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14th AF UNITS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
14th Air Force
American Volunteer Group
China Air Task Force
68th Composite Wing23d Fighter Gp1st Pursuit Sq / 74th Fighter Sq
2nd Pursuit Sq / 75th Fighter Sq
3d Pursuit Sq / 76th Fighter Sq
16th Fighter Sq
23d Fighter Control Sq
118th Tactical Recon Sq
5th AAF Special Weapons Detachment
308th Bombardment Gp373d Bombardment Sq
374th Bombardment Sq
375th Bombardment Sq
425th Bombardment Sq
69th Composite Wing 3d Air Cargo Resupply Detachment
 19th Liaison Sq
 27th Troop Carrier Sq
51st Fighter Gp16th Fighter Sq
25th Fighter Sq
26th Fighter Sq
36th Fighter Control Sq
51st Fighter Control Sq
322nd Fighter Control Sq
449th Fighter Sq
341st Bombardment Gp11th Bombardment Sq
22nd Bombardment Sq
490th Bombardment Sq
491st Bombardment Sq
312th Fighter Wing33d Fighter Gp58th Fighter Sq
59th Fighter Sq
60th Fighter Sq
81st Fighter Gp91st Fighter Sq
92nd Fighter Sq
93d Fighter Sq
311th Fighter Gp528th Fighter Sq
529th Fighter Sq
530th Fighter Sq
317th Fighter Control Sq
Chinese-American Composite Wing1st Bombardment Gp (Provisional)1st Bombardment Sq (Provisional)
2nd Bombardment Sq (Provisional)
3d Bombardment Sq (Provisional)
4th Bombardment Sq (Provisional)
3d Fighter Gp (Provisional)7th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
8th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
28th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
32nd Fighter Sq (Provisional)
5th Fighter Gp (Provisional)17th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
26th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
27th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
29th Fighter Sq (Provisional)
OTHER UNITS:XIV AF Strategic Air Command (Provisional)
4th Photographic Technical Unit
21st Photographic Reconnaissance Sq
35th Photographic Reconnaissance Sq
322nd Troop Carrier Sq
426th Night Fighter Sq
427th Night Fighter Sq
476th Fighter Group453d Fighter Sq
541st Fighter Sq
542nd Fighter Sq
543d Fighter Sq



14th Air Force  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Indian-made variation of the 14th AF patch
courtesy of Mr. Don Pearce

Later (and official) WWII-era 14th AF patches had the tiger leaping towards the right.
This change was made as the AAF didn't want the tiger to appear to be in retreat
when the patch was worn on the right-hand shoulder.


14th Air Force Organizational Chart (high-level)



14th Air Force Organizational Chart (detailed)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as Fourteenth Air Force on 5 Mar 1943. Activated on 10 Mar 1943. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Activated on 24 May 1946. Discontinued and inactivated on 1 Sep 1960. Activated on 20 Jan 1966. Organized on 1 Apr 1966. Redesignated as Fourteenth Aerospace Force on 1 Jul 1968. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1976. Redesignated as Fourteenth Air Force (Reserve), and activated in the Reserve, on 8 Oct 1976. Redesignated as Fourteenth Air Force on 1 Dec 1985. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1993. Activated on 1 Jul 1993. Redesignated as: Fourteenth Air Force (Air Forces Strategic-Space) on 24 May 2007; Fourteenth Air Force (Air Forces Strategic) on 4 Apr 2008.

Assignments:  US Army Forces, China-Burma-India Theater, 10 Mar 1943; US Forces, China Theater, c. 24 Oct 1944-15 Dec 1945; US Army Air Forces, Seattle Port of Embarkation, 5-6 Jan 1946. Air Defense Command, 24 May 1946; Continental Air Command, 1 Dec 1948-1 Sep 1960. Air (later Aerospace) Defense Command, 20 Jan 1966-1 Oct 1976. Air Force Reserve, 8 Oct 1976-1 Jul 1993. Air Force Space Command, 1 Jul 1993-.

Major Components

Commands:  XIV Air Force Strategic Air Command (Provisional): attached 9 Jul-31 Jul 1945. XIV Air Force Tactical Air Command: attached 22 Jun-20 Aug 1945 (further attached to Tenth Air Force, 1-20 Aug 1945).

Regions:  First Air Force Reserve: 1 Jul-15 Aug 1960. Second Air Force Reserve: 1 Jul-15 Aug 1960. Third Air Force Reserve: 1 Jul-15 Jul 1960.

Districts:  3 Air Reserve: 1 Dec 1951-1 Apr 1954. 8 Air Reserve: 8 Nov 1952-1 Jul 1953.

Divisions:  8 Air: 1 May 1949-1 Aug 1950. 9 Air: 1 May 1949-1 Aug 1950. 31 Air: 1 Apr 1966-1 Jul 1968. 32 Air: 1 Apr 1966-1 Jul 1968.

Wings:  Chinese American Composite (Provisional): attached 1 Oct 1943-9 Jun 1945; 31 Jul-19 Sep 1945. 10 Tactical Reconnaissance: 1 Feb-1 Apr 1949. 20 Fighter (later, 20 Fighter-Bomber): 1 Feb 1949-1 Aug 1950. 21 Space: 20 Sep 1993-. 30 Space: 20 Sep 1993-. 31 Fighter (later, 31 Fighter-Bomber): 1 Feb 1949-1 Jul 1950. 45 Space: 20 Sep 1993-. 50 Space: 20 Sep 1993-. 54 Fighter: 10-11 Oct 1950. 63 Fighter: 10-11 Oct 1950. 68 Fighter (later, 68 Composite): 3 Sep 1943-10 Oct 1945 (not operational). 69 Bombardment (later, 69 Composite): 3 Sep 1943-25 Aug 1945 (not operational). 71 Missile Warning: 1 Jul 1968-30 Apr 1971. 73 Aerospace Surveillance: 1 Jul 1968-30 Apr 1971. 94 Bombardment (later, 94 Tactical Reconnaissance; 94 Troop Carrier; 94 Tactical Airlift; 94 Airlift): 26 Jun 1949-1 Apr 1951; 14 Jun 1952-17 May 1955; 25 Mar 1958-15 Aug 1960; 8 Oct 1976-1 Jul 1993. 118 Tactical Reconnaissance: 1-12 Apr 1951. 137 Fighter-Bomber: 26 Oct-27 Nov 1950. 302 Troop Carrier: 25 Mar 1958-15 Aug 1960. 312 Fighter: 13 Mar 1944-5 Nov 1945 (detached 9 Jul-1 Aug 1945). 314 Troop Carrier: 1 Feb 1949-1 Aug 1950. 316 Troop Carrier: 1 Feb-20 Oct 1949. 319 Bombardment (later, 94 Fighter-Bomber): 10 Oct 1949-28 Mar 1951; 18 May 1955-16 Nov 1957. 323 Bombardment: 1 Jul 1950-28 Mar 1951. 433 Tactical Airlift: 18 May 1955-25 Mar 1958. 435 Troop Carrier: 26 Jul 1949-2 Mar 1951; 1 Dec 1952-15 Jul 1970. 443 Troop Carrier: 1 Jul 1950-2 May 1951. 445 Troop Carrier: 16 Nov 1957-15 Jul 1960. 446 Troop Carrier: 25 May 1955-25 Mar 1958. 448 Fighter-Bomber: 8 May 1955-16 Nov 1957. 459 Troop Carrier: 25 Mar 1958-15 Aug 1960. 460 Air Base (later, 460 Space): 1 Oct 2001-. 482 Troop Carrier (later, 482 Fighter-Bomber): 14 Jun-1 Dec 1952; 18 May 1955-16 Nov 1957. 514 Troop Carrier: 26 Jun 1949-10 Oct 1949; 25 Mar 1958-15 Aug 1960. 516 Troop Carrier: 26 Jun 1949-17 Apr 1951. 4756 Air Defense: 1 Apr 1966-1 Jan 1968. 4780 Air Defense: 1 Apr 1966-1 Jul 1968.

Groups:  10 Aerospace Defense: 1 Jul 1968-31 Dec 1970. 932 Aeromedical Airlift: 8 Oct 1976-1 Aug 1992. Centers. 614 Air and Space Operations (formerly, 614 Space Operations Group): 28 Aug 1998-.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 10 Mar 1943; Peishiyi, China, 7 Aug-c. 15 Dec 1945; Fort Lawton, WA, 5-6 Jan 1946. Orlando AAB (later AFB), FL, 24 May 1946; Robins AFB, GA, 28 Oct 1949-1 Sep 1960. Gunter AFB, AL, 1 Apr 1966; Burrows Building, Colorado Springs, CO, 1 Jul 1968-1 Oct 1976. Dobbins AFB (later, Air Reserve Base), GA, 8 Oct 1976-1 Jul 1993. Vandenberg AFB, CA, 1 Jul 1993-.

Commanders:  Maj Gen Claire L. Chennault, 10 Mar 1943; Brig Gen Edgar E. Glenn, 22 Apr 1943 (acting); Maj Gen Claire L. Chennault, 4 Jun 1943; Maj Gen Charles B. Stone III, 1 Aug 1945; Col Floyd J. Doran, 1 Dec 1945-c. 1946. Maj Gen Leo A. Walton, 24 May 1946; Brig Gen Ralph F. Stearley, 27 Jul 1948; Brig Gen Ralph A. Snavely, 18 Oct 1948 (acting); Maj Gen Ralph F. Stearley, 20 Nov 1948; Brig Gen Joseph H. Davidson, 2 Feb 1950 (acting); Maj Gen Ralph F. Stearley, 14 Mar 1950; Maj Gen Charles E. Thomas Jr., 17 Jul 1950; Col Cortland S. Johnson, 15 April 1951 (acting); Maj Gen Charles E. Thomas Jr., (by 23) May 1951; Col Edgar E. Glenn, 3 Apr 1952 (acting); Maj Gen Charles E. Thomas Jr., (by 8 May) 1952; Col Marden M. Munn, 15 Aug 1953 (acting); Maj Gen Charles E. Thomas Jr., 22 Sep 1953; Maj Gen George G. Finch, 1 Feb 1955; Maj Gen John W. Persons Jr., 1 Aug 1957; Col James R. Williams, 24 Apr 1959 (acting); Maj Gen John W. Persons Jr., 23 May 1959; Col James R. Williams, 1 Aug 1959 (acting); Maj Gen Chester E. McCarty, 9 Oct 1959; Col Harry S. Bishop, 17 Feb 1960 (acting); Maj Gen Chester E. McCarty, 16 Mar-1 Sep 1960. Maj Gen James B. Tipton, 1 Apr 1966; Brig Gen Thomas H. Beeson, 22 Oct 1966; Maj Gen Walter B. Putnam, 1 Nov 1966; Maj Gen Oris B. Johnson, 1 Jul 1968; Col Russell G. Ogan, 25 Jul 1969 (acting); Maj Gen Michael J. Ingelido, 4 Aug 1969; Maj Gen Otis C. Moore, (by 28) Aug 1972; Maj Gen James Paschall, 15 Apr 1974; Col Thomas M. Crawford Jr., 1 Aug 1975 (acting); Brig Gen Bruce K. Brown, 13 Aug 1975; Col Thomas M. Crawford Jr., 15 Jun-1 Oct 1976. Maj Gen Edwin R. Johnson, 8 Oct 1976; Maj Gen Edward Dillon, 1 Nov 1976; Brig Gen Donald M. Jenkins (acting), 24 Apr 1979; Maj Gen James E. McAdoo, 15 May 1979; Maj Gen Alan G. Sharp, 1 Jan 1983; Maj Gen James E. McAdoo, 1 Dec 1986; Brig Gen Dale E. Baumler, 3 Mar 1988; Brig Gen Wallace W. Whaley, 31 Jan-1 Jul 1993. Col Owen E. Jensen, 1 Jul 1993 (acting); Maj Gen Parick P. Caruana, 16 Sep 1993; Maj Gen William E. Jones, 22 Jul 1994; Maj Gen David L. Vesely, 28 Jun 1995; Maj Gen Gerald F. Perryman Jr., 10 Mar 1997; Maj Gen Robert C. Hinson, 6 May 1999; Maj Gen William R. Looney III, 6 Jun 2000; Maj Gen Michael A. Hamel, 3 May 2002; Lt Gen William L. Shelton, 18 May 2005; Lt Gen Larry D. James, 9 Dec 2008-.

Operations:  President Roosevelt established Fourteenth Air Force by special order on 10 March 1943. Claire Chennault, who had formed the American Volunteer Group of "Flying Tiger" fame received a promotion to Major General and assumed command. The new organization, conducted highly effective fighter and bomber operations over Japanese occupied Chinese territory, and the eastern third of mainland China and Formosa. Fourteenth Air Force also supported the airlift of cargo over the Himalayas from India (flying the "The Hump") for Chinese forces and B-29 operations at forward operating bases in China during Operation MATTERHORN, Oct 1944 to Mar 1945. By Aug 1945, its components had achieved air superiority over the skies of China and established a ratio of 7.7 enemy planes destroyed for every American plane lost in combat. The United States Army Air Forces credited 14 AF units with the destruction of 2,315 Japanese aircraft, 356 bridges, 1,225 locomotives and 712 railroad cars. Following the war, it returned to the US and inactivated on 6 Jan 1946.

In May of 1946, however, Fourteenth Air Force again activated at Orlando Army Air Base, FL, to administer Air Defense Command functions in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico. It supervised the air defense training of active duty units, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units. Continental Air Command later expanded its mission to include the equipping and combat preparation of these units. With the advent of the Korean War, the Fourteenth participated in the mobilization of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units and individuals from its headquarters at Robins AFB, GA. After the war, its reserve wings continued to participate in various worldwide airlift operations until inactivation in Sep 1960.

In Apr 1966, the Air Force again activated the Fourteenth Air Force as part of Air Defense Command at Gunter AFB, AL, to support the North American Aerospace Defense Command Southern Region's air defense mission. Later, it provided for Aerospace Defense Command training, testing and evaluation missions. On 1 Jul 1968, Fourteenth Air Force was redesignated Fourteenth Aerospace Force and moved to Colorado Springs, CO. It assumed responsibility for detecting foreign missile launches, tracking missiles and satellites in space, providing space vehicle launch services, maintaining a satellite data base of all man-made objects in space and performing anti-satellite actions. It also equipped, trained, administered and provided personnel to operate and maintain space surveillance, space defense and missile warning systems until 1 Oct 1976 when it again inactivated. Seven days later, the Air Force redesignated the 14th Aerospace Force as Fourteenth Air Force (Reserve) at Dobbins AFB, GA, to manage airlift forces for the Military Airlift Command. Its units participated in worldwide airlift missions, one of which was Operation JUST CAUSE, Dec 1989-Jan 1990. In order to facilitate a change in mission, reassignment, and move to Vandenberg AFB, CA, the AF inactivated the Fourteenth at Dobbins AFB, GA, on 1 July 1993 and on the same day activated it in California. Assigned to Air Force Space Command, its responsibilities involved space operations. In 1997, it established the Space Operations Center at Vandenberg AFB in California for the 24-hour command and control of all space operations resources, and in 2002, became the Air Force's space operations component of the United States Strategic Command. As the Air Force's only Numbered Air Force for space and its concurrent United States Strategic Command mission of Joint Space Operations, the Fourteenth's mission included space launches from the east and west coasts, satellite command and control, missile warning, space surveillance and command and control of assigned and attached joint space forces. Its overall mission included control and exploitation of space for global and theater operations, to ensure warfighters the best space capabilities available.

Service Streamers:  World War II Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: China Defensive; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1974-1 Oct 1976; 1 Jun 1986-31 May 1988; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Sep 1996-31 Aug 1998; 1 Sep 1998-31 Aug 2000; 1 Sep 2000-1 Sep 2001. Air Force Organizational Excellence Award: 1 Oct 2001-30 Sep 2003.

Emblem:  Azure, a winged Bengal tiger or with Sable and Argent markings, nose and langued gules armed White below and surmounting the lower points of a mullet of the fourth pierced of the fifth, all within an annulet and diminutive bordure Yellow. Approved on 6 Aug 1943; revised on 16 Aug 1994.

Significance:  Blue and yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, and the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The tiger represents the unit's heritage in China as the American Volunteer Group during World War II. The wings on the tiger reflect the unit's flight capabilities in peace and war. The star pierced red symbolized the devotion and sacrifice by all previous personnel of the unit. Approved 16 August 1994.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Operations and Honors through 10 Mar 2010.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)


Source:  Ex-CBI Roundup, December 1976 issue

14th AEROF Crest Is Symbol of An Adventure-Filled Era

Hq. 14th AEROF - The official crest of the Fourteenth Aerospace Force had its beginning in the superstitions of the Japanese people.

For nearly a decade before Pearl Harbor, Japanese military aircraft roamed at will over China, virtually unopposed in the air. Japanese bombers and fighters nestled in some 200 Japanese airmies to strike the ill-armed, ill-supplied retreating forces of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek. In the summer of 1941, the band of American flyers that was to become known as the American Volunteer Group (AVG) arrived in China under the leadership of Claire Lee Chennault. Chennault had first come to China in 1937 as an air advisor.

Shortly after the AVG's arrival in China, its members called themselves the Flying Tigers. They heard the Chinese call them tigers and learned that the Japanese inherently feared the Bengal Tiger as a symbol of evil. On the other hand, the Chinese looked upon the saber toothed tiger as their national symbol.

Before they were in China long, some of the members of the AVG spotted a RAF squadron of P-40 Tomahawks decorated with shark teeth along the nose of the aircraft. So the AVG soon converted the noses of their drab P-40s into grinning mouths of tiger sharks. A leering, bloody tongue was added and a single ominous eye just aft of the propeller completed the grim design which became world famous as the unofficial Flying Tiger trademark.

Upon the organization of the 14th Air Force in March, 1943, individual members of the AVG were either called to active duty under reserve commissions or commissioned in the Army of the United States and assigned duty with the 23rd Fighter Group, a unit of the 14th Air Force.

The 14th Air Force insignia was approved Aug. 6, 1943, as a result of a personal request from General Chennault. The design was created by Sgt. Howard Arnegard, a member of the 14th Air Force, who modeled it after an original Flying Tiger drawing created by Mr. Henry Porter, an artist at Walt Disney studios. The insignia is a blue disc with a winged Bengal Tiger partially covering a white star charged with a red disc. The Bengal Tiger reflects the good luck charm of the Chinese people. The blue disc represents an airman's skies, and the white star charged with a red disc is the traditional symbol the United States has displayed on all its aircraft.


Source:  Fact Sheets - 14th Air Force History (Vandenberg AFB website)

14TH AIR FORCE HISTORY

The Beginning-the American Volunteer Group

Preceding the establishment of the 14th Air Force, there was a slow build-up of American air strength in China. In 1937, Claire L. Chennault, a retired officer in the United States Army Air Corps, accepted the gigantic task of reorganizing the Chinese Air Force. In 1941, President Roosevelt signed a secret executive order which permitted Chennault to organize assistance. A group of volunteers (approximately 100 pilots and 150 support personnel) formed the American Volunteer Group (AVG). The AVG was trained by Chennault in Burma on innovative combat tactics. Later, one hundred crated P-40 aircraft, rejected by the British as obsolete, were shipped to China. To enhance esprit de corps, aircraft noses were painted to symbolize the grinning mouth, flashing teeth and the evil eye of the tiger shark. Subsequently, journalists used the tagline "Flying Tigers" which rapidly caught on worldwide.

Fighting against numerically superior forces, the AVG compiled one of the greatest records of the war before it was discontinued in 1942. According to official Chinese statistics, confirmed losses to the enemy by the AVG were 268 enemy aircraft destroyed and another 40 aircraft damaged against 12 losses for the AVG. In a separate report, Chennault credits the AVG with 294 enemy aircraft shot down.

The Creation of the 14th Air Force

The China Air Task Force continued as the "Flying Tigers" under the command of Brigadier General Chennault. After the China Air Task Force was discontinued, the 14th Air Force (14 AF) was established by the special order of President Roosevelt on 10 March 1943. Chennault was appointed the commander and promoted to Major General. The "Flying Tigers" of 14 AF (who adopted the "Flying Tigers" designation from the AVG) conducted highly effective fighter and bomber operations along a wide front that stretched from the bend of the Yellow River and Tsinan in the north to Indochina in the south, from Chengtu and the Salween River in the west to the China Sea and the island of Formosa in the east. They were also instrumental in supplying Chinese forces through the airlift of cargo across "The Hump" in the China-Burma-India theater. By the end of World War II, 14 AF had achieved air superiority over the skies of China and established a ratio of 7.7 enemy planes destroyed for every American plane lost in combat. Overall, military officials estimated that over 4,000 Japanese planes were destroyed or damaged in the China-Burma-India theater during World War II. In addition, they estimated that air units in China destroyed 1,100,000 tons of shipping, 1,079 locomotives, 4,836 trucks and 580 bridges. The United States Army Air Corps credits 14 AF with the destruction of 2,315 Japanese aircraft, 356 bridges, 1,225 locomotives and 712 railroad cars.

Post War Period

After World War II, 14 AF moved to Orlando Army Air Base, Florida, to administer Air Defense Command functions in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico. They supervised the air defense training of active duty units, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units. Continental Air Command later expanded the mission of 14 AF to include the equipping and combat preparation of units.

During the Korean War, 14 AF participated in the mobilization of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units and individuals from its headquarters at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia. After the Korean War, the reserve wings of 14 AF participated in various airlift operations, such as Operation SIXTEEN TONS, Operation SWIFT LIFT and Operation READY SWAP.

The 14th Air Force inactivated in 1960 and reactivated a few years later as part of Air Defense Command at Gunther AFB, Alabama. The reactivated 14 AF supported the North American Aerospace Defense Command Southern Region's air defense mission. Later, they provided for Aerospace Defense Command training, testing and evaluation missions.

Entry Into Space

In 1968, 14 AF moved to Ent AFB, Colorado, and was redesignated the 14th Aerospace Force. The 14th Aerospace Force was responsible for detecting foreign missile launches, tracking missiles and satellites in space, providing space vehicle launch services, maintaining a satellite data base of all man-made objects in space and performing anti-satellite actions. The 14th Aerospace Force also equipped, trained, administered and provided personnel to operate and maintain space surveillance, space defense and missile warning systems.

A Brief Return to Flying

In 1976, the 14th Aerospace Force was redesignated the 14 AF (Reserve) at Dobbins AFB, Georgia, where it managed airlift forces for Military Air Command and participated in such missions as Operation JUST CAUSE.

Return to Space

On 1 July 1993, 14 AF returned to its former space role and became a Numbered Air Force for Air Force Space Command, responsible for performing space operations. In 1997, 14 AF established the Space Operations Center at Vandenberg AFB in California for the 24-hour command and control of all space operations resources. In 2002, 14 AF became the Air Force space operational component of United States Strategic Command. In 2005, 14 AF officially opened up its newly renovated operations center. The new command and control capabilities of the Joint Space Operations Center ensured unity of effort for all space capabilities supporting joint military operations around the globe.

Today

As the Air Force's sole Numbered Air Force for space and its concurrent United States Strategic Command mission of Joint Space Operations, the operational mission of 14 AF includes space launch from the east and west coasts, satellite command and control, missile warning, space surveillance and command and control of assigned and attached joint space forces. The overall mission is control and exploit space for global and theater operations, thereby ensuring warfighters are supported by the best space capabilities available. The 14th Air Force consists of two launch wings (the 30th Space Wing at Vandenberg AFB, California, and the 45th Space Wing at Patrick AFB, Florida); a space control and missile warning wing (the 21st Space Wing at Peterson AFB, Colorado); a satellite command and control wing (the 50th Space Wing at Schriever AFB, Colorado) and a missile warning wing (the 460th Space Wing at Buckley AFB, Colorado).


History of the CBI Theater:

"Army Air Forces in WWII"  (7 volumes)
Office of Air Force History
Wesley Craven & James Cate, editors
       Site 1:  Hyperwar: U.S. Army Air Force in World War II
       Site 2:  Air Force Historical Studies Office

Table of Contents



American Volunteer Group (AVG)
(forerunner to the China Air Task Force, July 1937 - July 1942)


Monument located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


Monument located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:  Flying Tigers: American Volunteer Group

When Japan invaded China, the Chinese government looked to the United States for assistance, hiring U.S. Army Air Corps veteran Claire Chennault to train its pilots. Chennault was a leading developer of combat tactics for pursuit aircraft whose ideas had fallen out of favor. When he was forced to retire in 1937 from the Air Tactical School because of bronchitis, Madame Chiang Kai-Shek, the head of the Chinese Air Force, offered him the job. He accepted and left for China, where his health rapidly improved.

On 09 Jul 37 Chennault accepted a request from Generalissimo & Madam Chaing Kai-shek to take over the Chinese Air Force and straightened it out as the Italians had been running it. Chennault found that of the 500 planes listed only 91 actually existed.

On 15 Apr 41, President Roosevelt gave an unpublished Executive Order allowing men from the Army Air Corps, Naval & Marine air services to resign so they could join the new American Volunteer Group in China. The A.V.G. was born, and began working with the Chinese against the Japanese.

The AVG flew P-40 Tomahawks built by the Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Company, and 100 of the P-40's which were go to the UK were diverted to the AVG. Planes 1 - 33 were assigned to the 1st Pursuit Squadron, the Adam & Eve or Apple squadron as the logo on the fuselage was and apple with Adam & Eve. Planes 34 - 67 were assigned to the 2nd Pursuit Squadron, the Panda Bears. Planes 68 - 99 to the 3d Pursuit Squadron, The Hell's Angels squadron.

The Chinese called them Fei Hu, for the shark's teeth painted on their planes.

Table of Contents



China Air Task Force (CATF)
(forerunner to the 14th Air Force, July 1942 - March 1943)


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:  China Air Task Force: Replaced the American Volunteer Group

(Excerpt from Aviation History magazine, by Mr. William B. Allmon)

At midnight on July 4, 1942, the American Volunteer Group (AVG), better known as the Flying Tigers, ceased to exist. They were replaced by the China Air Task Force (CATF), a group that was, in the words of Tiger founder and leader Brigadier General Claire Lee Chennault, "patched together in the midst of combat from whatever happened to be available in China during the gloomy summer of 1942."

Chennault was called to Chungking, China, on March 29, 1942, for a conference to decide the fate of the AVG. Present at the conference were Chiang Kai-shek; his wife, Madame Chiang; Lt. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell, commander of U.S. forces in China; and (Colonel Clayton A.) Bissell, who had arrived in early March.

Stilwell and Bissell made it clear to both Chennault and Chiang that unless the AVG became part of the U.S. Army, its supplies would be cut off. "Unless the AVG fought in Army uniforms they were to be denied the privilege of fighting at all," Chennault wrote. He agreed to return to active duty but, as he later wrote, "I made it clear to Stilwell that my men would have to speak for themselves."

Chiang Kai-shek finally agreed to let the AVG be inducted into the USAAF, after Stilwell promised to replace it with a complete fighter group that Chennault would command. Stilwell and Bissell wanted the AVG dissolved by April 30, 1942. Chennault, wanting to keep the Flying Tigers going as long as possible, proposed the group disband on July 4, when the AVG's contracts with the Nationalist Chinese government expired. Stilwell and Bissell accepted. "And so it was agreed," Chennault recalled, "with smiles and handshaking from all but me."

Chennault returned to active duty in the USAAF on April 15, 1942. He was promoted eight days later, on April 23, from colonel to brigadier general. Chennault was told that he would have to be satisfied to command a "China Air Task Force" of fighters and bombers. Its mission was to defend the air supply route over the Himalayan mountains between India and China--called the "Hump"--and to provide air support for Chinese ground forces. The task force would operate as part of the Tenth Air Force, stationed in India, which would control supplies, personnel and operations. Bissell, also newly promoted to brigadier general--senior to Chennault by one day--would command all American air units in China. Chennault would be a deputy commander, subject to Bissell's orders.

The Flying Tigers' war ended on July 4, 1942, and the China Air Task Force's war began. Chennault had received little help from the U.S. Army in putting together the CATF. The Army supplied only a dozen green pilots, plus 20 clerks and mechanics. "Everything else...was AVG equipment bought and paid for by the Chinese," Chennault remembered. "The Army provided no fighter planes, no trucks, no jeeps, no radios, no administrative or maintenance equipment, not even an extra pair of uniform pants or an experienced group commander."



Other Sites of Interest:

 China Air Task Force - LIFE Magazine - April 12, 1943

Table of Contents



68th Composite Wing

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 68th Fighter Wing on 9 Aug 1943. Activated in China on 3 Sep 1943. Assigned to Fourteenth AF. Redesignated 68th Composite Wing in Dec 1943. Served in combat from Dec 1943 until Aug 1945. Inactivated in China on 10 Oct 1945. Disbanded 15 Jun 83; Reconstituted 31 Jul 85 as 518th Air Refueling Wg, not active.

Groups:  23d Fighter: 1943-1945.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 3 Sep 1943; Kweilin, China, c. 23 Dec 1943; Liuchow, China, c. 15 Sep 1944; Luliang, China, c. 7 Nov 1944; Peishiyi, China, c. 19 Sep-10 Oct 1945.

Commanders:  Brig Gen Clinton D Vincent, c. 23 Dec 1943; Col Clayton B Claassen, c. 13 Dec 1944; Lt Col Frank N Graves, 1 Aug 1945; Lt Col Charles C Simpson Jr, 10 Aug 1945; Lt Col Oliver H Clayton, 22 Aug 1945; Maj Asa F Constable, 8 Sep 1945-unkn.

Campaigns:  China Defensive; Western Pacific; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Insigne:  None.

Table of Contents



23d Fighter Group


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 23 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 17 Dec 1941. Redesignated 23 Fighter Group on 15 May 1942. Activated on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 5 Jan 1946. Activated on 10 Oct 1946. Inactivated on 24 Sep 1949. Redesignated 23 Fighter-Interceptor Group on 19 Dec 1950. Activated on 12 Jan 1951. Inactivated on 6 Feb 1952. Redesignated 23 Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 20 Jun 1955. Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1959. Redesignated 23 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985. Redesignated 23 Operations Group, and activated, on 1 Jun 1992. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1997. Redesignated 23 Fighter Group on 26 Sep 2006. Activated on 1 Oct 2006.

Assignments:  Tenth Air Force, China Air Task Force, 4 Jul 1942; Fourteenth Air Force, 10 Mar 1943-5 Jan 1946. 20 Fighter Wing, 10 Oct 1946; 23 Fighter Wing, 16 Aug 1948-24 Sep 1949. 23 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952. 4711 Air Defense Wing, 18 Aug 1955; 32 Air Division (Defense), 1 Mar 1956; Bangor Air Defense Sector, 1 Aug 1958-1 Jul 1959. 23 Wing, 1 Jun 1992-1 Apr 1997. 23 Wing, 1 Oct 2006-.

Squadrons:  2 Airlift: 1 Jun 1992-1 Apr 1997. 16 Fighter: attached, 4 Jul 1942-19 Oct 1943. 41 Airlift: 16 Jul 1993-1 Apr 1997. 74 Fighter: 4 Jul 1942-5 Jan 1946; 10 Oct 1946-24 Sep 1949; 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952; 15 Jun 1993-1 Apr 1997; 1 Oct 2006-. 75 Fighter (later, 75 Fighter-Interceptor; 75 Fighter): 4 Jul 1942-5 Jan 1946; 10 Oct 1946-24 Sep 1949; 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952; 18 Aug 1955-1 Jul 1959; 1 Jun 1992-1 Apr 1997; 1 Oct 2006-. 76 Fighter (later, 76 Fighter-Interceptor): 4 Jul 1942-5 Jan 1946; 10 Oct 1946-24 Sep 1949; 18 Aug 1955-9 Nov 1957. 118 Tactical Reconnaissance: attached, May-Aug 1945. 132 Fighter-Interceptor: attached, 21 Jul-2 Aug 1951. 134 Fighter-Interceptor: attached, Jan-2 Aug 1951. 449 Fighter: attached, Jul-19 Oct 1943.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 4 Jul 1942; Kweilin, China, c. Sep 1943; Liuchow, China, 8 Sep 1944; Luiliang, China, 14 Sep 1944; Liuchow, China, Aug 1945; Hanchow, China, c. 10 Oct-12 Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, WA, 3-5 Jan 1946. Northwest Field (later, Northwest Guam AFB), Guam, 10 Oct 1946-3 Apr 1949; Howard AFB, Canal Zone, 25 Apr-24 Sep 1949. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 18 Aug 1955-1 Jul 1959. Pope AFB, NC, 1 Jun 1992-1 Apr 1997. Pope AFB, NC, 1 Oct 2006; Moody AFB, GA, 30 Jul 2007-.

Commanders:  Col Robert L. Scott Jr., 4 Jul 1942; Lt Col Bruce K. Holloway, 9 Jan 1943; Lt Col Norval C. Bonawitz, 16 Sep 1943; Col David L. Hill, 4 Nov 1943; Lt Col Philip C. Loofbourrow, 15 Oct 1944; Col Edward F. Rector, 12 Dec 1944-c. Dec 1945. Col Lester S. Harris, 10 Oct 1946; Maj Leonard S. Dysinger, 1 Nov 1947; Lt Col Hadley V. Saehlenou, Nov 1947-unkn; Col Louis R. Hughes Jr., 1 Sep 1948-unkn. Unkn, Jan-Jul 1951; Col Norval K. Heath, c. Jul 1951-6 Feb 1952. Col Frank Q. O'Connor, 1955; Lt Col Frank J. Keller, Dec 1955; unkn, 1956-1959. Col Charles M. Thrash, 1 Jun 1992; Col Frederick D. Van Valkenburg, 30 Jun 1994; Col Bobby J. Wilkes, 12 Jul 1996-31 Mar 1997. Col Henry J. Santicola, 1 Oct 2006; Col Michael O'Dowd, 27 Jul 2007-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1942-1944; P-51, 1943-1945. F-47, 1946-1949; F-80, 1949. F-86, 1951-1952. F-89, 1955-1959. A-10, 1992-1997, 2006-; C-130, 1992-1997; F-16, 1992-1996.

Operations:  The 23 Fighter Group initially owed its planes, several of its pilots, and its nickname to Claire Chennault's American Volunteer Group, "The Flying Tigers." Upon activation, the group used the shark-nosed P-40s made famous by its predecessor. The group provided air defense for the Chinese terminus of the Hump route from India; conducted a campaign against Japanese aircraft, both in the air and on the ground, strafed and bombed Japanese forces, installations, and transportation; escorted bombers, and flew reconnaissance missions. It intercepted Japanese planes attempting to bomb Allied airfields; attacked Japanese airdromes; strafed and bombed river craft, troop concentrations, supply depots, and railroads; and protected bombers that attacked Hong Kong, Canton, Shanghai, and other targets. Its area of operations extended beyond China to Burma, French Indochina, and Formosa. The "Flying Tigers" operated against the Japanese during the enemy's drive toward Chansha and Chungking in May 1943 and supported Chinese forces during the Japanese offensive in the Tungting Hu region in Nov 1943. Despite bad weather and heavy flak, the group received a DUC for actions it took in the effort to halt a Japanese force that pushed down the Hsiang Valley in Jun 1944 by repeatedly striking boats, trucks, aircraft, troops, and other objectives. During the following spring, the group helped stop a Japanese offensive, then proceeded to bomb and strafe retreating enemy columns. In Oct 1946, the 23 Fighter Group activated on Guam and was assigned to the Far East Air Forces, where it flew training, interception, and island defense missions, until its move to the Panama Canal Zone in Apr 1949 to provide jet transitional training in RF-80s for the Caribbean Air Command. From 1951-1952 and 1955-1959, served as part of the Air Defense Command flying air defense missions over northeastern United States. Activated as the 23 Operations Group, under the composite-type 23 Wing in 1992, the group flew A-10s, C-130s, and F-16s. Provided airlift and close air support to the U. S. Army's XVIII Airborne Corps until 1997 when the 23 Wing was redesignated 23 Fighter Group and assumed new responsibilities. In Oct 2006 when the 23 Fighter Group returned to wing status, the 23 Operations Group again was redesignated to a fighter group and assumed the mission at Pope AFB, NC. Trained to provide close air support for ground forces, 2006-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Hunan Province, China, 17-25 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 31 May 1995-31 Mar 1997.

Emblem:  Azure, over a bolt of lightning, in pale, or, a Flying Tiger proper, tongue red, winged argent; all outlines black; a diminutive border silver-grey. (Approved 24 Jan 1957.) Group will use the wing emblem with group designation in the scroll. Emblem should be updated in accordance with AFI 84-105.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 10 Dec 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Nov 2007.



Source:  Ex-CBI Roundup, October 1980 Issue

Issued 27 August 1945 by Headquarters Fourteenth Air Force, APO 287, c/o Postmaster New York City, New York, as follows:

GENERAL ORDERS NUMBER 118)

1. UNIT CITATION: Under the provisions of War Department Circular No. 333, dated 22 December 1943, the following named unit is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action against the enemy:

23RD FIGHTER GROUP

The Japanese were sending 70,000 crack ground troops down the Siang River Valley in Hunan Province, China, aiming at the capture of Hengyang, vital communications center and mid-way point in the Japanese strategy to drive an inland corridor across China. A major defense stand by ill-equipped Chinese ground forces was planned at Hengshan, 25 miles north of Hengyang, to attempt to stop the drive. Between 17 June 1944 and 25 June 1944 the 23RD FIGHTER GROUP threw its total effort into the battle. On all but three days during this period the weather was adverse to aerial operations, with an overcast arched over the river valley and resting on the mountains that lined both sides of the valley. Demonstrating extraordinary heroism, the pilots flew nearly half of their missions during this period through this "tunnel" created low above the valley. The valley floor was studded with machine guns, antiaircraft guns and thousands of rifles in the hands of the troops, forcing the pilots to fly through deadly curtains of machine gun and small arms fire. Despite the extreme hazards, the Group's pilots flew 538 sorties, strafing and bombing the enemy spearhead forces. They killed 1,640 troops and destroyed approximately 780 cavalry and pack horses. Striking at the supply lines immediately behind the front, they destroyed 377 small boats and damaged 372 more; sank fifteen large river vessels 100-or-more feet in length and damaged eight. They destroyed 91 motor trucks and damaged 50. They also sank three and damaged two heavily-armed gunboats that the Japanese had rushed into the area to protect their water supply lines. In addition, they wrought extensive destruction among supplies and equipment in the 100 or more compound storage centers they destroyed and damaged. In four encounters with enemy aircraft, the Group's pilots shot down seven enemy planes, probably destroyed seven more and damaged eight, losing none of their own aircraft. This lone, gallant stand by the 23RD FIGHTER GROUP against 70,000 enemy troops, despite adverse weather and even after the Allied ground defense stand at Heng-shan failed to develop, is expressive of an extraordinary heroism, gallantry, determination and esprit de corps in keeping with the highest traditions of the American military service.

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL STONE:
CLAYTON B. CLAASSEN
Colonel, G.S.C.
Chief of Staff.


Other Sites of Interest:

23d Flying Tiger Association

Globalsecurity.org (23d Fighter Group)



Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (23d Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 23 Fighter Wing on 10 Aug 1948. Activated on 16 Aug 1948. Inactivated on 24 Sep 1949. Redesignated 23 Fighter-Interceptor Wing on 19 Dec 1950. Activated on 12 Jan 1951. Inactivated on 6 Feb 1952. Redesignated 23 Tactical Fighter Wing, and activated, on 28 Jan 1964. Organized on 8 Feb 1964. Redesignated 23 Fighter Wing on 1 Oct 1991. Inactivated on 1 Jun 1992. Redesignated 23 Wing, and activated, on 1 Jun 1992. Redesignated: 23 Fighter Group on 1 Apr 1997; 23 Wing on 1 Oct 2006.

Assignments:  Twentieth Air Force, 16 Aug 1948; Caribbean Air Command, 25 Apr-24 Sep 1949. Eastern Air Defense Force, 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952. Tactical Air Command, 28 Jan 1964; Twelfth Air Force, 8 Feb 1964; 835 Air Division, 1 Jul 1964; Twelfth Air Force, 30 Jun 1971; Ninth Air Force, 1 Jul 1972-1 Jun 1992. Ninth Air Force, 1 Jun 1992; 347 Wing, 1 Apr 1997; 4 Fighter Wing, 27 Jun 2000; 347 Rescue Wing, 18 Aug 2006; Ninth Air Force (later, Ninth Air Force [Air Forces Central]), 1 Oct 2006; Ninth Air Force, 5 Aug 2009- (new Ninth Air Force).

Components:

Groups:  23 Fighter (later, 23 Fighter-Interceptor; 23 Operations; 23 Fighter): 16 Aug 1948-24 Sep 1949; 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952; 1 Jun 1992-1 Apr 1997; 1 Oct 2006-. 347 Rescue: 1 Oct 2006-. 563 Rescue: 1 Oct 2006-.

Squadrons:  6 Special Operations Training: 1 Jan-15 Sep 1974. 74 Tactical Fighter (later, 74 Fighter): 1 Jul 1972-15 Feb 1992 (detached 2 Jul-28 Dec 1973; 29 Aug 1990-20 Apr 1991); 1 Apr 1997-1 Oct 2006. 75 Tactical Fighter (later, 75 Fighter) 1 Jul 1972-2 Dec 1991; 1 Apr-1 Jun 1992; 1 Apr 1997-1 Oct 2006. 76 Tactical Fighter (later, 76 Fighter): 1 Oct 1972-29 May 1992 (detached 27 Aug 1990-c. Apr 1991). 132 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 21 Jul 1951-6 Feb 1952. 134 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 1 Apr 1951-6 Feb 1952. 333 Tactical Fighter: 15 Oct 1970-22 Mar 1971. 357 Tactical Fighter: attached c. 8 Nov 1965-28 Jan 1966; assigned 15-22 Mar 1971. 419 Tactical Fighter Training: 15 Oct 1969-1 Oct 1971. 421 Tactical Fighter: 8 Dec 1957-16 Apr 1959. 560 Tactical Fighter: 8 Feb 1964-25 Sep 1968. 561 Tactical Fighter: 8 Feb 1964-1 Jul 1972 (detached 6 Mar-10 Jul 1965 and 9 Apr-30 Jun 1972). 562 Tactical Fighter: 8 Feb 1964-1 Jul 1972 (detached 13 Aug-6 Dec 1965). 563 Tactical Fighter: 8 Feb 1964-1 Jul 1972 (detached 8 Apr-15 Aug 1965). 4519 Combat Crew Training: 1 Aug 1967-16 Oct 1969.

Stations:  Northwest Guam AFB, Guam, 16 Aug 1948-3 Apr 1949; Howard AFB, CZ, 25 Apr-24 Sep 1949. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952. McConnell AFB, KS, 8 Feb 1964; England AFB, LA, 1 Jul 1972-1 Jun 1992. Pope AFB, NC, 1 Jun 1992; Moody AFB, GA, 1 Oct 2006-.

Commanders:  Col Romulus W. Puryear, 16 Aug 1948; Col John T. Shields, 22 Sep 1948; Col Angier H. Foster, 25 Apr 1949; Col Louis R. Hughes Jr., c. 28 Apr-24 Sep 1949. Col Charles H. MacDonald, 12 Jan 1951-6 Feb 1952. None (not manned), 28 Jan-7 Feb 1964; Col Olin E. Gilbert, 8 Feb 1964; Col Edmund B. Edwards, 17 Aug 1964; Col Deward E. Bower, 12 Jul 1965; Col Max T. Beall, 9 Oct 1967; Col James V. Hartinger, 28 Aug 1968; Col Walter D. Druen Jr., 15 Jun 1970; Col Garry A. Willard Jr., 21 Oct 1971; Col Harry W. Schurr, 28 Apr 1972; Col Louis W. Weber, 1 Jul 1972; Col Waymond C. Nutt, 20 Nov 1973; Col Charles W. McClarren, 28 Jun 1975; Col Bernard J. Bogoslofski, 12 Dec 1975; Col Paul L. Wieland, 1 Jan 1977; Col Jerry W. Osgood, 1 Jun 1979; Col Michael J. Dugan, 29 May 1980; Col Jimmie V. Adams, 30 Mar 1981; Col Peter K. Foley, 15 Apr 1983; Col James L. Jamerson, 31 May 1985; Col Glenn A. Profitt II, 20 Feb 1987; Col John L. Welde, 10 Jan 1989; Col David A. Sawyer, 2 Apr 1990; Col Richard C. Lemon, 27 Aug 1990; Col David A. Sawyer, c. 22 Apr 1991-1 Jun 1992. Brig Gen Bobby O. Floyd, 1 Jun 1992; Brig Gen James E. Sandstrom, 27 May 1994; Brig Gen Paul R. Dordal, 12 Jan 1996; Col Bobby J. Wilkes, 1 Apr 1997; Col Dale A. Elliott, 22 Jan 1998; Col Joseph R. Wood, 9 Aug 1999; Col Vincent P. Wisniewski, 23 Mar 2001; Col Vincent P. DiFronso, 24 Jan 2003; Col Warren L. Henderson, 23 Jul 2004; Col Henry J. Santicola, 27 Jul 2006; Col Joseph T. Callahan, III, 1 Oct 2006; Col Kenneth E. Todorov, 11 May 2007; Col Gary W. Henderson, 28 May 2009; Col Billy D. Thompson, 19 Jul 2011-.

Aircraft:  F-47, 1948-1949; RF-80, 1949. F-86, 1951-1952; F-51, 1951-1952; F-80, 1951-1952. F-105, 1964-1972; AT-33, 1966-1969; T-39, 1966-1972; A-7, 1972-1981; A-37, 1974; A-10, 1980-1992. A/OA-10 1992-; C-130, 1992-1997; F-16, 1993-1996; HH-60, 2006-; HC-130, 2006-.

Operations:  Air defense of Guam, 1948-1949, and of the Canal Zone, 1949. Air defense of the northeastern United States, 1951-1952. Conducted basic training for about 500 Air Force recruits, 1951. Replaced 388 Tactical Fighter Wing in Feb 1964. Maintained proficiency in tactical fighter operations, frequently deploying whole units or segments thereof to support contingency and combat operations in overseas areas, 1964-1965. Conducted F-105 replacement training, Jan 1966-Nov 1970, and training for ANG units, Nov 1970-Apr 1971. Maintained proficiency in tactical fighter operations, 1970-1972. Replaced 4403 Tactical Fighter Wing at England AFB, LA, in Jul 1972 and switched to A-7 aircraft operations. Also controlled an A-37B special operations training squadron in 1974. Converted to the A-10 Thunderbolt in 1980. Trained in close air support, joint anti-armor operations and battlefield air interdiction. Deployed elements in support of operations in Grenada, Oct-Nov 1983. Deployed two squadrons (74 and 76) to Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-Apr 1991, where they performed close air support and joint anti-armor operations. On 1 Jun 1992, the wing inactivated at England AFB and activated at Pope AFB, SC. As a composite wing continued A-10 Thunderbolt training while adding an OA-10 reconnaissance mission and a C-130 airlift mission. Took part in Operation Restore Hope in Somalia in 1992 and 1993. In 1997, when the wing was redesignated a group, it gave up its C-130 squadrons but kept A/OA-10s. One of its squadrons flew F-16s from 1993 to 1996, when it also converted to A-10s. Beginning in 2006, supported worldwide search and rescue missions utilizing HH-60 and HC-130 aircraft; operated and maintained the largest A-10 fighter group in the USAF; provided global war on terrorism (GWOT) force.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 17 Jan-24 Feb 1991. Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Jun 2008-31 May 2010. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jun 1970-15 Jun 1971; 1 Jul 1980-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Apr 1989-31 Mar 1991; 31 May 1995-31 Mar 1997; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2003; 1 Jun 2006-31 May 2008.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 23d Operations Group prior to 16 Aug 1948:

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; Western Pacific; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation; Hunan Province, China, 17-25 Jun 1944.

Emblem:  Azure a lightning flash palewise Or surmounted by a tiger salient to base proper, langued Gules winged Argent, all within a diminished bordure of the second. Approved for 23d Group on 24 Jan 1957 and used by 23d Wing since Jan 1964 (KE 17354). Motto: FLYING TIGERS. Approved on 10 Dec 1992.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 2 Nov 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 2 Nov 2011.


Moody changes 23d Wing emblem, returns to heritage

Posted 6/5/2012 Updated 6/5/2012
by Staff Sgt. Melissa K. Mekpongsatorn
23d Wing Public Affairs

6/5/2012 - MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- The Department of the Army Institute of Heraldry recently approved the new rendition of the 23d Wing historical emblem.

In an effort to return to the Flying Tiger history and continue a proud legacy, the new patch reinstates the emblem originally used in 1957.

The bottom of the new patch now reads Flying Tigers instead of 23rd Wing. The purpose of this change is to signify the return to the Flying Tigers historical roots and to identify Moody as the home of the Flying Tigers.

Table of Contents



1st Pursuit Squadron / 74th Fighter Squadron


Aircraft were numbered 11-50. Beginning in 1945, aircraft were numbered 1-40.


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 74th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 17 Dec 1941. Redesignated 74th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Activated on 4 Jul 1942. Redesignated 74th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 28 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 5 Jan 1946. Activated on 10 Oct 1946. Inactivated on 24 Sep 1949. Redesignated 74th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 19 Dec 1950. Activated on 12 Jan 1951. Inactivated on 25 Jun 1958. Redesignated 74th Tactical Fighter Squadron on 18 May 1972. Activated on 1 Jul 1972. Redesignated 74th Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated on 15 Feb 1992. Activated on 15 Jun 1993.

Assignments:  23d Fighter Group, 4 Jul 1942–5 Jan 1946. 23d Fighter Group, 10 Oct 1946–24 Sep 1949 (attached to 20th [later, 46th] Fighter Wing, Dec 1947–16 Aug 1948). 23d Fighter-Interceptor Group, 12 Jan 1951; 4711th Defense Wing, 6 Feb 1952; 528th Air Defense Group, 16 Feb 1953; 64th Air Division, 21 Aug 1954; 4734th Air Defense Group, 1 Apr 1957; 64th Air Division, 1 May–25 Jun 1958. 23d Tactical Fighter (later, 23d Fighter) Wing, 1 Jul 1972–15 Feb 1992 (attached to 354th Tactical Fighter Wing, 2 Jul–28 Dec 1973 and to Tactical Fighter Wing, 23, Provisional, 20 Dec 1990–20 Apr 1991). 23d Operations Group, 15 Jun 1993–.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 4 Jul 1942; Yunnani, China, 12 Mar 1943; Kweilin, China, 19 May 1943 (detachment operated from Liuchow, China, 16 Feb–30 Apr 1944); Luliang, China, 12 Sep 1944 (detachment operated from Tushan, China, Mar–Aug 1945); Liuchow, China, c. Aug 1945; Hangchow, China, c. 15 Oct–4 Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, Wash, 3–5 Jan 1946. Northwest Field (later, Northwest Guam AFB), Guam, 10 Oct 1946–3 Apr 1949; Howard AFB, CZ, 25 Apr–24 Sep 1949. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 12 Jan 1951–19 Aug 1954; Thule AB, Greenland, 20 Aug 1954–25 Jun 1958. England AFB, LA, 1 Jul 1972–15 Feb 1992 (deployed at Korat RTAFB, Thailand, 2 Jul–28 Dec 1973 and to King Fahd Aprt, Saudi Arabia, 29 Aug 1990–20 Apr 1991). Pope AFB, NC, 15 Jun 1993–11 Jan 2008. Moody AFB 11 Jan 08 per MO-04, Hq ACC, 25 Jul 2007; AFOSCR-ACC, 31 Jan 2008.

Commanders:  Maj Frank Schiel Jr., 4 Jul 1942; Maj Albert J. Baulmer, Dec 1942; Maj John D. Lombard, c. Mar 1943; Lt Col Norval C. Bonawitz, 7 Jul 1943; Maj Arthur W. Cruickshank, 15 May 1944; Maj John C. Herbst, 1944; Maj Philip G. Chapman, Feb 1945; Maj Floyd Finberg, Mar 1945; Maj Bruce Downs, Jun 1945; Maj Julius C. Lowell, Sep 1945-unkn. Maj John C. Haygood, 10 Oct 1946; Maj Joseph H. Griffin, 8 Nov 1947; Lt Col Charles E. Parsons, 1 Jan 1948; Capt Gardner E. Cole, 7 Dec 1948; Capt Adolph J. Bregar, c. Apr-24 Sep 1949. Capt John P. Wilson, 12 Jan 1951; Lt Col William B. Hawkins Jr., 13 Jan 1951; Maj Dudley M. Watson, c. May 1952; Capt Charles B. Morfit, 23 Jun 1952; Lt Col Richard L. Crutcher Jr., 23 Jul 1952; Lt Col Fred J. Wolfe, 19 Aug 1955; Lt Col Walter A. Smith Jr., 19 May 1956; Maj James A. Kyle, 1957-25 Jun 1958. Lt Col Clarence P. Bell, 1 Jul 1972; Lt Col Larry K. Barton, 23 Jul 1974; Lt Col Roy H. Boone, 16 Jun 1976; Lt Col Robert I. Bond, 17 May 1978; Lt Col Fred C. Boli, 26 Sep 1979; Lt Col John M. Roberson, 24 Nov 1979; Lt Col Robert A. Heston, 30 Nov 1981; Lt Col Richard C. Lemon, 18 Nov 1983; Lt Col Bobby D. Buffkin, 15 Nov 1985; Lt Col Robert O. Williams, 5 Oct 1987; Lt Col Phillip S. Williams, 17 Oct 1989-unkn. Lt Col Dana T. Atkins, 15 Jun 1993; Lt Col Michael V. Ely, 1 Jul 1994; Lt Col Timothy B. Vigil, 10 Jul 1996; Lt Col John F. Bingaman, 3 Jul 1997; Lt Col Charles L. Schneider, 7 Apr 1999; Lt Col Arden B. Dahl, 26 Mar 2001; Lt Col Charles C. Floyd, 12 Jul 2002; Lt Col Jeffrey L. Cowan, 26 Apr 2004; Lt Col Russell Myers, 1 Oct 2006-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1942-1944; P-51, 1944-1945. P-47, 1946-1949; RF-80, 1949. F-86, 1951-1952; F-89, 1952; F-94, 1952-1953; F-89, 1953-1958. A-7, 1972-1981; A-10, 1980-1992. F-16, 1993-1996; A/OA-10, 1996-.

Operations:  Combat in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 16 Jul 1942-10 Aug 1945. Air defense, 1946-1949 and 1951-1958. Combat in Southeast Asia, 8 Jul-15 Aug 1973. Combat in Southwest Asia, Jan-Feb 1991. Rotated personnel and equipment to Southwest Asia in support of various operations, 1994-2003. Trained and maintained combat-ready aircraft and personnel, 2006-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; Western Pacific; China Offensive. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Hunan Province, China, 17-25 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1980-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Apr 1989-31 Mar 1991; 31 May 1995-31 Mar 1997; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 24 Mar-10 Jun 1999; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2003. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm, 2 Jul-21 Dec 1972.

Emblem (WWII):  Over a shield blue, with a border gray, a bolt of lightning yellow, superimposed over the center of the shield, with the point extending over the upper and lower edges of the shield, thereover a representation of the "Flying Tiger" in natural colors, with wings white, extending upperward to the corners of the shield; the tiger represented as "closing in for the kill." (Approved 24 Sep 1952.)

Emblem (Current):  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Yellow border, a White sun with twelve pointed rays fimbriated Yellow from which emerges within a Red burst, the head and forepaws of an Orange Bengal tiger with paws outstretched, detailed Black, White eye, ear, teeth and claws, Red tongue and pupil, wearing a top hat of Blue, White and Red with White five pointed stars. MOTTO: FLYING TIGERS. Approved on 4 May 1979 (KE 68594); replaced emblem approved on 24 Sep 1952 (K 6607).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 10 Dec 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Nov 2007.



Other Sites of Interest:  23d Flying Tiger Association



Photos from 2007 Gathering of Mustangs and Legends


Rickenbacker International Airport
Columbus, Ohio
29 September 2007
Photos courtesy of Mr. Steve Bricker

Table of Contents



2nd Pursuit Squadron / 75th Fighter Squadron


(Handmade from burlap bag)


Aircraft were numbered 150-199. Beginning in 1945, aircraft were numbered 40-80. From spring until fall of 1943, the 75th FS used squadron insignia on the tail. After that they used their squadron color on the propeller spinner.


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 75th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 17 Dec 1941. Redesignated 75th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Activated on 4 Jul 1942. Redesignated 75th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 28 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 5 Jan 1946. Activated on 10 Oct 1946. Redesignated 75th Fighter Squadron, Jet, on 3 May 1949. Inactivated on 24 Sep 1949. Redesignated 75th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 19 Dec 1950. Activated on 12 Jan 1951. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 30 Jun 1968. Activated on 30 Sep 1968. Inactivated on 30 Nov 1969. Redesignated 75th Tactical Fighter Squadron on 18 May 1972. Activated on 1 Jul 1972. Redesignated 75th Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated on 2 Dec 1991. Activated on 1 Apr 1992.

Assignments:  23d Fighter Group, 4 Jul 1942–5 Jan 1946. 23d Fighter Group, 10 Oct 1946–24 Sep 1949 (attached to 20th [later, 46th] Fighter Wing, Dec 1947–16 Aug 1948). 23d Fighter-Interceptor Group, 12 Jan 1951; 4711th Defense Wing, 6 Feb 1952; 4709th Defense Wing, 14 Oct 1952; 519th Air Defense Group, 16 Feb 1953; 23d Fighter Group, 18 Aug 1955; Bangor Air Defense Sector, 1 Jul 1959; 36th Air Division, 1 Apr 1966–30 Jun 1968. 34th Air Division, 30 Sep 1968–30 Nov 1969. 23d Tactical Fighter (later, 23d Fighter) Wing, 1 Jul 1972–2 Dec 1991. 23d Fighter Wing, 1 Apr 1992; 23d Operations Group, 1 Jun 1992–.

Stations:  Hengyang, China, 4 Jul 1942; Chanyi, China, 17 Aug 1942; Yunani, China, 20 Jan 1943; Lingling, China, 31 Mar 1943; Kunming, China, 26 Apr 1943; Kweilin, China, 11 Oct 1943; Hengyang, China, c. Nov 1943; Lingling, China, 10 Jun 1944; Kweilin, China, 25 Jun 1944; Luliang, China, 12 Sep 1944; Luichow, China, Aug 1945; Hangchow, China, 10 Oct-10 Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, WA, 3-5 Jan 1946. Northwest Field (later, Northwest Guam AFB), Guam, 10 Oct 1946-3 Apr 1949; Howard AFB, CZ, 25 Apr-24 Sep 1949. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 12 Jan 1951; Suffolk County AFB, NY, 16 Oct 1952; Presque Isle AFB, ME, 18 Aug 1955; Dow AFB, ME, 25 Jun 1959-30 Jun 1968. Wurtsmith AFB, MI, 30 Sep 1968-30 Nov 1969. England AFB, LA, 1 Jul 1972-2 Dec 1991. Pope AFB, NC, 1 Apr 1992; Moody AFB, GA, 30 Jul 2007-.

Commanders:  Maj David L. Hill, Jul 1942; Lt Col John R. Alison, 1 Dec 1942; Maj Edmund R. Goss, c. Mar 1943; Lt Col E. W. Richardson, c. Oct 1943; Lt Col Philip C. Loofbourrow, c. Mar 1944; Maj Donald L. Quigley, Jul 1944; Maj A. T. House, Aug 1944; Lt Col Clyde B. Slocumb Jr., Oct 1944; Capt John R. Alarie, Dec 1945-c. Jan 1946. Capt Robert D. Cox, 10 Oct 1946; Maj Kenneth C. Jacobs, 1 Feb 1947; Maj Harold C. Gibson, Jan 1948; Maj George B. Hamilton, Oct 1948; Maj Richard R. Coursey Jr., May 1949; Lt Col George J. LaBreche, Jun-Sep 1949. Lt Col Francis J. Vetort, 12 Jan 1951; Maj Edward C. Fletcher, 13 Mar 1952; Lt Col August E. Weil, 1954; Maj George C. McCleary, c. 1955; Lt Col John A. Simmons Jr., 1956; Maj Luverne S. Johnson, c. 1957; Maj James S. Simon, 1959; Lt Col Harold I. Hill, 10 Jul 1959; Lt Col William C. Davis, 20 Aug 1962; Col Morris B. Pitts, 1 Jul 1964; Lt Col Donald F. Chaplain, 23 Jun 1966; Lt Col Robert E. Prince, 1 Nov 1967-30 Jun 1968. Lt Col Monroe E. Blaylock, by Jan-30 Nov 1969. Lt Col Robert D. Reichart, 1 Jul 1972; Lt Col George R. Kennebeck, 16 Mar 1974; Lt Col Hugh D. Ebert, 16 Jun 1975; Lt Col Lawrence G. Hoppe, 9 May 1977; Lt Col William K. Hayes, 31 May 1979; Lt Col Ronald E. Smith, 20 Mar 1981; Lt Col Albert M. Barnes, 1 Sep 1981; Lt Col Robert G. Coleman II, 1 Sep 1983; Lt Col Roger R. Radcliffe, 4 Sep 1985; Lt Col Marvin G. Bass, 24 Oct 1986; Lt Col John D. Smith, 12 Sep 1988; Lt Col Larry A. Reseter, 1 Jun 1990-unkn. Lt Col Phillip Brown, 3 Apr 1992; Lt Col William Dixon, 28 Jan 1994; Lt Col Leonard M. Ritchey, 26 May 1995; Lt Col Marc W. Frith, 11 Mar 1996; Lt Col Wayne C. Pepin, 24 Jun 1997; Lt Col John Allison, 27 May 1999; Lt Col Paul T. Johnson, 16 Jan 2001; Lt Col Raymond Strasburger, 8 Jun 2003; Lt Col Richard Turner, 2 Apr 2004; Lt Col Tim Rice, 10 Jun 2005-.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1942-1944; P-51, 1944-1945. P-47, 1946-1949; RF-80, 1949. F-86, 1951-1955; F-89, 1955-1959; F-101, 1958-1968. F-101, 1968-1969. A-7, 1972-1981; A-10, 1980-1991. A/OA-10, 1992-.

Operations:  Combat in China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 6 Jul 1942-14 Aug 1945. Air Defense, 1946-1949, 1951-1968, and 1968-1969. Combat in Southeast Asia, 1968-1969; Jul-Aug 1973. Combat in Southwest Asia, Jan-Feb 1991. Rotated personnel and aircraft in support of combat search and rescue (CSAR), close air support (CAS), and forward air control (FAC) missions in Southwest Asia, 1995-1997. Trained and maintained combat-ready personnel and aircraft.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; Western Pacific; China Offensive. Southwest Asia: Southwest Asia Ceasefire.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Hunan Province, China, 17-25 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Dec 1999-31 Mar 2000. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1980-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Apr 1989-31 Mar 1991; 31 May 1995-31 Mar 1997; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2003.

Emblem:  On a Black disc with an inner White border a tiger shark (White with Blue and Black markings and Red eye) swimming to dexter and firing Yellow tipped White rockets from its lateral fins. Approved on 27 Feb 1953 (K 7070).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 10 Dec 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Nov 2007.



Other Sites of Interest:  23d Flying Tiger Association

Table of Contents



3d Pursuit Squadron / 76th Fighter Squadron



"This is what we are wearing pending official unit stand-up and patch approval by the AF and Army Heraldry stuff. We are currently operating under the aegis of 442 FW, Det 1 here at Moody. The 442 FW is our parent wing at Whiteman AFB, MO. The long-term plan is for the 476th FG to stand-up at Moody with the 76th FS as one of its units. The group will operate as a Reserve Associate unit to the 23rd FG A-10s."

LaRue "Lurch" Russell, Captain, USAFR
76th Fighter Squadron, Chief of Training
(received 12/14/08)

(per AFHRA, Oct 2009)


Aircraft were numbered 100-149. Beginning in 1945, aircraft were numbered 100-140.


In 1943 the shark mouth was dropped by the 76th FS on their P-51s. The 76th FS painted a black silhouette of an indian on the tails of their P-51s after their unit call sign, Pontiac.


(Photo courtesy of Mr. David DuBois & Mr. David Bell)


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 76 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 17 Dec 1941. Redesignated 76 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Activated on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 5 Jan 1946. Activated on 10 Oct 1946. Inactivated on 24 Sep 1949. Redesignated 76 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jun 1955. Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Jul 1963. Redesignated 76 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 18 May 1972. Activated on 1 Oct 1972. Redesignated 76 Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated on 29 May 1992. Redesignated 76 Space Operations Squadron on 21 Nov 1995. Activated on 1 Dec 1995. Inactivated on 21 Jan 2001. Redesignated 76 Space Control Squadron, and activated, on 22 Jan 2001. Inactivated on 22 Jan 2008. Redesignated 76 Fighter Squadron on 6 Jan 2009. Activated on 1 Feb 2009.

Assignments:  23 Fighter Group, 4 Jul 1942-5 Jan 1946. 23 Fighter Group, 10 Oct 1946-24 Sep 1949. 23 Fighter Group, 18 Aug 1955; 35 Air Division, 9 Nov 1957; 32 Air Division, 15 Nov 1958; Boston Air Defense Sector, 1 Feb 1961-1 Jul 1963. 23 Tactical Fighter (later, 23 Fighter) Wing, 1 Oct 1972-29 May 1992. Fourteenth Air Force, 1 Dec 1995; 614 Space Operations Group, 28 Aug 1998; 21 Operations Group, 31 Mar 2000-21 Jan 2001. 21 Operations Group, 22 Jan 2001-22 Jan 2008. 476 Fighter Group, 1 Feb 2009-.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 4 Jul 1941; Kweilin, China, 25 Jul 1942; Kunming, China, 18 Aug 1942; Lingling, China, 13 May 1943; Hengyang, China, 11 Aug 1943 (detachment operated from Suichwan, China, 3 Oct-7 Dec 1943); Kweilin, China, 21 Nov 1943; Suichwan, China, 26 Dec 1943; Lingling, China, 1 Jun 1944; Liuchow, China, Jul 1944; Luliang, China, c. 12 Sep 1944; Liuchow, China, 24 Aug 1945; Hangchow, China, 15 Oct-4 Dec 1945; Fort Lewis, WA, 3-5 Jan 1946. Northwest Field, Guam, 10 Oct 1946-3 Apr 1949; Howard AFB, CZ, 25 Apr-24 Sep 1949. Presque Isle AFB, ME, 18 Aug 1955; Pinecastle (later, McCoy) AFB, FL, 8 Nov 1957; Westover AFB, MA, 1 Feb 1961-1 Jul 1963. England AFB, LA, 1 Oct 1972-29 May 1992 (deployed aircraft and personnel to Saudi Arabia, Aug 1990-Apr 1991). Falcon (later, Schriever) AFB, CO, 1 Dec 1995; Peterson AFB, CO, 1 Dec 1999-21 Jan 2001. Peterson AFB, CO, 22 Jan 2001-22 Jan 2008. Moody AFB, GA, 1 Feb 2009-.

Commanders:  Maj Edward F. Rector, 4 Jul 1942; Lt Col Bruce K. Holloway, 5 Dec 1942; Maj Grant Mahony, 2 Jan 1943; Capt William Miller, c. 9 Jun 1943; Maj Robert Costello, c. Jul 1943; Capt James M. Williams, c. Oct 1943; Maj John S. Stewart, c. Jan 1944; Lt Col Charles E. Griffith, c. May 1944; Lt Col L. V. Teeter, c. Dec 1944; Lt Col David T. Whiddon, c. Jun 1945; Maj Eugene McGuire, Oct 1945-c. Dec 1945. Maj Victor N. Curtis, 10 Oct 1946; Maj Robert M. Levy, 5 Oct 1948-1949. Lt Col Walter R. Hardee Jr., c. 1956; Maj Morris F. Wilson, 1957; Lt Col Donald V. Miller, 11 Sep 1959; Maj William B. Howell, 1 Feb 1961; Lt Col Frederick D. Ellis, 1961; Maj William B. Howell, 29 Dec 1961; Col James A. Hearn, 15 Feb 1962; Maj Robert W. Thompson, 6 May 1963; Capt Frederick W. Knops Jr., 28 May-1 Jul 1963. Lt Col John B. Cutler, 1 Oct 1972; Lt Col James E. Kelm, 10 May 1974; Lt Col Arthur L. Chase, 5 Aug 1975; Lt Col James W. Prescott Jr., 27 Jul 1977; Lt Col James L. Jamerson, 31 May 1979; Lt Col Joseph J. Redden, 5 Jan 1981; Lt Col Roger E. Carleton, 1 Jul 1982; Lt Col Robert H. Hoh, 29 Jun 1984; Lt Col Ronald T. Cooper, 15 Jul 1985; Lt Col Charles W. Pitts, 17 Jul 1987; Lt Col Victor E. Renuart Jr., 2 Jun 1989-29 May 1992. Lt Col Thomas Meade, 1 Dec 1995; Lt Col Dallas K. Stephens, Jul 1996; Lt Col Craig Brazeau, 6 Sep 1997; Lt Col Mary L. Staley, 20 Oct 1997; Lt Col David Ziegler, 6 Jul 1999; Lt Col Samuel J. McCraw, 22 May 2001; Lt Col Todd W. Gossett, 5 Jun 2003; Lt Col Jim E. Jennings, 29 Jun 2005; Lt Col Jennifer L. Moore, 8 May 2007-22 Jan 2008.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1942-1944; P-51, 1944-1945. P-47, 1946-1949; RF-80, 1949. F-89, 1955-1960; F-102, 1960-1963. A-7, 1972-1981; A-10, 1981-1992. None, 1995-2001. None, 2001-2008.

Operations:  Combat in the China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater, 18 Jul 1942-11 Aug 1945, earning a Distinguished Unit Citation for missions in China in June 1944. Air defense intercept operations in Guam, 1946-1949, in Panama, 1949, and at various bases in the eastern United States, 1955-1963. Trained in and conducted close air support operations, 1972-1992. Portion of squadron deployed to Saudi Arabia in 1990 and took part in operations against Iraq in early 1991. Beginning in Dec 1995, assisted other units to integrate space product applications into current operations procedures. Deployed personnel to air units worldwide to enhance their links to space assets. Provided counterspace capabilities to warfighters worldwide, 2001-2008.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive; Western Pacific; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: China, 17-25 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1980-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Apr 1989-31 Mar 1991; 1 Sep 1996-31 Aug 1998; 1 Sep 1998-31 Aug 1999; 1 Sept 1998-[30 Mar 2000]; [31 Mar 2000]-31 Aug 2001.

Emblem:  Newest rendition approved on 1 Aug 2000; originally approved on 24 Jul 1944.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 10 Feb 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 22 Jan 2008.



Transfer Ceremony Reunites Flying Tigers Heritage

by Corey Dahl
21st Space Wing Public Affairs

9/21/2007 - PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFPN) -- Two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs carried a piece of Flying Tigers heritage away from Peterson Sept. 21 as part of an effort by Air Force officials to reunite three pieces of a historic World War II legacy.

During the transfer ceremony, 76th Space Control Squadron officials here gave the squadron's piece of the historic Flying Tigers heritage, which has been held since 1995, to the new 76th Fighter Squadron, a Reserve associate unit based at Moody Air Force Base, Ga.

The 76th FS will now join the 74th and 75th Fighter Squadrons, which also share the Flying Tigers heritage, under the 23rd Wing, the same arrangement the original Flying Tigers shared in the 1940s.

Col. Steve Arthur, commander of the 442nd Fighter Wing at Whiteman AFB, Mo., which is supplying the reservists for the new squadron, said the new unit is excited to be adopting such a historic piece of Air Force history.

The Flying Tigers heritage dates back to 1941, when a group of American volunteer pilots banded together under secret presidential sanction to defend China against the Japanese. The unit eventually became renowned for its combat successes, often while flying in adverse conditions, as well as its distinctive Curtiss P-40 planes, which had shark-like faces painted on the front.

The unit was later split into the 74th, 75th and 76th Fighter Squadrons and fought the remainder of the war as part of the 23rd Fighter Group. Over the years, the units drifted apart, were deactivated and reactivated in numerous forms, and the heritage all three carried was separated.

The 76th FS began preparing for stand up earlier this year, though, and Air Force officials decided to reunite the heritage under the same wing once again. The timing was appropriate, said Col. Jay Raymond, commander of the 21st Space Wing, as the transfer occurred the same week the Air Force was celebrating its 60th birthday.

"This year, as we commemorate 60 years of air and space excellence, we're celebrating our past and looking toward our future," he said at the ceremony. "Today's ceremony is all about that Heritage to Horizons."

The 76th SPCS operates a counter communications system which provides a critical counterspace capability never before available to warfighters around the world.

"The Flying Tigers were an innovative group, and it is clear that the 76th SPCS, the Air Force's only counterspace unit, carried on that spirit of innovation," Colonel Raymond said. "Over the past 12 years, the men and women of the 76th SPCS have taken great care of this lineage and have proudly carried the mantle of the Flying Tigers."

For the 76th, the future means building a new legacy under their new name -- the 76th SPCS Lobos. Unit members said they're sorry to see the Flying Tigers heritage go, but they're looking forward to beginning their own storied lineage.

"We're just going from being a small part of a large history to being a big part of our own," said Capt. Cory Garcher, a member of the 76th Space Control Squadron.



Other Sites of Interest:

23d Flying Tiger Association

76th Fighter Squadron Association

76th Space Control Squadron

Table of Contents



16th Fighter Squadron


Aircraft were numbered 11-40. After October 1943 aircraft were numbered 350-400.


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



23d Fighter Control Squadron

Source:

Army Air Force Units In The India-Burma Theater on 1 May 1944 (See May 1944 AAF Station List)

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated 4 Jul 42, inactivated Oct 45. Disbanded 8 Oct 48. Reconstituted 1 Mar 92 and consolidated with the 1723d Special Tactics Sq as the 23d Special Tactics Sq, 31 Mar 92.

Assignments:  23d Fighter Gp -May 44, 14th Air Force -Aug 45, 10th Air Force.

Stations:

23d Fighter Control Squadron (627 NY) - Kunming, China
Det (627 NY) – Changsha, China
Det (627 NY) – Chanyi, China
Det (627 NY) – Chengtu, China
Det (627 NY) – Chihkiang, China
Det (627 NY) – Chungking, China
Det (627 NY) – Hengyang, China
Det (627 NY) – Iliang, China
Det (627 NY) – Kanchow, China
Det (627 NY) – Kukong, China
Det (627 NY) – Kunyang, China
Det (430 NY) – Kweilin, China
Det (627 NY) – Lingling, China
Det (627 NY) – Luichow, China
Det (627 NY) – Mengtze, China
Det (627 NY) – Namyang, China
Det (627 NY) – Nanning, China
Det (627 NY) – Peishiyi, China
Det (627 NY) – Poashan, China
Det (627 NY) – Suichwan, China
Det (627 NY) – Szomao, China



Source:  Fact Sheets - 23rd Special Tactics Squadron


23d STSQ, Blue Team

23d STSQ, Gold Team


23d STSQ, Red Team

23d STSQ, Red Team

23d STSQ, Viking Team

23RD SPECIAL TACTICS SQUADRON

Mission:  The unit trains, equips and employs combat control, pararescue, and support personnel in response to Presidential/Secretary of Defense taskings. The primary task is to integrate, synchronize, and/or control the elements of air and space power in the objective area.

The unit performs austere airfield control, terminal attack control, personnel rescue and recovery, assault zone assessment, battlefield trauma care, direct action, and special reconnaissance.

Lineage:  Constituted 23rd Fighter Control Squadron (Special) on 10 Jan 1943. Activated on 6 Feb 1943. Redesignated 23rd Fighter Control Squadron on 16 Sep 1943. Inactivated on 29 Oct 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconsituted, and consolidated (1 Mar 1992) with 1723rd Combat Control Squadron. Redesignated 1723rd Special tactics Squadron on 1 Apr 1990; 23rd Special Tactics Squadron on 31 Mar 1992.

Emblem Significance:  Blue and yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The globe stands for the worldwide commitment of Special Tactics Combat Controllers and Pararescuemen. The two shades of blue signify night and day deployment capability. The parachute and the dagger denote infiltration and commando operations respectively. The arrows represent triple threat capabilities--land, sea, or air. The lightning bolt indicates quick action medical and communications capabilities. The lamp of knowledge reflects the civic action role of the unit, i.e. the unit functions as teachers and medical providers as well as warriors.



Source:  Globalsecurity.org (23d Special Tactics Squadron)

Combat controllers of the 23d Special Tactics Squadron were deployed to Tuzla, Bosnia, in early 1996 where they were working in all three of the sectors controlled by British, French and Americans forces in Bosnia. While there, they were tasked with keeping commanders of the three special operations command control elements in radio contact with the special forces liaison coordination elements in the field. They also provided the six non-NATO countries with services such as assault zone surveys, communications and air traffic control.

Combat controllers from the 23d STS also deployed to Somalia during relief efforts there. During Operation United Shield in Mogadishu, and for a period of 72 hours, they oversaw more than 150 aircraft sorties from the airport.

Personnel from the 23d STS were involved in the recovery of downed 2 US Air Force pilots during Operation Allied Force. The two pilots involved were flying an F-16 and an F-117 aircraft.

Personnel from the 23d STS took part in the 2000 edition of the Canadian Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREX) from September 15-20, along with personnel from the 24th STS, based at Pope AFB, NC, and the 210th RQS, based at Kulis ANGB, AK. This was the first time in 15 years that Americans units had participated in the annual Canadian exercise.

The 23d Special Tactics Squadron comprises pararescuemen, combat controllers and various support specialties into one cohesive team. This unit provides a force multiplier capability for unconventional warfare in the worldwide arena.

The mission of the 23d STS is to:
  • Deploy specially organized, trained, and equipped forces to survey and assess assault zones.
  • Establish and control landing and drop zones in the most austere and inhospitable regions of the world.
  • Set up and operate forward area refueling and rearming points.
  • Establish and manage casualty collection, triage and evacuation sites.
  • Participate in Air Force Special Operations Command foreign internal defense efforts.
  • Provide special operations terminal attack control capability in hostile environments.

Table of Contents



118th Tactical Reconnaisanace Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


Aircraft were numbered 550-600 starting in June 1944. Beginning in 1945, aircraft were numbered 150-199.
Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


Artwork by Mr. Gaetan Marie (http://www.mustang.gaetanmarie.com)


Artwork by Mr. Gaetan Marie (http://www.mustang.gaetanmarie.com)


Plaque located at Air Force Academy Cemetery

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Organized as 118th Aero Squadron on 31 Aug 1917. Redesignated 639th Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 6 Jun 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 118th Observation Squadron which, having been alloted to NG, was activated on 1 Nov 1923. Ordered to active service on 24 Feb 1941. Redesignated: 118th Observation Squadron (Light) on 13 Jan 1942; 118th Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 118th Reconnaissance Squadron (Fighter) on 2 Apr 1943; 118th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 7 Nov 1945. Redesignated 118th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine and allotted to the Air National Guard 24 May 46, activated 1 Jul 46, federally recognized 7 Aug 46, redesignated 118th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 1 Mar 51, inactivated 1 Nov 52. Redesignated 118th Fighter-Bomber Squadron and activated 1 Jan 53, redesignated 118th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 1 Jul 55, 118th Tactical Fighter Squadron 1 Nov 58, 118th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron Aug 61, 118th Tactical Fighter Squadron 12 Jun 71, 118th Fighter Squadron 31 Mar 92. Redesignated 118th Airlift Squadron 1 Apr 08.

Assignments:  Unkn, 31 Aug 1917-Jun 1918; Second Corps Aeronautical School, Jun 1918-c. Mar 1919; unkn, c. Mar-6 Jun 1919. Connecticut NG (divisional aviation, 43d Division), 1 Nov 1923; IV Army Corps, 24 Feb 1941; 66th Observation (later Reconnaissance; Tactical Reconnaissance) Group, 1 Sep 1941; III Reconnaissance Command, Oct 1943; AAF, India-Burma Sector, Jan 1944 (attached to Tenth Air Force, 14 Feb-c. 12 Jun 1944); Fourteenth Air Force, c. 12 Jun 1944 (attached to 23d Fighter Group, c. 16 Jun 1944-c. 15 Aug 1945); Tenth Air Force, 1 Aug 1945; Fourteenth Air Force, 25 Aug-7 Nov 1945. 103d Fighter Group/ Fighter-Interceptor Group 1946-6 Feb 52, 4709th Defense Wing -1952. 103d Fighter-Bomber Group (later Fighter-Interceptor Group, Fighter Group, Tactical Fighter Group, Fighter Group, Tactical Fighter Group, Fighter Group, Operations Group) 1953-.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 31 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 3-13 Jan 1918; St Maixent, France, 29 Jan 1918; Our-ches, France, 3 Mar 1918; Amanty, France (detachment at Ourches), c. 24 Mar 1918; Chatillon-sur-Seine, France, 8 Jun 1918-1919; Mitchel Field, NY, c. 22 May-6 Jun 1919. Hartford, Conn, 1 Nov 1923; Jacksonville, Fla, 16 Mar 1941; Charleston, SC, 22 Jan 1942; Tullahoma, Tenn, 8 Sep 1942; Morris Field, NC, 9 Nov 1942; Camp Campbell, Ky, 2 Apr 1943; Statesboro AAFld, Ga, 23 Jun 1943; Aiken AAFld, SC, 29 Aug 1943; Key Field, Miss, 25 Oct-i8 Dec 1943; Gushkara, India, 16 Feb 1944 (detachments operated from Chakulia and Kharagpur, India, Mar-Jun 1944); Chengkung, China, Jun 1944 (air echelon at Kewilin, China, 16 Jun-14 Sep 1944, Liuchow, China, 14 Sep-7 Nov 1944, and Suichwan, China, 12 Nov 1944-22 Jan 1945; operated primarily from Laohwangping, China, after 14 Apr 1945); Laohwangping, China, Jun 1945; Liuchow, China, c. 25 Aug-26 Sep 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-7 Nov 1945. Bradley Fld, CT 1946-Jun 51, Suffolk County AFB, NY -1952. Bradley Fld, CT 1952-.

Aircraft:  In addition to JN type, TW-3, PT-1, BT-1, O-2, and 0-17, briefly included DH-4, SE-5, and M-1 during period 1924-1932; 0-38, 1931-c. 1937; in addition to 0-46, 1936-1943, 0-47, c. 1939-c. 1942, and P-39, c. 1942-1943, included O-49, O-57, O-58, and apparently O-59 during period 1941-1942 and B-25, DB-7, L-5, and apparently P-40 during period 1942-1943; in addition to P-40 and P-51, 1944-1945, included L-5, 1944-1945 and F-6, 1945; L-19, 1947-1950; L-19, 1947-1950; T-6, 1947-1950; B-26, 1947-1950; C-47, 1947-1950; P-47, 1947-1952; F-51, 1952-1954; F-84D, 1954-1956; F-94B, 1956-1958; F-86, 1958-1959; F-100A, 1959-1965; F-102, 1965-1971; F-100D, 1971-1979; A-10, 1979-2007; C-21A, 2007-.

Operations:  Constructed facilities, repaired aircraft and equipment, and served as transportation and supply unit in Zone of Advance, 1918-1919. Emergency operations while under state control included surveillance flights in Connecticut during labor troubles in 1934. Antisubmarine patrols, 26 Jan-c. Aug 1942; air defense patrols in India in area to rear of combat zone, 28 Mar-4 Jun 1944; combat in CBI as fighter unit, 18 Jun 1944-21 Jan 1945, 16 Apr-11 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  Theater of Operations.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Hunan Province, China, [18]-25 Jun 1944.

Emblem:  On a yellow disc with a black border, a representation of a Connecticut colonial secretary running with the colony's charter in his left hand proper (hat, coat and breeches blue; hair, vest, tie, shoes and stockings black; face, hands, shirt collar, shoe buckles and charter white) all encircled with a black annulet broken at the top with white spots, similar to the international code letters "F.E.A.", in base a white and black fleur-de-lis. (Approved 13 Aug 1953.)


Source:  Mr. Robert Boulier (from 118th TRS history)

History relates that in 1662 a royal charter was issued that among other things resulted in the union of the Hartford and New Haven colonies, a forward step in the formation of modern Connecticut. However, in 1687 Sir Edmund Andros, British administrator of the New England colonies, visited Hartford and attempted to execute "quo warranto" proceedings against the royal charter. Tradition explains that in the course of a discussion at night over surrender of the charter, the candles were extinguished and the charter itself (which had been brought to the meeting) was removed from the table and spirited away where it was hidden in a large oak tree, afterwards known as the "Charter Oak". Consequently, the charter was never revoked. Thus history and tradition were combined to produce the emblem of the 118th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron. This emblem was officially recognized in 1924 and approved under U.S. Air Force standards in 1953. The emblem represents a "colonial secretary" running with the Charter of 1662 to hide it in an oak tree. At the top of the emblem are the letters "F.E.A" represented in Morse code which in Latin stands for "Faithful and Alert", the squadron motto.


Source:  Philippe's Aviation Pages

The 118th Aero Squadron was organized at Kelly Field, TX, on August 31, 1917. This Air Service unit moved to France in January 1918 and was redesignated 639th Aero Squadron the following month. Was demobilized at Mitchell Field, NY on June 6, 1919. In 1936, its lineage and honors were consolidated with those of the 118th OS, which had been allotted to the Rhode Island NG but was activated as a Connecticut NG unit in November 1923. During World War II, the 118th TRS flew fighter and recce combat missions in the CBI theater of operations from February 1944 until the Japanese surrender. Was inactivated at Camp Kilmer, NJ, on November 7, 1945 and the unit was redesignated 118th FS. Was allotted back to the Connecticut NG on May 24, 1946. On August 7, 1946, the 118th FS (SE) extended federal recognition at Bradley Field, Windsor Locks and was equipped with P-47Ns. Was redesignated 118th FIS in September 1950 and was called to active duty as part of the Korean War call-up and transferred to Suffolk County AFB, NY, to provide air defense for New England and New York. The unit returned to state control in December 1952 to be reorganized as the 118th FBS with F-51Hs. In January 1953, it converted to F-84Ds followed by another conversion to the F-94Bs in 1956 when it was redesignated 118th FIS. In the Fall of 1957, the 118th became a Tactical Fighter Squadron and was equipped with F-86Hs. During the Summer of 1960, it converted to F-100As and was once again redesignated 118th FIS. In January 1966, it converted to F/TF-102As. In the Summer of 1971, the 118th TFS became TAC-gained and received F-100D/Fs. The CT ANG flew the "Huns" until the Summer of 1979 when it converted to A-10As. On March 15, 1992, the unit designation changed to 118th Fighter Squadron, 103d Fighter Group. Joined Air Combat Command in June 1992 as part of the Air Force restructuring program. Was redesignated the 118th Fighter Squadron and 103d Fighter Wing on October 1, 1995. During the same year, the 103d deployed in support of Operation Deny Flight and Precision Endeavour over Bosnia. In August 1996, the 103d FW deployed to Aviano AB, Italy to fly close air support (CAS) missions in Bosnia.



118th TRS Pilots, Meridian, MS (Photo courtesy of Mr. Chris Davis)
Front Row:  2Lt George "Spider" Greene, 1Lt Perry Cox, 1Lt Carl Eley, Capt Robert Gee, Maj Ed McComas, Capt Ira Jones, 1Lt Earl Davis, 1Lt Bruce Salisbury, 1Lt Warren Christensen
2nd Row:  2Lt John Powell, 1Lt Ray Darby, 2Lt Chester Malarz, 1Lt George Kutsher, 2Lt Henry Miehe, 1Lt Charles McMillin, 2Lt Berthold Petersen, 2Lt John Carpenter, 2Lt Robert O'Brien, 2Lt Oscar "Pop" Nislar
3rd Row:  Sgt Stan Gould (L-5 Pilot), 2Lt Don Penning, 1Lt Frank Bickel, SSgt Quincy McPhail (L-5 Pilot), Pvt Frank Castanette (L-5 Pilot)



Other Sites of Interest:

118th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron

Table of Contents



5th AAF Special Weapons Detachment

Stations:  Dudhkundi by 1 Aug 1945

Table of Contents



308th Bombardment Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 308 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated 15 Apr 1942. Inactivated 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 308 Reconnaissance Group, Weather, on 27 Sep 1946. Activated 17 Oct 1946. Inactivated 5 Jan 1951. Redesignated 308 Bombardment Group, Medium, on 4 Oct 1951. Activated 10 Oct 1951. Inactivated 16 Jun 1952. Consolidated (3 May 2006) with Long Range Missile Systems Group, which was established on 23 Nov 2004. Activated 27 Jan 2005. Redesignated 308 Armament Systems Group on 15 May 2006. Inactivated 30 Jun 2010 per DAF/A1M 194t, 19 May 2010; SO #GA-7, HQ AFMC, 28 May 10.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 15 Apr 1942; Fourteenth Air Force, 10 Mar 1943; United States Forces India-Burma Theater, Aug-Dec 1945; Air Transport Command, Air Weather Service, 17 Oct 1946; Military Air Transport Service, Air Weather Service, 1 Jun 1948-5 Jan 1951. 308 Bombardment Wing, 10 Oct 1951-16 Jan 1952. Air to Ground Munitions Systems (later, 308 Armament Systems) Wing, 27 Jan 2005-30 Jun 2010.

Components:  

Squadrons:  36 Reconnaissance (later, 425 Bombardment): 15 Apr 1942-6 Jan 1946; 53 Reconnaissance: attached 17 Oct 1946-15 Oct 1947. 54 Reconnaissance: 17 Oct 1946-15 Oct 1947. 55 Reconnaissance: 17 Oct 1946-15 Oct 1947. 59 Reconnaissance: attached 17 Oct 1946-15 Oct 1947. 373 Bombardment: 15 Apr 1942-21 Jul 1945; 10 Oct 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952). 374 Bombardment (later, 374 Reconnaissance): 15 Apr 1942-6 Jan 1946; 15 Oct 1947-19 Dec 1950; 10 Oct 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952). 375 Bombardment: 15 Apr 1942-6 Jan 1946; 10 Oct 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952). 512 Reconnaissance: 15 Oct 1947-20 Sep 1948; 13 Feb-14 Nov 1949. 513 Reconnaissance: 15 Oct 1947-20 Sep 1948; 10 Aug 1949-19 Dec 1950. 2078 Weather Reconnaissance: 1 Jun 1948-20 Mar 1950.

Stations:  Gowen Field, ID, 15 Apr 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 20 Jun 1942; Wendover Field, UT, 1 Oct-28 Nov 1942; Kunming, China, 20 Mar 1943; Hsinching , China, 10 Feb 1945; Ruspi, India, 27 Jun-15 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946. Morrison Field, FL, 17 Oct 1946; Fairfield-Suisun AAFld, CA, 1 Jul 1947; Tinker AFB, OK, 10 Nov 1949-5 Jan 1951. Forbes AFB, KS, 10 Oct 1951; Hunter AFB, GA, 11 Apr-16 Jun 1952. Eglin AFB, FL, 27 Jan 2005-.

Commanders:  Capt Harris K. McCauley, 11 May 1942; Col Fay R. Upthegrove, 5 Jun 1942; Maj Leroy A. Rainey, 15 Jul 1942; Col Eugene H. Beebe, 16 Sep 1942; Col William P. Fisher, c. 3 Nov 1943; Col John G. Armstrong, 19 Oct 1944; Col William D. Hopson, 1 Jul 1945-unkn. Col Richard E. Ellsworth, 17 Oct 1946-unkn; Col Hervey H. Whitfield, Apr 1949-unkn; Col George N. Newton Jr., 5 Nov 1951; Col Maurice A. Preston, 10 May-16 Jun 1952. Col James Geurts, Jan 2005; Col John R. Griggs, 4 May 2006-.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1942-1945. B-29, 1946-1951.

Operations:  Made many trips over the Hump to India to obtain gasoline, oil, bombs, spare parts, and other items the group needed to prepare for and then to sustain its combat operations. The 308th Group supported Chinese ground forces; attacked airfields, coalyards, docks, oil refineries, and fuel dumps in French Indochina; mined rivers and ports; bombed shops and docks at Rangoon; attacked Japanese shipping in the East China Sea, Formosa Strait, South China Sea, and Gulf of Tonkin. Received a DUC for an unescorted bombing attack, conducted through antiaircraft fire and fighter defenses, against docks and warehouses at Hankow on 21 Aug 1943. Received second DUC for interdiction of Japanese shipping during 1944-1945. Maj Horace S Carswell Jr was awarded the Medal of Honor for action on 26 Oct 1944 when, in spite of intense antiaircraft fire, he attacked a Japanese convoy in the South China Sea; his plane was so badly damaged that when he reached land he ordered the crew to bail out; Carswell, however, remained with the plane to try to save one man who could not jump because his parachute had been ripped by flak; before Carswell could attempt a crash landing, the plane struck a mountainside and burned. The group moved to India in Jun 1945. Ferried gasoline and supplies over the Hump. Sailed for the US in Dec 1945. From Oct 1946 through Jan 1951, served with Air Weather Service; supervised training and operation of weather reconnaissance units. Not operational 10 Oct 1951-16 Jun 1952. Beginning in Jan 2005 equipped warfighters with long range, precision attack capabilities.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: China Defensive; China Offensive; India-Burma; Western Pacific; New Guinea.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: China, 21 Aug 1943; East and South China Seas, Straits of Formosa, and Gulf of Tonkin, 24 May 1944-28 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  Azure, between a pale argent thereon three pallets gules, on the dexter a star of twelve points white, charged with an annulet azure; on the sinister a thundercloud proper with three lightning flashes or; in chief per chevron, inverted and enhanced sable, three bombs points downward or, between a semee of fifteen stars argent. Motto: Non Sibi, Sed Aliis - Not for Self, But for Others. (Approved 29 Aug 1952.) Group will use the wing emblem with the group designation in the scroll.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 May 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 4 May 2006.



Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (308th Armament Systems Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 308 Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 4 Oct 1951. Activated on 10 Oct 1951. Inactivated 25 Jun 1961. Redesignated 308 Strategic Missile Wing (ICBM-Titan), and activated, on 29 Nov 1961. Organized on 1 Apr 1962. Inactivated 18 Aug 1987. Consolidated (3 May 2006) with Air to Ground Munitions Systems Wing, which was established 23 Nov 2004. Activated 27 Jan 2005. Redesignated 308 Armament Systems Wing on 15 May 2006. Inactivated 30 Jun 2010 per DAF/A1M 194t, 19 May 2010; SO #GA-7, HQ AFMC, 28 May 10.

Assignments:  38 Air Division, 10 Oct 1951 (attached to 21 Air Division, 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952; 5 Air Division, 21 Aug-c. 26 Oct 1956); 820 Air Division, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961. Strategic Air Command, 29 Nov 1961; 825 Air (later, 825 Strategic Aerospace) Division, 1 Apr 1962; 42 Air Division, 1 Jan 1970; 17 Strategic Aerospace Division, 31 Mar 1970; 12 Strategic Missile (later, 12 Air) Division, 30 Jun 1971; 42 Air Division, 1 Apr 1973; 19 Air Division, 1 Dec 1982-18 Aug 1987. Air Armament Center, 27 Jan 2005-30 Jun 2010.

Components:  

Groups:  308 Bombardment: 10 Oct 1951-16 Jun 1952 (not operational).

Squadrons:  303 Air Refueling: attached 1 Feb 1956-15 Jul 1959. 308 Air Refueling: 8 Jul 1953-15 Jun 1959 (detached 1-21 Jun 1954, 5 Jan-4 Mar 1956, and 2 Apr-2 Jul 1958). 373 Bombardment (later, 373 Strategic Missile): attached 10 Oct 1951-15 Jun 1952 (not operational, 10 Oct-5 Nov 1951), assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961); assigned 1 Apr 1962-18 Aug 1987. 374 Bombardment (later, 374 Strategic Missile): attached 10 Oct 1951-15 Jun 1952 (not operational, 10 Oct-5 Nov 1951), assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961); assigned 1 Sep 1962-15 Aug 1986. 375 Bombardment: attached 10 Oct 1951-15 Jun 1952 (not operational, 10 Oct-13 Nov 1951), assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961). 425 Bombardment: 1 Oct 1958-25 Jun 1961 (not operational, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961).

Stations:  Forbes AFB, KS, 10 Oct 1951; Hunter AFB, GA, 17 Apr 1952; Plattsburgh AFB, NY, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961. Little Rock AFB, AR, 1 Apr 1962-18 Aug 1987. Eglin AFB, FL, 27 Jan 2005-.

Commanders:  None (not manned), 10 Oct-4 Nov 1951; Col George L. Newton Jr., 5 Nov 1951; Col Charles B. Dougher, 5 Feb 1952; Col George L. Newton Jr., 15 Mar 1952; Col Maurice A. Preston, 7 May 1952; Lt Col Perry P. Menzies, 20 Feb 1953; Col Maurice A. Preston, 28 Mar 1953; Col John F. Batjer, 5 Aug 1953; Col James H. Thompson, 15 Aug 1953; Col John F. Batjer, 24 Aug 1953; Col James H. Thompson, 27 Aug 1953; Col Ralph C. Jenkins, 29 Sep 1953; Col James H. Thompson, 1 Oct 1953; Brig Gen Maurice A. Preston, 23 Oct 1953; Col John F. Batjer, 12 Jan 1954; Lt Col John O. Vick, 21 Sep 1954; Col John F. Batjer, 12 Nov 1954; Col Paul W. Tibbetts Jr., 9 Jun 1956; Col William L. Gray, 7 Jan 1958-14 Jul 1959; none (not manned), 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961. None (not manned), 29 Nov 1961-31 Mar 1962; Col Charles P. Sullivan, 1 Apr 1962; Col Collier H. Davidson, 11 Jun 1962; Col Charles P. Sullivan, 1 Jul 1965; Col Edward A. Vivian, 28 Aug 1966; Col Don C. La Moine, 22 Aug 1969; Col William E. Bifford, 6 Jul 1971; Col Max M. Axelsen, 1 Sep 1972; Col Edward D. Bailey, 27 Apr 1973; Col William E. O'Neil, 15 Jul 1974; Col Joe P. Morgan, 17 Nov 1975; Col Gary E. Marsh, 17 Mar 1978; Col John T. Moser, 10 Jun 1980; Col Ronald J. Bishop Jr., 3 Dec l980; Col Jack A. Leach, 14 Jul 1982; Col John E. Chambers, 3 Aug 1984; Col Albert R. Greene Jr., 9 Jun 1986-18 Aug 1987. Mr. Gerry L. Freisthler, 27 Jan 2005; Mr. Thomas J. Robillard, 4 May 2006-.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1951-1952, 1952-1953; B-47, 1953-1954; 1954-1959; KC-97, 1953-1959. Titan II, 1963-1987.

Operations:  Strategic bombardment, 1951-1959, and air refueling, 1953-1959, to meet SAC's global commitments. Deployed to bases in North Africa three times, twice in detachment form and once (Sidi Slimane AB, Morocco, 21 Aug-c. 26 Oct 1956) as a unit. From Nov 1956 to Mar 1957, tested SAC alert plan by maintaining one-third of its bomber and tanker force in continuous alert. Not operational, Jul 1959-Jun 1961. Organized in Apr 1962 as a strategic missile wing. Gained control over first missile complex in Aug 1962 and became fully operational with 18 sites in Dec 1963. From 1963-1987, maintained missiles on 24-hour alert, ready to launch within minutes after receipt of authenticated orders from National Command Authorities. On 1 May 1985, tasked to comply with a presidential directive and inactivate its entire ICBM fleet, one at a time, in a safe and orderly fashion, by 30 Sep 1987. Activated in 2004 to design, develop, field and maintain a family of air-to-ground munitions that enhanced warfighter strike capabilities.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Nov 1956-1 Apr 1957; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1972-30 Jun 1974; 1 Jul 1975-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1984-30 Jun 1985; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1987.

Emblem:  Approved 22 Aug 2006.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 22 Jan 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 4 May 2006.



Other Sites of Interest:

308th Bomb Group

308th Strategic Missile Wing

308th Strategic Missile Wing

Table of Contents



373d Bombardment Squadron


Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 373d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 15 Apr 1942. Inactivated on 7 Jan 1946. Redesignated 373d Reconnaissance Squadron (Very Long Range, Weather) on 16 Sept 1947. Activated on 15 Oct 1947. Inactivated on 21 Feb 1951. Redesignated 373d Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 4 Oct 1951. Activated on 10 Oct 1951. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1961. Redesignated 373d Strategic Missile Squadron, and activated, on 29 Nov 1961. Organized on 1 Apr 1962. Inactivated 18 Aug 87.

Assignments:  308th Bombardment Group, 15 Apr 1942; 494th Bombardment Group, 21 Jul 1945; 11th Bombardment Group, 11 Oct 1945-7 Jan 1946. 8th Weather (later 2108th Air Weather) Group, 15 Oct 1947-21 Feb 1951. 308th Bombardment Group, 10 Oct 1951 (attached to 21st Air Division, 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 199); 308th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961. Strategic Air Command, 29 Nov 1961; 308th Strategic Missile Wing, 1 Apr 1962-.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 15 Apr 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 20 Jun 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 23 Jul 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 28 Aug 1942; Wendover Field, Utah, 1 Oct 1942; Pueblo AAB, Colo, 30 Nov 1942-2 Jan 1943; Yangkai, China, 20 Mar 1943; Luliang, China, 14 Sep 1944; Yontan, Okinawa, 21 Jul-ig Dec 1945; Vancouver, Wash, 4-7 Jan 1946. Kindley Field, Bermuda, 15 Oct 1947-21 Feb 1951. Forbes AFB, Kan, 10 Oct 1951; Hunter AFB, Ga, 17 Apr 1952; Plattsburgh AFB, NY, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961. Little Rock AFB, Ark, 1 Apr 1962-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-18, 1942; B-24, 1942-1945. TB-17, 1947-1948; B/RB/WB-29, 1947-1951. B-29, 1951-1953; B-47, 1954-1959. Titan, 1963-.

Operations:  Combat in CBI and Western Pacific, 4 May 1943-3 Jun 1945 and 21 Jul-14 Aug 1945. Not manned, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; New Guinea; Western Pacific; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: East and South China Seas, Straits of Formosa, and Gulf of Tonkin, 24 May 1944-28 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Nov 1956-1 Apr 1957.

Emblem:  A brown bear, front view, wearing brown flight boots lined in yellow and a green parachute harness with white buckles and carrying a black bomb in his right paw, a blue aerial bomb in his left, and cartridge-belt over his right shoulder; all on a white disc. (Approved 19 May 1953.)


Ex-CBI Roundup, July 1953 Issue



Other Sites of Interest:  308th Bomb Group

Table of Contents



374th Bombardment Squadron


B-24M (Courtesy of Mr. Nick King)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 374th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 15 Apr 1942. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 374th Reconnaissance Squadron (Very Long Range, Weather) on 16 Sep 1947. Activated on 15 Oct 1947. Inactivated on 21 Feb 1951. Redesignated 374th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 4 Oct 1951. Activated on 10 Oct 1951. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1961. Redesignated 374th Strategic Missile Squadron, and activated, on 24 Jan 1962. Organized on 1 Sep 1962. Inactivated 15 Aug 86.

Assignments:  308th Bombardment Group, 15 Apr 1942-6 Jan 1946. 308th Reconnaissance Group, 15 Oct 1947; Air Weather Service, 19 Dec 1950-21 Feb 1951. 308th Bombardment Group, 10 Oct 1951 (attached to 21st Air Division, 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952); 308th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961. Strategic Air Command, 24 Jan 1962; 308th Strategic Missile Wing, 1 Sep 1962-.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 15 Apr 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 18 Jun 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 24 Ju1 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 28 Aug 1942; Wendover Field, Utah, 1 Oct 1942; Pueblo AAB, Colo, 30 Nov 1942-2 Jan 1943; Chengkung, China, 20 Mar 1943; Kwanghan, China, 18 Feb 1945; Rupsi, India, 27 Jun-14 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946. Fairfield- Suisun AAFld, Calif, 15 Oct 1947 (one flight operated from Lincolnshire, England, 22 Nov 1948-6 Jul 1949); McClellan AFB, Calif, 28 Oct 1949-21 Feb 1951 (one flight operated from Dhahran Airfield, Saudi Arabia, 8 May-4 Dec 1950, and another from Eielson AFB, Alaska, 3 Jul-28 Sep 1950). Forbes AFB, Kan, 10 Oct 1951; Hunter AFB Ga, 17 Apr. 199; Plattsburg AFB, NY, 15 Jul 1959-25 June 1961. Little Rock AFB, Ark, 24 Jan 1962-.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1942; B-24, 1942-1945- B/RB/WB-29, 1947-1951; C-47, 1947-1951. B-29, 1951-1953; B-47, 1953-1959.

Operations:  Combat in CBI and Western Pacific, 4 May 1943-11 May 1945. Not manned, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961. Training for operations with Titan missiles, 1 Sep 1962-.

Service Steamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; New Guinea; Western Pacific; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: China, 21 Aug 1943; East and South China Seas, Straits of Formosa, and Gulf of Tonkin, 24 May 1944-28 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Nov 1956-1 Apr 1957.

Emblem:  On an irregular diamond shield red a phantom "bat-man'' head, body and legs yellow, wings, hands headgear black, grasping in each foot a bomb black. (Approved 23 Jul 1952.)



Saluting our Veterans - Arizona Hero Arthur J. Benko:



Other Sites of Interest:  308th Bomb Group

Table of Contents



375th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 375th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 15 Apr 1942. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 375th Reconnaissance Squadron (Very Long Range, Weather) on 16 Sep 1947. Activated on 15 Oct 1947. Inactivated on 21 Feb 1951. Redesignated 375th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 4 Oct 1951. Activated on 10 Oct 1951. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1961.

Assignments:  308th Bombardment Group, 15 Apr 1942-6 Jan 1946. 7th Weather Group 15 Oct 47-3 Jun 48, 7th Weather Group (later 2107th Air Weather Group) Jun 48-21 Feb 51. 308th Bombardment Group, 10 Oct 1951 (attached to 21st Air Division, 10 Oct 1951-17 Apr 1952); 308th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1961.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 15 Apr 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 18 Jun 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 24 Jul 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 28 Aug 1942; Wendover Field, Utah, 1 Oct 1942; Pueblo AAB, Colo, 1 Dec 1942-2 Jan 1943; Chengkung, China, 20 Mar 1943; Hsinching, China, 18 Feb 1945; Rupsi, India, 27 Jun-14 Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946. Ladd Field, Alaska, 15 Oct 1947 (one flight operated from Fairfield-Suisun AAFld, Calif, and later from Shemya AFB, Alaska, 15 Oct 1947-15 May 1949); Eielson AFB, Alaska, 6 Mar 1949-21 Feb 1951. Forbes AFB, Kan, 10 Oct 1951; Hunter AFB, Ga, 17 Apr 1952; Plattsburgh AFB, NY, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1942; B-24, 1942-1945. B/RB/WB-29, 1947-1951; C-47, 1947-1951. B-29, 1951-1952; B-47, 1953-1959.

Operations:  Combat in CBI and Western Pacific, 4 May 1943-19 Apr 1945. Not manned, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; New Guinea; Western Pacific; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: China, 21 Aug 1943; East and South China Seas, Straits of Formosa, and Gulf of Tonkin, 24 May 1944-[19] Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Nov 1956-1 Apr 1957.

Emblem:  Over and through a white disc, border black, a skeleton in black cloak, wearing black aviator's helmet and white goggles, ear phones and chin strap trimmed black, holding in the right hand a yellow aerial bomb point down, and in the left hand a scythe white trimmed black; inner folds of sleeve magenta. (Approved 11 Jan 1943.)



Other Sites of Interest:  308th Bomb Group

Table of Contents



425th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 36th Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 15 Apr 1942. Redesignated 425th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1942. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 425th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 11 Aug 1958. Activated on 1 Oct 1958. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1961.

Assignments:  308th Bombardment Group, 15 Apr 1942-6 Jan 1946. 308th Bombardment Wing, 1 Oct 1958-25 Jun 1961.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 15 Apr 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 18 Jun 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 24 Jul 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 28 Aug 1942; Wendover Field, Utah, 1 Oct 1942; Pueblo AAB, Colo, 30 Nov 1942-2 Jan 1943; Kunming, China, 20 Mar 1943; Kwanghan, China, 18 Feb 1945; Rupsi, India, 27 Jun-iq Oct 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-6 Jan 1946, Hunter AFB, Ga, 1 Oct 1958; Plattsburgh AFB, NY, 15 Jul 1959-25 Jun 1961.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1942; B-24, 1942-1945. B-47, 1958-1959.

Operations:  Combat in CBI and Western Pacific, 4 May 1943-3 Jun 1945. Not manned, 15 Ju1 1959-25 Jun 1961.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; New Guinea; Western Pacific; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: East and South China Seas, Straits of Formosa, and Gulf of Tonkin, 24 May 1944-28 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  On a tan disc, bordure blue, a green dragon, wings, tail barb, tongue, nose, and facial trimmings red, horns black, entwined about a large yellow aerial bomb; eleven white stars arranged four, two, and five about outer circumference of tan disc. (Approved 25 Aug 1943.)



Other Sites of Interest:  308th Bomb Group

Table of Contents



69th Composite Wing

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 69 Bombardment Wing on 9 Aug 1943. Activated on 3 Sep 1943. Redesignated 69 Composite Wing on 21 Dec 1943. Inactivated on 26 Dec 1945. Redesignated 69 Troop Carrier Wing on 28 Jan 1947. Activated in the Reserve on 23 Mar 1947. Redesignated 69 Air Division, Troop Carrier on 16 Apr 1948. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 69 Air Division on 1 Sep 1959.

Assignments:  Fourteenth Air Force, 3 Sep 1943; Tenth Air Force, 24 Aug-26 Dec 1945. Eleventh Air Force, 23 Mar 1947; First Air Force, 1 Jul 1948; Ninth Air Force, 23 Feb-27 Jun 1949.

Components

Groups:  51 Fighter: 2 Oct 1943-c. 26 Dec 1945. 341 Bombardment: 26 Dec 1943-21 Jun 1945, 1-25 Aug 1945. 375 Troop Carrier: 17 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949. 419 Troop Carrier: 17 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949. 433 Troop Carrier: 17 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949. 436 Troop Carrier: 1 Jul 1948-27 Jun 1949.

Squadrons:  19 Liaison: 10 Jun 1944-1 Aug 1945. 27 Troop Carrier: attached 21 May 1944-c. Jul 1945. 319 Troop Carrier: 2-27 Sep 1945. 328 Troop Carrier: attached 25 Aug-10 Nov 1945. 329 Troop Carrier: attached 5-24 Sep 1945.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 3 Sep 1943; Tsuyung, China, c. 12 Jan 1944; Kunming, China, by 30 Apr 1944-c. 26 Dec 1945. Greater Pittsburgh Airport, PA, 23 Mar 1947-27 Jun 1949.

Commanders:  Unkn, 3 Sep-22 Dec 1943; Brig Gen John C. Kennedy, 23 Dec 1943; Col Charles H. Anderson, 1 Sep 1945; Maj James F. Rhodes, c. 15 Nov 1945-unkn. Unkn, 23 Mar 1947-27 Jun 1949.

Aircraft:  B-25, 1943-1945; P-38, 1943-1945; P-40, 1943-1945; C-47, 1944-1945; L-1, 1944-1945; L-2, 1944; L-4, 1944; L-5, 1944-1945; L-6, 1944; P-51, 1944-1945; A-26, 1945. AT-6, 1947-1949; AT-7, 1947-1949; AT-11, 1947-1949; C-46, 1947-1949; C-47, 1947-1949.

Operations:  Activated in China in 1943, the wing engaged in sea sweeps and attacks against Japanese inland shipping. Between late 1943 and 1945 its units bombed and strafed such targets as trains, harbors, railroads in French Indochina, and the Canton Hong Kong area of South China. These units also provided air support to Chinese ground troops. Fighter aircraft defended Allied air bases, the eastern terminus of the Hump route, and the bases in the area of Kunming and attacked bridges, oil and gas storage facilities, supply dumps, convoys, and enemy troop concentrations. After the Japanese surrender, the 69th's troop carrier aircraft ferried troops and supplies in China, helped to evacuate prisoners of war, and flew mercy missions in China, French Indochina, and Manchuria. It activated in the Reserve in 1947 and evidently performed training duties until Jun 1949.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: China Defensive; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: China, French Indochina, Manchuria, 1-30 Sep 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 27 Jun 1949.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 27 Jun 1949.

Table of Contents



3d Air Cargo Resupply Detachment

Source:  Military Shoulder Patches of the U.S. (Mr. Ray Fincham)

The 35th Aerial Port Squadron was activated on 23 December 1944 as the 3d Air Cargo Resupply Detachment assigned to the U. S. Forces, India - Burma Theater in Ledo, Assam India attached to the 14th Army Air Force under General Clair Chennault (of the Flying Tigers fame). The 3d Air Cargo Resupply Detachment evolved to the 903d APRS then to the 514th Aerial Port Flight and eventually to the 35th Aerial Port Squadron.

The 35th Aerial Port Squadron has provided support to the U. S. Air Forces Europe in England, Germany, Spain, Italy, Greece, Turky, the Azores and also in Central America and the Near East area.

On 16 December 1990, one hundred thirty - eight members of the 35th Aerial Port Squadron were ordered to active service for Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

Table of Contents



19th Liaison Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



27th Troop Carrier Squadron


(See Transport Units)

Table of Contents



51st Fighter Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)

(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



16th Fighter Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



25th Fighter Squadron


-- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



26th Fighter Squadron

In subsequent years after operations in the CBI theater, the 26th Fighter Squadron was reactivated at Naha, Okinawa and the 2nd logo above (depicting the "Lancers") was the new squadron insignia. In the mid-fifties, the 26th was transferred to Clark Field and an old previous design by Walt Disney depicting a Tiger atop a Mustang was resurrected and was deemed the new squadron logo in keeping with its heritage in the CBI.  -- 26th Fighter Squadron (CBI)


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



36th Fighter Control Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  May have been 36th Interceptor Control Sq in 1942 at Losey Field, Puerto Rico. Active between Aug 44 and 1945, disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  I Fighter Command -Jan 45, 10th Air Force.

Stations:  Bradley Field, CT until Jan 45, Chabua and in China.



Source:  Mr. Charles Ridge, Jr.

I served in the 14th Army Air Force as a member of the 36th Fighter Control Squadron. We were assigned to the 51st Fighter Group based in China, to provide communications to P-51's at airstrips north of Kunming.

Table of Contents



51st Fighter Control Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  51st Interceptor Control Sq activated 10 Jan 42, redesignated 51st Fighter Control Sq 15 May 42, inactivated after 29 Nov 45, disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  51st Pursuit Gp (later Fighter Gp) -Jan 44, 10th Air Force -Apr 45, North Burma Task Force.

Stations:  March Field -12 Mar 42, Karachi -10 Sep 42, Dinjan -Sep 42, Kanjikoah -7 Jan 45, Myitkyina Putao -Sep 45, Dinjan -Sep 45, Piardoba -29 Nov 45, Karachi.

Table of Contents



322nd Fighter Control Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated 1 Apr 43, active through Aug 45, disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Assignments:  51st Fighter Gp to 1944, 14th Air Force -Aug 45 10th Air Force.

Stations:  Bradley Field, CT, Dinjan, and Kunming.

Table of Contents



449th Fighter Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



341st Bombardment Group


"Representative of the insigne adopted by the Group when it was assigned to 14th Air Force in Jan 1944. It is actually my colorized interpretation of a drawing which I found, several years ago, on the cover sheet of the 341st Bomb Group's submission for a Unit Citation. The submission package is in the Group's files at Air Force Historical Research Archive, Maxwell AFB, AL. I picked the colors based on comments from veterans of the unit." -- Tony Strotman, MSgt, USAF (1966-87)
341st Bomb Group

(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



11th Bombardment Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



22nd Bombardment Squadron

    
"Bombing Eagles" Insignia
(India 1942-43)

Designed by 22nd Squadron member Sgt. Charles F. Wright. It portrays an eagle, "King of the Air", dropping bombs against the mountains of Burma and suggests the operations of the Squadron during its first year in India. Officially adopted as the Squadron Insignia in December 1942 and used as a shoulder and jacket patch, and painted on all 22nd planes. However, it was not officially approved by USAAF headquarters as it was considered too similar to the "Eagle Squadron" insignia.
    
"Battlin' Bulldogs" Insignia
(China, 1944-45)

Over and through a lemon yellow disc, border light brown, a caricatured, pugnacious, light brown B-25 aircraft in flight, toward dexter base, wearing a red brown derby and a red-and-white-striped turtle-neck sweater, having look of ferocity on caricatured face, machine gun barrels, proper, issuing from nostrils, and a large brown cigar fired, proper, with white band, held in mouth, leaving white seed lines and trailing smoke toward rear, proper. (Approved 19 Mar 1945.)


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



490th Bombardment Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



491st Bombardment Squadron


Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



312th Fighter Wing

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Mr. Mark Boland

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 312th Fighter Wing on 7 Mar 1944 and activated in China on 1 Mar. Assigned to Fourteenth AF. Served in combat in China from Jul 1944 until Aug 1945. Moved to the US, Oct-Nov 1945. Inactivated on 5 Nov 1945. Disbanded 15 Jun 83.

Groups:  33d: 1944. 81st: 1944-1945. 311th: 1944-1945.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 13 Mar 1944; Chengtu, China, c. 25 Mar 1944-1 Oct 1945 (apparently at Shwangliu at some point in 1945 per the 11 May 1945 14th AF Station List); Camp Kilmer, NJ, c. 3-5 Nov 1945.

Commanders:  Brig Gen Adlai H Gilkeson, c. 25 Mar 1944; Brig Gen Russell E Randall, c. 4 Sep 1944-c. Oct 1945.

Campaigns:  China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Insigne:  Shield: On an ultramarine blue rectangle, long axis vertical, corners engrailed, a golden orange dragon rampant, proper, tail entwined about bend checky blue and silver, edged golden orange, all within a neat line of the last. (Approved 28 Apr 1945.)

Table of Contents



33d Fighter Group

(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



58th Fighter Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



59th Fighter Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



60th Fighter Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



81st Fighter Group


Backpatch made for 1950 Gunnery Meet,
worn by F-86 teams


LE NOM LES ARMES LA LOYAUTE = The name, the Arms, and Loyalty


Bench located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 81st Pursuit Group (Intercepter) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 81st Fighter Group in May 1942. Trained with P-39's. Moved overseas, Oct 1942-Feb 1943, the ground echelon arriving, in French Morocco with the force that invaded North Africa on 8 Nov, and the air echelon, which had trained for a time in England, arriving in North Africa between late Dec 1942 and early Feb 1943. Began combat with Twelfth AF in Jan 1943. Supported ground operations during the Allied drive against Axis forces in Tunisia. Patrolled the coast of Africa and protected Allied shipping in the Mediterranean Sea, Apr-Jul 1943. Provided cover for the convoys that landed troops on Pantelleria on II Jun and on Sicily on 10 Jul 1943. Supported the landings at Anzio on 22 Jan 1944 and flew patrols in that area for a short time. Moved to India, Feb-Mar 1944, and began training with P-40 and P-47 aircraft. Moved to China in May and became part of Fourteenth AF. Continued training and on occasion flew patrol and escort missions before returning to full-time combat duty in Jan 1945. Attacked enemy airfields and installations, flew escort missions, and aided the operations of Chinese ground forces by attacking troop concentrations, ammunition dumps, lines of communications, and other targets to hinder Japanese efforts to move men and materiel to the front. Inactivated in China on 27 Dec 1945.

Activated in Hawaii on 15 Oct 1946. Equipped with P-51's; converted to F-47's early in 1948. Moved to the US in 1949 and converted to jet aircraft, receiving F-80's at first but changing to F-86's soon afterward.

Redesignated 81st Fighter-Interceptor Group in Jan 1950. Moved to England, Aug-Sep 1951. Assigned to United States Air Forces in Europe. Redesignated 81st Fighter-Bomber Group in Apr 1954. Inactivated in England on 8 Feb 1955. Redesignated 81st Tactical Fighter Gp 31 Jul 85 (not active).

Squadrons:  78th: 1952-1955. 91st: 1942-1945; 1946-1955. 92d: 1942-1945; 1946-1955. 93d: 1942-1945; 1946-1951. 116th: 1951-1952.

Stations:  Morris Field, NC, Feb 1942; Dale Mabry Field, Fla, c. 1 May 1942; Muroc, Calif, c. 28 Jun-4 Oct 1942; Mediouna, French Morocco, c. 5 Jan 1943; Thelepte, Tunisia, 22 Jan 1943; Le Kouif Airfield, Algeria, 17 Feb 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 22 Feb 1943; Le Kouif Airfield, Algeria, 24 Feb 1943; Thelepte, Tunisia, c. Mar 1943; Algeria, c. 3 Apr 1943; Monastir, Tunisia, c. 26 May 1943; Sidi Ahmed, Tunisia, 10 Aug 1943; Castelvetrano, Sicily, 12 Oct 1943; Montecorvino Airfield, Italy, c. Feb 1944; Karachi, India, c. 2 Mar 1944; Kwanghan, China, 12 May 1944; Fungwansham, China, Feb 1945; Huhsien, China, Aug-Dec 1945. Wheeler Field, TH, 15 Oct 1946-21 May 1949; Kirtland AFB, NM, 17 Jun 1949; Moses Lake AFB, Wash, c. 1 May 1950-21 Aug 1951; Bentwaters RAF Station, England, 3 Sep 1951-8 Feb 1955.

Commanders:  Unkn, Feb-May 1942; Capt Harry E Hammond, 5 May 1942; Capt John D Sureau, 10 May 1942; Lt Col Paul M Jacobs, 22 May 1942; Lt Col Kenneth 5 Wade, c. Jul 1942; Col Philip B Klein, May 1943; Lt Col Michael Gordon, 2 Jul 1943; Maj Frederick S Hanson, 15 Jul 1943; Col Philip B Klein, 26 Aug 1943; Lt Col Fred G Hook Jr, 27 Sep 1944; Col Oliver G Cellini, 24 Oct 1944-unkn. Col Oswald W Lunde, [c. 1946]; Col Gladwyn E Pinkston, [c. 1948] Lt Col Clay Tice Jr, c. Apr 1950; Lt Col Lucius D Clay Jr, 1950; Lt Col Clay Tice Jr, c. Feb 1951; Col Robert Garrigan, c. Aug 1951; Col Benjamin B Cassiday Jr, c. Jul 1953; Col Walter L Moore, 1 Dec 1954-1955.

Campaigns:  Air Combat, EAME Theater; Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Insigne:  Shield: Or, a dragon salient wings displayed and addorsed azure, armed and langued gules, incensed proper, holding in its dexter claw a stylized boll weevil sable. Motto: Le Nom - Les Armes - La Loyaute: The Name, The Arms, and Loyalty. (Approved 2 Mar 1943.)



Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (81st Training Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 81 Fighter Wing on 15 Apr 1948. Activated on 1 May 1948. Redesignated as: 81 Fighter-Interceptor Wing on 20 Jan 1950; 81 Fighter-Bomber Wing on 1 Apr 1954; 81 Tactical Fighter Wing on 8 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1993. Redesignated as 81 Training Wing, and activated, on 1 Jul 1993.

Assignments:  7 Air Division, 1 May 1948; Pacific Air Command, 3 Sep 1948; Twelfth Air Force, 21 May 1949 (attached to Western Air Defense Force, 10 Nov 1949-); Fourth Air Force, 1 Apr 1950 (remained attached to Western Air Defense Force to 1 Aug 1950); Western Air Defense Force, 1 Aug 1950 (attached to Third Air Force, 5-8 Sep 1951); Third Air Force, 9 Sep 1951 (attached to 49 Air Division, Operational [later, 49 Air Division (Operational)], 1 Mar 1954-1 Jul 1956); Seventeenth Air Force, 1 Jul 1961; Third Air Force, 1 Sep 1963-1 Jul 1993. Second Air Force, 1 Jul 1993-.

Components:

Group:  81 Fighter (later, 81 Fighter-Interceptor; 81 Fighter-Bomber): 1 May 1948-8 Feb 1955.

Squadrons:  78 Fighter-Bomber (later, 78 Tactical Fighter): attached c. 22 Apr 1954-7 Feb 1955, assigned 8 Feb 1955-1 May 1992. 91 Fighter-Bomber (later, 91 Tactical Fighter): attached c. 22 Apr 1954-7 Feb 1955, assigned 8 Feb 1955-14 Aug 1992. 92 Fighter-Bomber (later, 92 Tactical Fighter): attached c. 22 Apr 1954-7 Feb 1955, assigned 8 Feb 1955-31 Mar 1993. 116 Fighter (later, 116 Fighter-Interceptor): attached 10 Feb-9 Aug 1951 (further attached to 81 Fighter-Interceptor Group). 509 Tactical Fighter: 1 Oct 1979-1 Jun 1988. 510 Tactical Fighter: 1 Oct 1978-1 Oct 1992. 511 Tactical Fighter: 1 Jan 1980-1 Sep 1988. 527 Aggressor: 14 Jul 1988-30 Sep 1990.

Stations:  Wheeler AFB, Territory of Hawaii, 1 May 1948-21 May 1949; Camp Stoneman, CA, 27 May 1949; Kirtland AFB, NM, 5 Jun 1949; Moses Lake (later, Larson) AFB, WA, 2 May 1950-16 Aug 1951; Bentwaters RAF Station (later, RAF Bentwaters), England, 6 Sep 1951-1 Jul 1993. Keesler AFB, MS, 1 Jul 1993-.

Commanders:  Col Thomas W. Blackburn, 1 May 1948; Lt Col Francis R. Royal, 21 May 1949; Col Thomas W. Blackburn, (by 28) Jun 1949; Col Gladwyn E. Pinkston, 28 Apr 1950; Col Robert F. Harris, 22 Aug 1951; Col Gladwyn E. Pinkston, 27 Sep 1951; Col Robert F. Harris, c. 3 Jan 1953; Col Gladwyn E. Pinkston, c. 20 Feb 1953; Col Robert J. Garrigan, 20 Jun 1953; Col Gladwyn E. Pinkston, c. 20 Aug 1953; Col Harold N. Holt, 2 Jun 1954; Col Ivan W. McElroy, 10 Jun 1955; Col Lester L. Krause Jr., 18 Jun 1957; Col Henry L. Crouch Jr., 8 Jul 1957; Col James R. DuBose Jr., 6 May 1960; Col Eugene L. Strickland, 9 Jul 1960; Col William C. Clark, 9 Jul 1962; Col Robin Olds, 9 Aug 1963; Brig Gen DeWitt R. Searles, 26 Jul 1965; Col Ramon R. Melton, 28 Jul 1967; Col George S. Dorman, 5 Jul 1968; Col Devol Brett, 25 Sep 1968; Col David J. Schmerbeck, 29 Aug 1969; Col John C. Bartholf, 6 Mar 1970; Col James W. Enos, 4 Sep 1970; Col Dwaine L. Weatherwax, 22 Jun 1971; Brig Gen Charles E. Word, 16 Aug 1972; Col John R. Paulk, 19 Apr 1974; Brig Gen Clyde H. Garner, 14 Mar 1975; Col Gerald D. Larson, 11 Feb 1976; Brig Gen Rudolph F. Wacker, 6 May 1977; Col Gordon E. Williams, 7 Aug 1979; Brig Gen Richard M. Pascoe, 24 Apr 1981; Brig Gen Dale C. Tabor, 2 Aug 1982; Col Lester P. Brown Jr., 20 Mar 1984; Col William A. Studer, 26 Mar 1986; Col Harold H. Rhoden, 30 Jul 1987; Col Tad J. Oelstrom, 5 Aug 1988; Col Roger E. Carleton, 13 Jul 1990; Col Roger R. Radcliff, 12 Jul 1991-1 Jul 1993. Brig Gen Karen S. Rankin, 1 Jul 1993; Brig Gen Andrew J. Pelak Jr., 7 Nov 1995; Brig Gen John M. Speigel, 4 Aug 1997; Brig Gen Elizabeth Anne Harrell, 14 Jul 1999; Brig Gen Roosevelt Mercer Jr., 5 Sep 2000; Brig Gen Michael W. Peterson, 2 May 2002; Brig Gen William T. Lord, 20 Apr 2004; Brig Gen Paul F. Capasso, 15 Nov 2005; Brig Gen Gregory J. Touhill, 2 Oct 2007; Col Christopher R. Valle, Apr 2009 (interim); Brig Gen Ian R. Dickinson, May 2009; Brig Gen Andrew M. Mueller, Jul 2010-.

Aircraft:  P (later, F)-47, 1948-1949; F-80, 1949; F-86, 1949-1955; F-51, 1951; F-84, 1954-1959; F-101, 1958-1966; F-4, 1965-1979; A-10, 1978-1993; F-16, 1988-1990.

Operations:  The 81 Fighter Wing conducted air defense of Hawaii, Dec 1948-May 1949, then became part of Western Air Defense Force's air defense structure in Nov 1949. From 1951 to mid-1954, it worked with Royal Air Force Fighter Command to provide air defense in England. The wing changed in 1954 from fighter-interceptor to fighter-bomber operations, carrying both conventional and nuclear weapons. Charged with tactical operations in support of USAFE and NATO, with air defense as a secondary mission, 1954-1979 and 1988-1990. Also operated out of RAF Woodbridge, 1958-1993. The wing began conversion to A-10s in late 1978, as its mission changed to close air support and battlefield air interdiction in support of NATO ground forces. It conducted joint operations with US and British ground forces and participated in rotational deployments to specified wartime operating locations throughout Europe. It won the A-10 category of the 1987 USAF Gunsmoke Gunnery meet. It added the 527 Aggressor Squadron, flying F-16s in 1988, to provide the only Dissimilar Aircraft Combat Tactics training for USAFE and NATO pilots in Europe, from Jul 1988 to Sep 1990. The wing conducted escort missions with A-10s for Coalition airlift forces during relief efforts in Turkey and northern Iraq, 6 Apr 1991-8 Dec 1992. Began preparation for base closure in Dec 1992, ending flying operations on 1 Apr 1993. The 81 Training Wing replaced Keesler Training Center in Jul 1993, taking on the mission of specialized technical training in electronics, avionics, computers, operations, maintenance, weather, radar, precision measurement, network controllers, and personnel and information management for USAF, AF Reserve, Air National Guard, other DoD agencies, and foreign nations. Keesler AFB received severe damage from Hurricane Katrina on 29 Aug 2005. The wing's relief and recovery mission, Operation Dragon Comeback, restored the base to full mission readiness within a month.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 28 Mar 1959-30 Jun 1961; 1 Jul 1961- 30 Jun 1963; 1 Jun 1966-31 May 1968; 1 Jul 1968-30 Jun 1970; 1 Jul 1976- 30 Jun 1978; 1 Jul 1979-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jun 1989-31 May 1991; 1 Jun 1991-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jun 2005-30 Jun 2006; 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2009.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 81 Fighter Group prior to 1 May 1948.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Or a dragon salient wings displayed and addorsed Azure armed and langued Gules, incensed proper, holding in its dexter claw a stylized boll weevil Sable. Motto: LE NOM LES ARMES LA LOYAUTE-The name, the arms, and loyalty. Approved for the 81st Group on 2 Mar 1943 and the 81st Wing on 14 May 1956 (152220 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 22 Jun 2011.

Commanders , Aircraft, and Operations through 22 Jun 2011.



Other Sites of Interest:

81st Fighter-Interceptor Wing 1954 Scrapbook

Table of Contents



91st Fighter Squadron


(Design used from May 44-Dec 45)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 91st Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 91st Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942 (possibly had supplemental designations as 91st Fighter Squadron, Two Engine 1943-1944, Fighter Squadron, Single Engine 1944-1945). Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated: 91st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jan 1950 (possibly had supplemental designations as 91st Fighter Squadron, Single Engine 1946-1949, and Fighter Squadron, Jet 1949-20 Jan 50.); 91st Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 1 Apr 1954; 91st Tactical Fighter Squadron on 8 Jul 1958. Inactivated unknown date (1992?).

Assignments:  81st Pursuit (later Fighter) Group, 9 Feb 1942-27 Dec 1945. 81st Fighter (later Fighter-Interceptor; Fighter-Bomber) Group, 15 Oct 1946; 81st Fighter-Bomber (later Tactical Fighter) Wing, 8 Feb 1955-.

Stations:  Morris Field, NC, 9 Feb 1942; Dale Mabry Field, Fla, 1 May 1942; Muroc, Calif, 27 Jun-4 Oct 1942; Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 10 Nov 1942; Fedala, French Morocco, 16 Dec 1942; Mediouna, French Morocco, c. 3 Jan 1943; Thelepte, Tunisia, 23 Jan 1943; Le Kouif Airfield, Algeria, 17 Feb 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 22 Feb 1943; Le Kouif Airfield, Algeria, 24 Feb 1943; Thelepte, Tunisia, 5 Mar 1943; Bone, Algeria, 5 Apr 1943; Sfax, Tunisia, 23 May 1943; Sidi Ahmed, Tunisia, 5 Aug 1943; Castelvetrano, Sicily, 12 Oct 1943; Montecorvino Airfield, Italy, 6 Dec 1943-15 Feb 1944 (operated from Capodichino, Italy, 13 Dec 1943-1 Feb 1944); Karachi, India, 25 Feb 1944; Fungwanshan, China, c. 1 Jun 1944 (operated from Hsian, China, 9 Apr-15 Aug 1945); Huhsien, China, c. 17 Aug-27 Dec 1945. Wheeler Field, TH, 15 Oct 1946-21 May 1949; Kirtland AFB, NM, 17 Jun 1949; Moses Lake AFB, Wash, c. 1 May 1950-21 Aug 1951; Bentwaters RAF Station, England, 5 Sep 1951-1 Feb 1980. RAF Woodbridge 1 Feb 80-unknown.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1942-1944; P-38, 1943-1944; P-40, 1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-47, 1946-1949; F-80, 1949; F-86, 1949-1955; F-84, 1954-1958; F-101, 1958-.

Operations:  Combat in MTO, 27 Jan 1943-13 Feb 1944, and CBI, 16 Jun 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Algeria-French Morocco with Arrowhead; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, EAME Theater; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jul 1961-30 Jun 1963.

Emblem:  On a disc of thirteen alternating vertical stripes, white and red, a horizontal upper division blue. The disc piped yellow, thereon, a wing and a cloud, white, pierced with a lightning flash yellow. (Approved 14 Jun 1951.)

Table of Contents



92nd Fighter Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


P-47D of the 92nd FS with a replacement rudder from a silver 91st FS plane. -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 92d Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 92d Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated: 92d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jan 1950 (possibly had supplemental designations as 92nd Fighter Squadron, Two Engine 1943-1944, Fighter Squadron, Single Engine 1944-1945, 1946-1949, and Fighter Squadron, Jet 1949-20 Jan 50); 92d Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 1 Apr 1954; 92nd Tactical Fighter Squadron on 8 Jul 1958 (later Fighter Squadron); 92nd Information Warfare Aggressor Squadron 1 Nov 2000.

Assignments:  81st Pursuit (later Fighter) Group 9 Feb 1942-27 Dec 1945. 81st Fighter (later Fighter-Interceptor; Fighter-Bomber) Group, 15 Oct 1946; 81st Fighter-Bomber (later Tactical Fighter) Wing, 8 Feb 1955-1993. 318th Information Operations Group, 1 Nov 2000-.

Stations:  Morris Field, NC, 9 Feb 1942; Dale Mabry Field, Fla, 1 May 1942; Muroc, Calif, 27 Jun-4 Oct 1942; Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 11 Nov 1942; Louis Gentil Field, French Morocco, 16 Dec 1942; Mediouna, French Morocco, c. 5 Jan 1943; Thelepte, Tunisia, 12 Jan 1943; Le Kouif Airfield, Algeria, 17 Feb 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 22 Feb 1943; Le Kouif Airfield, Algeria, 24 Feb 1943; Thelepte, Tunisia, 6 Mar 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 29 Mar 1943; Maison Blanche, Algeria, 6 Apr 1943; Warmer, Algeria, 12 May 1943; Sidi Ahmed, Tunisia, 15 Aug 1943; Castelvetrano, Sicily, 13 Oct 1943; Capodichino, Italy, 17 Jan-14 Feb 1944; Karachi, India, 22 Mar 1944; Kwanghan, China, 15 May 1944; Fungwanshan, China, 12 Feb 1945; Huhsien, China, 20 Aug 1945; Hsian, China, Oct-27 Dec 1945. Wheeler Field, TH, 15 Oct 1946-21 May 1949; Kirtland AFB, NM, 17 Jun 1949; Moses Lake AFB, Wash, 30 Apr 1950-21 Aug 1951; Shepherds Grove RAF Station, England, 5 Sep 1951; Manston RAF Station, England, 28 Mar 1955; Bentwaters RAF Station, England, 30 Apr 1958-1993. Kelly Annex, Lackland AFB 1 Nov 2000-.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1942-1944; P-38, 1943-1944; P-40, 1944-1945; P-47, 1944-1945; P-47, 1946-1949; F-80, 1949; F-86, 1949-1955; F-84, 1954-1958; F-101, 1958-1965; F-4 1965-1979; A-10 1979-1993.

Operations:  Combat in MTO, 22 Jan 1943-c. 12 Feb 1944 and in CBI, 1 Jun 1944-2 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Algeria-French Morocco with Arrowhead; Tunisia; Naples-Foggia; Anzio; Rome-Arno; Air Combat, FAME Theater; China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jul 1961-30 June 1963.

Emblem:  An irregular shaped figure, divided palewise by cloud-like formation, yellow and ultramarine blue, charged in sinister segment with a white skull facing toward dexter, and having an orange lightning flash issuing from the mouth and a like flash from the eye, all within a border divided palewise, ultramarine blue and light green. (Approved 30 Jun 1945.)



Source:  92nd Information Warfare Aggressor Squadron (Lackland AFB Spokesman, January 2002)

Aggressor squadron celebrates first anniversary
Time capsule opening highlights get together
(January 2002)

The 92nd Information Warfare Aggressor Squadron and guests gathered at Kelly USA to celebrate their first anniversary since activating Nov. 1, 2000.

The aggressors are one of five squadrons in the 318th Information Operations Group, operating under the Air Force Information Warfare Center at Lackland AFB, Texas.

After a barbecue lunch with all of the trimmings, the squadron assembled for the opening of an Air Force Museum time capsule left by the 92nd Tactical Fighter Squadron of RAF Bentwaters, England.

The 92nd "Skulls" flew the A-10 Thunderbolt II until they deactivated in 1993. The time capsule contained a wide variety of memorabilia from previous incarnations of the squadron including photographs, plaques, history books, a skull and a "Hoglog"-a freeform journal of pilot banter and brotherly derision.

"The anniversary was a chance for all of us, 92nd members and our families, to come together and celebrate how far we've come," Lt. Col. Sergio Muniz, 92nd commander said.

The 92nd was first activated in 1946 as the 92nd Fighter Squadron (JET) in the territory of Hawaii. Subsequent designations of the squadron include 92nd Fighter Interceptor Squadron and 92nd Fighter Bomber Squadron.

As part of the 81st Fighter Group (JET), the 92nd was transferred from Wheeler Field, Hawaii, to Kirtland AFB, N.M.; then to Larsen AFB, Washington; finally arriving in England at RAF Station Shepherds Grove. Another move in 1955 brought the squadron to RAF Manston. In 1958, the 92nd moved to RAF Bentwaters, Suffolk, where the wing had been headquartered since its arrival in England in 1951.

Originally flying F-84 Thunderjet, the squadron completed conversion to the F-101 Voodoo in 1958. On July 8, 1958 the squadron was re-designated the 92nd Tactical Fighter Squadron. 1965 brought about the conversion from the F-101 to the mighty F-4C Phantom, which were flown until 1973 when conversion to the F-4D was completed. The 92nd became the first operational A-10 squadron in Europe in 1979.

The 92nd's current mission is to lead the Air Force in assessing vulnerabilities on computer networks to protect information systems from attack. The squadron consists of four flights-the Network Operations Flight, the Systems Vulnerability Flight, the Aggressor Operations Flight and the Counter-Information Programs Flight.

"The fact that the 92nd has shifted from a fighter squadron to an information warfare squadron is an indication of where wars are headed," Lt. Col. Jerry Cummin, operations officer, said.

The anniversary celebration brought to life memories of the past, and hopes for the future of this squadron rich in history.

Table of Contents



93d Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 93d Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 9 Feb 1942. Redesignated 93d Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1945. Activated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated 93d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 20 Jan 1950. Discontinued on 8 Jul 1960.

Assignments:  81st Pursuit (later Fighter) Group, 9 Feb 1942-8 Dec 1945. 81st Fighter (later Fighter-Interceptor) Group, 15 Oct 1946 (attached to Albuquerque Air Defense Area, 1 May 1950); Western Air Defense Force (attached to 34th Air Division), 10 Aug 1951; 34th Air Division, 6 Feb 1952; Albuquerque Air Defense Sector, 1 Jan 1960; Department of the Air Force, 8 Jul 1960-.

Stations:  Morris Field, NC, 9 Feb 1942; Dale Mabry Field, Fla, 1 May 1942; Muroc, Calif, 26 Jun-4 Oct 1942; Port Lyautey, French Morocco, 10 Nov 1942; Berteaux, Algeria, 19 Feb 1943; Youks-les-Bains, Algeria, 10 Mar 1943 (operated from Thelepte, Tunisia, 6 Mar-c. 5 Apr 1943); Bone, Algeria, 3 Apr 1943; Monastir, Tunisia, 22 May 1943; Sidi Ahmed, Tunisia, 23 Aug 1943; Castelvetrano, Sicily, 21 Oct 1943; Montecorvino Airfield, Italy, c. Feb 1944; Karachi, India, c. 1 Mar 1944; Kwanghan, China, c. 11 Jul 1944; Gushkara, India, c. Oct 1944-16 Oct 1945; Shanghai, China, c. 9-17 Nov 1945; Camp Stoneman, Calif, 5-8 Dec 1945. Wheeler Field, TH, 15 Oct 1946-21 May 1949; Kirtland AFB, NM, 17 Jun 1949-8 Jul 1960.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1942-1944; P-38, 1943-1944; P-40, 1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-51, 1946-1947; P-47, 1946-1949; F-80, 1949; F-86, 1949-1960.

Operations:  Combat in MTO, 8 Mar 1943-11 Feb 1944, and CBI, 14 Aug-18 Sep 1944. Trained pilots for units in China, Oct 1944-Jun 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Algeria-French Morocco with Arrowhead; Tunisia; Air Combat, FAME Theater; China Defensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a blue disc edged black, a white cloud; issuing from base, a snow-capped mountain peak; standing on the mountain peak and surmounting the cloud, a caricatured bird, black with gray head, breast and tail, Air Force golden yellow beak and talons, red eye and breast markings, his wings folded and supporting behind his back a heavy brown wooden club pierced with a "wicked-looking black spike; details black throughout. (Approved 6 Aug 1958.)

Table of Contents



311th Fighter Group

(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



528th Fighter Squadron

  
"Dragon Fly" flight was a code name used by the squadron in talking to ground liaison officers during the Marauder campaign. The name stuck. It was appropriate, too, when the squadron moved to the 14th Air Force in China. The dragon is an important symbol of Chinese myth. The insignia of the "Dragon Flys" was drawn by squadron members Bill Lackey and William G. Lamb. The shoulder patch of the squadron, which incorporates the drawing, is done in red, white, blue and yellow.
-- Ex-CBI Roundup, December 1995 issue.


(See 10th AF Units)

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529th Fighter Squadron


Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


(See 10th AF Units)

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530th Fighter Squadron


P-51A, 43-6283 "Hell's Angel" -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


(See 10th AF Units)

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317th Fighter Control Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

The 317th FCS was activated at March Field, Riverside, Calif, on 15 Jun 43, disbanded 8 Oct 48.



Source:  Mr. Harold Lasker (317th C.O., 1 Aug 44 until end of war)

(The 317th FCS) left March Field in March 1944 to be shipped overseas. After stops in Oran, Algeria and Calcutta, India, it arrived in Chengtu, China in July 1944 to be assigned to the 312th Fighter Wing of the 14th AF. This Wing was comprised of two fighter groups, the 311th and the 81st. The 311th consisted of three fighter squadrons, the 528th, 529th, and 530th. The 81st consisted of three fighter squadrons, the 91st, 92nd, and 93d plus the 426th night fighter squadron which arrived later.

The 312th Fighter Wing was headquartered in Chengtu. However it had several detachments. I was assigned on August 1, 1944 to open a base in Sian. I was the C.O. of the 317th F.C.S. there till the end of the War. Each month one of the three squadrons of the 311th was rotated to serve at Sian. In February 1945, one flight of P-61 night fighters arrived as well. These were detached from the 426th night fighter squadron.

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Chinese-American Composite Wing  (See CBI Unit Histories)


Embroidered silk scarf owned by Capt. Harry Kebric,
Combat Liaison Officer with the CACW and designer of the CACW insignia
(from the collection of Mr. Peter Kirkup)

Distinguished Unit Citation:  1 May-30 Jun 44, WD GO 120-45.



Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Commanders:  Winslow Morse, 1 October 1943 - 2 December 1944; T. Alan Bennett, 3 December 1944 - September 1945.



Source:  Accomplishments of the CACW

OCTOBER 1, 1943 - AUGUST 1, 1945

Initially formed on July 31, 1943 as the 1st Bomb Group (Provisional) and the 3d Fighter Group (Provisional), Chinese Air Force, The Chinese American Composite Wing (Provisional) would be officially activated on October 1, 1943. The operational units of the CACW would be jointly commanded by both American and Chinese air force officers, and the unit's aircraft would be jointly manned by American and Chinese pilots and air crewmen.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE C.A.C.W.

During it first year and a half of operations, the Chinese and American airmen of the CACW could claim the destruction of 190 Japanese aircraft in air-to-air combat, and 301 more on the ground. The fighters and bombers of the CACW had destroyed at least 1500 Japanese vehicles and sunk several hundred thousand tons of Japanese merchant and naval shipping, in addition they had taken a heavy toll on Japanese ground troops, facilities, railroads and bridges. In that same time, they had lost 35 fighters and 8 bombers to enemy ground fire, and 20 fighters to Japanese aircraft. However, not a single CACW bomber had been lost to enemy fighters, a tribute to the abilities of the Wing's B-25 aircrews, and the quality of the escort protection provided by the Wing's fighter pilots.

The most successful fighter pilot of the CACW was Lt. Colonel William N. Reed, who had first fought in China as a member of the AVG. As a "Flying Tiger," Reed had destroyed 3 Japanese aircraft in aerial combat and 8 more on the ground. Then returning to China to command the CACW's 7th Fighter Squadron and eventually its 3d Fighter Group, he would destroy an additional 6 Japanese aircraft in aerial combat.



Source:  Fourteenth Air Force Heir to the Flying Tigers

The Chinese-American Composite Wing (CACW) became a part of the Fourteenth Air Force in July 1943. The CACW consisted of Chinese aircraft and crews trained under Lend-Lease with a combination of Chinese and USAAF officers serving as the wing's group, squadron and flight leaders. Organized as two fighter groups of P-40s and one bomber group of B-25s, CACW units began their first combat operations in October 1943. The coming in of the CACW effectively gave Chennault command and control over all tactical aviation operations occurring within the China theater.




Provided courtesy of Mr. Allan Blue (from the files of S/Sgt Richard C. Frye, 4th BS (M), CACW)



Source:  CBI Roundup - November 12, 1943 - China-Burma-India Theater of World War II

Chinese-American Wing In Action With 14th AF

14TH AIR FORCE HQ. - During the past week, the 14th Air Force rained destruction upon Japanese troops, installations, shipping and Japanese-occupied towns. As a result of these missions, during which the newly arrived Chinese-American Composite Wing participated for the first time on November 4, six large enemy vessels were sunk and one more was probably sunk. On a raid against the Swatow Airdrome, three Jap fighters and one bomber on the ground were damaged.

On Nov. 3, B-25's, with fighter escort, made a triple assault against the Jap troops in the Lake Tungting area. Operating in support of Chinese troops, they attacked Ouchihkow, Hwajung and Shihshow. Large fires were started in the target area. Fighter aircraft carrying fragmentation bombs made a successful low-level attack on the Lasion airdrome in central Burma. The next day B-25's in a shipping sweep over the South China Sea, bombed and sank one 5,900-ton cargo vessel and scored a probable on a 1,000-ton freighter. They also attacked and damaged three Japanese fighters and one bomber which were caught on the ground at the Swatow airdrome. On this mission one plane failed to return.

Two flights of 16 and 21 Jap bombers attacked small towns in Eastern China, but did not cause severe damage.

On Nov. 7, Mitchell bombers with fighter escort returned to the China Coast, hitting shipping in the harbor of Amoy. Coming in at low level, they bombed seven vessels, five of which were left sinking. One of the vessels sunk was a 250-foot Japanese destroyer. The planes encountered heavy fire from anti-aircraft and machine guns but returned safely to their base.



Other Sites of Interest:

Society of Oral History on Modern China



Items owned by Capt. Harry Kebric, Combat Liaison Officer with the CACW and designer of the CACW insignia.  The banner was hand embroidered in silk on a parachute panel (chute used by a P-40 pilot) by Chinese orphans at the request of a Chinese General.  It was a special thank you to Capt. Kebric for his kindness to the local populous.  (from the collection of Mr. Peter Kirkup)

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1st Bomb Group (Provisional)

Lineage:  Formed 31 Jul 43; Activated 1 Oct 1943, Malir Cantonment, Karachi

Aircraft:  B-25D/H/J

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1st Bombardment Squadron (Provisional)


B-25J from the 1st BS / 1st BG CACW -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

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2nd Bombardment Squadron (Provisional)

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3d Bombardment Squadron (Provisional)

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4th Bombardment Squadron (Provisional)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  Mr. Allan Blue (from the files & diaries of S/Sgt Richard C. Frye, 4th BS (M), CACW)

Stations:

  • Kweilin, China
  • c. 14 Sep 44 Peishiyu, China
         Det (Task Force 34) - Chihkiang, China c. 10 Nov 44)
  • c. 14 Apr 45 Chihkiang, China
  • c. 27 Apr 45 Peishiyu, China (Det remains at Chihkiang)
  • 4 Sep 45: All personnel tranferred to 22 BS / 341 BG for transport home

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3d Fighter Group (Provisional)


Embroidered silk scarf owned by Capt. Harry Kebric,
Combat Liaison Officer with the CACW and designer of the CACW insignia
(from the collection of Mr. Peter Kirkup)

(Courtesy of Mr. Peter Castner)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed 31 Jul 43; Activated 1 Oct 1943, Malir Cantonment, Karachi

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Ehr Tong AFLD, Kweilin; Liangshan; An Kang

Commanders:  T. Alan Bennett, Jul 1943; William Reed, Dec 1944; William Turner, Dec 1944; Gil Bright, Jan 1945; Eugene Strickland, Mar 1945; William Yancey, Jul 1945

Aircraft:  P-40N; P-51C/D/K from early 1945.

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7th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Oct 1943

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Ehr Tong AFLD, Kweilin; Liangshan; Laohokow, An Kang

Commanders:  William Reed, Oct 43; Bill Lewis, Dec 1944; Thomas Reynolds, Jan 45; Bert Welch, May 1945; Ross Bachley, Jul 1945

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8th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)


P-40N -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Oct 1943

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Ehr Tong AFLD, Kweilin; Li Chia Chen; Liangshan; Laohokow, An Kang

Commanders:  Howard Cords, Oct 1943; Harvey Davis, Apr 1944; James Bull, Sep 1944; Frank Klump, Dec 1944; E. H. Mueller, Jan 1945

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28th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Aug 1943; Activated 9 Oct 1943

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Ehr Tong AFLD, Kweilin; Ling Ling; Li Chia Chen; En Shih, An Kang

Commanders:  Eugene Strickland, Aug 43; Keith Lindell, Dec 1944; Robert Ferguson, May 1945; Donald Campbell, Jun 1945


Note:  A version of this insignia is used by the 28th FS, Taiwanese Air Force:



Source:

The 28th Fighter Squadron is an element of the 3d Fighter Group, 427th Tactical Fighter Wing and is located at Ching Chuan Kang Airbase. The squadron flies the Ching-kuo Indigenous Defense Fighter.

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32nd Fighter Squadron (Provisional)


Embroidered silk scarf owned by Capt. Harry Kebric,
Combat Liaison Officer with the CACW and designer of the CACW insignia
(from the collection of Mr. Peter Kirkup)


Commemorative version
(courtesy of Mr. Peter Castner)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Aug 1943; Activated 9 Oct 1943

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Ehr Tong AFLD, Kweilin; Li Chia Chen; Hangchung (Det, Hsian); An Kang

Commanders:  William Turner, Aug 1943; Raymond Callaway, Sep 1944; Herman Byrd, Dec 1944; Jesse Harris, May 1945

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5th Fighter Group (Provisional)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Activated 13 Jan 44

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Kweilin; Suichwan; Chihkiang

Commanders:  Frank Rouse, Jan 1944; John Dunning, Nov 1944; Charles Wilder, June 1945; Howard Means, Jul 1945; William Turner, Aug 1945

Aircraft:  P-40N; P-51C/D/K from early 1945.

Photos courtesy of Mr. Jay Marvin
Son of Mr. John Marvin, 159th AACS

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17th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Mar 1944; Activated c. May 1944 (attached to 26th FS until late Aug 1944)

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Chihkiang

Commanders:  Charles Wilder, Mar 1944; Glyn Ramsey, Nov 1944; Frank Stevens, Apr 1945

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26th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)


Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Jan 1944; Activated c. 17 Mar 1944

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Kweilin; Suichwan; Hengyang; Chihkiang

Commanders:  Bob Van Ausdall, Jan 1944; Bill Johnson, Mar 1945

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27th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Mar 1944; Activated c. 22 Jun 1944 (attached to 29th FS until late Aug 1944)

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Chihkiang

Commanders:  James Dale, Mar 1944; Irving Erickson, Jan 1945; Winton Matthews, Apr 1945

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29th Fighter Squadron (Provisional)

Source:  Journal of the American Aviation Historical Society, Winter 1982

Lineage:  Formed Jan 1944; Activated c. 17 Mar 1944

Stations:  Malir Cantonment, Karachi; Kweilin; Suichwan; Hengyang; Chihkiang

Commanders:  William Hull, Jan 1944; Fred Ploetz, Feb 1945; Frank Everest, May 1945; Dick Turner, May 1945; Byron McKenzie, Jun 1945; henry Lawrence, Jul 1945

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XIV AF Strategic Air Command (Provisional)

Activated 8 Jun 45 in China

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4th Photographic Technical Unit

Source:

Army Pamphlet 672-1

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated on 20 Oct 43 at Esler Field, LA. Redesignated 4 Photo Technical Unit Nov 44, inactivated 7 Nov 45, disbanded 8 Oct 48, reconstituted 16 Oct 84 & amp; consolidated with 94 Reconnaissance Technical Sq as 4 Reconnaissance Technical Sq. Unit mission was aerial photography and map making; organization stationed in China in Dec 44; Unit prepared for return to the United States in Aug 45.

Assignments:  14th Air Force.

Stations:  unknown -1944, Chabua -1945, Chabua, Kunming, Chengtu, Chunking -Aug 45.

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendation:  5 Feb-31 May 45, GO 102, Hq 14th AF, dtd 5 Aug 45.

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21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

"Scandalous Lady", an F-5E from the 21st PRS in late war colours.
The serial was either removed or more likely hidden by exhaust stains.
-- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 14 Jul 1942. Activated on 2 Sep 1942. Re-designated: 21st Photographic Squadron (Light) on 6 Feb 1943; 21st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 13 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 21st Reconnaissance Squadron (Photographic) on 11 Mar 1947. Activated in the reserve on 1 Oct 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Consolidated 19 Sep 85 with 921st Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy as 921st Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy.

Assignments:  5th Photographic (later Photographic Reconnaissance and Mapping) Group, 2 Sep 1942; Fourteenth Air Force, Jun 1943-6 Jan 1946. 74th Reconnaissance Group, 1 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949.

Stations:  Colorado Springs, Colo, 2 Sep 1942-27 Apr 1943; Bishnupur, India, 27 Jun 1943 (flights at Kunming, China, 12 Jul-22 Aug 1943, and Kweilin, China, 12 Jul 1943-12 Sep 1944); Kunming, China, 22 Aug 1943 (flights at Suichwan, China, 26 Oct 1943-26 Jun 1944. c. 12 Nov 1944-22 Jan 1945; Liangshan, China, 1 Apr-18 Oct 1944; Kanchow, China, Aug-20 Nov 1944; Liuchow, China, 10 Sep-6 Nov 1944; Hanchung, China, 18 Oct 1944-13 Aug 1945; Luliang, China, c. 26 Nov 1944-13 May 1945; Hsian, China, 5 Feb-c. 5 Oct 1945; and Laifeng, China, 7 May-16 Aug 1945); Shwangliu, China, 14 May 1945 (flights at Ankang, China, 25 Jun-c. 5 Oct 1945, and Chihkiang, China, 16 Aug-c. 15 Oct 1945); Hangchow, China, 18 Oct-c. 15 Dec 1945; Ft Lawton, Wash, 5-6 Jan 1946. Stewart Field, NY, 1 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949-

Aircraft:  In addition to F-5, 1943-1945, included F-4, 1943-1945, P-40, 1943-1944, and F-6 and B-25, 1945-

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 12 Jul 1943-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Pacific; India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; New Guinea; Western Pacific; Central Burma; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Over and through a dark red disc, a demisphere in base light gray, marked with lines of latitude and longitude dark gray, encompassed by a pair of gold dividers, all surmounted by a peregrine falcon in flight, grasping a gold aerial camera in the talons. (Approved 29 Apr 1944.)

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35th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Designated 123d Observation Squadron, and allotted to NG, on 30 Jul 1940. Activated on 18 Apr 1941. Ordered to active service on 15 Sep 1941. Redesignated: 123d Observation Squadron (Light) on 13 Jan 1942; 123d Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 123d Reconnaissance Squadron (Bombardment) on 2 Apr 1943; 35th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 11 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 7 Nov 1945. Redesignated 123d Fighter Squadron, Single Engine and allotted to Air National Guard 24 May 46, activated 26 Jun 46, redesignated 123d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron 1 Mar 51, inactivated 1 Nov 52. Activated 1 Dec 52, redesignated 123d Fighter Squadron 31 Mar 92.

Assignments:  Oregon NG, 18 Apr 1941; 70th Observation (later Reconnaissance) Group, 15 Sep 1941; 77th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, 11 Aug 1943 (attached to 70th Tactical Reconnaissance Group to 31 Oct 1943); III Reconnaissance (later Tactical Air) Command, 30 Nov 1943; AAF, India-Burma Sector, 5 May 1944; Fourteenth Air Force, c. Sep 1944; Tenth Air Force, 1 Aug 1945; Fourteenth Air Force, 25 Aug-7 Nov 1945.

Stations:  Portland, Ore, 18 Apr 1941; Gray Field, Wash, 25 Sep 1941 (detachment operated from Hoquiam, Wash, 15 Mar-c. Aug 1942); Ontario AAFld, Calif, 16 Mar 1943; Redmond AAFld, Calif, 20 Aug 1943; Gainesville AAFld, Tex, 10 Nov 1943; Will Rogers Field, Okla, 5 Feb-10 Apr 1944; Guskhara, India, 13 Jun 1944; Kunming, China, 1 Sep 1944 (flights at Nanning, China, 16 Sep-6 Oct 1944, and Yunnani, China, 16 Sep 1944-10 Feb 1945); Chanyi, China, 17 Sep 1944 (flights at Chihkiang, China, 19 Oct 1944-c. 1 Sep 1945; Suichwan, China, 19 Nov 1944-22 Jan 1945; Chengkung, China, 10 Feb-13 May 1945; Laohwangping, China, 27 Feb-c. 1 Sep 1945; Kunming, China, 14 May-31 Jul 1945; and Nanning, China, 31 Jul-c. 1 Sep 1945); Luliang, China, 18-24 Sep 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 5-7 Nov 1945. Portland Apt (later AFB), OR 1946-1952. Portland IAP, OR 1952-. Assigned to 142nd Fighter Group 1946-Feb 51, 4th Air Force -Feb 51, 142nd Fighter Group -Feb 51, 325th Fighter-Interceptor Group -6 Feb 52 (attached to 325th Fighter-Interceptor Wing Mar 51-Feb 52), 4704th Defense Wing -1952. 142nd Fighter-Interceptor Group (later Fighter Group, Fighter-Interceptor Group, Operations Group), 1952-.

Aircraft:  In addition to 0-47 and 0-49,1941-1943, included 0-46,1941-c. 1942; in addition to B-25, 1943-1944, and P-38, 1944, included A-2O and DB-7, 1943, and P-39, 1943-1944; in addition to F-5, 1944-1945, briefly included B-25, 1945.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols, 8 Dec 1941-10 Aug 1942; combat in CBI, 12 Sep 1944-Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; China Defensive; New Guinea; Western Pacific; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On an ultramarine blue disc, crossed by an irregular patch of yellow to form land and water areas, a stylized red hawk, in flight, toward dexter base, grasping in its talons a black aerial machine gun and a black aerial rocket. (Approved 24 Jan 1950.)



Source:  Globalsecurity.org (123d Fighter Sq)

Previously designated as the 123d Fighter Interceptor Squadron, the squadron was renamed the 123th Fighter Squadron in 1992.

The squadron converted to the F-15A/B aircraft in 1989/90, with most of those planes coming from the 318th FIS at McChord AFB, which was being disbanded.

The Unit has been flying the F-15 Eagle jet fighter since 1989. The 142 FW has 15 PAI and 3 BAI/AR F-15A and F-15B Eagles.

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322nd Troop Carrier Squadron



Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 322d Troop Carrier Squadron on 25 Aug 1944. Activated on 9 Sep 1944. Inactivated on 6 Jan 1946. Redesignated 322d Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium (Special) on 18 Jul 1956. Activated on 18 Sep 1956. This was a special operations unit, replacing the 581st Air Resupply Gp. Inactivated on 8 Dec 1957.

Assignments:  Fourteenth Air Force, 9 Sep 1944; Tenth Air Force, 25 Aug 1945-6 Jan 1946 (attached to 443d Troop Carrier Group, 4 Sep-1 Dec 1945). 313th Air Division, 18 Sep 1956; Fifth Air Force, 12 Feb-8 Dec 1957.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 9 Sep 1944; Loping, China, 25 May 1945; Liangshan, China, 1 Aug 1945; Chihkiang, China, 25 Aug 1945; Hankow, China, 3 Oct-1 Dec 1945; Ft Lawton, Wash, 4-6 Jan 1946. Kadena, Okinawa, 18 Sep 1956-8 Dec 1957.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1944-1945; C-46, 1945. C-54, 1956-1957. SA-16, 1956-1957. C-119, 1956-1957.

Operations:  Aerial transportation in China, 9 Sep 1944-25 Aug 1945; airlifted Chinese troops to bases in eastern China for disarmament operations, Sep-Nov 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  China Defensive; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: China, 5-30 Sep 1945.

Emblem:  On a shield AF blue, a globe, water areas light blue, land areas green; on an heraldic chief, white, a silhouetted sword, in fess, superimposed over two olive branches, in saltire, all black; curved around the outer sinister area of the shield a large red dart, outlined black, with barbed head pointing to center of globe. (Approved 27 Feb 1957.)

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426th Night Fighter Squadron


P-61A "SATAN 13" of the 426th NFS -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King


(See 10th AF Units)

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427th Night Fighter Squadron


(See 10th AF Units)

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476th Fighter Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 476 Fighter Group on 20 Apr 1943. Activated on 19 May 1943. Disbanded on 31 Jul 1943. Reestablished on 11 Oct 1943. Activated on 1 Dec 1943. Disbanded on 1 Apr 1944. Reestablished and redesignated 476 Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 11 Dec 1956. Activated on 8 Feb 1957. Discontinued on 1 Apr 1960. Redesignated: 476 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985; 476 Fighter Group on 6 Jan 2009. Activated on 1 Feb 2009.

Assignments:  Fourteenth Air Force, 19 May-31 Jul 1943. First Air Force, 1 Dec 1943; Second Air Force, 26 Mar-1 Apr 1944. 29 Air Division, 8 Feb 1957-1 Apr 1960. 442 Fighter Wing, 1 Feb 2009-.

Squadrons:  13 Fighter Interceptor: 1 Jul 1959-1 Apr 1960. 76 Fighter: 1 Feb 2009-. 453 Fighter: 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944. 541 Fighter: 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944. 542 Fighter: 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944. 543 Fighter: 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Stations:  Kunming, China, 19 May-31 Jul 1943. Richmond AAB, 1 Dec 1943; Pocatello AAFld, ID, 26 Mar-1 Apr 1944. Glasgow AFB, MT, 8 Feb 1957-1 Apr 1960. Moody AFB, GA, 1 Feb 2009-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 19 May-31 Jul 1943. Unkn, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944. Maj Charles E. Darling, 8 Feb 1957; Col Beverly E. Carmack, 1 Jul 1958; Col Clayton M. Isaacson, 10 Jul 1959-1 Apr 1960.

Aircraft:  None, 1943-1944. F-86, 1959-1960; F-101, 1959-1960.

Operations:  Activated in China on 19 May 1943; disbanded two months later. Reactivated in the US on 1 Dec 1943 as a replacement training unit with four squadrons assigned; squadrons apparently did not become operational and group disbanded on 1 Apr 1944. Activated again on 8 Feb 1957; involved in activation of Glasgow AFB, MT; did not operate as a separate unit until 9 Mar 1959; trained air defense crews through inactivation on 1 Apr 1960.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: China Defensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Approved 18 May 2010.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 10 Feb 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Apr 1960.



Tigers With New Stripes (Moody AFB News)

by Master Sgt. Bill Huntington
442nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs

7/13/2009 - MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- The Air Force's historic Flying Tigers officially came to the Air Force Reserve Command as the 476th Fighter Group was activated in a ceremony here, July 11.

The stand up of the 476th FG -- with its subordinate units, the 76th Fighter Squadron, the 476th Maintenance Squadron and the 476th Aerospace Medicine Flight -- is also historic as it officially brings Total Force Integration to Moody with 476 citizen Airmen flying and maintaining the 23rd Wing's A-10C Thunderbolt II aircraft in the Air Force's first A-10 fighter- associate unit partnership.

During the ceremony Col. Greg Eckfeld, 476th FG commander, spoke of the great distance the group has come since its start in 2008 as a detachment of the 442nd Fighter Wing, which is based at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo.

"A little more than a year ago I arrived at Moody, excited, but wondering how I, and a group of four other initial personnel , were going to grow this organization and if we could integrate Citizen Airmen from the Air Force Reserve with our active-duty counterparts," Colonel Eckfeld said. "I can say without question, we have been successful."

According to the colonel, this has been accomplished while supporting real-world, combat operations with pilots and crew chiefs deploying for Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

Colonel Eckfeld also thanked his people for all of their hard work in making it happen and emphasized his gratitude to Moody's host unit for their contributions in the effort to make TFI a reality.

"My future challenge and primary goals are, first, recruiting and then integrating traditional reservists and Air Reserve Technicians into the busy operations tempo of the 23rd Wing," Colonel Eckfeld said. "Our challenge is building integrated organizations that operate seamlessly with both active-duty personnel and reservists working side by side in this busy environment."

The event, presided over by Col. Mark Clemons, 442nd FW commander, followed the time-honored tradition of unfurling each unit's guidon flags, and introducing the new commanders. It included a special salute to the 476th FG and 76th FS commanders by their respective aircraft crew chiefs as commanders' names were revealed painted on the sides of two A-10s.

Underscoring the group's pioneering role in the Air Force, Colonel Clemons recounted the 76th Fighter Squadron's heritage from its start in China as the American Volunteer Group and subsequent organization as an official Army Air Forces squadron during World War II.

"Once again, the 76th is pioneering new ways of applying combat aerospace power," Colonel Clemons said of the 76th FS. "With its reincarnation as the 76th Fighter Squadron, this proud and storied unit will be the first-ever A-10 associate unit, flying a unique combat aircraft, which has been modified for the digital age - the A-10C."

Group members, standing in formation, rendered salutes to their new leaders as the ceremony progressed. Recognizing the significance of the event, some later expressed their pride, as well as a determination to become a TFI team player.

"We are here and we are ready to support the active-duty," said Master Sgt. Stacey Moore, 476th AMDF. "We are stepping forward in a new thing and we are going to make it work."

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453d Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 453d Fighter Squadron, and activated, on 20 Nov 1943. Disbanded on 1 Apr 1944.

Assignments:  I Fighter Command, 20 Nov 1943; 476th Fighter Group, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Stations:  Richmond AAB, Va, 20 Nov 1943; Pocatello AAFld, Idaho, 25 Mar-1 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Aircraft:  ( See operations. )

Operations:  Programmed as a replacement training unit but apparently did not become operational.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



541st Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 541st Fighter Squadron on 11 Oct 1943. Activated on 1 Dec 1943. Disbanded on 1 Apr 1944.

Assignments:  476th Fighter Group, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Stations:  Richmond AAB, Va, 1 Dec 1943; Pocatello aafld, Idaho, 25 Mar-1 Apr 1944.

Aircraft:  ( See operations. )

Operations:  Programmed as a replacement training unit but apparently did not become operational.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



542nd Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 542d Fighter Squadron on 11 Oct 1943. Activated on 1 Dec 1943. Disbanded on 1 Apr 1944.

Assignments:  476th Fighter Group, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Stations:  Richmond AAB, Va, 1 Dec 1943; Pocatello AAFld, Idaho, 26 Mar-1 Apr 1944.

Aircraft:  ( See operations. )

Operations:  Programmed as a replacement training unit but apparently did not become operational.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



543d Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 543d Fighter Squadron on 11 Oct 1943. Activated on 1 Dec 1943. Disbanded on 1 Apr 1944.

Assignments:  476th Fighter Group, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Stations:  Richmond AAB, Va, 1 Dec 1943; Pocatello AAFld, Idaho, 26 Mar-1 Apr 1944.

Aircraft:  ( See operations. )

Operations:  Programmed as a replacement training unit but apparently did not become operational.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents
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