 101st Air Refueling Wing -1 Jan 93, 101st Operations Group.

Stations:  Will Rogers Field, Okla, 2 Mar 1942; Hunter Field, Ga, 4 Jul 1942; Waycross, Ga, 22 Oct 1942 - 18 Jul 1943; Nawadih, India, 14 Sep 1943; Dinjan, India, 11 Oct 1943; Tingkawk Sakan, Burma, 14 May 1944; Shwangliu, China, 24 Aug 1944 (detachments operated from Hanchung, China, and Liangshan, China, Sep 1944 - Jan 1945 and from Hsian, China, beginning 15 Feb 1945); Hsian, China, Aug 1945; Shanghai, China, 22 Oct - 14 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 4-6 Jan 1946. Camp Keyes, ME 1947-Jan 51, Dow AFB, ME -Apr 51, Presque Isle AFB, ME -1952. Bangor Intl Jetport, ME.

Aircraft:  V-72, 1942; A-36, 1942-1944; P-51, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 16 Oct 1943 - 14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.


Source:  Philippe's Aviation Pages

The 132nd Air Refueling Squadron traces its origins from the 528th BS (Dive) constituted at Will Rogers Field, OK, in January 1942 and activated in March 1942. Was redesignated 528th FBS in September 1943, shortly after arriving in India, and 528th FS in May 1944. The unit flew A-36As and P-51s in the CBI theater until VJ Day. Was inactivated at Ft Lawton, WA in January 1946. Was reconstituted and redesignated the 132nd FS before being allotted to the Maine NG on May 24, 1946. The 132nd FS (SE) was federally recognized at Dow Field, Bangor, ME, on February 5, 1947 and equipped with P-47Ds. In the Summer of 1948, it converted to F-80Cs and was redesignated the 132nd FS (Jet). The unit was called to active duty as part of the Korean war call-up on February 1, 1951. Later that month, the unit was redesignated 132nd FIS and re-equipped with F-51Ds to provide air defense for the Northeast US from Dow AFB. It returned to state control on November 1, 1951 but remained at Dow AFB with F-51Hs. Converted to F-94As in June 1954. In September 1957, converted to F-89Ds followed by another version in December 1959, F-89Js. It became ADC-gained in July 1960 and reached group status with federal recognition of the 101st FIG in December 1960. Dow AFB was inactivated in June 1968 and renamed Bangor IAP. In July 1969, the unit shortly converted to F/TF-102As followed three months later by the F-101B/Fs. In the Spring of 1976, the 132nd converted to KC-135As and a new mission. Was redesignated 132nd AREFS and became SAC-gained on April 1, 1976. Converted to KC-135Es during FY 85. Was called to active duty as part of Operation Desert Shield call-up on December 20, 1990. Released from active duty on May 30, 1991, after taking part in Desert Shield/Storm. Unit designation changed to 132nd ARS, 101st ARW in March 1992 and became part of AMC in June of the same year.

Table of Contents



529th Fighter Squadron


Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 383d Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 2 Ma 1942. Redesignated: 383d Bombardment Squadron (Dive) on 27 Jul 1942; 529th Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 30 Sep 1943; 529th Fighter Squadron on 30 May 1944. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 133d Fighter Squadron, Single Engine and allotted to ANG, on 24 May 1946. Activated 17 Feb 47, federally recognized 4 Apr 47, redesignated 133d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 10 Feb 51, inactivated 1 Nov 52. Activated 1 Nov 52, redesignated 133d Air Transport Squadron (Heavy) 1 Sep 60, 133d Military Airlift Squadron 1 Jan 66, 133d Tactical Airlift Squadron 11 Sep 71, 133d Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy 1 Oct 75, 133d Air Refueling Squadron, 1994.

Assignments:  311th Bombardment (later Fighter-Bomber; Fighter) Group, 2 Mar 1942 - 6 Jan 1946. 101st Fighter Group/Fighter-Interceptor Group 1947-6 Feb 52, 4707th Defense Wing -1952. 101st Fighter-Interceptor Group/101st Fighter Group/157th Air Transport Group/157th Military Airlift Group/157th Tactical Airlift Group/Air Refueling Group -1 Oct 95, 157th Operations Group.

Stations:  Will Rogers Field, Okla, 2 Mar 1942; Hunter Field, Ga, 4 Jul 1942; Waycross, Ga, 19 Oct 1942 - 18 Jul 1943; Nawadih, India, 17 Sep 1943; Dinjan, India, 19 Oct 1943; Pungchacheng, China, 23 Aug 1944 (detachment operated from Hsian, China, 18 Sep - 30 Oct 1944, and 30 Mar - Aug 1945); Hsian, China, Aug 1945; Shanghai, China, 22 Oct - 14 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 5-6 Jan 1946. Grenier Fld, NH 1947-Aug 51, Larson AFB, WA -1952. Grenier Fld, NH 1952-1 Oct 75, Pease ANGB, NH.

Aircraft:  V-72, 1942; A-36, 1942-1944; P-51, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 16 Oct 1943 - 14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.


Source:  Philippe's Aviation Pages

The 133d Air Refueling Squadron originates from the 529th BS (Light), constituted at Will Rogers Field, OK. in January 1942. Was activated two months later and redesignated 529th FBS shortly after arriving in India in September 1943.. Assigned to the 311th FG, Tenth Air Force, the squadron was redesignated the 529th FS in May 1944 and flew combat operations in the CBI from October 1943 to August 1945 with A-36s and P-51s. Was inactivated at Ft Lawton, WA, in January 1946. The unit was reconstituted and redesignated the 133d FS before being allotted to the New Hampshire NG on May 24, 1946. the 133d FS (SE) was federally recognized on April 4, 1947 at Grenier Field, Manchester, NH, and equipped with P-47Ds. Was called to active duty on February 1, 1951 as part of the Korean War call-up but remained at Grenier Field as the 133d FIS. In November 1952, the 133d returned to state control and converted to F-51Hs. In June 1954, the 133d converted to F-94A/Bs. The unit reached group status with federal recognition of the 101st FIG on April 16, 1956. The 133d converted to F-86Ls in April 1958. In the Summer of 1960, the 133d became the first ANG unit to be equipped with four-engined aircraft when it converted to C-97As. On September 1, 1960, the squadron was redesignated 133d ATS and the group renumbered and redesignated 157th ATG. On October 1, 1961, the unit was called to active duty as part of the Berlin Crisis call-up to fly worldwide airlift missions from Grenier Field. Returned to state control on August 31, 1962. In January 1966, the unit moved to Pease AFB and was redesignated 133d MAS when it became MAC-gained. The unit converted to C-124Cs in December 1967. In the Summer of 1971, received C-130As to replace the C-124s. Was redesignated 133d TAS and became TAC-gained on September 11, 1971. Converted to KC-135As and a new mission in the Summer of 1975. On October 1, 1975, the unit was redesignated 133d AREFS and became SAC-gained. During 1984, converted to KC-135Es. In September 1990, Pease AFB was inactivated and renamed Pease Air National Guard Base. The unit was called to active duty in December 1990, as part of Operation Desert Shield. Was released from active duty in May 1991. During 1992, the unit joined AMC and was renamed the 133d ARS, 157th ARG. In 1993, the unit deployed to Moron AB, Spain in support of Operation Restore Hope. Later that year, the 133d converted to KC-135R. On October 1, 1995, the unit was redesignated the 133d Air refueling Squadron and 157th Air Refueling Wing. In 1997 and 1999, the unit deployed to Turkey in support of Operation Northern Watch.

Table of Contents



530th Fighter Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


P-51A, 43-6283 "Hell's Angel" -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 384th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 2 Mar 1942. Redesignated: 384th Bombardment Squadron (Dive) on 27 Jul 1942; 530th Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 30 Sep 1943; 530th Fighter Squadron on 30 May 1944. Inactivated on 16 Feb 1946. Redesignated 134th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine and allotted to the Air National Guard 24 May 46, activated 1 Jul 46, federally recognized 14 Aug 46, redesignated 134th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 10 Feb 51, inactivated 1 Nov 52. Activated 1 Nov 52, redesignated 134th Defense Systems Evaluation Squadron 1 Apr 74, 134th Tactical Fighter Squadron 1 Jan 82, 134th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron unknown, 134th Fighter Squadron 1 Jun 92.

Assignments:  311th Bombardment (later Fighter-Bomber; Fighter) Group, 2 Mar 1942 - 6 Jan 1946. Vermont National Guard 1946-1 Oct 46, 67th Fighter Wing -3 Feb 47, 101st Fighter Group/Fighter-Interceptor Group -Apr 51, 23d Fighter- Interceptor Group -6 Feb 52 (attached to 23d Fighter-Interceptor Wing Apr 51-Feb 52), 4711th Defense Wing -1952. 101st Fighter-Interceptor Group -Apr 54, 101st Air Defense Wing -1 Jul 60, 158th Fighter Group/Fighter-Interceptor Group/Defense Systems Evaluation Group/Tactical Fighter Group/Fighter-Interceptor Group/Fighter Group -1 Oct 95, 158th Operations Group.

Stations:  Will Roger Field, Okla, 2 Mar 1942; Hunter Field, Ga, 4 Jul 1942; Waycross, Ga, 22 Oct 1942 - 18 Jul 1943; Nawadih, India, 20 Sep 1943; Dinjan, India, 18 Oct 1943 (detachment operated from Kurmitola, India, 21 Oct - Nov 1943, 28 May - 11 Jun 1944; Warazup, Burma - June 1944); Kwanghan, China, 21 Oct 1944 (detachment operated from Hsian, China, 30 Oct 1944 - 21 Feb 1945); Pungchacheng, China, 5 May 1945; Hsian, China, Aug 1945; Shanghai, China, 17 Oct 1945 - 16 Feb 1946. Ethan Allen Fld 1946-Apr 51, Grenier Fld, NH -1952. Burlington Muni Apt, VT 1952-.

Aircraft:  V-72, 1942; A-36, 1942-1944; P-51, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 17 Oct 1943 - 21 Jul 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.


Members of the 530th Fighter Squadron, 311th Fighter Group.
Ernest Spensley seated left front, looking at picture.
(CBIVA Sound-off, Fall 1983 issue)


The famous score-board of all the squadron action of the 530th.
(CBIVA Sound-off, Fall 1983 issue)


Source:  CBI Roundup - July 20, 1944 - China-Burma-India Theater of World War II
(Courtesy of Mr. Carl Weidenburner)

SQUADRON NAMED BY JAPS OVER RADIO

10TH AIR FORCE BASE - Ever since it started winning a reputation for itself by knocking down Japanese planes over Burma, one of the crack P-51 (Mustang) fighter-bomber squadron of the 10th USAAF, Eastern Air Command, has been seeking a suitable nickname, but without notable results.

Then one evening suddenly out of the thin air, it got it's nickname - "Yellow Scorpions" - and, from all people, the Japanese themselves.

Commanded by Maj. Sydney Newcomb, of Green Village, N.J., the squadron has 50 enemy planes confirmed.

At the start of their operations, "Sid's Kids," whose planes are distinguished by yellow-painted noses, won victories in the skies only one or two at a time. Their foes were the famous "Black Dragons," the crack front line Japanese Navy pilots from the South Pacific, who were sent to Burma for a "rest."

SENSATIONAL RECORD

A few battles and the Americans obtained the experience they needed to weld them into a great fighting team.

Recently, Newcomb's outfit tangled with the Japs again over Central Burma, and the result was one of the most remarkable of the entire war. The Yanks, in one scrap, bagged 13 planes confirmed, without suffering so much as ONE bullet hole in any of their planes.

The next day, "Sid's Kids" destroyed eight more Japanese planes in the air, and, excepting for a few holes in a couple of the ships, no damage was suffered. The day after that, they again found the enemy, this time getting four more, all without the loss of a plane. The score thus was 25 Japanese planes confirmed as destroyed, with several more listed as probably destroyed and many more damaged, against no losses for our side.

BOAST UNFULFILLED

Only a few days after the third melee, members of the squadron heard a Japanese broadcast reporting that it was coming over to "annihilate the 'Yellow Scorpion' squadron," but no one knew which outfit the Japs meant. A few days later, the Japs again broadcast the same warning, but this time identified the squadron by its location. Neither time did the Japs fulfill their threat. They never even came over when they said they would, nor did they make an attempt at a subsequent date.

But the broadcasts did serve the Americans a good turn. It gave the squadron a nickname. They've adopted the nickname, "Yellow Scorpions."


Source:  Philippe's Aviation Pages

The 134th FS traces its origins from the 530th FS constituted in January 1942 at Will Rogers Field, OK. Was activated in march 1942 and equipped with A-36As. Was redesignated 384th BS (Dive) prior to moving to India during the Summer of 1943 and became the 530th FBS before combat operations began. Redesignated 530th FS in May 1944 and flew P-51As and Bs in China and India before being inactivated at Shangai, China, on February 16, 1946. Was reconstituted and redesignated the 134th FS before being allotted to the Vermont NG on May 24, 1946. The 134th FS (SE) was federally recognized at Burlington MAP on August 14, 1946 and was initially equipped only with support aircraft. In April 1947, it was assigned P-47Ds as mission aircraft. In July 1950, converted to F-51Ds and was redesignated 134th Fighter Interceptor Squadron. Was called to active duty in February 1951 but remained based at Ethan Allen AFB (Burlington). Returned to state control on October 31, 1952. In April 1952, converted to F-94A/Bs followed by another conversion in 1958 to F-89Ds. On July 1, 1960, the unit reached group status with federal recognition of the 158th FIG and became ADC-gained. In the Summer of 1965, the 134th converted to F/TF-102As. On June 9, 1974, the 134th was redesignated a Defense Evaluation Systems Squadron and converted to EB-57B/Es. It became TAC-gained on April 1, 1980, following ADC inactivation. On January 1, 1982, was redesignated the 134th TFS after converting to F-4Ds. It began a conversion to F-16As in April 1986, followed by another conversion to ADF F-16s in 1990. Joined the air defense community in 1987 and was redesignated the 134th FIS. The unit said farewell to the ADF in February 1994 and transitioned to Block-25s aircraft.. On October 1, 1995, the unit was redesignated the 134 Fighter Squadron, 158th Fighter Wing. During 2000, deployed to Southern Watch as part of Aerospace Expeditionary Force 9.

Table of Contents



341st Bombardment Group


"Representative of the insigne adopted by the Group when it was assigned to 14th Air Force in Jan 1944. It is actually my colorized interpretation of a drawing which I found, several years ago, on the cover sheet of the 341st Bomb Group's submission for a Unit Citation. The submission package is in the Group's files at Air Force Historical Research Archive, Maxwell AFB, AL. I picked the colors based on comments from veterans of the unit." -- Tony Strotman, MSgt, USAF (1966-87)
341st Bomb Group


Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 341 Bombardment Group (Medium) on 14 Aug 1942. Activated on 15 Sep 1942. Redesignated as 341 Bombardment Group, Medium, on 1 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 2 Nov 1945. Redesignated as 341 Bombardment Group, Light, and activated in the Reserve, on 27 Dec 1946. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 341 Bombardment Wing, Medium, which was established on 23 Mar 1953. Activated on 1 Sep 1955. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1961. Redesignated as 341 Strategic Missile Wing (ICBM-Minuteman), and activated, on 1 Jul 1961. Organized on 15 Jul 1961. Redesignated as: 341 Missile Wing on 1 Sep 1991; 341 Space Wing on 1 Oct 1997; 341 Missile Wing on 1 Jul 2008.

Assignments:  Tenth Air Force, 15 Sep 1942; India Air Task Force, 3 Oct 1942; Tenth Air Force, 16 Oct 1943; Fourteenth Air Force, 25 Oct 1943 (attached to Tenth Air Force, 25 Oct-14 Dec 1943; Strategic Air Force, 15 Dec 1943-); 69 Composite Wing, 26 Dec 1943 (continued attachment to Strategic Air Force until c. 7 Jan 1944); XIV Air Force Tactical Air Command (Provisional) (attached to 69 Composite Wing), 21 Jun 1945; 69 Composite Wing, 1 Aug 1945; Fourteenth Air Force, 25 Aug-c. Sep 1945. First Air Force, 27 Dec 1946; 3 Bombardment Wing (later, 3 Air Division), 17 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949. Fifteenth Air Force, 1 Sep 1955; 819 Air Division, 1 Feb 1956-25 Jun 1961 (attached to 3 Air Division, 9 Jan-c. 4 Apr 1958). Strategic Air Command, 1 Jul 1961; 22 Air Division, 15 Jul 1961; 821 Strategic Aerospace Division, 1 Jul 1962; 813 Strategic Aerospace Division, 1 Jul 1964; 18 Strategic Aerospace Division, 2 Jul 1966; 810 Strategic Aerospace Division, 2 Jul 1968; 4 Strategic Missile (later, 4 Air) Division, 30 Jun 1971; 47 Air Division, 15 Jan 1973; 4 Air Division, 23 Jan 1987; Fifteenth Air Force, 23 Aug 1988; 40 Air Division, 7 Jul 1989; Fifteenth Air Force, 14 Jun 1991; Twentieth Air Force, 1 Sep 1991-.

Components

Group:  341 Operations: 1 Sep 1991-.

Squadrons:  10 Bombardment (10 Strategic Missile): 18 Jun 1947-27 Jun 1949; 1 Sep 1955-25 Jun 1961; 1 Dec 1961-1 Sep 1991. 11 Air Refueling: 1 Dec 1955-1 Jun 1960 (detached 19 Dec 1956-10 Apr 1957, 9 Jan-c. 4 Apr 1958, and 10 Jul-26 Sep 1958). 11 Bombardment: 15 Sep 1942-10 Mar 1943 (detached 15 Sep 1942-10 Mar 1943); 25 Oct 1943-2 Nov 1945 (detached 25 Oct 1943-c. 6 Jan 1944, 13 Mar- c. Dec 1944, and 16 Mar-1 Aug 1945). 12 Bombardment (later, 12 Strategic Missile): 24 Jul 1947-27 Jun 1949; 1 Sep 1955-25 Jun 1961; 1 Mar 1962-1 Sep 1991. 22 Bombardment: 15 Sep 1942-2 Nov 1945. 490 Bombardment (later, 490 Strategic Missile): assigned 15 Sep 1942-25 Oct 1943, attached 26 Oct 1943-c. 7 Jan 1944; assigned 7 May-2 Nov 1945 (detached 7 May-c. 25 Aug 1945); 4 Apr 1947-27 Jun 1949; 1 Sep 1955-25 Jun 1961; 1 May 1962-1 Sep 1991. 491 Bombardment: 15 Sep 1942-2 Nov 1945; 5 Jun 1947-27 Jun 1949; 1 Nov 1958- 25 Jun 1961. 564 Strategic Missile: 1 Apr 1966-1 Sep 1991.

Stations:  Camp Malir, Karachi, India, 15 Sep 1942; Chakulia, India, 30 Dec 1942; Kurmitola, India, Jun 1943; Kunming, China, 7 Jan 1944; Yangkai, China, 13 Dec 1944-c. Sep 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-2 Nov 1945. Westover Field (later, AFB), MA, 27 Dec 1946-27 Jun 1949. Abilene (later, Dyess) AFB, TX, 1 Sep 1955-25 Jun 1961. Malmstrom AFB, MT, 15 Jul 1961-.

Commanders:  Col Torgils G. Wold, 15 Sep 1942; Lt Col James A. Philpott, 21 Sep 1943; Col Torgils G. Wold, 2 Nov 1943; Col Morris F. Taber, 23 Nov 1943; Maj Loren S. Nickels, 2 Feb 1944; Col Morris F. Taber, 17 Mar 1944; Col Joseph B. Wells, 11 Apr 1944; Col Donald L. Clark, 1 Dec 1944; Col James W. Newsome, 16 Apr 1945; Unkn, Sep-Nov 1945. None (not manned), 27 Dec 1946-Feb 1947; Lt Col Ralph P. Warriner, by Mar 1947; Unkn, Jan-Jun 1949. Col Anthony J. Perna, 1 Sep 1955; Col Frank P. Sturdivant, 3 Dec 1955; Col Calvin E. Peeler, 31 Oct 1957; Col Anthony J. Perna, 1 Nov 1957; Col Jack W. Hayes, Jr., 9 Jun 1959; Col Ralph T. Holland, 3 Feb-25 Jun 1961. None (not manned), 1-14 Jul 1961; Col Burton C. Andrus, Jr., 15 Jul 1961; Brig Gen Lawrence S. Lightner, 20 Feb 1963; Col Rex Dowtin, 1 Jul 1964; Col Thomas F. Doyle, 3 Jun 1966; Col John W. Carroll, 5 Jul 1966; Col Eugene J. Crahen, 13 Mar 1968; Brig Gen Gerald G. Fall, Jr., 27 May 1970; Brig Gen Kermit C. Kaericher, 7 Jun 1972; Col Ralph D. Scott, 7 Jun 1973; Col William R. Brooksher, 18 Jun 1975; Col Gerald E. McIlmoyle, 23 Jul 1976; Col Allen K. Rachel, 23 Mar 1978; Col James L. Crouch, 25 May 1979; Col Dennis M. Heitkamp, 5 Jun 1981; Col James B. Knight, 20 Jun 1983; Col Robert W. Parker, 3 Aug 1984; Col Teddy E. Rinebarger, 13 Dec 1985; Col Richard O. Keen, 10 Jul 1987; Col Edward L. Burchfield, 20 Sep 1988; Col William R. Smith, 27 Aug 1990; Brig Gen Thomas H. Neary, 15 Jan 1992; Col Donald P. Pettit, 29 Jul 1993; Brig Gen Robert E. Larned, 14 Jul 1994; Brig Gen Timothy J. McMahon, 19 Jul 1995; Brig Gen Glenn C. Waltman, 20 Feb 1997; Col J. Gregory Pavlovich, 18 Nov 1998; Col Thomas F. Deppe, 9 Jun 2000; Col C. Donald Alston, 11 Jul 2002; Col Everett H. Thomas, 7 Jul 2004; Col Geoffrey A. Frazier (interim), 5 Apr 2006; Col Sandra E. Finan, 7 Jul 2006; Col Michael E. Fortney, 21 May 2008-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-25, 1942-1945; A-26, 1945. AT-6, 1947-1949; AT-11, 1947-1949. B-47, 1956-1961; KC-97, 1956-1960. Minuteman I, 1962-1969; Minuteman II, 1967-1995; Minuteman III, 1975-; UH-1, 1993-.

Operations:  Received personnel and equipment and conducted training during late 1942. Entered combat early in 1943, chiefly against enemy transportation in central Burma by bombing bridges, locomotives, rail yards, and other targets to delay movement of supplies to the Japanese troops fighting in northern Burma. After moving to China in Jan 1944, engaged primarily in sea sweeps and attacks against inland shipping. Also struck rail and transportation targets in French Indochina and the Canton-Hong Kong area of China. Received a Distinguished Unit Citation for developing and employing the special "glip" bombing technique against enemy bridges in French Indochina. Briefly active in the Reserve from Dec 1946-Jun 1949; conducted routine training activities. Upon returning to active service, performed strategic bombardment training operations on a global scale, Jan 1956-May 1961, and air refueling, Feb 1956-May 1960. Deployed at Andersen AFB, Guam, Jan-Apr 1958. Became USAF's first Minuteman ICBM wing. Supervised missile training and coordinated silo construction, Jul 1961-Jul 1963 and Oct 1964-May 1967. First Minuteman I missile arrived and emplaced in its silo at Malmstrom in Jul 1962, with first missile going on alert in Oct 1962. Wing's three missile squadrons became fully operational by early Jul 1963. Replaced Minuteman Is with Minuteman IIs, 1967-1969 and added Minuteman IIIs in Jan 1975. Received the Strategic Air Command (SAC) Commander's Missile Wing of the Year Award for 1969. Won the SAC missile combat competition and the Blanchard Trophy in 1976, 1986, 1990, 1991, and the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and the Blanchard Trophy in 1995, 1998, 2002, 2006, and 2008. Won the Lee R. Williams Trophy as SAC's (after 1991, AFSPC's) outstanding missile wing for 1963, 1975, 1976, 1986, 1987, 1991, and 2008. In accordance with the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START), in Sep 1991, the 341st Missile Wing began taking its Minuteman II's off alert and completed their deactivation in Aug 1995. Since Aug 1995, maintains launch control and missile alert facilities for assigned Minuteman IIIs.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: French Indo-China, 11 Dec 1944-12 Mar 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 22 Oct 1962-31 Dec 1963; 1 Jul 1975- 30 Jun 1976; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1979-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1988-30 Jun 1990; 1 Jul 1990-30 Jun 1991; 1 Sep 1991-31 Aug 1993; 1 Sep 1993-31 Aug 1994; 1 Sep 1994-31 Aug 1995; 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1996; 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999; 1 Oct 1998-30 Sep 1999; 1 Oct 2000-30 Sep 2002; 1 Oct 2002-1 Oct 2003; 1 Jan 2003-31 Dec 2003; 1 Oct 2004-30 Sep 2006; 1 Oct 2006-30 Sep 2008.

Emblem:  Per fess nebuly Azure, semi of mullets Argent, and White a sheath palewise point to base of the second and rising therefrom a sword of the like its hilt a winged escutcheon Or, between in base two lightning flashes pilewise Gules surmounted by an olive branch Vert veined Yellow; all within a diminished bordure of the last. Motto: PAX ORBIS PER ARMA AERIA — World peace through air strength. Approved on 5 Jun 1957, modified on 22 Mar 1995.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, Operations, and Honors through 17 Jun 2009.

Supersedes statement prepared on 20 Oct 2005.


Source:  341st Bomb Group

INDIA
New Malir Air Base, Karachi, India
11th Bomb Sq, 23 - 27 May 42, det. May 42 - Jun 43
22nd Bomb Sq., 23 May - 2 Dec 42
341st Group-490th-491st, Sep - Dec 42

Allahabad, India
11th Bomb Sq., 28 May - 3 Jun 42

Dinjan, India
11th Bomb Sq., detachment 28 Jun - 24 Oct 42

Chakulia, India
22nd & 491st Bomb Sq., Dec 42 - Jan 44
490th Bomb Sq., 20 - 25 May 43

Kurmitola, India
341st Group, Dec 43 - Jan 44
490th Bomb Sq., 25 May - 25 Aug 43

Ondal, India
490th Bomb Sq., 5 Jan - 20 May 43

Dergaon, India
490th Bomb Sq., 26 Aug - 19 Oct 44

Moran, India
490th Bomb Sq., 20 Oct - 28 Nov 44

BURMA
Warzup, Burma
490th Bomb Sq., 29 Nov 44 - 12 Apr 45

CHINA
Kunming, China
11th Bomb Sq., 4 Jun 42 - 20 Jun 43
341st Bomb Group, Jan 44 - Sep 45

Yangkai, China
22nd & 491st Bomb Sq. Jan 44 - Sep 45
11th Bomb Sq. Nov 44 - Sep 45

Hanchung, China
490th Bomb Sq., 13 Apr - 13 Sep 45

Kweilin, China
11th Bomb Sq., 21 Jun 43 - 27 Jun 44
det. of 11th, 30 Jun - 20 Jul 42; Jun - Nov 44
det. of 491st circa Jun - Jul 44 and 29 Aug - 2 Nov 44)

Hengyang, China
detachment of 11th Bomb Sq., 2 - 6 Aug 42, circa Jun 43 - Jun 44

Nanning, China
detachment of 11th Bomb Sq., 24 Oct - 28 Nov 42; circa Jun 43 - Jun 44

Lingling, China
detachment of 11th Bomb Sq., circa Jun 43 - Jun 44

Yang Tong, China
11th Bomb Sq., 28 Jun - 1 Nov 44

Luichow, China
detachment of 11th Bomb Sq., circa Jun - Nov 44
det. of 491st circa Jun - Jul 44

Laowhangpin, China
detachment of 11th Bomb Sq., circa Feb - Mar 45

Chihkiang, China
detachment of 11th circa Feb - Mar 45,
detachment of 22nd Bomb Sq., 29 Mar - 2 Apr 45

Yunnani, China
detachment of 22nd Bomb Sq., 29 Apr - 6 May 44, circa Nov 44 - Jan 45

Peishiyi, China
detachment of 22nd Bomb Sq., 27 Feb - 25 Mar 45


Other Sites of Interest:

GlobalSecurity.org (341st Space Wing)

Table of Contents



11th Bombardment Squadron

(See listing under 7th Bombardment Group, above)

Table of Contents



22nd Bombardment Squadron

(See listing under 7th Bombardment Group, above)

Table of Contents



490th Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 490th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 14 Aug 1942. Activated on 15 Sep 1942. Redesignated 490th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 1 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 2 Nov 1945. Redesignated 490th Bombardment Squadron, Light, on 11 Mar 1947. Activated in the Reserve on 4 Apr 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 490th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 7 Jun 1955. Activated on 1 Sep 1955. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1961. Redesignated 490th Strategic Missile Squadron (ICBM-Minuteman), and activated, on 18 Dec 1961. Organized on 1 May 1962. Redesignated 490th Missile Squadron on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  341st Bombardment Group, 15 Sep 1942; Tenth Air Force, 25 Oct 1943 (attached to 341st Bombardment Group, 25 Oct 1943-c. 7 Jan 1944); 341st Bombardment Group, 7 May-2 Nov 1945 (312th Fighter Wing for operational control, 7 May-c. 25 Aug 1945). 341st Bombardment Group, 4 Apr 1947-27 Jun 1949. 341st Bombardment Wing, 1 Sep 1955-25 Jun 1961. Strategic Air Command, 18 Dec 1961; 341st Strategic Missile Wing, 1 May 1962; 341st Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991-.

Stations:  Camp Malir, Karachi, India, 15 Sep 1942; Moire Camp, Ondal, India, 5 Jan 1943 (operated from Chakulia, India, 20-25 May 1943); Kurmitola, India, 25 May 1943; Dergaon, India, 26 Aug 1944; Moran, India, 20 Oct 1944; Warazup, Burma, 29 Nov 1944; Hanchung, China, 13 Apr-13 Sep 1945 (detachment operated from Hsian, China, 16 Apr-4 Aug 1945); Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-2 Nov 1945. Dow Field (later, AFB), ME, 4 Apr 1947-27 Jun 1949. Abilene (later, Dyess) AFB, TX, 1 Sep 1955-25 Jun 1961 (deployed at Andersen AFB, Guam, 9 Jan-c. 3 Apr 1958). Malmstrom AFB, MT, 1 May 1962-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-25, 1942-1945. AT-6, 1947-1949; AT-11, 1947-1949. B-47, 1956-1961. Minuteman I, 1962-1969; Minuteman II, 1969-.

Operations:  Combat in Central Burma and India, 18 Feb 1943-20 May 1944 and 5 Jul 1944-4 Aug 1945; flew supplies from Chittagong, India to Imphal, India, 20 May-30 Jun 1944 and dropped leaflets for the US Office of War Information, Jan-Aug 1945. Strategic missile operations, 1962-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Central Burma, 1 Oct-31 Dec 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 22 Oct 1962-31 Dec 1963; 1 Jul 1975-30 Jun 1976; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1979-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1988-30 Jun 1990; 1 Jul 1990-30 Jun 1991; 1 Sep 1991 -31 Aug 1993.

Emblem:  Per fess nebuly Celeste and Silver Gray a target issuant from dexter base of the like ringed Or and from its center a sword imbedded Argent hilt of the third between also from target center a lightning bolt palewise and another fesswise Gules; all within a diminished border Azure. Original emblem approved on 11 Jul 1956 (154861 A.C.), modified and reinstated on 2 Mar 1995; replaced emblem approved on 10 Sep 1985 (DFSC 86-03055).

Emblem Significance (1956 version):  The sword piercing the center of the bull's eye is indicative of accuracy of mission and striking power; the thunderbolt elements as reimposed from the Strategic Air Command emblem suggest force and, as coupled with the sword, denote the power of force and accuracy assured by the squadron. The horizontal bisection of the shield contains the fortress crenelations of the US Air Force shield with a fortress-grey base below the star emblazoned blue of the Strategic Air Command banner. Emblem approved 11 July 1956. (Source: AFHRA Records)


Other Sites of Interest:

341st Bomb Group

Burma Bridge Busters


490th BS Personnel, Karachi, India, 25 Jan 43

Table of Contents



491st Bombardment Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


(courtesy of Mr. John Mulioli)


Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 79th Aero Squadron on 15 Aug 1917. Redesignated 491st Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 31 Jan 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 491st Bombardment Squadron which was constituted and allotted to the reserve on 31 Mar 1924. Disbanded on 31 May 1942. Consolidated (1958) with 491st Bombardment Squadron (Medium) which was constituted 14 Aug 1942. Activated on 15 Sep 1942. Inactivated on 2 Nov 1945. Redesignated 491st Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 26 May 1947. Activated in the reserve on 5 Jun 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 491st Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 20 Aug 1958. Activated on 1 Nov 1958. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 26 Jun 1961.

Assignments:  Unkn, 15 Aug-Dec 1917; Seventh Aviation Instruction Center, Dec 1917-Dec 1918; unkn, Dec 1918-31 Jan 1919. 341st Bombardment Group, 15 Sep 1942-2 Nov 1945. 341st Bombardment Group, 5 Jun 1947-27 Jun 1949. 341st Bombardment Wing, 1 Nov 1958-25 Jun 1961.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 15 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 3-22 Nov 1917; Aulnat (near Clermont-Ferrand) France, 18 Dec 1917; St. Nazaire, France, c. 30 Dec 1918-c. 12 Jan 1919; Garden City, NY, c. 23-31 Jan 1919. Karachi, India, 15 Sep 1942; Chakulia, India, 5 Jan 1943 (detachment of ground personnel at Gaya, India, 20 Jul-10 Sep 1943); Yangkai, China, 10 Jan 1944-13 Sep 1945 (one detachment operated from Kweilin and Liuchow, China, 13 Jun-10 Jul 1944; and another operated from Liuchow, China, 29 Aug-2 Nov 1944); Camp Kilmer, NJ, 1-2 Nov 1945. New Haven, Conn, 5 Jun 1947-27 Jun 1949. Dyess AFB, Tex, 1 Nov 1958-25 Jun 1961.

Aircraft:  B-25, 1942-1945. B-47, 1958-1961.

Operations:  Constructed and maintained facilities, Feb-Dec 1918. Apparently never active during the period 1924-1942 when allotted to the reserve with assignment to Ninth Corps Area and designated station at Seattle, Wash. Combat in CBI, 10 Jan 1943-25 Jul 1945.

Service Streamers:  Theater of Operations.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; New Guinea; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: French Indochina, 11 Dec 1944-12 Mar 1945.

Emblem:  On a yellow disc, border black, a medium blue sphere in base, marked with white lines of latitude and longitude, and having a black and red stake affixed at pole, being rung by white horseshoe, trimmed black, leaving white speed lines to rear toward sinister chief. (Approved 19 Oct 1944.)


Other Sites of Interest:  341st Bomb Group

Table of Contents



96th Fighter Control Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

The 96th Fighter Control Sq was reassigned from IV Fighter Cd to Hq, Bradley Fld in Mar 44. Arrived in the CBI, at some later time it was assigned directly to 10th Air Force. Disbanded 8 Oct 48.


Source:  Mr. Robert Fagelson, 51st FCS

As the Allied offensive progressed to Bhamo and farther southward more Control Centers were needed.  The number of Fighter Control Centers would thus exceed the capabilities of one Fighter Control Squadron so the Control Centers in India were to be operated by the 51st Fighter Control Squadron while the Control Centers in Burma were to be operated by the 96th Fighter Control Squadron which had just arrived in the India-Burma Theater from the United States (c. May 1944).  The transfer of the Burma Control Centers was made during August 1944.

(See 51st FCS History, CBI Unit Histories)

Table of Contents



426th Night Fighter Squadron


P-61A "SATAN 13" of the 426th NFS -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 426th Night Fighter Squadron on 8 Dec 1943. Activated on 1 Jan 1944. Inactivated on 5 Nov 1945. Redesignated 426th Tactical Fighter Training Squadron and activated 1970 organized 18 Jan 70, inactivated unknown. Redesignated 426th Tactical Fighter Sq unknown date, inactivated 29 Nov 90.

Assignments:  IV Fighter Command, 1 Jan 1944; 481st Night Fighter Operational Training Group, 7 Feb 1944; Tenth Air Force, 11 Jun 1944; AAF, India-Burma Sector, 22 Aug 1944; Fourteenth Air Force, Nov 1944-5 Nov 1945 (attached to 312th Fighter Wing, Feb-5 Nov 1945). 58th Tactical Fighter Training Wing/Tactical Training Wing 1970-Jan 81, 405th Tactical Training Wg Jan 1981-29 Nov 1990.

Stations:  Hammer Field, Calif, 1 Jan 1944; Delano AAFld, Calif, 31 Mar-15 Jun 1944; Calcutta, India on 29 Jun 44; Madhaiganj, India, c. 9 Aug 1944; Chengtu, China, 5 Nov 1944 (detachments operated from Kunming, China, Nov-25 Dec 1944; Hsian, China, 27 Nov 1944-17 Aug 1945); Shwangliu, China, Mar 1945 (detachments operated from Liangshan, China, Apr-13 Aug 1945; Ankang, China, Apr-21 Aug 1945); Unit began relocating to Shwangliu, China on 17 Aug 45. India, Sep-Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 3-5 Nov 1945. Luke AFB, AZ 1970-unknown.

Aircraft:  P-70, 1944; P-61, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 21 Nov 1944-13 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On an ultramarine blue disc, within a border light red, a dexter skeleton hand gold, holding in the finger tips a cat's eyeball white, flecked with veins of red, having a pupil green and iris yellow orange, surmounted by a silhouette, single-engine aircraft of the field. (Approved 8 Jun 1944.)


Other Sites of Interest:  Night Fighter

Table of Contents



427th Night Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 427th Night Fighter Squadron on 19 Jan 1944. Activated on 1 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 29 Oct 1945. Redesignated 427th Special Operations Training Squadron 1970, activated 1 Jul 70; inactivated 15 Jul 72; 427th Special Operations Squardron activated (unknown).

Assignments:  IV Fighter Command (attached to 481st Night Fighter Operational Training Group), 1 Feb 1944; Tenth Air Force, 11 Jun 1944; Twelfth Air Force (attached to 62nd Fighter Wing), Sep 1944; AAF, India-Burma Sector, 2 Oct 1944; Tenth Air Force, 13 Dec 1944; Fourteenth Air Force, 24 Aug-29 Oct 1945. 4410th Special Operations Training Group 1970-1972. AF Special Operations Command -unknown.

Stations:  Hammer Field, Calif, 1 Feb 1944; Bakersfield, Calif, 1 May-12 Jul 1944; Pomigliano, Italy, 12 Aug-20 Sep 1944 (air echelon relocated to Pomigliano, Italy on 25 Jul 44. ground echelon departed on 27 Jul 44); Pandaveswar, India, 31 Oct 1944 (detachments operated from Myitkyina, Burma, 13 Nov-Dec 1944); Myitkyina, Burma, c. Dec 1944 (detachment operated from Kunming, China, 18 Dec 1944-c. 28 Jun 1945); Dinjan, India, c. 25 May 1945 (detachments operated from Chengkung, China, 29 Jun-c. 16 Aug 1945; Nanning, China, 26 Jul-c. 16 Aug 1945); Unit consolidated at Liuchow, China, 13 Aug 1945; India, Sep-Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 28-29 Oct 1945. England AFB, LA 1970-1972. Pope AFB, NC -unknown.

Aircraft:  P-47 1944; P-70, 1944; P-61, 1944-1945. All aircraft were turned in at Yangkai, China on 29 Aug 45 due to cessation of hostilities and preparation for relocation to the United States. A-37 1970-1972; CN-235 -unknown.

Operations:  Combat in MTO, Sep 1944, and in CBI, 23 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Rome-Arno; India-Burma; China Defensive; North Apennines; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a grayed blue disc, border equally divided light green and red violet, within a black annulet, a white spider web surmounted by two, yellow orange, jagged lightning flashes, pile-wise, points converging in dexter base at center of broken torteau. (Approved 30 Apr 1945.)


Source:  A-37 Dragonfly (Globalsecurity.org)

The A-37 made its debut in the special operations arsenal in 1967 when the 4410th Combat Crew Training Wing began training U.S. and Vietnamese Air Force in the A-37B. The first A-37B arrived at Hurlburt Field in December 1969 for the 603d Special Operations Squadron. In July 1970 the 427th Special Operations Training Squadron assumed transition training in the A-37. When the 427th SOTS inactivated July 15, 1972, the mission of training Dragonfly pilots fell on the 6th Special Operations Squadron, which was redesignated the 6th SOTS. The mission now included all A-37B training for the Air Force military assistance program. Eventually the 6th SOTS became a part of the 1st Special Operations Wing.


Source:  militaryphotos.net

The USAF’s 427th Special Operations Squadron’s (427th SOS) mission is to provide Short Takeoff/Landing (STOL) and tactically qualified crews to support training requirements for the US Army Special Operations Forces (SOF) community. Their customers include the US Army Special Operations Command (USASOC), The US Army Special Forces Command (USASFK), and the John F Kennedy Special Warfare Center (JFKSWCS).

The 427th SOS provides US Army SOF personnel the opportunity to train on various types of aircraft for infiltration and exfiltration that they may encounter in the lesser developed countries in which they provide training. The 427th SOS aircrews must be proficient in smaller types of aircraft in order to familiarize US Army personnel with their characteristics, peculiarities, and capabilities. The 427th SOS is a tenant unit on Pope AFB, NC, and a direct reporting unit Air Force Special Operations Command, Hulbert Field, Florida.


Other Sites of Interest:  427th Special Operations Squadron - Wikipedia

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