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20th AF UNITS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
20th Air Force
XX Bomber Command10th Photo Tech Unit
58th Bomb Wing40th Bomb Gp25th Bomb Sq
44th Bomb Sq
45th Bomb Sq
395th Bomb Sq
1st Bomb Maint Sq
2nd Bomb Maint Sq
3d Bomb Maint Sq
4th Bomb Maint Sq
11th Photo Lab
28th Air Service Gp
58th Wing Guard Sect. (Prov)
58th Wing Trans Sect. (Prov)
444th Bomb Gp676th Bomb Sq
677th Bomb Sq
678th Bomb Sq
679th Bomb Sq
5th Bomb Maint Sq
6th Bomb Maint Sq
7th Bomb Maint Sq
8th Bomb Maint Sq
12th Photo Lab
25th Air Service Gp
462nd Bomb Gp768th Bomb Sq
769th Bomb Sq
770th Bomb Sq
771st Bomb Sq
9th Bomb Maint Sq
10th Bomb Maint Sq
11th Bomb Maint Sq
12th Bomb Maint Sq
13th Photo Lab
86th Air Service Gp
468th Bomb Gp792nd Bomb Sq
793d Bomb Sq
794th Bomb Sq
795th Bomb Sq
2nd Combat Camera Unit
13th Bomb Maint Sq
14th Bomb Maint Sq
15th Bomb Maint Sq
16th Bomb Maint Sq
14th Photo Lab
87th Air Service Gp
73d Bomb Wing497th Bomb Gp869th Bomb Sq
870th Bomb Sq
871st Bomb Sq
15th Photo Lab
65th Air Service Gp
73d Wing Guard Sect. (Prov)
73d Wing Trans Sect. (Prov)
498th Bomb Gp873d Bomb Sq
874th Bomb Sq
875th Bomb Sq
21st Bomb Maint Sq
22nd Bomb Maint Sq
23d Bomb Maint Sq
16th Photo Lab
91st Air Service Gp
499th Bomb Gp877th Bomb Sq
878th Bomb Sq
879th Bomb Sq
17th Photo Lab
303th Air Service Gp
500th Bomb Gp881st Bomb Sq
882nd Bomb Sq
883d Bomb Sq
18th Photo Lab
330th Air Service Gp
OTHER UNITS
(20th AF):
15th Fighter Gp45th Fighter Sq
47th Fighter Sq
78th Fighter Sq
21st Fighter Gp46th Fighter Sq
72nd Fighter Sq
531st Fighter Sq
1st Air Transport Sq (Mobile)
2nd Air Transport Sq (Mobile)
3d Air Transport Sq (Mobile)
1st Photo Recon Sq
1st Photo Recon Sq (Flight "C")
3d Photo Recon Sq
9th Photographic Technical Sq
41st Photo Recon Sq
655th Bomb Sq, Recon
4th Emergency Rescue Sq
22nd Air Depot Gp
17th Historical Unit
 
XXI Bomber Command35th Photo Tech Unit
313th Bomb Wing6th Bomb Gp24th Bomb Sq
39th Bomb Sq
40th Bomb Sq
22nd Photo Lab
72nd Air Service Gp
9th Bomb Gp1st Bomb Sq
5th Bomb Sq
99th Bomb Sq
77nd Air Service Gp
504th Bomb Gp393d Bomb Sq
398th Bomb Sq
421st Bomb Sq
680th Bomb Sq
20th Photo Lab
358th Air Service Gp
505th Bomb Gp482nd Bomb Sq
483d Bomb Sq
484th Bomb Sq
359th Air Service Gp
509th Composite Gp320th Troop Carrier Sq
393d Bomb Sq
1st Ordnance Sq
1st Technical Service Det
1395th Military Police Co
390th Air Service Gp
314th Bomb Wing19th Bomb Gp28th Bomb Sq
30th Bomb Sq
93d Bomb Sq
31st Air Service Gp
29th Bomb Gp6th Bomb Sq
43d Bomb Sq
52nd Bomb Sq
69th Air Service Gp
39th Bomb Gp60th Bomb Sq
61st Bomb Sq
62nd Bomb Sq
27th Photo Lab
89th Air Service Gp
330th Bomb Gp457th Bomb Sq
458th Bomb Sq
459th Bomb Sq
26th Photo Lab
90th Air Service Gp
315th Bomb Wing16th Bomb Gp15th Bomb Sq
16th Bomb Sq
17th Bomb Sq
23d Photo Lab
24th Air Service Gp
331st Bomb Gp355th Bomb Sq
356th Bomb Sq
357th Bomb Sq
30th Photo Lab
73d Air Service Gp
501st Bomb Gp21st Bomb Sq
41st Bomb Sq
485th Bomb Sq
28th Photo Lab
75th Air Service Gp
502nd Bomb Gp402nd Bomb Sq
411th Bomb Sq
430th Bomb Sq
29th Photo Lab
76th Air Service Gp
301st Fighter Wing318th Fighter Gp19th Fighter Sq
73d Fighter Sq
333d Fighter Sq
413th Fighter Gp1st Fighter Sq
21st Fighter Sq
34th Fighter Sq
414th Fighter Gp413th Fighter Sq
437th Fighter Sq
456th Fighter Sq
506th Fighter Gp457th Fighter Sq
458th Fighter Sq
462nd Fighter Sq
507th Fighter Gp463d Fighter Sq
464th Fighter Sq
465th Fighter Sq



20th Air Force  (See CBI Unit Histories)


Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

"The Army Almanac", U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950

Lineage:  Established as Twentieth Air Force and activated on 4 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 1 Mar 1955. Activated on 1 Sep 1991. Redesignated Twentieth Air Force (Air Forces Strategic), Hq, 1 Dec 2009 per DAF/A1M 157t, 6 Nov 2009; SO GS-02, Hq AFGSC, 20 Nov 2009 and reassigned to Air Force Global Strike Command, 1 Dec 2009 per DAF/A1M 155t, 2 Nov 2009; SO #GD-002, Hq AFSPC, 19 Nov 2009.

Assignments:  Army Air Forces, 4 Apr 1944; United States Army Strategic Air Forces, 16 Jul 1945; Pacific Air Command, United States Army (later Far East Air Forces), 6 Dec 1945-1 Mar 1955. Strategic Air Command, 1 Sep 1991; Air Combat Command, 1 Jun 1992; Air Force Space Command, 1 Jul 1993; Air Force Global Strike Command, 1 Dec 2009-.

Major Components

Commands:  VII Fighter, 5 Aug 1945-c. Aug 1946. XX Bomber, 19 Apr 1944-18 Jul 1945. XXI Bomber, 9 Nov 1944-18 Jul 1945.

Wings:  18 Fighter-Bomber, 10 Nov 1954-31 Jan 1955. 19 Bombardment, 17 Aug 1948-16 May 1949, 17 Oct 1949-11 Jun 1954 (detached 1 Jun 1953-c. 28 May 1954). 23 Fighter, 16 Aug 1948-25 Apr 1949. 44 Missile, 1 Sep 1991-5 Jul 1994. 51 Fighter, 16 May 1949-1 Mar 1955 (detached 25 Sep-12 Oct 1950). 58 Bombardment, 29 Jun-12 Oct 1944; 1 Feb-15 Nov 1945. 73 Bombardment, c. 6 Aug-9 Nov 1944. 90 Missile (later, 90 Space), 1 Sep 1991-. 91 Missile (later, 91 Missile Group; 91 Missile Wing; 91 Space Wing, 91 Missile Wing); 1 Sep 1991-. 98 Bombardment (Attached 18 Jun-25 Jul 1954). 301 Fighter, 21 May 1945-14 Aug 1945 (detached 21 May 1945-14 Aug 1945). 307 Bombardment (Attached 18 Jun-19 Nov 1954). 310 Training and Test, 1 Sep 1991-1 Jul 1993. 313 Bombardment, 16 Jul 1945-13 Mar 1946. 314 Bombardment, 16 Jul 1945-15 May 1946. 315 Bombardment, 16 Jul 1945-30 May 1946. 321 Missile (later, 321 Missile Group), 1 Sep 1991-2 Jul 1998. 341 Missile (later, 341 Space), 1 Sep 1991-. 351 Missile, 1 Sep 1991-31 Jul 1995. 374 Troop Carrier, (Attached 17 Aug 1948-5 Mar 1949).

Stations:  Washington, DC, 4 Apr 1944; Harmon Field (later Harmon AFB), Guam, 16 Jul 1945; Kadena AFB (later Kadena AB), Okinawa, 16 May 1949-1 Mar 1955. Vandenberg AFB, CA, 1 Sep 1991; Francis E. Warren AFB, WY, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  Gen of the Army Henry H. (Hap) Arnold, 6 Apr 1944; Maj Gen Curtis E. LeMay, 16 Jul 1945; Lt Gen Nathan F. Twining, 2 Aug 1945; Maj Gen James E. Parker, 15 Oct 1945; Brig Gen Frederick M. Hopkins Jr., 19 Mar 1946; Maj Gen Francis H. Griswold, 10 Sep 1946; Maj Gen Alvin C. Kincaid, 8 Sep 1948; Maj Gen Ralph F. Stearley, 31 Jul 1950; Maj Gen Fay R. Upthegrove, 8 Feb 1953-1 Mar 1955. Brig Gen Thomas E. Kuenning Jr., 1 Sep 1991; Lt Gen Arlen D. Jameson, 1 Jul 1992; Maj Gen Robert W. Parker, 22 Jun 1994; Maj Gen Donald G. Cook, 17 Jun 1996; Maj Gen Thomas H. Neary, 4 Sep 1998; Maj Gen Timothy J. McMahon, 19 Jul 2000; Lt Gen Frank G. Klotz, 30 May 2003; Lt Gen Thomas F. Deppe, 14 Oct 2005; Maj Gen Roger W. Burg, 10 Aug 2007; Maj Gen C. Donald Alston, 1 Jul 2010-.

Operations:  After the activation of Twentieth Air Force in Apr 1944, some combat units moved from the United States to India and onto forward bases in China by summer to conduct heavy bombardment operations with B-29 Superfortresses against targets in Japan, Formosa, Thailand, and Burma during Operation MATTERHORN. Other combat elements moved in late 1944 from the United States to the Marianas, where they were joined in early 1945 by the elements that had been in India and China. Headquarters, Twentieth Air Force moved to Guam on 16 Jul 1945. From Guam, Saipan, and Tinian, the Twentieth conducted a strategic air offensive against Japan, climaxed by the dropping of two atomic bombs, one each on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which led to the Japanese surrender, ending World War II. After the war, the Twentieth remained in the theater. Elements served in combat for a short time at the beginning of the Korean War, but Twentieth AF later was concerned primarily with logistics support for the operations of other organizations and with providing air defense of the Ryukyu Islands. Inactivated in Okinawa on 1 Mar 1955. Activated again in 1991 to maintain and operate the Air Force's intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) forces, first under Strategic Air Command, then (1992) under Air Combat Command, later (1993) under Air Force Space Command, and finally (2009) under Air Force Global Strike Command (the former Strategic Air Command).

Service Streamers:  World War II: American Theater; Asiatic-Pacific Theater; Korea: Korean Service.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Sep 1991-31 Aug 1993; 1 Sep 1993-14 Oct 1994; 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1997; 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999; 1 Oct 1999-30 Sep 2001; 1 Oct 2001-30 Sep 2003; 1 Oct 2005-30 Sep 2007.

Emblem:  A disc of ultramarine blue marked with white parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude surmounted in base by a white star charged at center with a red disc and circumscribed by an annulet golden orange lined blue, tips enclosing the Arabic numeral "20". (Approved 26 May 1944.) Modified on 15 Oct 1991 and 18 May 1994.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through May 2011.

Commanders and Operations through Apr 2011.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)


Source:  Fact Sheets - 20th Air Force (F.E Warren AFB website)

20TH AIR FORCE

Mission

America's ICBM Team Deterring Conflict With Professional People And Safe, Secure, Ready Missiles
Employ Force Upon Direction

History

Twentieth Air Force has a proud heritage as America's long-range strategic force. Activated June 20, 1941, the unit's B-29 Superfortresses bombed the Japanese Islands. Twentieth Air Force bombers, the Enola Gay and Bock's Car, brought an early end to World War II after they dropped the first atomic bombs on Japan. Twentieth Air Force units also supported United Nations' forces during the Korean War.

Inactivated on March 1, 1951, the unit was reactivated Sept. 1, 1991, as a component of the Strategic Air Command and was located at Vandenberg AFB, Calif. Operationally responsible for all land-based Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles, 20th Air Force's rebirth came at a time when America's nuclear forces were entering a decade of unprecedented force reductions and changes. Spawned by the Cold War's end and the breakup of the Soviet Union, these changes reshaped the basic fabric of this nation's nuclear deterrent forces. For the men and women of America's ICBM Team, it proved to be a period of sustained, dramatic change. In nine short years since its rebirth, 20th Air Force experienced three major command identities. After one year in Strategic Air Command and another year in Air Combat Command, 20th Air Force found a permanent home in Air Force Space Command in 1993. Twentieth Air Force Headquarters' location also changed in 1993, moving from Vandenberg AFB, Calif., to its current home here at F. E. Warren.

ICBM force structure was reduced radically as well during the 1990s, downsizing from six wings to three, and from 1,000 alert ICBMs to 550. These draw downs posed major leadership challenges for airmen at all levels of command.

Twentieth Air Force headquarters is unique in that it has dual responsibilities to Air Force Space Command and United States Strategic Command. As the missile Numbered Air Force for AFSPC, 20th Air Force is responsible for maintaining and operating the Air Force's ICBM force. Designated as STRATCOM's Task Force 214, 20th Air Force provides on-alert, combat ready ICBMs to the president. Combined with the other two legs of the Triad, bombers and submarines, STRATCOM forces protect the United States with an umbrella of deterrence.


History of the CBI Theater:

"Army Air Forces in WWII"  (7 volumes)
Office of Air Force History
Wesley Craven & James Cate, editors
       Site 1:  Hyperwar: U.S. Army Air Force in World War II
       Site 2:  Air Force Historical Studies Office


Other Sites and Documents of Interest:

B-29 Superfortress Then and Now

Prairie Bombers Digital Library

Twentieth Air Force Wiki Resources

 The Twentieth Air Force in World War II  (Adobe Acrobat document)

Table of Contents



XX Bomber Command

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as XX Bomber Command on 19 Nov 1943 and activated on 20 Nov. Assigned to Second AF. Moved to India early in 1944. Assigned to Twentieth AF. Engaged in very-long-range bombardment operations from Jun 1944 until all of its tactical components were relieved of assignment in Mar 1945. Moved to Okinawa, Jun-Jul 1945. Inactivated on 16 Jul 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948.

Wings:  58th: 1943-1945. 73d: 1943-1944.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 20 Nov 1943-12 Feb 1944; Kharagpur, India, 28 Mar 1944-17 Jun 1945; Sakugawa, Okinawa, 7-16 Jul 1945.

Commanders:  Brig Gen Kenneth B Wolfe, 27 Nov 1943; Brig Gen Lavern G Saunders, 6 Jul 1944; Maj Gen Curtis E LeMay, 29 Aug 1944; Brig Gen Roger M Ramey, 20 Jan 1945; Brig Gen Joseph Smith, 25 Apr-16 Jul 1945.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  None.

Insigne:  On an ultramarine blue arc segment, couped at base, within border gold, two very large aerial bombs of the last, falling parallel to sides in perspective, toward and over a bezant in base, marked with latitude and longitude representations of the field. (Approved 20 Mar 1945.)



Other Sites of Interest:

XX Bomber Command Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



10th Photographic Technical Unit

Stations:  Hijli; Kharagpur;

Meritorious Unit Commendation:  8 Apr-8 Oct 44, GO 79, Hq 20th AF, dtd 5 Apr 45



Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

The 10th Photo Tech Unit was later on Okinawa (at Kadena from about 1946) until it was inactivated 7 Jan 50. It does not show up in Air Force Bases, Vol II, but it was assigned to the 32nd Composite Wing for the 32nd's 1948-1949 existence). On 16 Oct 84 it was consolidated with the 452nd Reconnaissance Technical Squadron as the 6th Reconnaissance Technical Squadron, possibly never active under this designation.

Table of Contents



58th Bombardment Wing


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 58 Bombardment Operational Training Wing (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1943. Activated on 1 May 1943. Redesignated: 58 Bombardment Wing (Heavy) on 12 Jul 1943; 58 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 19 Nov 1943; 58 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, Special on 13 Jan 1944. Disestablished on 12 Oct 1944. Reestablished as 58 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 1 Feb 1945. Activated on 8 Feb 1945. Redesignated 58 Air Division, Bombardment on 16 Apr 1948. Inactivated on 16 Oct 1948. Redesignated 58 Air Division (Defense) on 3 May 1955. Activated on 8 Sep 1955. Inactivated on 1 Feb 1959.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 1 May 1943; II Bomber Command, 15 May 1943; Army Air Forces, 8 Jun 1943; Second Air Force, 15 Oct 1943; XX Bomber Command, 20 Nov 1943; Twentieth Air Force, 29 Jun-12 Oct 1944. XX Bomber Command, 8 Feb 1945; XXI Bomber Command, 29 Mar 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul 1945; Army Service Forces, c. 15 Nov 1945; Fourth Air Force, 7 Dec 1945; Second Air Force, 29 Mar 1946; Fifteenth Air Force, 31 Mar 1946; Eighth Air Force, 1 Nov 1946; Strategic Air Command, 1 Mar-16 Oct 1948. Eastern Air Defense Force, 8 Sep 1955-1 Feb 1959.

Components

Groups:  40 Bombardment: 1 May 1943-12 Oct 1944; 8 Feb 1945-1 Oct 1946. 355 Fighter: 1 Mar 1956-8 Jan 1958. 444 Bombardment: c. Aug 1943-12 Oct 1944; 8 Feb 1945-1 Oct 1946. 462 Bombardment: 1 Jul 1943-12 Oct 1944; 8 Feb 1945-31 Mar 1946. 468 Bombardment: 1 Aug 1943-12 Oct 1944; 8 Feb 1945-31 Mar 1946. 472 Bombardment: 1 Sep 1943-1 Apr 1944.

Squadron:  56 Fighter-Interceptor: 1 Mar 1956-1 Sep 1958. 87 Fighter-Interceptor: 8 Apr 1956-1 Sep 1958. 319 Fighter-Interceptor: 1 Mar 1956-1 Sep 1958.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 1 May 1943; Cobb County AAFld, GA, 15 Jun 1943; Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 15 Sep 1943-12 Mar 1944; Chakulia, India, 2 Apr 1944; Kharagpur, India, 23 Apr 12 Oct 1944. Hijli Base Area, India, 8-24 Feb 1945; West Field, Tinian, 29 Mar-15 Nov 1945; March Field, CA, 2 Dec 1945; Fort Worth AAFld, TX, 9 May 1946; Andrews AFB, MD, 1 Mar-16 Oct 1948. Wright Patterson AFB, OH, 8 Sep 1955-1 Feb 1959.

Commanders:  Unkn, 1 May-20 Jun 1943; Brig Gen Kenneth B. Wolf, 21 Jun 1943; Col Leonard F. Harmon, 27 Nov 1943; Brig Gen LaVern G. Saunders, by 31 Mar 1944-unkn; Col Dwight O. Monteith, 8 Feb 1945; Brig Gen Roger M. Ramey, 24 Apr 1945-1 Nov 1946; unkn, 1 Nov 1946-16 Oct 1948. Brig Gen Von R. Shores Jr., 8 Sep 1955; Col William E. Elder, by 30 Jun 1957-14 Sep 1958; unkn, 15 Sep 1958-1 Feb 1959.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-29, 1943-1944. B-29, 1945-1946. F-86, 1955-1958; F-89, 1956-1958; F-94, 1956-1957.

Operations:  The 58th wing's units transported supplies over the Himalaya Mountains to staging bases in China in 1944. Operating later from bases in India, and at times staging through fields in China, the subordinate units struck such Japanese targets as transportation centers, naval installations, iron works, and aircraft plants in Burma, Thailand, China, Japan, Indonesia, and Formosa. The wing moved to Tinian in early 1945 and continued Bombardment operations against Japan. Its units made daylight attacks from high altitudes on strategic targets, participated in incendiary raids on urban areas, and dropped mines in Japanese shipping lanes. After the Japanese surrender, they dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners of war in Japan, Korea, and Formosa, and took part in show of force missions. Inactive for seven years, the 58th activated as an Air Division (defense) in Sep 1955 and assumed responsibility for the defense of parts of Illinois, Indiana, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, and supported operations, when necessary, of other commands. It supervised training programs for its subordinate units and supported exercises such as Hour Hand, Blue Light, Red Cap, Iron Bar, and Surefire.

Service Streamers:  World War II Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  A shield per bend argent and checky of the first and sable in chief an escutcheon gules charged with a cross or between four stylized arrowheads, tips to center, of the last. (Approved 11 Jan 1956.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Feb 1959.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Feb 1959.



Other Sites of Interest:

New England Air Museum - 58th Bomb Wing Memorial

58th Air Division Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



40th Bombardment Group



(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 40th Bombardment Group (Medium) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated in Puerto Rico on 1 Apr 1941. Redesignated 40th Bombardment Group (Heavy) in May 1942. Trained and patrolled the Caribbean area, using B-17 and B-26 aircraft. Operated first from Puerto Rico and later from the Panama Canal Zone. Moved to the US in Jun 1943. Redesignated 40th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) in Nov 1943. After training with B-29's, moved to India, via Africa, Mar-Jun 1944. Assigned to Twentieth AF in Jun 1944. Transported supplies over the Hump to staging bases in China before entering combat with a strike on railroad shops at Bangkok, Thailand, on 5 Jun 1944. On 15 Jun participated in the first AAF attack on Japan since the Doolittle raid in 1942. Operating from bases in India, and at times staging through fields in China, the group struck such targets as transportation centers, naval installations, iron works, and aircraft plants in Burma, Thailand, China, Japan, Indonesia, and Formosa, receiving a DUC for bombing iron and steel works at Yawata, Japan, on 20 Aug 1944. From a staging field in Ceylon, it mined waters near the port of Palembang, Sumatra, in Aug 1944. Moved to Tinian, Feb-Apr 1945, for further operations against Japan. Made daylight attacks from high altitude on strategic targets, participated in incendiary raids on urban areas, and dropped mines in Japanese shipping lanes. Received a DUC for attacking naval aircraft factories at Kure, oil storage facilities at Oshima, and the industrial area of Nagoya, in May 1945. Raided light metal industries in Osaka in Jul 1945, being awarded another DUC for this mission. After V-J Day, dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners in Japan, Korea, and Formosa, and took part in show-of-force missions. Returned to the US in Nov 1945. Assigned to Strategic Air Command on 21 Mar 1946. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1946.

Consolidated 31 Jan 84 with 40th Strategic Aerospace Wg, which was constituted 9 May 52 as the 40th Bombardment Wg, Medium, activated 28 May 52, redesignated 40th Strategic Aerospace Wg 1 Feb 64, discontinued and inactivated 1 Sep 64, and 40th Tactical Group, which was organized 1 Apr 66, redesignated 40th Tactical Support Wg 30 Jul 90, inactivated 4 May 92.

Redesignated 40 Air Expeditionary Wing, and converted to provisional status, on 31 Jan 2002.

Assignments:  13 Composite Wing, 1 Apr 1941; VI Bomber Command, 25 Oct 1941 (attached to VI Interceptor Command, 15 Jan-5 Apr 1942); VI Interceptor Command, 6 Apr 1942; VI Bomber Command, 22 Jun 1942; 58 Bombardment Operational Training (later, 58 Bombardment) Wing, 9 Jul 1943; XX Bomber Command, 12 Oct 1944; 58 Bombardment Wing, 8 Feb 1945-1 Oct 1946. 802 Air Division, 28 May 1952 (attached to: 310 Bombardment Wing, 6 Feb-1 May 1953; 7 Air Division, 9 Jun-9 Sep 1955 and c. 1 Jul-c. 1 Oct 1957); 21 Air (later, 21 Strategic Aerospace) Division, 20 Jun 1960-1 Sep 1964. United States Air Forces in Europe, 14 Mar 1966; Seventeenth Air Force, 1 Apr 1966; Sixteenth Air Force, 1 Dec 1968-4 May 1992. Pacific Air Forces to activate or inactivate at any time after 31 Jan 2002.

Squadrons:  5 Reconnaissance (later, 395 Bombardment): attached 1 Apr 1941-24 Feb 1942, assigned 25 Feb-9 Aug 1942; assigned 12 May 1943-20 Oct 1944. 25 Bombardment: 12 May 1943-1 Oct 1946 (not operational, 21 Sep-1 Oct 1946); 28 May 1952-1 Sep 1964 (not operational, 28 May 1952-c. 3 Apr 1953 and 15 Aug-1 Sep 1964). 29: 1 Apr 1941-12 May 1943. 32 Tactical Fighter: attached 2-24 Jun 1972. 40 Air Refueling: 8 Jul 1952-1 Jun 1960 (not operational, 8 Jul-7 Sep 1952; detached 8 Sep 1952-30 Apr 1953, 1-10 Mar 1954, 4 May-27 Jun 1954, 25 Jun-5 Sep 1956, c. 1 Jul-c. 1 Oct 1957, and c. 1 Oct 1958-10 Jan 1959). 44 Bombardment: 1 Apr 1941-1 Oct 1946 (not operational 21 Sep-1 Oct 1946); 28 May 1952-1 Sep 1964 (not operational, 28 May 1952-31 May 1953 and 15 Aug-1 Sep 1964). 45 Bombardment: 1 Apr 1941-1 Oct 1946 (not operational, 21 Sep-1 Oct 1946); 28 May 1952-1 Sep 1964 (not operational, 28 May 1952-30 Sep 1953 and 15 Aug-1 Sep 1964). 74: 9 Aug 1942-12 May 1943. 90 Air Refueling: 20 Jun 1960-15 Nov 1962. 343: 10 Nov 1945-27 Mar 1946 (not operational, 10 Nov 1945-27 Mar 1946). 548 Strategic Missile: 1 Jan-1 Sep 1964 (detached 1 Aug-1 Sep 1964). 660: 1 Feb 1959-1 Jan 1962.

Stations:  Borinquen Field, Puerto Rico, 1 Apr 1941; Howard Field, Panama Canal Zone, 16 Jun 1942; Albrook Field, Panama Canal Zone, 16 Sep 1942; Howard Field, Panama Canal Zone, 2-15 Jun 1943; Pratt AAFld, KS, 1 Jul 1943-Mar 1944; Chakulia, India, 2 Apr 1944-25 Feb 1945; West Field, Tinian, 4 Apr-7 Nov 1945; March Field, CA, 27 Nov 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 8 May-1 Oct 1946. Smoky Hill (later, Schilling) AFB, KS, 28 May 1952; Forbes AFB, KS, 20 Jun 1960-1 Sep 1964. Aviano AB, Italy, 1 Apr 1966-4 May 1992.

Commanders:  Lt Col William B. Sousa, 1 Apr 1941; Maj George W. McGregor, 29 Apr 1941; Col Ivan M. Palmer, 26 Nov 1941; Col Vernon C. Smith, 19 Jan 1943; Col Henry K. Mooney, 16 May 1943; Col Lewis R. Parker, 1 Jul 1943; Lt Col Louis E. Coira, 24 Feb 1944; Col Leonard F. Harman, 10 Apr 1944; Col Willam H., Blanchard, 4 Aug 1944; Col Henry R. Sullivan Jr., 16 Feb 1945; Col William K. Skaer, 27 Feb 1945; Lt Col Oscar R. Schaaf, 21 Mar 1946; Col Alva L. Harvey, 4 May 1946; Lt Col Oscar R. Schaaf, 21 Aug 1946; 1st Lt William F. Seith, 21 Sep-1 Oct 1946. None (not manned), 28 May 1952-5 Feb 1953; Col Stanley J. Donovan, 6 Feb 1953; Col David A. Burchinal, 2 May 1953; Col Robert J. Nolan, 26 Oct 1953; Col Berton H. Burns, 11 Jun 1954; Col Charles L. Wimberly, 15 Jul 1954; Col Robert J. Nolan, 27 Jul 1954; Col Berton H. Burns, 16 Sep 1954; Col Andrew S. Low Jr., 1 Jun 1957; Col George Y. Jumper, 4 Jul 1958; Col Woodward B. Carpenter, 7 Jul 1959; Col Norman J. McGowan, 20 Jun 1960; Col Joel A. Carroll Jr., 8 Jul 1961-10 Aug 1964; unkn, 11 Aug-1 Sep 1964. None (not manned), 14-31 Mar 1966; Col Carl E. Lovell, 1 Apr 1966; Lt Col George M. Dwight Jr., 18 May 1966 (temporary); Col Robert R. Fowler, 3 Jun 1966 (temporary); Col Richard L. Hamilton, 27 Jun 1966; Col Glyn W. Ramsey, 31 Mar 1967; Col Thomas A. Barr, 7 Jul 1969; Col Morton C. Mumma III, 10 May 1971; Col John L. Piotrowski, 7 Jan 1972; Col Robert L. Miller III, 16 Mar 1974; Col William L. Gibson, 9 Jul 1976; Col James W. Dearborn, 15 Jun 1978; Col Henry M. Yochum II, 22 May 1980; Col Dean F. Vikan, 8 Jul 1981; Col Lester P. Brown Jr., 1 Jul 1982; Col Frederick A. Zehrer III, 16 Mar 1984; Col George W. McKenna, 20 Apr 1985 (temporary); Col James T. Hannam, 19 Jun 1985; Col Frank Plescha, 25 Jun 1986; Col John W. Hawley, 28 Jan 1988; Lt Col Wayne Mayfield, 15 May 1989 (temporary); Col James C. Evans, 6 Jul 1989; Col Wayne Mayfield, 10 Mar 1990 (temporary); Col Thomas K. Speelman, 30 Jul 1990; unkn, Jul 1991-4 May 1992.

Aircraft and Missiles:  Primarily B-18, 1941-1942; B-17, 1942-1943, 1946; B-24, 1943; B-29, 1943-1946. B-29, 1953-1954; KC-97, 1953-1960, 1960-1962; B-47, 1954-1964; Atlas "E", 1964. None assigned, 1966-1992, but organization exercised operational control over many different kinds of aircraft from squadron detachments that rotated periodically to Aviano.

Operations:  Flew antisubmarine patrol missions around Puerto Rico from Apr 1941 to Jun 1942 and the Panama Canal Zone from Jun 1942 to Jun 1943, when it moved to the continental United States to train to become the first Army Air Forces group to be assigned the B-29 Superfortress. Moved to India and set up a staging base in China in Apr 1944, to which it shuttled fuel and oil over the Himalaya Mountains (the “Hump”). Entered combat on 5 Jun 1944 with a raid on railroad shops at Bangkok, Thailand. On 15 Jun the group took part in the first Army Air Forces air raid on Japan since the Doolittle raid of April 1942. Operating from bases in India, and at times staging through China, the group stuck transportation centers, naval installations, iron works, and aircraft plants in Burma, Thailand, China, Japan, Indonesia, and Formosa. On August 10, 1944, the group took part with three other groups on the longest single-stage bombing mission of World War II, flying from a staging base in Ceylon to Palembang, Sumatra, to bomb a refinery and mine a river (Operation BOOMERANG). The group earned a Distinguished Unit Citation for bombing iron and steel plants at Yawata, Japan, on 20 Aug 1944. Moved to Tinian in the Marianas Islands in April 1945 for high altitude daylight attacks on strategic targets in Japan. Took part in lower-level night incendiary raids on urban areas and mined waters around Japan. Earned a second Distinguished Unit Citation for attacking naval aircraft factories at Kure, oil storage facilities at Oshima, and the industrial city of Nagoya, in May 1945. Received a third Distinguished Unit Citation for a 24 Jul 1945 air raid on light metal industries in Osaka. After victory over Japan, dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners of war and took part in show-of-force missions over Japan. Returned to the United States in Nov 1945. Conducted air sampling missions for the Operation CROSSROADS atomic bomb tests, Jun-Aug 1946, and inactivated in Oct. Although activated in May 1952, the group was not manned until early Feb 1953. In 1954, it converted from propeller-driven B-29s to jet B-47 bombers. Deployed at Lakenheath RAF Station, England, 9 Jun-9 Sep 1955. Performed bombardment training and air refueling missions to meet global commitments of Strategic Air Command, 1955-1964. Deployed at Greenham Comman RAF Station, England, Jul-Oct 1957. Gained an Atlas missile squadron in Jan 1964, but inactivated in Sep of that year. From Apr 1966 through May 1992, maintained readiness of Aviano AB, Italy and managed and supported squadron detachments that deployed there temporarily for training, exercises, humanitarian operations, or contingencies. During that period, however, the organization had no assigned aircraft and no assigned flying units.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations (Japan): 20 Aug 1944; 5-14 May 1945; 24 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1972-30 Apr 1973; 6 May-31 Dec 1976; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 31 Jan 2002.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 4 May 1992.

Insigne:  Shield:  Azure, on a bomb burst proper fimbriated argent four drop bombs in cross or. (Approved 28 Mar 1942. This insigne was replaced 6 Jan 1954.)



Other Sites of Interest:

40th Bombardment Group Association

40th Bombardment Wing

40th Air Expeditionary Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



25th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 20 Aero Squadron on 13 Jun 1917. Redesignated 25 Aero Squadron on 22 Jun 1917. Demobilized on 17 Jun 1919. Reconstituted, and consolidated (1924), with 25 Squadron, which was authorized on 30 Aug 1921. Organized on 1 Oct 1921. Redesignated: 25 Bombardment Squadron on 25 Jan 1923; 25 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 25 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 25 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1946. Redesignated 25 Bombardment Squadron, Medium on 9 May 1952. Activated on 28 May 1952. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Sep 1964. Redesignated 25 Strategic Training Squadron on 21 Jun 1988. Activated on 1 Jul 1988. Redesignated 25 Flying Tactics Training Squadron on 1 Sep 1991; 25 Training Squadron on 15 Jun 1993. Inactivated on 21 Sep 1995. Redesignated 25 Space Control Tactics Squadron on 20 Apr 2004 per DAF/DPM 510s, 20 Apr 2004. Activated on 1 Jul 2004 per DAF/DPM 510s, 20 Apr 2004; SO #GD-011, Hq AFSPC, 5 May 2004; AFOSCR-AFSPC, 31 Jul 2004. Redesignated 25 Space Range Squadron per DAF/A1M 887s, 17 Oct 2007; So #GD-001, Hq AFSPC, 7 Nov 2007.

Assignments:  Unkn, 13 Jun 1917-Nov 1918; 4 Pursuit Group, Nov 1918-Apr 1919; unkn, Apr-17 Jun 1919. Second Corps Area, 1 Oct 1921; Panama Canal Department, 30 Apr 1922; 6 Observation (later, 6 Composite; 6 Bombardment) Group, 27 May 1922; 40 Bombardment Group, 12 May 1943-1 Oct 1946. 40 Bombardment (later, 40 Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 28 May 1952-1 Sep 1964. Strategic Air Command, 1 Jul 1988; 99 Strategic Weapons Wing, 10 Aug 1989; 99 Operations and Maintenance (later, 99 Operations) Group, 1 Sep 1991-21 Sep 1995. 595 Space Group, 1 Jul 2004-.

Stations:  Camp Kelly, TX, 13 Jun-28 Dec 1917; Ayr, Scotland, 31 Jan 1918; Marske, England, 23 Apr-7 Aug 1918; St. Maxient, France, 20 Aug 1918; Romorantin, France, 29 Aug 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 18 Sep 1918; Toul, France, 24 Oct 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 15 Apr 1919; Le Mans, France, 5-19 May 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, 6-17 Jun 1919. Mitchel Field, NY, 1 Oct 1921-22 Apr 1922; France Field, CZ, 30 Apr 1922; Rio Hato, Panama, 8 Dec 1941; Salinas, Ecuador, c. 21 Jan 1942; Howard Field, CZ, 22 May-16 Jun 1943; Pratt AAFld, KS, 1 Jul 1943-12 Mar 1944; Chakulia, India, c. 11 Apr 1944-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-7 Nov 1945; March Field, CA, 27 Nov 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, c. 8 May-1 Oct 1946. Smoky Hill (later, Schilling) AFB, KS, 28 May 1952 (deployed at Lakenheath RAF Station, England, Jun-Sep 1955 and Greenham Common RAF Station, England, Jul-Oct 1957); Forbes AFB, KS, 20 Jun 1960-1 Sep 1964. Ellsworth AFB, SD, 1 Jul 1988-21 Sep 1995. Schriever AFB, CO, 1 Jul 2004-.

Commanders:  Capt Harold M. Clark, 13 Jun 1917; Capt W. P. Jernigan, c. 17 Aug 1917; Maj Seth W. Cook, 12 Nov 1917; 1 Lt Walter J. Seaburn, 22 Nov 1917; 1 Lt Morse B. Kent, 30 Jan 1918; Maj Reed G. Landis, 25 Sep 1918-unkn. Unkn, 1921-1943; Maj Carl P. Walter, 1943; Lt Col Warren S Wilkinson, 24 Aug 1943; Maj Henry P. Luna, Sep 1944; Lt Col William Kingsbury, Oct 1944; Lt Col J. D. White, Sep 1945; Maj J. C. Eigenmann, 21 Sep 1945; Lt Col Oscar R. Schaaf, 15 Jan 1946; Lt Col Willard W. Wilson, Apr-c. 1 Oct 1946. Lt Col Gerald Wolke, 5 Mar 1953; Lt Col Edward P. Clark, 23 Apr 1953; Lt Col Richard B. Burgess, by Dec 1956; Lt Col William R. Young, Jun 1957; Lt Col Burdette J. McKinnis Jr., Sep 1958; Maj J. M. Campbell, Jun 1959; Maj James W. Schultz, Jun 1960; Lt Col Walter T. Galligan, 30 May 1961; Lt Col Richard R. Anderson, 31 Jul 1961; Lt Col Theodore M. Raley, 25 Jul 1962-1 Sep 1964. Unkn, 1 Jul 1988-9 Aug 1990; Lt Col Mason H. Beckett Jr., 10 Aug 1990; Lt Col Timothy C. Jones, 28 Aug 1991; Lt Col John L. Christensen, 2 Nov 1992; Lt Col Christopher G. Warner, 8 Nov 1993; Unkn, Jan 1994-21 Sep 1995.

Aircraft:  SE-5, 1918-1919. Unkn, 1921-1922; included NBS-1 during period 1922-1929; included LB-5, LB-6, and LB-7 during period 1928-1932; B-3, 1931-1936; B-6, 1936-1937; B-10, 1937-1939; B-18, 1938-1942; B-24, 1942-1943; LB-30, 1942-1943; B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1944-1946. B-29, 1953-1954; B-47, 1954-1964. None, 1988-1995.

Operations:  Combat as pursuit unit with Second Army, 10-11 Nov 1918. Good-will flights to El Salvador and Nicaragua, 13-19 May 1935, to Guatemala, 8-11 Feb 1938, to El Salvador, 19-22 Apr 1938; mercy mission to Chile following devastating earthquake, 28 Jan-13 Feb 1939. Antisubmarine patrols, Dec 1941-May 1943. Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-29 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 5 May-14 Aug 1945. Activated in Kansas in May 1952 but did not become operational until Apr 1953. Trained for bombing proficiency. Deployed to England in 1955 and 1957. Maintained aircraft and aircrews on alert at bases in North Africa, England, and Alaska. From 1988 to 1995, supervised SAC B-52 and B-1 bomber crew training program.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Japan, 5-14 May 1945; Japan, 24 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 10 Aug 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1991-15 Apr 1993; 1 Sep 2004-31 Aug 2005; 1 Sep 2005-31 Aug 2006; 1 Sep 2006-31 Aug 2007.

Emblem:  On a disc white, outlined black, a caricatured executioner, face and hands golden yellow, suit and mask black, belt and nose red, collar white, swinging an axe with four notches in the blade, the handle red and the head steel gray, stained with red dripping blood. (Approved 15 Feb 1924 from World War I emblem.) 25 SCTS emblem approved on 15 Oct 2004.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 10 Apr 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 1993.

Table of Contents



44th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 44th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Apr 1941. Redesignated 44th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 7 May 1942; 44th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1946. Redesignated 44th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 9 May 1952. Activated on 28 May 1952. Discontinued and inactivated on or about 1 July 1964.

Assignments:  40th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1941-1 Oct 1946. 40th Bombardment Wing, 28 May 1952-1 Jul 1964.

Stations:  Borinquen Field, PR, 1 Apr 1941; Howard Field, CZ, 16 Jun 1942 Guatemala City, Guatemala, 6 Jul 1942; Howard Field, CZ, c. 4-15 Jun 1943 Pratt AAFld, Kan, 1 Jul 1943 - 12 Mar 1944; Chakulia, India, c. 11 Apr 1944 - Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-7 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, 2 Nov 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, c 13 May-1 Oct 1946. Smoky Hill AFB, Kan, 28 May 1952; Forbes AFB, Kan, 20 Jun 1960.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; B-17, 1942-1944; B-24, 1942-1943; B-26,1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1944-1946. B-29, 1953-1954; B-47, 1954-1964.

Operation:  Anti-submarine patrols, Dec 1941 - May 1943. Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944 - 29 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 5 May-l4 Aug 1945.

Service Steamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma..

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Japan, 5-14 May 1945; Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  On and over a blue disc edged in gold a falcon affronte in red, white, and black, outlined in yellow, with wings displayed and carrying a yellow aerial bomb.(Approved 7 Feb 1942)



Other Sites of Interest:

40th Bombardment Wing

Table of Contents



45th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 45th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 November 1940. Activated on 1 April 1941, Redesignated: 45th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 7 May 1942; 45th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 November 1943. Inactivated on 1 October 1946. Redesignated 45th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 9 May 1952. Activated on 28 May 1952. Discontinued and inactivated on 1 September 1964.

Assignments:  40th Bombardment Group, 1 April 1941 - 1 October 1946. 40th Bombardment Wing, 28 May 1952 - 1 September 1964.

Stations:  Borinquen Field, PR, 1 April 1941; France Field, CZ, 17 June 1942; David, Panama, 13 November 1942; Galapagos Islands, 18 February 1943; Howard Field, CZ, c. 22 May - 15 June 1943; Pratt AAFld, Kan, 1 July 1943 - 11 March 1944; Chakulia, India, c. 9 April 1944 - April 1945; West Field, Tinian, April - 7 November 1945; March Field, Calif, 27 November 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, c. 13 May -1 October 1946; Smoky Hill AFB, Kan, 28 May 1952 Forbes AFB, Kan, 20 June 1960 - 1 September 1964.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; LB-30, 1942-1943; B-24, 1943; B-17, 1943,1944; B-26, 1943; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1946, B-29, 1943-1954; B-47, 1954-1964.

Operations:  Anti-submarine patrols, December 1941 - May 1943. Combat in CBI, 5 June 1944 - 29 March 1945, and Western Pacific, 5 May - 14 August 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations; Yawata, Japan, 20 August 1944; Japan, 5 - 14 May 1945; Japan, 24 July 1945.

Emblem:  On and over a red demolition bomb outlined in black and marked with three yellow stripes, a yellow hawk with black head, in flight, and grasping a black forty-five caliber automatic pistol, outlined in yellow. (Approved 6 March 1942.)



Other Sites of Interest:  40th Bombardment Wing

Table of Contents



395th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

5th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 5th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Apr 1941. Redesignated: 395th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 Apr 1942; 395th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 7 May 1942; 395th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Disbanded on 20 Oct 1944. Reconstituted 19 Sep 1985 and consolidated with the 395th Strategic Missile Sq as the 395th Tactical Missile Sq (not active).

Assignments:  40th Bombardment Group, attached on 1 Apr 1941, and assigned on 25 Feb 1942; 6th Bombardment Group, 9 Aug 1942; 40th Bombardment Group, 12 May 1943-20 Oct 1944.

Stations:  Borinquen, PR, 1 Apr 1941; Rio Hato, Panama, 17 Jun 1942-16 Jun 1943; Pratt AAFld, Kan, 1 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Chakulia, India, c. 11 Apr-20 Oct 1944.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1943; A-17, 1942-1943; B-24, 1942-1943; LB-30, 1943; YB-29,1943; B-29,1943-1944. 1942-1943; B-17, 1942-1944; B-26, 1943; YB-29,1943; B-29,1943-1944.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols, Dec 1941-Feb 1943. Replacement and later operational training unit, Jun 1942-May 1943. Combat in CBI, 5 Jun-17 Oct 1944.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944.

Emblem:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:  40th Bombardment Wing

Table of Contents



1st Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Pratt AAF, KS.

Table of Contents



2nd Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Pratt AAF, KS.

Table of Contents



3d Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated at Pratt AAF, KS 20 Nov 43. Maintained B-29 aircraft of the 45 Bombardment Squadron. Transferred to Chakulia, India 15 Apr 44. Was amalgamated into 45 Bombardment Squadron, May 1944 but was made independent again 19 Jun 44.

Table of Contents



4th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Pratt AAF, KS. Transferred to Chakulia Air Base, India.

Table of Contents



11th Photographic Laboratory

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Pratt AAF, KS. Distinguished Unit Citation: 20 Aug 44, WD GO 65-45. Disbanded 8 Oct 48.

Table of Contents



28th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
39th Air Engineering Sq
585th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



444th Bombardment Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)


Aug 44-May 45: Aircraft numbers in diamond -
consecutive runs of 20-25 numbers

From May 45: Colored band indicate squadron:
676th-green; 677th-red; 678th-yellow; 679th-blue
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 444 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 15 Feb 1943. Activated on 1 Mar 1943. Redesignated as: 444 Bombardment Group (Heavy) (B-29) on 26 Apr 1943; 444 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy on 19 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1946. Redesignated as: 444 Air Expeditionary Group and converted to provisional status, on 15 Jan 2003; 444 Air Expeditionary Wing on 24 Feb 2010 and remained on provisional status.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 1 Mar 1943; 58 Bombardment Wing, 23 Jul 1943; Second Air Force, 5 Nov 1943; 58 Bombardment Wing, 20 Nov 1943; XX Bomber Command, 12 Oct 1944; 58 Bombardment Wing, 3 Apr 1945; I Staging Command, 10 Nov 1945; Fourth Air Force, c. 15 Nov 1945; 58 Bombardment Wing, 14 Jan-1 Oct 1946. Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate at anytime after 15 Jan 2003.

Squadrons:  344 Bombardment: 10 Nov 1945-27 Mar 1946. 409 Bombardment: 6 May-1 Oct 1946. 676 Bombardment: 1 Mar 1943-1 Oct 1946. 677 Bombardment : 1 Mar 1943-1 Oct 1946. 678 Bombardment (later, 10 Reconnaissance): 1 Mar 1943-7 Mar 1946. 679 Bombardment: 1 Mar 1943-12 Oct 1944.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 1 Mar 1943; Great Bend Army AFld, KS, 29 Jul 1943-12 Mar 1944; Charra, India, 11 Apr 1944; Dudhkundi, India, 1 Jul 1944-1 Mar 1945; West Field, Tinian, 7 Apr-28 Sep 1945; Merced AAFld, CA, 15 Nov 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 6 May-1 Oct 1946.

Commanders:  Maj Arthur T. Snell, 28 Mar 1943; Maj Robert J. Hughey, 14 Apr 1943; Maj Walter W. Cross, 17 Apr 1943; Col Alva L. Harvey, 5 Aug 1943; Col Henry R. Sullivan, 22 Apr 1945; Col James C. Selser Jr., 3 Jun 1945-1 Oct 1946.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1943; B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1946.

Operations:  Combat training in the US, Mar 1943-Mar 1944. Moved to India in Mar-Apr 1944 and assigned to Twentieth Air Force. Flew supplies over the Hump to Chinese bases that its B-29s would later use for staging attacks against Japan. On 15 Jun 1944, participated in the first Army Air Force strike on the Japanese home islands since the Doolittle raid in 1942. Bombed transportation centers, naval installations, aircraft plants, and other targets in Burma, China, Thailand, Japan, and Formosa. Moved to Tinian in the spring of 1945 and participated in incendiary raids on urban areas for the duration of the war. Returned to US in late 1945 and was assigned to Strategic Air Command until inactivation on 1 Oct 1946.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Japan, 10-14 May 1945; Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 11 Mar 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Oct 1946.


Source:  444th Bombardment Group Association & Mr. Patrick Stinson

Aircraft Markings:  Aircraft marked with squadron color on nosewheel, stripe on fuselage (just aft of the wing), and stripes on the engine nacelles. The Bomb Group tail markings and paint schemes are as follows:

India:  Dark Blue Diamond with yellow aircraft number in center. Most B-29s were unpainted, but some of the first few were painted Olive Drab with light green underside.

Tinian:  Very Large "Triangle-N". Unpainted, new B-29's arriving from the U.S. had factory painted dark black underside.

Aircraft Numbering:  Col. Alva Harvey (444th BG commander, 5 Aug 43-22 Apr 1945) decided to make the 679th the "flagship" squadron of the 444th Bomb Group. This squadron was assigned numbers in the 10's and 20's. The numbering to the next squadron then continued in reverse order with the 678th getting the 30's and 40's, the 677th the 50's and 60's and the original 676th in the 70's and 80's range.

In October of 1944 all groups of the 58th Bomb Wing were reorganized from four to three squadrons per group. The personnel and equipment of one squadron was divided into three and split among the remaining three squadrons. In the 444th Bomb Group it was the original 676th squadron that was split up. One third of it went to the 677th, one third to the 678th and one third to the 679th which was then renumbered to become the new 676th. The personnel and equipment of the 679th remained together, but they traded in their "bull" for a "dragon". They kept their low end numbers. (There is some confusion on whether they adopted the squadron color of the original 676th (green), or retained the one the 679th had used up to that time (blue).) The numbers in the 70's and 80's soon disappeared. There was no effort, however, to renumber the aircraft of the 677th and 678th squadrons.

Thus before the reorganization the consecutive numbers from low to high covered the squadrons in this order: 679th, 678th, 677th and 676th. After the reorganization the low to high number sequence went 676th, 678th and 677th.


Other Sites of Interest:

444th Bombardment Group Association

444th Bombardment Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



676th Bombardment Squadron


From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 676th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 15 Feb 1943. Activated on 1 Mar 1943. Redesignated 676th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1946.

Assignments:  444th Bombardment Group, 1 Mar 1943-1 Oct 1946.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Mar 1943; Great Bend AAFld, Kan, 2 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Charra, India, c. 11 Apr 1944; Dudhkundi, India, 1 Jul 1944-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-27 Oct 1945; Merced AAFld, Calif, 15 Nov 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, c. 9 May-1 Oct 1946.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943- 1946.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-28 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 10 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Japan, 1-14 May 1945; Japan, 24 Ju1 1945.

Emblem:  Over and through a yellow disc, the caricatured figure, THE RELUCTANT DRAGON, light and dark green, winged light blue, in flight toward dexter, over a small, light blue cloud formation in base supporting three, black aerial bombs, and hurling a small, black bomb with the left forepaw, while holding a like bomb in the right forepaw. (Approved 27 Jun 1945.)


Other Sites of Interest:  444th Bombardment Group Association

Table of Contents



677th Bombardment Squadron


Aug 44-May 45: Aircraft numbers in diamond -
consecutive runs of 20-25 numbers

From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 677th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 15 Feb 1943. Activated on 1 Mar 1943. Redesignated 677th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1946.

Assignments:  444th Bombardment Group, 1 Mar 1943-1 Oct 1946.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Mar 1943; Great Bend AAFld, Kan, 2 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Charra, India, c. 13 Apr 1944; Dudhkundi, India, 1 Jul 1944-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-27 Oct 1945; Merced AAFld, Calif, 15 Nov 1945; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 10 May-1 Oct 1946.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-28 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 10 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Japan, 10-14 May 1945; Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  On a yellow disc, a caricatured "Uncle Sam" in sheriffs garb, consisting of a gray-green, broad brim hat, blue scarf, red jacket with sheriffs badge affixed to left side of chest, brown gloves, two brown cartridge belts with holsters attached, and light blue-and-white striped trousers tucked in top of brown, "Seven League" boots, winged white, striding over orange and black world in base, and in each hand a "six shooter" proper, pointing toward sinister. (Approved 31 Oct 1946.)



Other Sites of Interest:  444th Bombardment Group Association

Table of Contents



678th Bombardment Squadron


10th Intelligence Sq


Aug 44-May 45: Aircraft numbers in diamond -
consecutive runs of 20-25 numbers

From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 678th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 15 Feb 1943. Activated on 1 Mar 1943. Redesignated 678th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943; 10th Reconnaissance Squadron (Very Long Range, Photographic) on 17 Dec 1945. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. Redesignated 10th Reconnaissance Squadron (Photographic) on 8 Oct 1947. Activated in the reserve on 6 Nov 1947. Redesignated 10th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron (Photographic) on 27 Jun 1949. Inactivated on 28 Jan 1950. Redesignated 10th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium) on 9 May 1952. Activated on 28 May 1952. Inactivated on 1 Ju1 1958. Redesignated as 10th Tactical Reconnaissance Sq, activated and organized on 1 Jan 1966, inactivated 30 Jun 1971, consolidated 1 Oct 1993 with the 600th Electronic Security Sq as the 10th Intelligence Sq.

Assignments:  444th Bombardment Group, 1 Mar 1943; 311th Reconnaissance Wing, 7-31 Mar 1946. 26th Reconnaissance Group, 6 Nov 1947; Ninth Air Force, 27 Jun 1949-28 Jan 1950. 26th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, 28 May 1952-1 Jul 1958. 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wg 1966-1971, 67th Intelligence Gp 1993-unknown, 480th Intelligence Gp -1 Dec 2003, 497th Intelligence Gp.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Mar 1943; Great Bend, AAFld, Kan, 3 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Charra, India, c. 13 Apr 1944; Dudhkundi, India, 1 Jul 1944-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-27 Oct 1945; Merced AAFld, Calif, 15 Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. Rochester, NY, 6 Nov 1947; Langley AFB, Va, 27 Jun 1949-28 Jan 1950. Lockbourne AFB, Ohio, 28 May 1952-1 Jul 1958. Mountain Home AFB, ID 1966-1971; Langley AFB, VA 1993-.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1943; B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1946. YRB-47, 1954; RB-47, 1954-1958.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-28 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 10 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Steamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Japan, 10-14 May 1945; Japan, 24 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 21 Mar-3 May 1956.

Emblem:  On an Air Force golden yellow disc within a black border nebuly, fimbriated of the first, edged of the second, a black silhouetted head of a Greek warrior in profile, wearing an Air Force golden yellow helmet, details and outlines black; on the helmet's visor three black lightning bolts fesswise. (Approved 19 Apr 1957.)



Other Sites of Interest:  444th Bombardment Group Association

Table of Contents



679th Bombardment Squadron


Aug 44-May 45: Aircraft numbers in diamond -
consecutive runs of 20-25 numbers

From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 679th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 15 Feb 1943. Activated on 1 Mar 1943. Redesignated 679th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Disbanded on 12 Oct 1944.

Assignments:  444th Bombardment Group, 1 Mar 1943-12 Oct 1944.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Mar 1943; Great Bend AAFld, Kan, 3 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Charra, India, c. 13 Apr 1944; Dudhkundi, India, 1 Jul-12 Oct 1944.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; YB-29, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1944.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun-26 Sep 1944.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944.

Emblem:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:  444th Bombardment Group Association

Table of Contents



5th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Great Bend AAF, KS. Maintenance on B-29 aircraft, attached to 676 Bombardment Squadron, China-Burma-India and Pacific Theaters of Operations. Initial overseas station, Charra, India.

Table of Contents



6th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Great Bend AAF, KS and assigned to 44 Bombardment Group (Very Heavy). Maintenance on B-29 aircraft, China-Burma-India Theater of Operations (Charra and Dudhkundi, India). Reorganized and inactivation, 12 Oct 44; Transferred to 677 Bombardment Squadron, 444 Bombardment Group.

Table of Contents



7th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Great Bend AAF, KS. Transferred to Charra and Dudhkundi, India. Reorganized and consolidated with 678 Bombardment Squadron, 12 Oct 44.

Table of Contents



8th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Great Bend AAF, KS in compliance with reorganization of Very Heavy Bombardment Squadrons (B-29 aircraft). Transferred to Charra and Dudhkundi, India. Disbanded 12 Oct 44 with personnel transferred to 676 Bombardment Squadron.

Table of Contents



12th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Great Bend AAF, KS.

Table of Contents



25th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
35th Air Engineering Sq
578th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



462nd Bombardment Group


(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 462 Bombardment Group (Heavy) (B-29) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Jul 1943. Redesignated 462 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy on 19 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. Consolidated 31 Jan 84 with 462nd Strategic Aerospace Wg, which was constituted and activated 15 Nov 62. Organized on 1 Feb 1963. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1966. Redesignated 462 Air Expeditionary Group, and converted to provisional status, on 12 Jun 2002.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 1 Jul 1943; 58 Bombardment Wing, 1 Aug 1943; Second Air Force, 3 Nov 1943; 58 Bombardment Wing, 20 Nov 1943; XX Bomber Command, 7 Jul 1944; 58 Bombardment Wing, c. 25 Apr 1945-31 Mar 1946. Strategic Air Command, 15 Nov 1962; 18 Strategic Aerospace Division, 1 Feb 1963-25 Jun 1966. Air Mobility Command to activate or inactivate at any time after 12 Jun 2002.

Squadrons:  43 Air Refueling: 1 Feb 1963-2 Apr 1966. 345: 10 Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. 568 Strategic Missile: 1 Feb 1963-25 Mar 1965. 768 Bombardment: 1 Jul 1943-31 Mar 1946; 1 Feb 1963-2 Apr 1966. 769: 1 Jul 1943-31 Mar 1946. 770: 1 Jul 1943-31 Mar 1946. 771: 1 Jul 1943-12 Oct 1944.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Jul 1943; Walker AAFld, Kan, 28 Jul 1943-12 Mar 1944; Piardoba, India, 7 Apr 1944-26 Feb 1945; West Field, Tinian, 4 Apr-5 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. Larson AFB WA 1963-1966. Diego Garcia -unknown.

Commanders:  Col Alan D. Clark, 5 Aug 1943; Col Richard H. Carmichael, 26 Aug 1943; Col Alfred F. Kalberer, 20 Aug 1944; unkn, Feb-31 Mar 1946. None (not manned), 15 Nov 1962-31 Jan 1963; Col David A. Tate, 1 Feb 1963; Col Alex W. Talmant, 19 Jul 1965; Col Clyde W. Owen, c. 15 Mar-25 Jun 1966.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; YB-29, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1946. Titan I, 1963-1965; B-52, 1963-1966; KC-135, 1963-1966.

Operations (through 1966):  Prepared for combat as one of the initial B-29 units. Moved to India piecemeal during the first half of 1944. From there, transported supplies over the Himalaya Mountains (the “Hump”) to staging fields in China before entering combat with an attack on railroad shops at Bangkok, Thailand, on 5 Jun 1944. On 15 Jun 1944, took part in the first Army Air Forces strike on the Japanese home islands since the Doolittle Raid in Apr 1942. Operating from India and China, bombed transportation centers, naval installations, iron works, aircraft plants, and other targets in Japan, Thailand, Burma, China, Formosa, and Indonesia. From a staging base in Ceylon, mined the Moesi River on Sumatra in Aug 1944 on the longest bombardment flight of World War II. Earned a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for a daylight attack on iron and steel works at Yawata, Japan, in Aug 1944. Although most of the group personnel sailed for Tinian in late Feb 1945, the air echelon continued to fly missions from India until late Mar 1945. On 5 May 1945, aircrews from the group took part in the first mission from Tinian against the Japanese homeland. Conducted mining, strategic bombardment, and incendiary raids on urban areas of Japan. For strikes on industrial areas of Tokyo and Yokohama in May 1945, the group earned a second DUC. Returned to the United States in late 1945 and inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. From 1963 to 1965, conducted strategic bombardment training, missile training, and air refueling missions, continuing all but the missile training until Apr 1966.

Campaigns:  American Theater; India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Distinguished Unit Citations:  Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23, 25, and 29 May 1945; Takarazuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  WWII: None.  462nd SAW: Approved on 7 Feb 1963.



Other Sites of Interest:

462nd Strategic Air Wing

462nd Bombardment Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



768th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 768th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Jul 1943. Redesignated 768th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. Redesignated 768th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), and activated, on 15 Nov 1962. Organized on 1 Feb 1963. Discontinued and inactivated either on 25 Apr or 25 Jun 1966.

Assignments:  462d Bombardment Group, 1 Jul 1943-31 Mar 1946. Strategic Air Command, 15 Nov 1962; 462d Strategic Aerospace Wing, 1 Feb 1963-.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Jul 1943; Walker AAFld, Kan, 28 Jul 1943-c. 12 Mar 194; Piardoba, India, c. 16 Apr 1944-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-5 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. Larson AFB, Wash, 1 Feb 1963-.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; B-29, 1944-1946; B-52, 1963-.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-29 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 5 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23,25, and 29 May 1945; Takarazuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



769th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 769th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 JuI 1943. Redesignated 769th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Assignments:  462d Bombardment Group, 1 Jul 1943-31 Mar 1946.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Jul 1943; Walker AAFM, Kan, 28 Jul 1943-c. 12 Mar 1944; Piardoba, India, c. 19 Apr 1944-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-5 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; YB-29, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1946.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-30 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 5 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23, 25, and 29 May 1945; Takarazuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



770th Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 770th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Ju1 1943. Redesignated 770th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Assignments:  462d Bombardment Group, 1 Jul 1943-31 Mar 1946.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Jul 1943; Walker AAFM, Kan, 28 Jul 1943-c. 12 Mar 1944; Piardoba, India, c. 19 Apr ig44-Apr 1945; West Field, Tinian, Apr-5 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1946.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun 1944-29 Mar 1945, and Western Pacific, 5 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23, 25, and 29 May 1945; Takarazuka, Japan, 24 July 1945

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



771st Bombardment Squadron


(Aug 44-May 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 771st Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Jul 1943. Redesignated 771st Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Disbanded on 12 Oct 1944.

Assignments:  462d Bombardment Group, 1 Jul 1943-12 Oct 1944.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 JuI 1943; Walker AAFld, Kan, 28 Jul 1943-c. 12 Mar 1944; Piardoba, India, c. 13 May-12 Oct 1944.

Aircraft:  B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; B-29, 1943-1944.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun-10 Oct 1944.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive; Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



9th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index, Mr. Bernie Shearon

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Walker AAF, KS. Redesignated c. Apr 44 as 9 Bombardment Maintenance Squadron (Very Heavy), Special retroactive to 14 Feb 44. Disbanded 12 Oct 44. Reconstituted 1 Jun 92 as 9th Logistics Squadron, activated 12 Jun 92 and assigned to 9th Air Operations Group at Shaw AFB, SC per DAF/MO Letter 348r, 15 Jun 92, Subject: Organization Actions Affecting Certain Air Combat Command Units. Inactivated 1 Jan 94.

Table of Contents



10th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Walker AAF, KS.

Table of Contents



11th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 24 Nov 43, Walker AAF, KS. Primary mission: maintenance and administration for 770 Bombardment Squadron.

Table of Contents



12th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Walker AAF, KS. Disbanded 12 Oct 44. Reconstituted 1 Jun 92 as 12th Logistics Sq, activated 15 Jun 92 and assigned to 12th Air Operations Gp at Bergstrom AFB, TX per DAF/MO Letter 348r, 15 Jun 92, Subject: Organization Actions Affecting Certain Air Combat Command Units. Moved to Davis-Monthan AFB Oct 92. Inactivated 1 Jan 94.

Table of Contents



13th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Walker AAF, KS.

Table of Contents



86th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
349th Air Engineering Sq
584th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



468th Bombardment Group


Aug 44-May 45: Stripes on rudder indicate squadron: 792nd-white; 793d-blue; 794th-red; 795th-yellow)

From May 45: Squadron color on tip of tail
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 468th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Aug 1943. Redesignated 468th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) in Nov 1943. Equipped with B-29's. Moved, via Africa, to the CBI theater, Mar-Jun 1944. Assigned to Twentieth AF in Jun 1944. Flew over the Hump to carry supplies from India to staging fields in China before entering combat with an attack on railroad shops at Bangkok, Thailand, on 5 Jun 1944. On 15 Jun participated in the first AAF attack on Japan since the Doolittle raid in 1942. From bases in India, China, and Ceylon, mined shipping lanes near Saigon, French Indochina, and Shanghai, China, and struck Japanese installations in Burma, Thailand, French Indochina, Indonesia, Formosa, China, and Japan. Targets included iron works, aircraft factories, transportation centers, and naval installations. Received a DUC for participation in a daylight raid on the iron and steel works at Yawata, Japan, in Aug 1944. Evacuated advanced bases in China in Jan 1945 but continued operations from India, bombing storage areas in Rangoon, Burma, a railroad bridge at Bangkok, Thailand, railroad shops at Kuala Lumpur, Malaya, and the drydock in Singapore harbor. Flew additional missions against Japan after moving to Tinian during Feb-May 1945. Took part in mining operations, incendiary raids on area targets, and high-altitude missions against strategic objectives. Dropped incendiaries on Tokyo and Yokohama in May 1945, being awarded a DUC for the attacks. Received another DUC for a daylight strike on an aircraft plant at Takarazuka, Japan, in Jul 1945. After the war, dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and participated in show-of-force missions over Japan. Returned to the US in Nov 1945. Assigned to Strategic Air Command on 21 Mar 1946. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Squadrons:  512th: 1945-1946. 792d: 1943-1946. 793d: 1943-1946. 794th (later 6th): 1943-1946. 795th: 1943-1946.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Kharagpur, India, 13 Apr 1944-24 Feb 1945; West Field, Tinian, 6 Apr-15 Nov 1945; Ft Worth AAFld, Tex, 1 Dec 1945; Roswell AAFld, NM, 12 Jan-31 Mar 1946.

Commanders:  Col Howard E Engler, 8 Sep 1943; Col Ted S Faulkner, 3 Aug 1944; Col James V Edmundson, 5 Nov 1944-31 Mar 1946.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo And Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945; Takarasuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:

468th Bomb Group

468th Bombardment Group

468th Bombardment Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



792nd Bombardment Squadron


Aug 44-May 45

From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 792d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Aug 1943. Redesignated 792d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 782nd Tactical Fighter Sq as the 782nd Tactical Air Support Sq (not active).

Assignments:  468th Bombardment Group, 1 Aug 1943-31 Mar 1946.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Kharagpur, India, c. 13 Apr 1944-4 May 1945; West Field, Tinian, 7 May-15 Nov 1945; Fort Worth AAFld, Tex, 1 Dec 1945; Roswell AAFld, NM, 9 Jan-31 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1943; B-29, 1943-1946.

Operations:  Combat in CBI and Western Pacific, 5 Jun 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945; Takarazuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



793d Bombardment Squadron


Aug 44-May 45

From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 793d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Aug 1943. Redesignated 793d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Assignments:  468th Bombardment Group, 1 Aug 1943-31 Mar 1946.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Kharagpur, India, c. 13 Apr 1944-4 May 1945; West Field, Tinian, 7 May-15 Nov 1945; Fort Worth AAFld, Tex, 1 Dec 1945; Roswell AAFld, NM, 9 Jan-31 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1943; B-29, 1943-1946.

Operations:  Combat in CBI and Western Pacific, 5 Jun 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific; Central Burma.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945; Takarazuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



794th Bombardment Squadron


Aug 44-May 45

From May 45
 (Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 794 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Aug 1943. Redesignated as: 794 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 20 Nov 1943; 6 Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Long Range, Photographic-RCM on 17 Dec 1945. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. Redesignated as: 6 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Medium on 14 Jan 1955. Activated on 24 Jan 1955. Redesignated as 6 Bombardment Squadron, Medium on 25 Oct 1961. Discontinued and inactivated on 25 Jun 1962. Designated as 6 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy and activated on 15 Nov 1962. Organized on 1 Feb 1963. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1969. Redesignated as 6 Reconnaissance Squadron on 20 Oct 2009 per DAF/A1M 150t. Activated on 23 Oct 2009 per DAF/A1M 150t, 20 Oct 2009; SO #GB-04, Hq ACC, 22 Oct 2009.

Assignments:  468 Bombardment Group, 1 Aug 1943; 311 Reconnaissance Wing, 7-31 Mar 1946. 70 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 70 Bombardment) Wing, 24 Jan 1955-25 Jun 1962. Strategic Air Command, 15 Nov 1962; 70 Bombardment Wing, 1 Feb 1963-31 Dec 1969. 49 Operations Group, 23 Oct 2009.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 1 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Kharagpur, India, c. 13 Apr 1944-4 May 1945; West Field, Tinian, 7 May-15 Nov 1945; Fort Worth AAFld, TX, 1 Dec 1945; Roswell AAFld, NM, 9 Jan-31 Mar 1946. Little Rock AFB, AR, 24 Jan 1955-25 Jun 1962. Clinton-Sherman AFB, OK, 1 Feb 1963-31 Dec 1969. Holloman AFB, NM, 23 Oct 2009-.

Commanders:  Capt Charles H. Reeves, 15 Sep 1943; Lt Col Edward C. Teats, 19 Sep 1943; Maj (later Lt Col) Robert S. Clinkscales, 28 Sep 1943; Maj Donald J. Humphrey, 21 Aug 1944; Lt Col Philip Hennin, 9 Oct 1944; Maj (later Lt Col) Walter R. George, 28 Nov 1944; Maj Clarence C. McPherson, 12 Jun 1945; unkn-31 Mar 1946. Maj Carl A. Kluender, 24 Jan 1955; unkn, 18 Feb 1955; Lt Col Marston T. Westbrook, 19 Apr 1955; Maj Delbert R. Lawson, 1 Jul 1957; Maj Frank D. Crook, 1 Sep 1957; Lt Col Marston T. Westbrook, Nov 1957; Lt Col Gerald M. Adams, Apr 1958; Lt Col Albert S. Harwell, Jr., Jul 1958; Lt Col John H. Blumenstock, c. Nov 1958; Maj Fred Davison, Apr 1959-25 Jan 1962; unkn, 26 Jan-25 Jun 1962. Lt Col Henry T. Wilson, Jr., c. Feb 1963; Lt Col Joseph C. Henderson, by 17 Feb 1965; Lt Col Donald L. Stallsmith, by 31 Mar 1966; Lt Col Harold J. Hickox, by 31 Mar 1967; Lt Col Kenneth Peterson, by 23 Apr 1968; Lt Col Arthur T. Waaland, by 31 Dec 1968; Lt Col William A. Bryan, Jr., by 29 Sep 1969, Lt Col B. P. Payne, by Dec-31 Dec 1969. Lt Col Ryan C. Sherwood, 23 Oct 2009-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1943; B-29, 1943-1946. RB-47, 1955-1962. B-52, 1963-1969. MQ-1, 2009-.

Operations:  Trained former B-17 aircrews to operate the B-29; flew supply missions from India into China over the Himalaya Mountains and bombed enemy targets in Southeast Asia and Japan during Operation MATTERHORN, Oct 1944 to May 1945; after relocation to the Mariana Islands, flew long range missions to bomb targets in Japan from May to Aug 1945; in Dec 1945, began transition to reconnaissance mission when inactivated in Mar 1946. After reactivation in Jan 1955, conducted strategic reconnaissance on a global scale and provided reconnaissance reports and target material as requested; in 1958, trained aircrews for B-47 transition and crew training; reequipped and trained crews to operate the RB-47, the reconnaissance version of the jet bomber, in Oct 1961 until inactivation in Jun 1962. After reactivation in 1963, operated the B-52 to deter nuclear war and, if necessary, conduct global offensive bombing missions. Several squadron aircraft and aircrews deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam, on a rotating basis from summer 1968 to Dec 1969 to participate in Operation ARC LIGHT, the bombing of enemy concentrations in South Vietnam by B-52s. Redesignated as the 6 Reconnaissance Squadron and activated in Oct 2009, this time to train officers as pilots and enlisted personnel as sensor operators for flight operations of the MQ-1 Predator.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  World War II: India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive; Western Pacific: Central Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945; Takazuka, Japan, 24 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 15 Feb-30 Dec 1957; 15 Apr-1 Oct 1968.

Emblem:  Approved on 20 May 1964.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Aircraft, Commanders, Operations and Honors through 29 Oct 2009.

Supersedes information found in Maurer Maurer, Combat Squadrons of the Air Force World War II (Washington: USGPO, 1969), p. 759.



Source:  Strategic-Air-Command.com, 70th BW page

6 BS:  Assigned Jan. 24, 1955-June 25, 1962 (Not operational Jan 24-April 30, 1962; Detached May 1 - Oct 1955); On Feb 1, 1963, it acquired the B-52Es previously used by 98 BS, 4123d Strategic Wing, which it flew until 1968, when re-equipped with B-52D, which it flew for a year. Some B-52C were also assigned in 1968-69. (Not operational Apr 15 - Oct 1, 1968 and Apr - Sept 1969.) Inactivated Dec. 31, 1969.

Table of Contents



795th Bombardment Squadron


Aug 44-May 45

From May 45
(Tails based on originals by Mr. Scott Burris. Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 795th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 19 May 1943. Activated on 1 Aug 1943. Redesignated 795th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 20 Nov 1943. Disbanded on 12 Oct 1944.

Assignments:  468th Bombardment Group, 1 Aug 1943-12 Oct 1944.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Aug 1943-12 Mar 1944; Kharagpur, India, c. 13 Apr-12 Oct 1944.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1943; B-29, 1943-1944.

Operations:  Combat in CBI, 5 Jun-26 Sep 1944.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; Air Offensive, Japan; China Defensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Yawata, Japan, 20 Aug 1944.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



2nd Combat Camera Unit


(See 10th AF Units)

Table of Contents



13th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Smoky Hill Army Air Field, Salina, KS. Assigned to 792 Bombardment Squadron, 468 Bombardment Group. Temporarily stationed at Oran, Algeria, North Africa, March 1944 before permanent change of station to Kharagpur, India, May 1944. Later absorbed by 792 Bomb Sq.

Serviced B-29 aircraft for combat missions which included China-Burma-India theater of operations, air offensive, Japan, and supply missions over Himalayas between India and China.

Table of Contents



14th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Smoky Hill AAF, Salina, KS. Attached to 793 Bombardment Squadron. Aircraft maintenance (B-29) in China-Burma-India and Pacific operations. Later absorbed by 793 Bomb Sq.

Table of Contents



15th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Smoky Hill AAF, Salina, KS. Assigned to maintain aircraft, 794 Bombardment Squadron. Transferred to Kharagpur, India. Inactivated 12 Oct 44; personnel absorbed by 794 Bombardment Squadron.

Table of Contents



16th Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Smoky Hill Army Air Field, Salina, KS. Assigned to 795 Bombardment Squadron. Initial utilization of B-29 in combat, strikes on Japanese mainland. Later absorbed by 795 Bomb Sq.

Table of Contents



14th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Smoky Hill AAF, KS.

Table of Contents



87th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
355th Air Engineering Sq
589th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



73d Bombardment Wing


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 5 Heavy Bombardment Processing Headquarters on 9 Feb 1943. Activated on 17 Feb 1943. Redesignated 73 Bombardment Operational Training Wing (Heavy) on 12 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1943. Redesignated 73 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Redesignated: 73 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, Special on 13 Jan 1944; 73 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 24 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 31 May 1946. Activated in the Reserve on 12 Jun 1947. Redesignated 73 Air Division, Bombardment on 16 Apr 1948. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 73 Air Division (Weapons) on 1 Apr 1957. Activated on 1 Jul 1957. Redesignated 73 Air Division on 1 Mar 1963. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Apr 1966..

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 12 Aug-15 Oct 1943. XX Bomber Command, 20 Nov 1943; Second Air Force, 2 Jun-30 Jul 1944; Twentieth Air Force, c. 6 Aug 1944; XXI Bomber Command, 9 Nov 1944-16 Jul 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul 1945; Fourth Air Force, 7 Dec 1945; Third Air Force, 5 Jan 1946; Strategic Air Command, 21 Mar 1946; Fifteenth Air Force, 31 Mar-31 May 1946. Second Air Force, 12 Jun 1947; Tenth Air Force, 1 Jul 1948-27 Jun 1949. Air Defense Command, 1 Jul 1957-1 Apr 1966.

Components

Wings:  4750 Air Defense: 1 Jul 1957-25 Jun 1960. 4751 Air Defense Missile: 15 Jan 1958-1 Oct 1959. 4756 Air Defense: 1 Jul 1957-1 Jul 1960. 4756 Air Defense: 1 Sep 1962-1 Apr 1966. 4780 Air Defense: 1 Jul 1962-1 Apr 1966.

Groups:  338 Bombardment: 17 Oct 1947-27 Jun 1949. 351 Bombardment: 17 Oct 1947-4 Jun 1948. 381 Bombardment: 4 Jun 1948-27 Jun 1949. 497 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-31 Mar 1946. 498 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-31 May 1946. 499 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946. 500 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-17 Jan 1946. 4756 Air Defense: 1 Jul 1960-1 Sep 1962.

Squadron:  4751 Air Defense: 1 Jul 1963-1 Apr 1966.

Stations:  Walker AAFld, KS, 17 Feb 1943; Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 30 Jun-15 Oct 1943. Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 20 Nov 1943; Colorado Springs, CO, 29 Feb-17 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 24 Aug 1944-20 Oct 1945; MacDill Field, FL, 15 Jan-31 May 1946. Orchard Place Airport, IL, 12 Jun 1947-29 Jun 1949. Tyndall AFB, FL, 1 Jul 1957-1 Apr 1966.

Commanders:  Unkn, 17 Feb-11 Aug 1943; Col Thomas H. Chapman, 12 Aug-15 Oct 1943. Unkn, 20 Nov 1943; Col Thomas H. Chapman, 27 Nov 1943; Brig Gen Emmett O'Donnell Jr., 15 Mar 1944; Col Morris J. Lee, 16 Sep 1945; Col Neil B. Harding, 28 Jan-14 May 1946; unkn, 15-31 May 1946. Brig Gen Milton H. Askins, 1 Jul 1957; Maj Gen Frederick R. Terrell, 1 Jul 1960; Brig Gen Robert W. Burns, 2 Jul 1962; Col Jean H. Daugherty, 8 May 1965; Brig Gen Thomas H. Beeson, 31 Jul 1965-1 Apr 1966.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1943-1946. B-57, c. 1957-c. 1960; F-102, c. 1957-c. 1966; F-104, c. 1957-c. 1960; T-33, c. 1957-1966; F-101, c. 1960-c. 1966; F-106, c. 1960-c. 1966.

Operations:  As the 73d wing, it first trained in U. S. and then moved to Saipan in Aug 1944. It flew several bombing missions against Truk to gain combat experience before bombing Iwo Jima. In Nov 1944, the 73d began bombing Japan, with only moderate success. Poor weather, the lack of precision radar bombing equipment, and tremendous winds encountered at high altitudes over Japan made accuracy difficult. Consequently, it turned to devastating low altitude incendiary attacks. In addition to Tokyo, Nagoya, and Osaka, the 73d fire bombed numerous Japanese cities until war's end. As the 73d Air Division, it evaluated, upgraded, and determined the proficiency of the Air Defense Command fighter-interceptor and missile squadrons, 1 Jul 1957-1 Apr 1966. The division developed and tested Air Defense Command tactics, equipment, aircraft, guided missiles, and related equipment and armaments. It also maintained active contact with Army, Navy, and other Air Force commands to assure coordinated military effort in the use of rocket and missile ranges, defense plans, air sea land rescue, and airspace and airways directly concerned with the operations of the Air Defense Command Weapons Center.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Azure, a diminished border argent, issuant from base and sinister two piles throughout bendwise the sinister overlapping the dexter and terminating upon the border of the last, each charged with an arrowhead sable garnished of the second and emitting a flight trail throughout or edged gules. (Approved 9 Apr 1958.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Apr 1966.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Apr 1966.



Other Sites of Interest:

73d Air Division Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



497th Bombardment Group


(Oct 44-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

497th Air Refueling Wg

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 497th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943 and activated on 20 Nov. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946. Consolidated 31 Jan 84 with the 497th Air Refueling Wg, which was constituted and activated 15 Nov 62, organized 1 Jan 63. Discontinued and inactivated 15 Sep 64.

Assignments:  73d Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, 20 Nov 1943-31 Mar 1946. Strategic Air Command, 31 Mar 1946-15 Nov 1962. 820th Strategic Aerospace Div 1 Jan 1963-15 Sep 1964.

Squadrons:  26th Air Refueling: 1 Jan 1963-15 Sep 1964. 380th Air Refueling: 1 Jan 1963-15 Sep 1964. 513th Bombardment: 1 Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. 869th Bombardment: 20 Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. 870th: 20 Nov 1945-31 Mar 1946. 871st: 20 Nov 1945-7 Mar 1946. 872d: 20 Nov 1945-10 May 1944.

Stations:  El Paso Mun Aprt, Tex, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 1 Dec 1943; Pratt AAFld, Kan, 13 Apr 1944; Camp Anza, Calif (ground echelon), 20-29 Jul 1944; Herington AAFld, Kans (air echelon), 31 Aug-Oct 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 17 Oct 1944-1 Nov 1945 (ground echelon), Oct 1044-Oct 1945 (air echelon); Camp Stoneman, Calif, 14 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, 26 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, 5 Jan-31 Mar 1946. Plattsburgh NY AFB 1 Jan 1963-15 Sep 1964.

Commanders:  Lt. Col John P Veerling, 10 Dec 1943; Capt Cador O Smith, 1 Jan 1944; Lt Glenn E McClure, 16 Jan 1944; Maj Alfred J Hanlon Jr, 26 Jan 1944; Col Karl Truesdell Jr, 6 Mar 1944; Col Arnold T Johnson, 22 Apr 1944; Col Stuart P Wright, 26 Apr 1944; Col Arnold T Johnson, 26 Feb 1945-31 Mar 1946. None (not manned), 15 Nov-31 Dec 1962; Col Fred W Miller, 1 Jan 1963; Col James O Frankosky, 12 Mar 1963; Col Vernon K Cammack, 1 Nov 1963; Col John H M Linebaugh, 1 Jul 1964; Col Robert G Moll, 15 Jul-15 Sep 1964.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944-1945; B-29, 1944-1945, 1946; KC-97, 1963-1964.

Operations:  Prepared for overseas duty with B-17s and B-29's. Moved to Saipan, Jul-Oct 1944, and assigned to Twentieth AF. Began B-29 operations in Oct 1944 with attacks against Iwo Jima and the Truk Islands. Took part in the first attack (24 Nov 1944) on Japan by AAF planes based in the Marianas. Flew many missions against strategic objectives in Japan; on numerous raids, made its attacks in daylight and from high altitude. Received a DUC for a mission on 27 Jan 1945: although weather conditions prevented the group from bombing its primary objective, the unescorted B-29's withstood severe enemy attacks to strike an alternate target, the industrial area of Hamamatsu. Awarded second DUC for attacking strategic centers in Japan during Jul and Aug 1945. Assisted the assault on Okinawa in Apr 1945 by bombing enemy airfields to cut down air attacks against the invasion force. Beginning in Mar 1945 and continuing until the end of the war the group made incendiary raids against Japan, flying at night and at low altitude to bomb area targets. Returned to the US in Nov 1945. Assigned to Strategic Air Command on 21 Mar 1946 and inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Replaced 4108th Air Refueling Wing on 1 Jan 1963. Supported global air refueling mission of SAC and other USAF needs as required. Inactivated on 15 Sep 1964.

Service Steamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 27 Jan 1945; Japan, 26 Jul-2 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, 1 Jan-30 Jun 1963.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest: 497th Air Refueling Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



869th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 869th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Assignments:  497th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-31 Mar 1946.

Stations:  El Paso Mun Aprt, Tex, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 1 Dec 1943; Pratt AAFld, Kan, 13 Apr-17 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 17 Sep 1944-1 Nov 1945; Camp Stoneman, Calif, 14 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. 26 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, c. 5 Jan-31 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 28 Oct 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 27 Jan 1945; Japan, 26 Jul-2 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  Over and through a light turquoise blue disc, a large, caricatured pug stalking across a small white cloud formation in base, wearing a red-and-white-striped turtleneck sweater, purple trousers, brown shoes and derby, carrying a large yellow aerial bomb under the left arm, while smoking a cigar, proper, and flourishing with the right hand to indicate "it's a cinch." (Approved 10 May 1944.)

Table of Contents



870th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 870th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1946.

Assignments:  497th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-31 Mar 1946.

Stations:  El Paso Mun Aprt, Tex, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 1 Dec 1943; Pratt AAFld, Kan, 13 Apr-18 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 17 Sep 1944-1 Nov 1945; Camp Stoneman, Calif, 14 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. 26 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, c. 5 Jan-31 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 1 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 27 Jan 1945; Japan, 26 Jul-2 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  Over and through a medium blue disc, wide border dark red, a gorilla affronte, proper, standing on a yellow sphere marked with black lines of latitude and longitude in base, and holding a large light red aerial bomb under the left arm, while hurling a like aerial bomb with the upraised right arm, all in front of a large white cloud formation. (Approved 18 Aug 1944.)

Table of Contents



871st Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 871st Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 7 Mar 1946.

Assignments:  497th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-7 Mar 1946.

Stations:  El Paso Mun Aprt, Tex, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 1 Dec 1943; Pratt AAFld, Kan, 13 Apr-18 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 17 Sep 1944-1 Nov 1945; Camp Stoneman, Calif, 14 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. 26 Nov 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, c. 5 Jan-7 Mar 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 2 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 27 Jan 1945; Japan, 26 Jul-2 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  Over and through a light pastel green disc, wide border orange, an ancient warrior of giant stature, standing affronte, feet apart, left hand resting on hip, attired in battle dress of gold mail, and wearing a winged gold helmet and metallic gloves, having a broad sword of metal, proper, strapped about the waist by green sword belt, holding a white fire bomb in the right mailed hand; all in front of three lavender and purple mountain peaks in base, and casting a dark green line shadow on background. (Approved 5 Aug 1944.)

Table of Contents



15th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at El Paso AAF, TX.

Table of Contents



65th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
3d Air Engineering Sq
573d Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



498th Bombardment Group


(Oct 44-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 498 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 4 Aug 1946. Redesignated as 498 Tactical Missile Group, and activated, on 16 Sep 1960. Organized on 8 Feb 1961. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1969. Redesignated as 498 Armament Systems Wing on 14 Feb 2006. Activated on 31 Mar 2006. Redesignated as 498 Nuclear Systems Wing on 1 Apr 2009.

Assignments:  73 Bombardment Wing, 20 Nov 1943; Fifteenth Air Force, 19 May-4 Aug 1946. Pacific Air Forces, 16 Sep 1960; 313 Air Division, 8 Feb 1961-31 Dec 1969. Nuclear Weapons Center, 31 Mar 2006-.

Operational Components:  514 Bombardment: 15 Oct 1945-7 Mar 1946. 873 Bombardment (later, 873 Tactical Missile): 20 Nov 1943-4 Aug 1946; 8 Feb 1961-8 Jul 1965. 874 Bombardment (later, 874 Tactical Missile): 20 Nov 1943-4 Aug 1946; 8 Sep 1961-8 Jul 1965. 875 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-4 Aug 1946. 876 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-10 May 1944.

Stations:  Clovis AAFld, NM, 20 Nov 1943; Great Bend AAFld, KS, 13 Apr-13 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 6 Sep 1944-2 Nov 1945; March Field, CA, Dec 1945; MacDill Field, FL, 5 Jan-4 Aug 1946. Kadena AB, Okinawa, 8 Feb 1961-31 Dec 1969. Kirtland AFB, NM, 31 Mar 2006-.

Commanders:  None, not manned, 20 Nov -10 Dec 1943; Lt Col Joseph H. West, 11 Dec 1943; Maj Crocker Snow, 20 Jan 1944; Col Wiley D. Ganey, 14 Mar 1944; Col Donald W. Saunders, 10 Aug 1945-unkn; Col Richard T. King Jr., unkn-4 Aug 1946. Lt Col Clyde R. Borchers, 8 Feb 1961 (acting), 19 Jul 1961; Col Warren E. Vinzant, 1 Aug 1961; Col Hubert W. Gainer, 17 Jul 1965; Col Peter H. Spear, 27 Jan 1967; Col Merle Johnson, 18 Jul-31 Dec 1969. Unkn, 31 Mar 2006; Col Harry L. Andrews, 26 Jun 2006; Col Richard M. Stuckey, 24 Jun 2008-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-17, 1944. B-29, 1944-1946. RB-24, 1944. Mace, 1961-1969.

Operations:  Trained in B-17s and B-29s and moved to Saipan Jul-Nov 1944. Flew its first combat missions against Iwo Jima and the Truk Islands. On 24 Nov 1944, participated in the first assault on Japan by B-29s operating from the Marianas. Conducted numerous attacks against industrial targets in Japan, flying in daylight and at high altitude to carry out these missions. Received a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for striking an aircraft engine plant at Nagoya on 13 Dec 1944. Began flying missions at night in Mar 1945, operating from low altitudes to drop incendiaries on area targets in Japan; received a second DUC for incendiary raids on urban industries near Kobe and Osaka during Jun 1945. Operations also included strikes against Japanese airfields during the Allied invasion of Okinawa in Apr 1945. Returned to Okinawa in 1961 and was equipped with Mace Missiles and provided air defense of the Ryuku Islands through 1969. Since its activation in Mar 2006, the wing sustains US nuclear munitions and cruise missiles, including their maintenance, storage, modernization and acquisition support activities for both the Department of Defense and Department of Energy.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 13 Dec 1944; Japan, 1-7 Jun 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 8 Feb 1961-29 May 1963; 1 Jul 1965-31 Dec 1966; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1967; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1968; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1969.

Emblem:  Approved on 25 Aug 2009.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, and Honors through 22 Dec 2009.

Aircraft and Missiles through 31 Dec 1969.



Other Sites of Interest:

498th Armament Systems Wing (Kirtland AFB, NM) 498th Armament Systems Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



873d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 873d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 4 Aug 1946. Redesignated 873d Tactical Missile Squadron, and activated, on 16 Sep 1960. Organized on 8 Feb 1961. Discontinued and inactivated 8 Jul 1965.

Assignments:  498th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 193-4 Aug 1946. Pacific Air Forces, 16 Sep 1960; 498th Tactical Missile Group, 8 Feb 1961-.

Stations:  Clovis AAFld, NM, 20 Nov 1943; Great Bend AAFld, Kan, 13 Apr-16 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 7 Sep 1944-2 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. 7 Dec 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, 5 Jan-4 Aug 1946. Kadena, Okinawa, 8 Feb 1961-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946. Mace, 1961-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 28 Oct 1944-13 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 13 Dec 1944; Japan, 1-7 Jun 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 8 Feb 1961-29 May 1963.

Emblem (873d TMS):  On and over a medium blue globe, grid lines Air Force blue, a stylized missile bendwise, its nose pointing upward and extending beyond the globe, Air Force golden yellow, shaded Air Force blue; the missile passing through a white gimbal fimbriated red; radiating from the common center of the earth, missile and gimbal, four red arrows; flanking the nose of the missile, four white stars, two on either side; outlines and details Air Force blue throughout. (Approved 11 Sep 1962.)

Table of Contents



874th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 874th Bombardment Squadron on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 4 Aug 1946. Redesignated 874th Tactical Missile Squadron, and activated on 25 Apr 1961. Organized on 8 Sep 1961. Discontinued and inactivated 8 Jul 65.

Assignments:  498th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-4 Aug 1946. Pacific Air Forces, 25 Apr 1961; 498th Tactical Missile Group, 8 Sep 1961-.

Stations:  Clovis AAFld, NM, 20 Nov 1943; Great Bend AAFld, Kan,13 Apr-16 Ju1 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 7 Sep 1944-1 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. 7 Dec 1943; MacDill Field, Fla, 5 Jan-4 Aug 1946. Kadena, Okinawa, 8 Sep 1961-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-17, 1944; B-29,1944-1946. Mace, 1961-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 28 Oct 1944-13 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 13 Dec 1944; Japan, 1-7 Jun 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 8 Feb 1961-29 May 1963.

Emblem:  Over and through a disc bendy of 12 blue and red, the head and neck of a green dragon, striking toward sinister base between 8 white stars, arranged 3 to chief and 5 to base. (Approved 10 Aug 1944.)

Table of Contents



875th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 875th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 4 Aug 1946.

Assignments:  498th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-4 Aug 1946.

Stations:  Clovis AAFld, NM, 20 Nov 1943; Great Bend AAFld, Kan, 13 Apr-16 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 7 Sep 1944-2 Nov 195; March Field Calif, c. 7 Dec 1945; MacDill Field, Fla, 5 Jan-4 Aug 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; RB-24, 1944; B-29,1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 28 Oct 1944-13 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 13 Dec 1944; Japan, 17 June 1945.

Emblem:  On an orange disc, border black, a stylized figure of VULCAN in light purple and black, standing over green globe marked with yellow lines of latitude and longitude in base, and holding in the left hand twelve red, jagged lightning flashes arranged seven to dexter, five to sinister, striking a blow with large light purple and black sledge held aloft in the right hand. (Approved 9 Nov 1944.)

Table of Contents



21st Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Clovis AAF, NM. Maintained B-17F and B-29 aircraft; included modification work on B-29 aircraft. Moved to Great Bend AAF, KS. Inactivated 19 Aug 44 and merged with 873 Bombardment Squadron.

Table of Contents



22nd Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Activated 20 Nov 43, Clovis AAF, NM.

Table of Contents



23d Bombardment Maintenance Squadron, VH

Source:  Air Force History Index

Activated 20 Nov 43, Clovis AAF, NM. Initially assigned to 498 Bombardment Group; reassigned to 444 Bombardment Group, 10 Dec 43, Great Bend, KS. Reorganized and consolidated into 678 Bombardment Squadron 20 May 44.

Table of Contents



16th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Clovis AAF, NM.

Table of Contents



91st Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
322nd Air Engineering Sq
572nd Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



499th Bombardment Group


(Oct 44-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

499th Air Refueling Wg

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 499 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 16 Feb 1946. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 499 Air Refueling Wing which was established and activated on 15 Nov 1962. Organized on 1 Jan 1963. Discontinued, and inactivated on 25 Jun 1966.

Assignments:  73 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946. Strategic Air Command, 15 Nov 1962; 57 Air Division, 1 Jan 1963-25 Jun 1966.

Squadrons:  11 Air Refueling: 1 Jan 1963-1 Jul 1964. 19 Air Refueling: 1 Jan 1963-1 Jan 1966. 303 Air Refueling: 1 Jan-15 Jun 1963. 305 Air Refueling: 1 Jan 1963-1 Jul 1964. 384 Air Refueling: 1 Jan 1963-25 Jun 1966. 877 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946. 878 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-10 Feb 1946. 879 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946. 880 Bombardment: 20 Nov 1943-10 May 1944.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field AZ, 20 Nov 1943; Smoky Hil1 AAFld, KS, 1 Dec 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 16 Feb 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 8 Apr 1944; Camp Anza, CA, 25 Jul-13 Aug 1944 (ground echelon); Isley Field, Saipan, 23 Sep 1944-9 Nov 1945 (ground echelon), Nov 1944-Oct 1945 (air echelon); March Field, CA, 25 Nov 1945-16 Feb 1946. Westover AFB, MA, 1 Jan 1963-25 Jun 1966.

Commanders:  Maj Jack F. Bozung, Dec 1943; Lt Lester A. Luecke, 1 Dec 1943; Maj Arnold R. Johnson, 18 Jan 1944; Maj Douglas C. Northrop, 22, Jan 1944; Col Samuel R. Harris, 4 Apr 1944; Col Morris J. Lee, 21 Mar l945; Lt Col Walter E. Chambers, 13 Aug 1945-unkn. None (not manned), 15 Nov-31 Dec 1962; Col William R. Brown, 1 Jan 1963; Col Therwin S. Walters, 1 Jul 1965; Col Edward D. Wooten, 30 Nov 1965-25 Jun 1966 (additional duty).

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945. KC-97, 1963-1960; KC-135, 1963-1965; EC-135 1965.

Operations:  Trained for combat with B-17s and B-29s. Moved to Saipan, Jul-Nov 1944, and became part of Twentieth Air Force. Took part on 24 Nov 1944 in the first strike against Japan by AAF planes stationed in the Marianas. Flew numerous missions in daylight, operating from high altitude to bomb strategic targets in Japan. Received a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for striking the Mitsubishi aircraft engine plant in Nagoya on 23 Jan 1945. In Mar 1945, began to conduct night attacks, flying at low altitude to drop incendiaries on area targets in Japan. Completed a series of attacks against enemy airfields on Kyushu to aid the Allied assault on Okinawa in Apr 1945 and received a second DUC for this action. Also dropped propaganda leaflets on Japan, and after the war dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners of war. Returned to the US, Oct-Nov 1945. Inactivated on 16 Feb 1946. Replaced the 4050th Air Refueling Wing in Jan 1963. Supported SAC bombardment and TAC fighter aircraft with air-to-air refueling and occasionally deployed segments of its tanker force overseas to support unit movements and special operations. From activation until mid-1964 was the largest air refueling wing in the Air Force, with squadrons at Westover AFB, MA, Dover AFB, DE, McGuire AFB, NJ, Otis AFB, MA, and Kindley AFB, Bermuda. Also flew EC-135s on a post attack command control system (PACCS) airborne command post mission in support of Eighth Air Force. From Nov 1965 until inactivated, wing components operated under a bomb wing at Westover AFB, MA.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 22-28 Apr 1945.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:

499th Air Refueling Wing

499th Air Refueling Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



877th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 877th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 16 Feb 1946.

Assignments:  499th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 20 Nov 1943; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Dec 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 11 Feb 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 8 Apr-22 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 22 Sep 1944-c. Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. Nov 1945-16 Feb 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 24 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 22-28 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  On a light turquoise blue disc, border triparted red, white, and black, a caricatured, brown and white condor with red head and yellow orange beak and feet, in flight toward dexter, hurling a yellow orange lightning flash with the feet, striking in dexter base at large, irregular, red-and-yellow orange, blazing target, edged black. (Approved 16 May 1945.)

Table of Contents



878th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 878th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Jul 1944. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 16 Feb 1946.

Assignments:  499th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 20 Nov 1943; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Dec 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 11 Feb 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 8 Apr-22 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 22 Sep 1944-c. Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. Nov 1945-16 Feb 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 24 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 22-28 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  On a light turquoise blue disc, border white, edged black, a caricatured, red pack horse facing to dexter, winged white, snorting flames from the nostrils, and having three, brown aerial bombs strapped on back by a brown and yellow band, all in front of a large, white cloud formation; in dexter fess a yellow orange, five-point star, edged black. (Approved 6 Sep 1945.)

Table of Contents



879th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 879th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 16 Feb 1946.

Assignments:  499th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-16 Feb 1946.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 20 Nov 1943; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Dec 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 11 Feb 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 8 Apr-22 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 22 Sep 1944-c. Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, c. Nov 1945-16 Feb 1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 24 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 22-28 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



17th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Davis-Monthan Fld, AZ.

Table of Contents



303d Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
327th Air Engineering Sq
73d Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



500th Bombardment Group


(Oct 44-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 500th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943 and activated on 20 Nov. Equipped first with B-17's; later trained for combat with B-29's. Moved to Saipan, Jul-Nov 1944, for service with Twentieth AF. Entered combat on 11 Nov 1944 with an attack against a submarine base in the Truk Islands. On 24 Nov participated in the first attack on Japan by B-29's based in the Marianas. After that, conducted many daylight raids, operating from high altitude to bomb strategic targets in Japan. Struck the Mitsubishi aircraft engine plant at Nagoya in Jan 1945 and received a DUC for the mission. Bombed enemy airfields and other installations on Kyushu in support of the Allied assault on Okinawa in Apr 1945. Beginning in Mar 1945, flew missions at night and at low altitude to drop incendiaries on area targets in Japan. Received second DUC for incendiary attacks on the urban-industrial section of Osaka, feeder industries at Hamamatsu, and shipping and rail targets on Kyushu, in Jun 1945. Released propaganda leaflets over the Japanese home islands, Jul-Aug 1945. Dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners in Japan, Korea, China, and Formosa after the war. Returned to the US in Oct 1945. Inactivated on 17 Jan 1946.

Consolidated 31 Jan 84 with the 500th Air Refueling Wg, which was constituted and activated 15 Nov 62, organized 1 Jan 63, discontinued and inactivated 15 Dec 64.

Assignments:  Twentieth AF, Jul 1944. 17th Strategic Aerospace Div 1 Jan-1 Jul 1963, 40th Air Div -1964.

Squadrons:  881st: 1943-1946. 882d: 1943-1946. 883d: 1943-1946. 884th: 1943-1944.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, 12 Jan 1944; Walker AAFld, Kan, 16 Apr-13 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 18 Sep 1944-21 Oct 1945; March Field, Calif, 24 Oct 1945-17 Jan 1946. Selfridge AFB MI 1963-1964.

Commanders:  Unkn, Nov 1943-Jan 1944; Maj Ralph A Reeve, 28 Jan 1944; Maj John E Gay, 7 Feb 1944; Lt Col John E Dougherty, 8 Mar 1944; Col Richard T King Jr, 5 May 1944; Col John E Dougherty, 5 Dec 1944; Lt Col William L McDowell Jr, 4 Dec 1945; Maj James H Coats, 19 Dec 1945-17 Jan 1946.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 15-20 Jun 1945.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:

500th Bomb Group

500th Air Refueling Wing

500th Air Refueling Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



881st Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 881st Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 17 Jan 1946. Consolidated 18 Sep 1985 with the 1st Tactical Missile Sq as the 1st Tactical Missile Sq (not active).

Assignments:  500th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-17 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, c. 16 Dec 1943; Walker AAFM, Kan, 16 Apr-23 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 19 Sep 1944-15 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, 29 Nov 1945-17 Jan 1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 11 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945; subsequently flew supplies to POW camps in Japan, Korea, and Formosa.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 15-20 Jun 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



882nd Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 882d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 17 Jan 1946.

Assignments:  500th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-17 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFM, NM, c. 16 Dec 1943; Walker AAFld, Kan, 16 Apr-23 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 19 Sep 1944-15 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, 29 Nov 1945-17 Jan 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 11 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945; subsequently flew supplies to POW camps in Japan, Korea, and Formosa.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 15-20 Jun 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



883d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 883d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 19 Nov 1943. Activated on 20 Nov 1943. Inactivated on 17 Jan 1946.

Assignments:  500th Bombardment Group, 20 Nov 1943-17 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Gowen Field, Idaho, 20 Nov 1943; Clovis AAFld, NM, c. 16 Dec 1943; Walker AAFld, Kan, 16 Apr-23 Jul 1944; Isley Field, Saipan, 19 Sep 1944-15 Nov 1945; March Field, Calif, 29 Nov 1945-17 Jan 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 11 Nov 1944-14 Aug 1945; subsequently flew supplies to POW camps in Japan, Korea, and Formosa.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Nagoya, Japan, 23 Jan 1945; Japan, 15-20 Jun 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



18th Photo Lab

Activated 20 Nov 43 at Gowen Fld, ID.

Table of Contents



330th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
52nd Air Engineering Sq
301st Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



XXI Bomber Command

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as XXI Bomber Command on 1 Mar 1944 and activated the same day. Assigned to Second AF. Moved to the Marianas late in 1944 and assigned to Twentieth AF, engaged in very-long range bombardment operations until mid-Jul 1945. The history of XXI Bomber Command terminated on 16 Jul 1945. (On that date Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, XXI Bomber Command was redesignated Headquarters Squadron, Twentieth AF. This redesignation, which brought an end to XXI Bomber Command as an establishment, had no effect on the lineage of Twentieth AF.)

Wings:  58th: 1945. 73d: 1944-1945. 313th: 1944-1945. 314th: 1944-1945. 315th: 1945.

Stations:  Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Mar 1944; Peterson Field, Colo, 11 Jun-20 Oct 1944; Harmon Field, Guam, 4 Dec 1944-16 Jul 1945.

Commanders:  Col John B Montgomery, 7 Apr 1944; Brig Gen Roger M Ramey, 15 Jun 1944; Brig Gen Haywood S Hansel1 Jr, 28 Aug 1944; Maj Gen Curtis E LeMay, 20 Jan-16 Jul 1945.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  None.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:

XXI Bomber Command Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



35th Photographic Technical Unit

Source:


This unit provided the quantitative reproduction of photographs required by XXI bomber command. It also performed detailed interpretations of the photographs for these units.

This unit was activated as a Photographic Laboratory in Salinas, Kansas on April 1, 1944 and became the 35th Photographic Technical Unit. Assigned to XXI Bomber Command.

Stations:  Salina, Kansas 3 Jun-5 Jul 1944; Peterson Field, Colorado 6 Jul-3 Nov 1944; Fort Lawton, Washington 5-10 Nov 1944; San Francisco, California 13-16 Nov 1944; Pearl Harbor, TH 23-26 Nov 1944; Eniwetok 4-8 Dec 1944; Harmon Field, Guam 12 Dec 1944-.

Table of Contents



313th Bombardment Wing

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 313 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 15 Apr 1944. Activated on 23 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 15 Jun 1948. Redesignated 313 Air Division on 3 Jan 1955. Activated on 1 Mar 1955. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1991.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 23 Apr 1944; XXI Bomber Command, 8 Jun 1944; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul 1945; Thirteenth Air Force, 13 Mar 1946-15 Jun 1948. Fifth Air Force, 1 Mar 1955-1 Oct 1991.

Components

Wings:  18 Fighter-Bomber (later, 18 Tactical Fighter): attached 1 Mar 1955-1 Feb 1957; assigned 10 Nov 1958-1 Oct 1991 (detached 28 Jan-13 Jun 1968). 51 Fighter Interceptor: 1 Mar 1955-31 May 1971. 374 Tactical Airlift: 1 Nov 1968-31 May 1971.

Groups:  5 Bombardment (later, 5 Reconnaissance): 10 Jun 1946-5 Feb 1947; 15 Mar 1947-10 Jan 1948 (detached 7 Aug 1947-10 Jan 1948). 6 Bombardment: 28 Dec 1944-1 Jun 1947. 9 Bombardment: 28 Dec 1944-9 Jun 1947. 383 Bombardment: 12 Sep-19 Dec 1945. 498 Tactical Missile: 8 Feb 1961-31 Dec 1969 (detached entire period). 504 Bombardment: 23 Dec 1944-15 Jun 1946. 505 Bombardment: 23 Dec-30 Jun 1946. 509 Composite: 29 May-c. 17 Oct 1945 (detached for all or most of this period). 581 Air Resupply: 1 Mar 1955 18 Sep 1956 (detached entire period).

Squadrons:  1 Reconnaissance: attached c. 11 Feb-c. Apr 1946. 5 Reconnaissance: 15 Jun 1946-3 Feb 1947. 15 Tactical Reconnaissance: 25 Apr 1960-20 Apr 1970 (detached to 18 Tactical Fighter Wing, 25 Apr 1960-20 Apr 1970). 24 Combat Mapping: 1 Apr-15 Jun 1946. 38 Reconnaissance: 15 Mar-20 Apr 1947. 322 Troop Carrier: 18 Sep 1956-12 Feb 1957. 336 Fighter-Day: attached 1 Feb-8 Dec 1957 (not operational 1 Nov-8 Dec 1957).

Stations:  Peterson Field, CO, 23 Apr 1944; Colorado Springs, CO, 1 Jun 1944; Peterson Field, CO, 14 Jun-5 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 24 Dec 1944; Clark Field (later, Air Base), Luzon, Philippine Islands, 17 Feb 1946-15 Jun 1948. Kadena AB, Okinawa, 1 Mar 1955-1 Oct 1991.

Commanders:  Brig Gen John H. Davies, 23 Apr 1944; Brig Gen George W. Mundy, 25 Aug 1945; Col Herbert K. Baisley, 19 May 1947; Brig Gen Robert C. Oliver, 12 Jun-6 Aug 1947; none (not manned), 7 Aug 1947-15 Jun 1948. Maj Gen Fay R. Upthegrove, 1 Mar 1955; Col Curtis D. Sluman, 11 Jul 1955; Brig Gen William G. Hipps, 3 Sep 1955; Brig Gen Dale O. Smith, 8 Jan 1958; Col Wallace C. Barrett, 14 Aug 1958; Maj Gen Dale O. Smith, 24 Oct 1958; Col John H. de Russy, 28 Sep 1961; Maj Gen Robert M. Stillman, 5 Oct 1961; Maj Gen Albert P. Clark, 18 Jul 1963; Col James W. Newsome, 19 Jul 1965; Maj Gen Jay T. Robbins, 31 Jul 1965; Maj Gen Jerry D. Page, 1 Mar 1967; Maj Gen Oris B. Johnson, 6 Aug 1969; Maj Gen Lawrence F. Tanberg, 30 Aug 1971; Brig Gen Robert F. Titus, 29 May 1973; Brig Gen Clyde F. McClain, 3 Aug 1973; Maj Gen Walter H. Baxter III, 9 Jun 1976; Brig Gen James R. Brown, 22 Aug 1978; Brig Gen Thomas G. McInerney, 11 Feb 1981; Maj Gen Michael A. Nelson, 8 Jun 1983; Brig Gen Donald Snyder, 5 Jul 1984; Brig Gen Keith B. Connolly, 25 Aug 1986; Brig Gen Peter D. Robinson, 11 Sep 1987; Brig Gen Ralph T. Browning, 18 Aug 1988; Brig Gen Joseph E. Hurd, 17 Aug 1990-c. 1 Oct 1991.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1944-1947; B-29/F-13, 1946-1947; C-46, 1946-1947; C-47, 1946; F-7, 1946-1947; L-5, 1946; F-2, 1947-1948; FB-17, 1947. F-86, 1955-1957; SA-16, 1956-1957; C-54, 1956-1957; C-119, 1956-1957; F-100, 1957-1963; F-102, 1959-1964, 1966-1971; RF-101, 1960-1967; F-105, 1962-1972; F-4, 1964-1966, 1971-1981; RF-4, 1967-1989; C-130, 1968-1971, 1972-1977; F-106, 1968; MC-130, 1977-1991; F-15, 1979-1991; E-3, 1991; KC-135, 1991.

Operations:  After training in the United States, the 313th deployed to the Pacific, and by Dec 1944 , subordinate units began flying missions, initially against Iwo Jima, the Truk Islands, and other Japanese held areas. Later, they flew incendiary raids on area targets in Japan, participated in mining operations in the Shimonoseki Strait, and contributed to the blockade of the Japanese Empire by mining harbors in Japan and Korea. In Apr 1945 the 313th assisted the invasion of Okinawa by bombing Japanese airfields used by kamikaze pilots. After the Japanese surrender in Aug, its units dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and participated in show-of-force flights over Japan. Early in 1946, the 313th transferred to the Philippine Islands where it conducted Bombardment training, aerial reconnaissance and mapping and construction projects. In Mar 1955, the organization assumed responsibility for air defense of the Ryukyu Islands and tactical operations in the Far East, maintaining assigned forces at the highest possible degree of combat readiness. In addition, it supported Fifth Air Force in the development, planning, and coordination of requirements for future Air Force operations in the Ryukyu Islands. The division also supported numerous exercises such as Cope Thunder, Cope Diamond, Team Spirit, and Cope North.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific (Air).

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1965-31 Dec 1966; 1 Oct 1979-31 May 1980; 1 Jun 1981-31 May 1983; 1 Jun 1983-31 May 1984; 1 Jun 1984-31 May 1986; 1 Jun 1989-31 May 1991.

Emblem:  On a shield azure, a silhouetted futuramic aircraft, volant in dexter chief, Air Force blue, fimbriated argent, with vapor trail forming an acute angular pattern from the aircraft to dexter base, the trail between three stars arched in bend sinister, one to chief, two to dexter of trail, all of the third, in sinister base an eagle volant of the second, fimbriated and detailed argent, grasping with his talons two bolts of lightning of the last. (Approved 15 Jul 1957.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Oct 1991.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Oct 1991.



Other Sites of Interest:

313th Air Division Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



6th Bombardment Group



(Jan-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 3 Observation Group, and organized, on 30 Sep 1919. Redesignated: 6 Group (Observation) on 14 Mar 1921; 6 Group (Composite) in Jun 1922; 6 Composite Group on 25 Jan 1923; 6 Bombardment Group on 1 Sep 1937; 6 Bombardment Group (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 6 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 12 Dec 1940. Disestablished on 1 Nov 1943. Reestablished, and consolidated (29 Jun 1944) with the 6 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, which was established on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 18 Oct 1948. Redesignated 6 Bombardment Group, Medium on 20 Dec 1950. Activated on 2 Jan 1951. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated: 6 Strategic Group on 31 Jul 1985; 6 Operations Group on 1 Jul 1996. Activated on 1 Oct 1996.

Assignments:  Panama Canal Department, 30 Sep 1919; 19 Composite Wing (later, 19 Wing; 19 Bombardment Wing), 25 Jan 1933; VI Bomber Command, 25 Oct 1941-1 Nov 1943. Second Air Force, 1 Apr 1944; 313 Bombardment Wing, 23 Apr 1944; 1 Air Division, 1 Jun 1947-18 Oct 1948. 6 Bombardment Wing, 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952. 6 Air Refueling (later, 6 Air Mobility) Wing, 1 Oct 1996-.

Components

Squadrons:  3 Bombardment: 1 Feb 1940-1 Nov 1943. 5 Aero: 24 Oct 1919-24 Mar 1920 (detached entire period). 6 Air Refueling: 10 Apr-1 Aug 1951 (detached entire period). 7 Aero (later, 7 Observation; 7 Reconnaissance; 397 Bombardment): assigned 30 Sep 1919-1 Feb 1940, attached 1 Feb 1940-25 Feb 1942, assigned 25 Feb 1942-1 Nov 1943. 24 Bombardment: 1 Apr 1944-18 Oct 1948; 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952). 24 Aero (later, 24 Pursuit): assigned 27 May 1922-8 May 1929, attached 8 May 1929-1 Dec 1932. 25 Bombardment: 27 May 1922-12 May 1943. 29 Bombardment: 12 May-1 Nov 1943. 39 Bombardment: 1 Apr 1944-18 Oct 1948; 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952). 40 Bombardment: 1 Apr 1944-18 Oct 1948; 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952). 41 Bombardment: 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 44 Observation: 1 Apr 1931-1 Sep 1937. 74 Bombardment: 1 Feb 1940-9 Aug 1942; 12 May-1 Nov 1943. 78 Pursuit: attached 1 Apr 1931-1 Dec 1932. 91 Air Refueling: 1 Oct 1996-. 310 Airlift: 1 Jan 2001-. 395 Bombardment: 9 Aug 1942-12 May 1943. 911 Air Refueling: 12 Apr 2008-.

Stations:  France Field, Canal Zone, 30 Sep 1919; Rio Hato AB, Panama, 9 Dec 1941; Albrook Field, Canal Zone, 14 Jan 1943; Howard Field, Canal Zone, Oct-1 Nov 1943. Dalhart AAFld, TX, 1 Apr 1944; Grand Island AAFld, NE, 19 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, c. Feb 1946; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 1 Jun 1947-18 Oct 1948. Walker AFB, NM, 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952. MacDill AFB, FL, 1 Oct 1996-.

Commanders:  Lt Col Millard F. Harmon Jr., 30 Sep 1919; Maj Raycroft Walsh, 22 Mar 1921; Maj Follett Bradley, 3 Aug 1923; Maj Roy M. Jones, 10 Jul 1926; Lt Col A. G. Fisher, 24 Aug 1926; Maj Leo G. Heffernan, 4 Jul 1931; Lt Col Lewis H. Brereton, 2 Dec 1931; Lt Col Junius H. Houghton, 20 Jun 1935; Lt Col Richard H. Ballard, 18 Jul 1936; Lt Col William O. Butler, 31 Dec 1936; Lt Col Vernon L. Burge, 22 Jun 1939; Lt Col Edwin J. House, 30 Aug 1939; Maj Samuel M. Connell, c. Sep 1940-Feb 1941; Col Henry K. Mooney, 15 Sep 1941-20 Jan 1943; unkn, 20 Jan-1 Nov 1943. None (not manned), 1-18 Apr 1944; Maj William E. Taylor, 19 Apr 1944; Lt Col Howard D. Kenzie, 28 Apr 1944; Col Kenneth H. Gibson, 17 Jun 1944; Lt Col Theodore W. Tucker, 31 Aug 1945; Col John P. Kenny, 29 Aug 1946; Col Frank P. Sturdivant, 4 Dec 1946-unkn. None (not manned), 15 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952. Col Patrick T. Sakole, 1 Oct 1996; Col Vern M. Findley II, 2 Aug 1997; Col Timothy D. Gann, 13 May 1998; Col Alfred J. Stewart, 17 Apr 2000; Col Robert C. Kane, 15 Apr 2002; Col Brian Kelly, 22 Jul 2003; Col Scott A. Brumbaugh, 22 Apr 2005; Col Jon D. Klaus, 4 May 2007-.

Aircraft:  During 1917-1919 period, included JN-4, R-3 (R-9), and R-4. During 1919-1931 period, included JN-4, DH-4, HS2L, OA-1, O-2, NBS-1, P-12, SE-5, MB-3, and PW-9. During 1928-1932 period, included LB-5, LB-6, and LB-7. During 1930-1936 period, included OA-4. O-19, 1930-1937; B-3, 1931-1936; B-6, 1936-1937; B-10, 1936-1939; B-18, 1938-1943; B-17, 1941-1943; LB-30, 1942-1943; B-24, 1942-1943; A-17, 1942-1943; L-4, 1943; RB-17, 1943. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1947. KC-135, 1996-; EC-135, 1997-2003; CT-43, 1997-2001; C-37, 2001-.

Operations:  Participated in training exercises, maneuvers, and patrols in defense of the Panama Canal, 1919-1943. During this period, the group also took part in aerial photography missions, aerial reviews, and good will flights to Central and South American countries. In Jan 1939, it flew mercy missions to Santiago, Chile, for the relief of earthquake victims. Antisubmarine patrols, 7 Dec 1941-12 Sep 1943. Trained for heavy bombardment combat operations, first with B-17s and then with B-29s, Apr-Nov 1944. It moved to the Mariana Islands in Nov 1944, from where it raided Iwo Jima, Truk, and Japan. At first the group flew high altitude daylight missions, but in Mar 1945, it began to fly low level night incendiary raids against Japanese cities. Earned a DUC for a 25 May mission against Tokyo. Earned a second DUC for mining missions around Japan and the Japanese-occupied Korean peninsula in Jul 1945. To support the American invasion of Okinawa in Apr 1945, the group bombed Kamikaze airfields in Kyushu. Immediately after the war, it participated in show-of-force flights over Japan and dropped food and other relief supplies to newly freed Allied prisoners of war. Moved to Philippines between Jan and Mar 1946 and to Ryukyu Islands in Jun 1947. Inactivated in Okinawa in Oct 1948. During a brief period of activation between 2 Jan 1951 and 16 Jun 1952, the group had only one officer and one airman assigned. Activated again on 1 Oct 1996 with an air refueling mission. Elements deployed to Southwest Asia in Jul 1998 to refuel aircraft engaged in no-fly operations over northern Iraq. After Jan 2001, the group also provided airlift for the commanders of U.S. Central Command and U.S. Special Operations Command. It also refueled fighters providing security over the southeastern United States as part of homeland security after terrorist attacks against the United States in Sep 2001. Since 2001, personnel and aircraft deployed around the world to fulfill air refueling and aeromedical missions.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Tokyo, Japan, 25 May 1945; Japanese Empire, 9-19 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: [1 Oct] 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jun 2006.

Emblem:  Group will use the wing emblem with the group designation in the scroll.

Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2005.

Supersedes statement prepared on 11 Dec 2006.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, Commanders, and Honors through 5 Jan 2009.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (6th Air Mobility Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 6 Bombardment Wing, Medium on 20 Dec 1950. Activated on 2 Jan 1951. Redesignated: 6 Bombardment Wing, Heavy on 16 Jun 1952; 6 Strategic Aerospace Wing on 1 May 1962; 6 Strategic Wing on 25 Mar 1967; 6 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing on 1 Apr 1988. Inactivated on 1 Sep 1992. Redesignated 6 Air Base Wing on 22 Dec 1993. Activated on 4 Jan 1994. Redesignated: 6 Air Refueling Wing on 1 Oct 1996; 6 Air Mobility Wing on 1 Jan 2001.

Assignments:  Eighth Air Force, 2 Jan 1951; 47 Air (later, 47 Strategic Aerospace) Division, 10 Feb 1951 (attached to 3 Air Division, 31 Oct 1955-26 Jan 1956); 22 Strategic Aerospace Division, 1 Jul 1963; 12 Strategic Aerospace Division, 1 Jul 1965; 18 Strategic Aerospace Division, 25 Mar 1967; 12 Strategic Aerospace Division, 2 Jul 1968; 14 Strategic Aerospace Division, 30 Jun 1971; 47 Air Division, 1 Oct 1976; 14 Air Division, 1 Oct 1985; 3 Air Division, 9 Aug 1990; Fifteenth Air Force, 1 Apr-1 Sep 1992. Ninth Air Force, 4 Jan 1994; Twenty-First Air Force, 1 Oct 1996; Eighteenth Air Force, 1 Oct 2003-.

Components

Groups:  6 Bombardment (later, 6 Operations): 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952; 1 Oct 1996-.

Squadrons:  6 Air Refueling: 3 Jan 1958-25 Jan 1967. 24 Bombardment (later, 24 Strategic Reconnaissance): attached 2 Jan 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jan 1967; assigned 25 Mar 1967-7 Jul 1992. 39 Bombardment: attached 2 Jan 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-15 Sep 1963. 40 Bombardment: attached 2 Jan 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jan 1967. 307 Air Refueling: attached c. 1 Aug 1951-16 Jun 1952. 310 Air Refueling: 25 Jun 1965-25 Jan 1967. 579 Strategic Missile: 1 Sep 1961-25 Mar 1965. 4129 Combat Crew Training: 1 Aug 1959-15 Sep 1963.

Stations:  Walker AFB, NM, 2 Jan 1951; Eielson AFB, AK, 25 Mar 1967-1 Sep 1992. MacDill AFB, FL, 4 Jan 1994-.

Commanders:  Col Thomas S. Jeffrey Jr., 2 Jan 1951; Col William K. Martin, 15 Jan 1951; Col Glen W. Martin, 20 May 1955; Col Everett W. Best, 21 Sep 1956; Col Daniel V. MacDonald, 3 Jun 1957; Lt Col Lewis R. Riley, 15 Aug 1957; Col Edwin C. Evans, 16 Sep 1957; Col Everett W. Best, 23 Sep 1957; Col Donald E. Hillman, 23 Feb 1960; Col Ernest C. Eddy, 18 Jul 1962; Col Floyd H. Haywood Jr., 15 Jul 1963; Col Richard M. Hoban, 15 Apr 1965; Col Lester F. Miller, 15 Jun 1965; Col George P. Cole, 9 Jul 1966; Col Rowland H. Worrell Jr., 2 Sep 1966; Col Martin E. Plocher, 25 Mar 1967; Col Ray M. Watkins, 11 Jul 1967; Col Leslie W. Brockwell, 4 Jun 1969; Col Melford W. Lewis, 23 Jun 1970; Col Doyle F. Reynolds, 5 Jun 1972; Col Joe L. Church, 6 Dec 1973; Col William J. Campbell, 11 Jul 1974; Col Donald M. Griffin, 7 Oct 1975; Col Jimmy S. Lassetter, 28 May 1976; Col John A. Dale, 4 Oct 1977; Col William R. Perry, 26 Nov 1979; Col Benjamin F. Schneider Jr., 20 Jul 1981; Col Mark J. Heller, 29 Jul 1983; Col James W. Morrow Jr., 3 Oct 1984; Col Thomas W. Young, 14 Jul 1986; Col James L. Holmes Jr., 18 Nov 1987; Col George R. Warner, 10 Mar 1989; Col William G. Manire Jr., 18 Jun 1990; Col James E. Andrews, 13 Jun 1991-1 Sep 1992. Col Charles T. Ohlinger III, 4 Jan 1994; Brig Gen John D. Becker, 28 Jun 1996; Brig Gen James N. Soligan, 21 Nov 1997; Brig Gen Arthur F. Diehl III, 30 Jun 1999; Brig Gen William W. Hodges, 1 Aug 2001; Col David M. Snyder, 10 Jan 2003-.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-29, 1951-1952; KB-29, 1951-1952; B-36, 1952-1957; B-52, 1957- 1967; Atlas, 1962-1965; KC-135, 1958-1967, 1967-1992; RC-135, 1967- 1992; TC-135, 1985-1992. KC-135, 1996-; EC-135, 1997-2003; CT-43, 1997-2001; C-37, 2001-.

Operations:  Conducted strategic bombardment training from activation in 1951 until 1 Sep 1959, with air refueling as additional mission in 1951-1952, and again from Apr 1958 until Jan 1967. Deployed at Andersen AFB, Guam, Oct 1955-Jan 1956. Two bombardment squadrons (24th and 30th) joined the 4129 CCTS in Sep 1959, training B-52 and KC-135 crews, while the 40 Bombardment Squadron continued flying operational missions until 10 Jun 1960. From 10 Jun 1960 to 1 Dec 1961 the wing flew a few operational missions in a non-combat ready status. A missile squadron joined the wing's resources in Sep 1961. The 40 Bombardment Squadron returned to operational status on 1 Dec 1961, and on 5 Sep 1963 the other two bomb squadrons also regained tactical status. The 39 Bombardment Squadron discontinued a few days later, but the 24th and 40th Bombardment Squadrons continued global bombardment training through Dec 1966, when they phased down for inactivation. The missile squadron phased out its Atlas operations in Feb 1965 and inactivated a month later. On 25 Mar 1967, the wing moved without personnel or equipment to Eielson AFB, AK, where it replaced the 4157 Strategic Wing and assumed resources and missions of that wing. In Alaska, the wing flew RC-135 strategic reconnaissance missions with an assigned squadron, and, with KC-135s deployed to Eielson from SAC, AFRES, and the ANG, conducted Alaska Task Force (ATTF) missions to support reconnaissance and numerous exercises for the Air Force and Navy. From Apr 1968 to Jul 1972 the wing periodically served as the airborne monitor of the Alaskan ballistic missile early warning station. The wing maintained a detachment at Shemya AFS, in the Aleutians, and operated from there, Feb-May 1975 and Jun-Sep 1976, when Eielson closed for repair of earthquake damage. Won the P.T. Cullen Award for greatest contributions to the photo and signal intelligence efforts of Strategic Air Command, 1973, 1978, and 1983. Wing became inoperational in Jul 1992 and inactivated in Sep of that year. After activation in Jan 1994, maintained MacDill AFB. In Oct 1996, assumed an aerial refueling mission. Provided refueling support for global mobility requirements and later also for fighters flying homeland security missions over the southeastern United States. Deployed tanker aircraft and crews to Southwest Asia to support no-fly zone operations over northern Iraq in Jul 1998. In Jan 2001, the wing added an airlift mission, providing airlift for leaders of U.S. Central Command and U.S. Special Operations Command. Since 11 Sep 2001, deployed to forward locations in support of Global War on Terrorism; transported military leaders and combatant commanders; provided medical evacuation from overseas theater of operations.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 May 1960-31 May 1962; 1 Jul 1971- 30 Jun 1973; 1 Jul 1973-30 Jun 1975; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1978; 1 Jul 1978- 30 Jun 1980; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1982; 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jun 1994-31 May 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 6 Operations Group prior to 2 Jan 1951. Service Streamers. None. Campaign Streamers. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citations: Tokyo, Japan, 25 May 1945; Japanese Empire, 9-19 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  Or, pily of twelve Gules, overall a base Azure supporting a sailing ship with sails set affronte Sable, sails Argent, between two mounts issuing from dexter and sinister Vert, below a shooting star in dexter chief and a bi-wing aircraft, viewed from below Argent, garnished Sable, in sinister chief; all within a diminished bordure of the first. Motto. PARATI DEFENDERE - Ready to defend. Approved for the 6th Group on 22 Jan 1924 and adopted by the 6th Wing on 18 Mar 1955 (KE 2549); replaced by emblem approved on 21 Oct 1980 (KE 7162); original emblem reinstated on 20 Sep 1988 (KE 2549).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 11 Dec 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Jun 2003.


Other Sites of Interest:

The 6th Bomb Group

B-29 Superfortress Then and Now

6th Air Mobility Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



24th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 24th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 18 Oct 1948. Redesignated 24th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 20 Dec 1950. Activated on 2 Jan 1951. Redesignated 24th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 16 Jun 1952. Constituted 1967 as 24th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron and activated, organized 25 Mar 67, consolidated 19 Sep 85 with 24th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, inactivated 8 Jul 92. Redesignated 24th Reconnaissance Squadron and activated (unknown), inactivated 1 Jul 94.

Assignments:  6th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-18 Oct 1948. 6th Bombardment Group, 2 Jan 1951; 6th Bombardment (later Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 16 Jun 1952. 6th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing 25 Mar 67-8 Jul 92, 55th Operations Group unknown-1994.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Apr 1944; Grand Island AAFld, Neb, 26 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1945; Clark Field, Luzon, 13 Mar 1946; Kadena, Okinawa, 1 Jun 1947-18 Oct 1948. Walker AFB, NM, 2 Jan 1951-16 Jun 1952. Eielson AFB 25 Mar 67-8 Jul 92. Eareckson AFB (unknown), Offutt AFB unknown -1 Jul 94.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1947. B-29, 1951-1952; B-36, 1952-1957; B-52, 1957-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 27 Jan-14 Aug 1945. No personnel assigned, 25 Apr 1947-18 Oct 1948. While retaining combat capability, trained B-52 crews for Strategic Air Command, 15 Ju1 1959-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Tokyo, Japan, 25 May 1945; Japanese Empire, 9-19 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 May 1960-31 May 1962.

Emblem:  On a disc per fess debased, light turquoise blue and light yellow, edged in black, a caricatured black cat with gold halo above head, standing on base segment, wearing yellow orange gloves and yellow orange trunks with black polka dots, holding in the right forepaw a large brown club, and in the left forepaw a red firecracker, lighted at the fuse, proper. (Approved 24 Nov 1944.)

Source:  sacpatches.com

This design (black cat) was worn through the Squadron's B-29 and B-36 era and well into it's B-52 era. On October 23, 1964 a new design with a delta shaped aircraft and 24 stars was approved. The new design was worn by the 24th Bombardment Squadron until it was inactivated on January 25, 1967.

Table of Contents



39th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II


Lineage:  Constituted 39th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 18 Oct 1948. Redesignated 39th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 20 Dec 1950. Activated on 2 Jan 1951. Redesignated 39th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 16 Jun 1952. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 15 Sep 1963. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 9th Air Commando Squadron (Psychological Operations), which was constituted and activated on 9 Jan 1967. Organized on 25 Jan 1967. Redesignated 9th Special Operations Squadron on 1 Aug 1968. Inactivated on 29 Feb 1972. Activated on 1 Mar 1988.

Assignments:  6th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944–18 Oct 1948. 6th Bombardment Group, 2 Jan 1951; 6th Bombardment (later, 6th Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 16 Jun 1952–15 Sep 1963. Pacific Air Forces, 9 Jan 1967; 14th Air Commando (later, 14th Special Operations) Wing, 25 Jan 1967; 315th Tactical Airlift Wing, 30 Sep 1971–29 Feb 1972. 39th Special Operations Wing, 1 Mar 1988; 1st Special Operations Wing, 18 Apr 1989; 1st Special Operations (later, 16th Operations) Group, 22 Sep 1992–.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, TX, 1 Apr 1944; Grand Island AAFld, NE, 26 May–18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 13 Mar 1946; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 1 Jun 1947–18 Oct 1948. Walker AFB, NM, 2 Jan 1951–15 Sep 1963. Pleiku AB, South Vietnam, 25 Jan 1967; Nha Trang AB, South Vietnam, 1 Sep 1967; Tuy Hoa AB, South Vietnam, 5 Sep 1969; Phan Rang AB, South Vietnam, 15 Aug 1970–29 Feb 1972. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Mar 1988–.

Aircraft:  B–17, 1944; B–29, 1944–1947. B–29, 1951–1952; B–36, 1952–1957; B–52, 1957–1963. C–47, 1967–1972; U–10, 1967; O–2, 1967–1972. HC–130, 1988–.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 27 Jan–14 Aug 1945. No personnel assigned, 25 Apr 1947–18 Oct 1948. While retaining combat capability, trained B–52 crews for Strategic Air Command 15 Jul 1959–Sep 1963. Combat in Southeast Asia, Mar 1967–Jan 1972. Trained for special operations, refueling and resupply missions using modified C–130 aircraft, 1988–. Combat in Panama, 20 Dec 1989–14 Jan 1990 and Southwest Asia, 16 Jan–5 Apr 1991.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Steamers:  World War II: Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989–1990.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Tokyo, Japan, 25 May 1945; Japanese Empire, 9–19 Jul 1945. Presidential Unit Citations: Vietnam, 1–7 Mar 1967; Vietnam, 21 Jun 1968–30 Jun 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" device: 16 Jun 1967–20 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1970–30 Jun 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 May 1960–31 May 1962; 1 May 1988–30 Apr 1990; 16 Apr 1992–15 Apr 1994. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Crosses with Palm: [Mar] 1967–1 Aug 1968; 16 Jun 1967–[9 Jan] 1972; 1 Jan–30 Aug 1968; 5 Oct 1971–[9] Jan 1972.

Emblem (39th BS):  On a disc per pale azure and white, a red pile between an Air Force golden yellow lightning bolt issuing from dexter and a SAC ribbon, light blue spattered with white stars issuing from sinister, bath diminishing and terminating at base honor point; over all a black silhouetted bat in flight upward, speed lines black, highlights white below a black and white target issuing from chief; all within an Air Force golden yellow border. Motto: On a white scroll edged and inscribed Air Force blue, PER TARTARUM AD METAM, Through Hell Against the Target. (Approved 11 Apr 1961.)

Emblem (9th SOS):  On an Ultramarine Azure disc bordered with Air Force Or, an Argent snow owl clutches a Gules commando knife. An Argent crescent moon on the sinister side of the disc is in the background. MOTTO: NIGHT WINGS. Approved on 7 Jul 1988 (DFSC 88–08490); replaced emblems approved on 7 Mar 1969 (KE 34397) and 11 Apr 1961 (K 12339).

Table of Contents



40th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 40th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 18 Oct 1948. Redesignated 40th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 20 Dec 1950. Activated on 2 Jan 1951. Redesignated 40th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 16 Jun 1952. Discontinued and inactivated 1 Jul 1967.

Assignments:  6th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-18 Oct 1948. 6th Bombardment Group, 2 Jan 1951; 6th Bombardment (later Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Apr 1944; Grand Island AAFld, Neb, 26 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 13 Mar 1946; Kadena, Okinawa, 1 Jun 1947-18 Oct 1948. Walker AFB, NM, 2 Jan 1951-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1947. B-29, 1951-1952; B-36,1952-1957; B-52,1957-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 27 Jan-14 Aug 1945. No personnel assigned, 25 Apr 1947-18 Oct 1948. While retaining combat capability, trained B-52 crews for Strategic Air Command, 10 Jun 1960-1 Jan 1962.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Tokyo, Japan, 25 May 1945; Japanese Empire, 9-19 Jul 1945, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 May 1960-31 May 1962.

Emblem:  On an Air Force blue disc edged white within a silver gray border, the SAC ribbon, bendwise, light blue spattered with white stars, between two white cloud formations, one issuing from dexter, on issuing from sinister (left) chief, shaded silver gray; over all a black mailed fist, winged white, shaded silver gray, highlighted white, grasping a red lightning flash palewise, highlighted whight, piercing in base the black center of a red and white target in perspective, five small black lightning flashes radiating upward from the target's center. (Approved 19 Apr 1962.)

Table of Contents



72nd Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
535th Air Engineering Sq
579th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



9th Bombardment Group


(Jan-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 9 Group (Observation) on 19 Jul 1922. Organized on 1 Aug 1922. Redesignated: 9 Observation Group on 25 Jan 1923; 9 Bombardment Group on 1 Mar 1935; 9 Bombardment Group (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 9 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 9 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 20 Oct 1948. Redesignated 9 Strategic Reconnaissance Group, and activated, on 1 May 1949. Redesignated: 9 Bombardment Group, Heavy, on 1 Apr 1950; 9 Bombardment Group, Medium, on 2 Oct 1950. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated: 9 Strategic Reconnaissance Group on 31 Jul 1985; 9 Operations Group on 29 Aug 1991. Activated on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  II Corps Area, 1 Aug 1922; 19 Composite Wing, 1 Apr 1931; II Corps Area, c. 25 Jan 1933; 2 Wing, 1 Mar 1935; 19 Bombardment Wing, 12 Nov 1940; VI Bomber Command, 25 Oct 1941 (attached to VI Interceptor [later, VI Fighter] Command, 28 Jan 1942-unkn 1942); AAF School of Applied Tactics (later, AAF Tactical Center), 31 Oct 1942; Second Air Force, 9 Mar 1944; 313 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, c. 28 Dec 1944; Twentieth Air Force, 9 Jun 1947-20 Oct 1948. 9 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 9 Bombardment) Wing, 1 May 1949-16 Jun 1952. 9 (later, 9 Reconnaissance) Wing, 1 Sep 1991-.

Components

Squadrons:  1 (later, 1 Observation; 1 Bombardment; 1 Strategic Reconnaissance; 1 Bombardment; 1 Reconnaissance): assigned 1 Aug 1922, attached 24 Mar 1923, assigned 15 Feb 1929-10 Oct 1948 (not operational, 15 Mar-30 Apr 1946, and Apr 1947-10 Oct 1948); assigned 1 Jun 1949-16 Jun 1952 (detached 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952); assigned 1 Sep 1991-. 5 (later, 5 Observation; 5 Bombardment; 5 Strategic Reconnaissance; 5 Bombardment; 5 Reconnaissance): assigned 1 Aug 1922, attached 24 Mar 1923, assigned 15 Feb 1929-20 Oct 1948 (not operational 16 May-c. 16 Sep 1946 and Apr 1947-10 Oct 1948); assigned 1 May 1949-16 Jun 1952 (detached 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952); assigned 1 Oct 1994-. 9 Air Refueling: 1 Aug 1951-16 Jun 1952 (detached entire period). 12 Reconnaissance: 8 Nov 2001-. 14 Bombardment: attached 1 Mar 1935-c. 8 May 1936. 18 Reconnaissance: attached 1 Sep 1936-c. Sep 1940; 3 Apr 2006-. 44 Reconnaissance (later, 430 Bombardment): attached 20 Nov 1940, assigned 25 Feb 1942-10 May 1944 (not operational Nov 1942-Mar 1943). 59 Bombardment: attached 6 Jan 1941-21 Jul 1942. 99 Observation (later, 99 Bombardment; 99 Strategic Reconnaissance; 99 Bombardment; 99 Reconnaissance): attached 9 Nov 1928, assigned 15 Feb 1929-20 Oct 1948 (not operational Nov 1942-Feb 1943, c. 15 Mar-27 Sep 1946, and Apr 1947-20 Oct 1948); assigned 1 May 1949-16 Jun 1952 (not operational 1-31 May 1949; detached 5 Aug-23 Sep 1950 and 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952); assigned 1 Sep 1991-. 349 Air Refueling: 1 Sep 1991-1 Jun 1992. 350 Air Refueling: 1 Sep 1991-1 Oct 1993.

Stations:  Mitchel Field, NY, 1 Aug 1922-6 Nov 1940; Rio Hato, Panama, 12 Nov 1940; Waller Field, Trinidad, 30 Oct 1941-31 Oct 1942; Orlando AB, FL, 31 Oct 1942; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 9 Mar 1944; McCook AAFld, NE, 19 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 15 Apr 1946; Harmon Field, Guam, 9 Jun 1947-20 Oct 1948. Fairfield-Suisun (later, Travis) AFB, CA, 1 May 1949-16 Jun 1952. Beale AFB, CA, 1 Sep 1991-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 1922-1929; Maj William O. Ryan, 1929-unkn; Col Follett Bradley, Jun 1933-May 1934; Col Walter H. Frank, 1934-1936; Lt Col Carl W. Connell, 1 Sep 1936; Col Ross F. Cole, Apr 1940; Maj Charles F. Born, Aug 1941; Lt Col Stuart P. Wright, Jan 1942; Lt Col Gerald E. Williams, 1942; Col Harry G. Montgomery, 10 Nov 1942; Col James T. Connally, 15 Dec 1942; Col Donald W. Eisenhart, 1 May 1944; Col Henry C. Huglin, 6 Mar 1945; Col David Wade, 17 Sep 1945-c. 25 Apr 1947; none (not manned), 25 Apr 1947-20 Oct 1948. Lt Col Walter Y. Lucas, 1 May 1949; Col Donald W. Eisenhart, 24 Aug 1949; Col William P Brett, 27 Mar 1950; Lt Col Walter Y. Lucas, 24 Jun 1950; Col Clifford J. Heflin, 6 Jul 1950-10 Feb 1951; none (not manned), 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952. Col Robert F. Behler, 22 Nov 1991; Col George A. Lafferty, 30 Jul 1993; Col James F. Shambo, 3 Jan 1995; Col James P. Hunt, 3 Sep 1996; Col R. Kent Traylor, 25 Jun 1998; Col Alan L. Vogel, 23 Aug 2000; Col Gregory D. Augst, 16 Jul 2002; Col Gregory A. Kern, 8 Jun 2004; Col Harry D. Polumbo, 15 May 2006-.

Aircraft:  Flew O-1, O-11, O-13, O-25, O-31, O-38, O-39, O-40, O-43, YO-31, YO-35, YO-40, OA-2, A-3, B-6, C-8,1922-1936; B-10, 1936-1938; B-18, 1938-1942; B-17, 1942-1944; B-24, 1942-1944; B-25, 1943-1944; B-26, 1943-1944; C-73, 1943-1944; B-29, 1944-1947. RB-17, 1949-1950; B-29, 1949-1951; RB-29, 1949-1950; B-36, 1949-1950. KC-135, 1991-1993; U-2, 1991-; T-38, 1991-; TR-1, 1991-1993; SR-71, 1995-1999; RQ-4, 2002-.

Operations:  Trained, took part in maneuvers, and participated in air shows, 1922-1940. Performed antisubmarine patrols and reconnaissance of the Vichy French fleet at Martinique, Dec 1941-Oct 1942, using B-18 aircraft from a base in Trinidad. Returned without personnel or equipment to the United States on 31 Oct 1942. The group trained cadres for heavy and medium bombardment units that had received ground instruction at the AAF School of Applied Tactics in Orlando, Florida. Developed operational bombardment tactics and tested special devices and equipment. After Mar 1944, prepared for combat. Moved to the Pacific theater at the end of the year and commenced operations late in Jan 1945 with attacks against Japanese-held Maug Island in the northern Marianas. After that, struck targets in Japan, at first flying high-altitude daylight missions against industrial targets. In Mar 1945, began incendiary raids at night. Earned a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for bombing the industrial area of Kawasaki in Apr 1945. In Apr and May, assisted the Allied assault on Okinawa by striking airfields that the Japanese were using to launch aircraft against the invasion force. Dropped mines in Japan's Inland Sea to disrupt enemy shipping, earning a second DUC in May 1945. Immediately after the war, dropped food and supplies to former Allied prisoners and took part in show-of-force missions over the Japanese home islands. After redesignation as a strategic reconnaissance group on 1 May 1949, flew missions from California, 1949-1950. Resumed a strategic bombardment mission in Apr 1950, training until Feb 1951. Since Sep 1991, conducted global high-altitude manned aerial reconnaissance and surveillance missions, using primarily U-2 aircraft. No other USAF group has flown the U-2 since turn of 21st century. During U.S. military operations in Afghanistan in late 2001 and Iraq in early 2003, the group also flew the unmanned RQ-4 Global Hawk aircraft. Served as DOD's sole manager for U-2 high-altitude reconnaissance assets, 2000-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Kawasaki, Japan, 15-16 Apr 1945; Japan, 13-28 May 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Sep 1991-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004.

Emblem:  Per pale vert and sable a pallet wavy argent; over all on a fess or four crosses patee of the second (sable). Crest: On a wreath of the colors (argent and vert) a rattlesnake entwined about a prickly pear cactus all proper. Motto: Semper Paratus - Always Ready. (Approved 20 Mar 1924.)  Group will use the wing emblem with the group designation in the scroll.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 4 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 4 Apr 2007.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (9th Reconnaissance Wing)


In 1956 the term "Dragon Lady" was born with a major Central Intelligence Agency operation by the same name using the U-2. "Dragon Lady" was the name of a popular comic strip during this time that seemed to represent the nature of U-2. The word dragon is associated with earlier British projects to gain information about German rocket programs. Eventually, in the reconnaissance world, the term dragon was used to refer to individuals processing scientific or technical information.  (Source: 5th Reconnaissance Squadron History)
SOLUM VOLAMUS = We Fly Alone

"Habu" was a nickname given to the SR-71 by local islanders on Okinawa after a highly respected island snake.

Lineage:  Established as 9 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing on 25 Apr 1949. Activated on 1 May 1949. Redesignated as: 9 Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 1 Apr 1950; 9 Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 2 Oct 1950; 9 Strategic Aerospace Wing on 1 Apr 1962; 9 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing on 25 Jun 1966; 9 Wing on 1 Sep 1991; 9 Reconnaissance Wing on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  311 Air Division, 1 May 1949; Second Air Force, 1 Nov 1949; Fifteenth Air Force, 1 Apr 1950; 14 Air Division, 10 Feb 1951; Fifteenth Air Force, 1 May 1953 (attached to 7 Air Division, 23 May-11 Jul 1955; 3 Air Division, 3-22 Oct 1955 and 1 Oct 1957-c. 10 Jan 1958); 813 Air (later, 813 Strategic Aerospace) Division, 15 Jul 1959; 14 Strategic Aerospace (later, 14 Air) Division, 25 Jun 1966; Second Air Force, 1 Sep 1991; Twelfth Air Force, 1 Jul 1993; Eighth Air Force, 1 Oct 2002; Twelfth Air Force (Air Forces Southern), 1 Oct 2009-.

Components

Wings:  5 Strategic Reconnaissance: attached 12 Nov 1949-10 Feb 1951.

Groups:  5 Strategic Reconnaissance: attached 9 Nov 1949-10 Feb 1951. 9 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 9 Bombardment; 9 Operations): 1 May 1949-16 Jun 1952; 1 Sep 1991-.

Squadrons:  1 Bombardment (later, 1 Strategic Reconnaissance): attached 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-1 Sep 1991. 5 Bombardment (later, 5 Strategic Reconnaissance Training): attached 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1966; assigned 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1990. 9 Air Refueling: 16 Jun 1952-15 Dec 1965 (detached 16 Jun 1952-30 Apr 1953). 38 Reconnaissance: attached 26 May-1 Jun 1949. 95 Reconnaissance: 30 Jun 1991-15 Sep 1993. 97 Air Refueling: 15 Jul 1961-1 Jul 1962 (detached). 99 Bombardment (later, 99 Strategic Reconnaissance): attached 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-1 Apr 1971; assigned 30 Jun 1976-1 Sep 1991. 349 Air Refueling: 15 Mar 1983-1 Sep 1991. 350 Air Refueling: 15 Mar 1983-1 Sep 1991. 569 Strategic Missile: 1 Jun 1961-25 Jun 1965. 658 Bombardment: 1 Oct 1958-1 Jan 1962. 4029 Strategic Reconnaissance Training: 1 Aug 1981- 1 Jul 1986. 4364 Support (later, 4364th Post Attack Command and Control): 20 Jul 1962-25 Mar 1965.

Stations:  Fairfield-Suisun (later, Travis) AFB, CA, 1 May 1949; Mountain Home AFB, ID, 1 May 1953; Beale AFB, CA, 25 Jun 1966-.

Commanders:  Col Raymond L. Winn, 1 May 1949; Brig Gen Robert F. Travis, 16 Jun 1949; Col Carlos J. Cochrane, 6 Aug 1950; Col Joe W. Kelly, 10 Aug 1950; Col Clifford J. Heflin, 10 Feb 1951; Brig Gen William C. Kingsbury, 5 Jan 1953; Col Robert V. De Shazo, 27 Jul 1957; Col Rufus H. Holloway, 15 Jul 1959; Col Walter Y. Lucas, 7 Jun 1960; Col William L. Gray, 5 Jul 1962; Col William R. Smith, 2 Apr 1964; Col Walter Y. Lucas, 10 Jun 1965; Maj Adelbert J. Lemke, c. May 1966; Col Douglas T. Nelson, 25 Jun 1966; Col William R. Hayes, 14 Dec 1966; Col Charles F. Minter, Sr., 27 Jun 1969; Col Harold E. Confer, 1 Jul 1970; Col Jerome F. O'Malley, 31 May 1972; Col Patrick J. Halloran, 10 May 1973; Col John H. Storrie, 30 Jun 1975; Col Lyman M. Kidder, 30 Sep 1977; Col Franklin D. Shelton, 1 Feb 1979; Col David G. Young, c. 17 Jul 1980; Col Thomas S. Pugh, 20 Jul 1982; Col George V. Freese, 4 Aug 1983; Col David H. Pinsky, 28 Jan 1985; Col Richard H. Graham, 17 Jul 1987; Col James S. Savarda, 6 Dec 1988; Col Thomas J. Keck, 12 Jun 1990; Col Richard A. Young, 21 Nov 1991; Col Larry W. Tieman, 28 Jun 1993; Brig Gen John W. Rutledge, 15 Jul 1994; Brig Gen Robert H. Behler, 22 Sep 1995; Brig Gen Charles N. Simpson, 18 Apr 1997; Brig Gen Kevin P. Chilton, 2 Jun 1999; Brig Gen Stanley Gorenc, 15 Sep 2000; Brig Gen Thomas B. Wright, 21 Mar 2003; Brig Gen Lawrence L. Wells, 6 Aug 2004; Brig Gen Harry D. Polumbo Jr., 15 May 2006; Brig Gen Robert P. Otto, 2 Jun 2008-.

Aircraft:  B/RB-17, 1949-1950; B-29, 1949-1954; RB-29, 1949-1951; RB-36, 1949-1950, 1951; KB-29, 1953; B-47, 1954-1966; KC-97, 1954-1965; Titan, 1962-1965; EB-47, 1962-1965; T-38, 1969-; SR-71, 1966-1990; U-2, 1976-; TR-1, 1981-1993; KC-135, 1983-1993; SR-71, 1995-1999; RQ-4, 2002-.

Operations:  Conducted strategic reconnaissance with assigned components, May 1949- Mar 1950, and with components of 5 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, Nov 1949-Feb 1951. Conducted strategic bombardment training, Feb 1951-Dec 1965. Performed air refueling, May-Jul 1953, Sep 1954-Dec 1965, and Mar 1983-Oct 1993. Conducted Strategic Air Command (SAC) airborne communications relay missions, Dec 1962- Mar 1965. Deployed at Fairford RAF Station, England, May-Jul 1955, at Kadena AB, Okinawa, 3-22 Oct 1955, at Eielson AFB, AK, 18-22 Jan 1956, and at Andersen AFB, Guam, Oct 1957-Jan 1958. Controlled a Titan missile complex, Jun 1961-Jun 1965. Phased down operations at Mountain Home AFB, ID, Jan-Jun 1966, then moved to Beale AFB, CA. Equipped with the SR-71 aircraft in 1966; performed strategic reconnaissance in Southeast Asia beginning in 1968; provided photographic intelligence for the Son Tay prison camp raid in North Vietnam, Nov 1970. Conducted humanitarian and scientific missions for Department of Defense and other government agencies when requested. Added U-2 & U-2R aircraft in 1976 and specialized KC-135Q tankers in 1983 to become the only USAF wing so equipped. Participated in USAF operations worldwide, including Grenada, Oct-Nov 1983, and Libya, Apr 1986. Following the 1990 retirement of SR-71 aircraft, U-2 aircraft flew intelligence-gathering missions, Aug 1990- Mar 1991, in Southwest Asia, particularly during the Gulf War buildup and subsequent combat operations. Continued to provide worldwide reconnaissance as directed. In 1993, lost its air refueling capacity and specialized in global high altitude manned surveillance and reconnaissance missions for the National Command Authorities, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and theater commanders. While flying U-2s as its primary aircraft, it also flew SR-71s, the world's fastest aircraft, from 1995 to 1999. Although the wing headquarters remained at Beale AFB, California, it also operated components at several locations around the world. After the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, wing elements took part in reconnaissance missions in support of U.S. military efforts in Afghanistan and Iraq, flying both the manned U-2 and the new unmanned RQ-4 Global Hawk aircraft. As the Air Force's only U-2 training center, provided initial, requalification and proficiency training for all U-2 pilots and mission planners and all RQ-4 crewmembers, 2004-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation: 31 Mar-31 Dec 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jul 1972-30 Jun 1973. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1957-31 Jan 1958; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1970-30 Jun 1971; 1 Jul 1971-30 Jun 1972; 1 Jul 1973-30 Jun 1975; 1 Jul 1975-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1982; 1 Jul 1983-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1986; 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1990; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004; 1 Jun 2005-31 May 2007; 1 Jun 2007-31 May 2009.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 9 Operations Group prior to 1 May 1949. Service Streamers. None. Campaign Streamers. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citations: Kawasaki, Japan, 15/16 Apr 1945; Japan, 13-28 May 1945.

Emblem:  Per pale Vert and Sable, a pallet wavy Argent fimbriated Or, on a fess of the last four crosses patee of the second garnished Brown, all within a diminished bordure Yellow. Motto: SEMPER PARATUS — Always ready. Approved for 9th Group on 20 Mar 1924 and for 9th Wing on 1 Jul 1952 (K 2650).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 18 Apr 2012.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Jun 2008.

9th RW, Detachment 1 was activated at Kadena, Okinawa, Japan on 9 August 1974 (replacing OL-KA) and was inactivated in 1990. (Source: History Of The 9th Reconnaissance Wing Pamphlet)  DET 1 3+ ICHI BAN (Translation = Number One)



9th RW, Detachment 2 was activated at Osan AB on 1 July 1976 (replacing OL-OA, 9 SRW) and was redesignated Detachment 2, 9th Wing on 19 September 1991. (Source: History Of The 9th Reconnaissance Wing Pamphlet)  Notes: The "Blackcat" nickname was started by Detachment H, Central Intelligence Agency activated in Taiwan from 1960-1974. Detachment H flyers would frequent an establishment called the "Blackcat" in a nearby town. The name "Blackcat" soon became synonymous with the members of the U-2 Detachment. The original Blackcat patch was designed in 1961 by Lieutenant Colonel Chen Whei-Shen. Lieutenant Colonel David G. Young established the "Blackcat" as OL-OA's nickname in 1976. The nickname transferred to Detachment 2 and is now used by the 5th Reconnaissance Squadron at Osan. (Source: 5th Reconnaissance Squadron History)




9th SRW, Detachment 4 was activated at RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom on 1 April 1979. Originally operating the U-2, the unit was augmented with an SR-71 until April 1982, when the SR-71 became permanently based at RAF Mildenhall. Both the U-2 and SR-71 operated from Mildenhall until 22 February 1983 when the U-2 departed, its role being assumed by the TR-1 at RAF Alconbury. The Detachment was inactivated on 18 January 1990. (Sources: Detachment 4 Fact Sheet, Unknown Date; History Of The 9th Reconnaissance Wing Pamphlet; and RAF Mildenhall History Webpage)


9th Wing, Detachment 4 was activated at Howard AFB, Panama in 1991 and was inactivated in 1993.  SERPIENTES DEL SOL (Translation= Serpents Of The Sun)



Operating Location OLYMPIC FLAME (OL-OF) was activated at Patrick AFB, Florida on 29 January 1982 and inactivated 1 January 1983 (replaced by Detachment 5, 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing). (Sources: History Of The 9th Reconnaissance Wing Pamphlet)


Kadena AB, Okinawa, Japan, U-2 and SR-71, also known as: OL-8, OL-RK, (OLRK), (OLKA), later to Det 1, (disestablished ?). OL-RK became OL-KA on 10/21/1971, to Det 1 in 08/1974.



OL-UK moved from RAF Alconbury, United Kingdom to RAF Fairford, United Kingdom on 15 March 1995. From 2-4 January 1996, OL-UK's U-2s were moved to Istres AB, France and the unit was inactivated. (Source: Historical Highlights, the United States Air Forces in Europe 1942-1997)


Detachment 2, 9th Operations Group was activated at Edwards AFB, California on 1 April 1995 and was inactivated on 1 August 1999. (Sources: History Of The 9th Reconnaissance Wing Pamphlet)


9th Reconnaissance Wing Patch Origins

Source:  Beale AFB / 9th RW History

SHIELD:  Per pale vert and sable a pallet wavy argent fimbriated, Or, over all on a fess of four crosses patee of the second (sable).

CREST:  On a wreath of the colors (argent and vert) a rattlesnake entwined about a prickly pear cactus all proper.

MOTTO:  Semper Paratus (Always Ready).

SIGNIFICANCE:  The shield, in black and green, represents the old colors of the Air Service parted by a wavy line representing the Rio Grande River. On the gold band are four black crosses representing four WW I offensives, Aisne-Marne, Champagne-Marne, Meusse-Argonne, and St. Mihiel, in which squadrons later assigned to the 9th Wing fought. The crest recalls the service in Mexico.


Other Sites of Interest:

9th Bombardment Group History

9th Bombardment Group Wiki Resources

Beale AFB Web Site

9th Reconnaissance Wing Lineage

Table of Contents



1st Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 1 Provisional Aero Squadron on 5 Mar 1913. Redesignated: 1 Aero Squadron on 8 Dec 1913; 1 Squadron (Observation) on 14 Mar 1921; 1 Observation Squadron on 25 Jan 1923; 1 Bombardment Squadron on 1 Mar 1935; 1 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 1 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 1 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944; 1 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Photographic, on 10 Oct 1948; 1 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Apr 1950; 1 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 2 Oct 1950; 1 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron on 25 Jun 1966; 1 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (Training) on 1 Jul 1990; 1 Reconnaissance Squadron (Training) on 1 Sep 1991; 1 Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 Jul 1994.

Assignments:  Unkn, 5 Mar 1913-Apr 1918; I Corps Observation Group, Apr-Nov 1918; unkn, Nov 1918-1 Oct 1919; 1 Army Observation (later, 7 Observation) Group, 1 Oct 1919 (attached to 1 Provisional Air Brigade for operations, 6 May-3 Oct 1921); 2 Wing, 30 Aug 1921; Second Corps Area, 30 Sep 1921; 9 Observation (later, 9 Bombardment) Group, assigned 1 Aug 1922, attached 24 Mar 1923, and assigned 15 Feb 1929; 311 Air Division, 10 Oct 1948 (attached to 55 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, 10-26 Oct 1948, and to 55 Strategic Reconnaissance Group, 27 Oct 1948-31 May 1949); 9 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 9 Bombardment) Group, 1 Jun 1949 (attached to 9 Bombardment Wing, 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 9 Bombardment (later, 9 Strategic Aerospace; 9 Strategic Reconnaissance) Wing, 16 Jun 1952; 9 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991-.

Stations:  Texas City, TX, 5 Mar 1913; San Diego, CA, c. 28 Nov 1913 (detachment operated from Ft Crockett, TX, 30 Apr-13 Jul 1914; from Brownsville, TX, 17 Apr-c. 24 May 1915); Ft Sill, OK, 29 Jul 1915 (detachment operated from Brownsville, TX, 18 Aug-c. Dec 1915); Ft Sam Houston, TX, 26 Nov 1915; Columbus, NM, 15 Mar 1916; Casas Grandes, Mexico (operated from Colonia Dublan), 19 Mar 1916; San Geronimo, Mexico, 5 Apr 1916; San Antonio, Mexico, 9 Apr 1916; Satevo, Mexico, 11 Apr 1916; Namiquipa, Mexico, 17 Apr 1916; Columbus, NM, 22 Apr 1916-5 Aug 1917 (detachments operated from Colonia Dublan and El Valle, Mexico, until c. Jan 1917); Avord, France, 13 Sep 1917; Issoudun, France, 20 Sep 1917; Amanty, France, 19 Oct 1917; Ourches, France, 4 Apr 1918; Saints, France, 29 Jun 1918; Francheville, France, 6 Jul 1918; Moras Ferme (near La Ferte-sous-Jouarre), France, c. 22 Jul 1918; May-en-Multien, France, 5 Aug 1918; Coincy, France, 10 Aug 1918; Chailly-en-Brie, France, 13 Aug 1918; Toul, France, 22 Aug 1918; Remicourt, France, 21 Sep 1918; Julvecourt, France, 5 Nov 1918; Mercy-le-Bas, France, 21 Nov 1918; Trier, Germany, 6 Dec 1918; Weissenthurm, Germany, 21 Jan-14 Jul 1919; Park Field, TN, 4 Aug 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, 10 Oct 1919-6 Nov 1940 (operated from Langley Field, VA, 6 May-26 Oct 1921); Rio Hato, Panama, 13 Nov 1940; Piarco Aprt, Trinidad, 24 Apr 1941; Waller Field, Trinidad, 29 Oct 1941; Edinburgh Field, Trinidad, 23 Aug 1942; Orlando AB, FL, 31 Oct 1942; Brooksville, FL, 15 Dec 1942; Orlando AB, FL, 25 Feb 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, c. 3 Mar 1944; McCook AAFld, NE, 19 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944-7 Mar 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar 1946; Harmon Field, Guam, 9 Jun 1947-10 Oct 1948; Topeka AFB, KS, 10 Oct 1948; Fairfield-Suisun (later, Travis) AFB, CA, 1 Jun 1949; Mountain Home AFB, ID, 1 May 1953 (deployed at Fairford RAF Station, England, 22 May-8 Jul 1955); Beale AFB, CA, 25 Jun 1966-.

Commanders:  Capt Charles de Forest Chandler, 5 Mar 1913; Capt Arthur S. Cowan, 1 Apr 1913; Maj Benjamin D. Foulois, by Apr 1914; 1Lt William L. Patterson, 26 Apr 1914; Capt Arthur S. Cowan, by Jun 1914; unknown, 6 Aug 1914-c. Apr 1915; Maj Benjamin D. Foulois, by Apr 1915; unknown, 4 Nov-c. Dec 1916; Capt Townsend F. Dodd, by Dec 1916; Maj Ralph Royce, 16-31 Mar 1917; unknown, 1-2 Apr 1917; Capt J. L. Dunsworth, 3 Apr 1917; Maj Ralph Royce, 9 Aug 1917; Capt Joseph T. McNarney, 3 Oct 1917; unknown, 15 Oct 1917-c. Aug 1918; 1Lt Arthur J. Coyle, 18 Aug 1918; 1Lt Paul Meyers, 26 Oct 1918; unknown, c. 1919-Jan 1936; Maj C. P. Prime, by Jan 1936; Maj C. E. Duncan, by Aug 1937; 2Lt B. E. Allen, by Aug 1938; 1Lt E. S. Wetzel, by Jan 1939; Capt Stuart P. Wright, by Jul 1940; Maj Alvin N. Moore, by Nov 1942; Maj Mack McKay, 16 Jun 1943; Lt Col Thomas J. Classen, 27 Feb 1944; Lt Col Ralph E. Settle, 1 May 1944; Lt Col Henry C. Huglin, 24 Feb 1945; Lt Col Leroy V. Casey, 27 Mar 1945; Maj Alton P. Donnell, Aug 1945; unknown, Sep 1945-1949 (not manned, 25 Apr 1947-9 Oct 1948); Lt Col Harry L. Evans, by 1 Jun 1949; Maj John S. McIntosh, May 1950; Col G. H. Fulcher, 5 Jun 1950; Maj Ellis W. Wright Jr., 27 Feb 1951; Maj George Buckingham, May 1951; Lt Col Frank E. Ferrell, May 1951; Lt Col Boyd B. White, 23 Jul 1951; Lt Col Frank E. Ferrell, 29 Dec 1951; Lt Col Eugene Q. Steffes Jr., Nov 1953; Lt Col Frank E. Ferrell, Jan 1954; Lt Col Robert A. Weir, Oct 1954; Lt Col Loren E. Buckey, Apr 1957; Lt Col Herschel T. Pascoe, Aug 1959; Maj Claude H. Bridges Jr., May 1960; Lt Col Richard W. Edmonson, Jul 1962; Lt Col James C. Mitchell, Jul 1964; Lt Col John S. Harpster, Aug 1965; Lt Col Harold E. Confer, 25 Jun 1966; Col Raymond L. Haupt, Nov 1966; Lt Col Allan L. Hichew, Aug 1967; Lt Col Patrick J. Halloran, Aug 1968; Lt Col James L. Watkins, Dec 1969; Lt Col Larry S. Devall, Jul 1971; Lt Col George N. Bull, Jun 1972; Lt Col Bryan K. McCallum, Jul 1973; Lt Col James H. Shelton, Jan 1974; Lt Col Raphael S. Samay, Aug 1975; Lt Col Adolphus H. Bledsoe Jr., Jul 1977; Lt Col Randolph B. Hertzog, Dec 1978; Lt Col Richard H. Graham, 2 Jan 1980; Lt Col Eldon W. Joersz, 11 Aug 1981; Lt Col Alan B. Cirino, 18 Jul 1983; Lt Col Joseph C. Kinego, 2 Aug 1985; Lt Col William D. Orcutt, 4 Aug 1987; Lt Col William R. Dyckman, 10 Nov 1988; Lt Col Kenneth W. Womack, 27 Dec 1990; Lt Col Bobby L. Fairless, 2 Mar 1992; Lt Col David J. Bonsi, 30 Apr 1993; Lt Col David W. Wright, 20 May 1994; Lt Col Joseph R. Muus, 23 Jun 1995; Lt Col Mario C. Buda, 21 Jul 1997; Lt Col Bryan K. Anderson, 26 Jul 1999;. Lt Col Domenick M. Eanniello, 23 Jul 2001; Lt Col David E. Miller, 15 Oct 2002; Lt Col Alan Marshall, (temporary), 14 Jul 2003; Lt Col Walter Flint, 4 Sep 2003; Lt Col Michael J, Masucci, 5 Aug 2005-.

Aircraft:  In addition to Wright C, 1913-1914, and Burgess H, 1913-1915, included Wright B, Burgess F, Burgess I-Scout, Burgess J-Scout, Curtiss D, Curtiss E, Curtiss H, Martin TT, and apparently Wright D-Scout, during period 1913-1915; JN-2 (JN-3), 1915-1916; N-8, 1916; in addition to R-2, 1916-1917, included (for field testing) H-2, H-3, Twin JN, R-Land, Sturtevant Adv Tr, V-1, D-5, and JN-4 during period 1916-1917; AR-1, 1917-1918; Spad XI, 1918; Salmson 2, 1918-1919; in addition to DH-4 apparently included 0-2 during period 1919-1928; in addition to O-1, c. 1928-1936, included O-13, Y1O-31, Y1O-35, O-39, Y1O-40, and B-6, during period 1930-1936; B-10, 1936-1938; B-18, 1939-1942; B-17, 1942-1944, 1948-1949; B-29, 1944-1947, 1948-1949, 1950-1954; RB-17, 1948-1949; RB-29, 1948-1949; B-36, 1949-1950; B-47, 1954-1966; SR-71, 1966-1990; T-38, 1969; U-2, 1990-.

Operations:  Organized in response to Mexican Revolution of Feb 1913; deployed detachments to Texas, for projected foreign service during Tampico-Vera Cruz crisis, Apr-Jul 1914, and for border patrol duty, Apr-May 1915, Aug-c. Dec 1915; served as reconnaissance and liaison unit with Punitive Expedition to Mexico, Mar 1916-c. Jan 1917; patrolled border until c. May 1917. Combat as corps observation unit with French XXXVIII Army Corps and American I Army Corps, 11 Apr-8 Nov 1918; served with III Army Corps as part of occupation forces, Nov 1918-Jul 1919. Participated in demonstrations of effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships, Jun-Sep 1921. Antisubmarine patrols, and reconnaissance of Vichy French fleet at Martinique, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Trained cadres for bombardment units, Nov 1942-Feb 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, 25 Jan-14 Aug 1945. Unmanned Apr 1947-10 Oct 1948. Photographic reconnaissance, Oct 1948-Apr 1950. Returned to bombardment training, Apr 1950-Jun 1966. Worldwide reconnaissance with SR-71 aircraft, Jun 1966-Jun 1990. Reconnaissance pilot training with U-2 aircraft, 1990-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Mexico 1916-1917. World War I: Lorraine; Ile-de-France; Champagne; Champagne-Marne; Aisne-Marne; St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Kawasaki, Japan, 15-16 Apr 1945; Japan, 13-28 May 1945. Presidential Unit Citation: 31 Mar-31 Dec 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award With Combat "V" Device: 1 Jul 1972-30 Jun 1973. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1957-31 Jan 1958; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1970-30 Jun 1971; 1 Jul 1971-30 Jun 1972; 1 Jul 1975-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1982; 1 Jul 1983-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1986; 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1990; 1 Sep 1991-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004; 1 Jun 2005-31 May 2007; 1 Jun 2007-31 May 2009.

Emblem:  A Brown cave man wearing a Black breech clout standing on a Black mound, looking to dexter with right hand shielding his eyes, left hand holding a spear horizontally, in front of a rising sun, against a Blue background; all within a Black bordered Gold annulet bearing thirteen Black crosses patee. Approved on 14 Jul 1931 (K 7136).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 18 Apr 2012.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2005.

Table of Contents



5th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 5 Aero Squadron on 5 May 1917. Redesignated Squadron A, Souther Field, GA, on 15 Jul 1918. Demobilized on 11 Nov 1918. Reconstituted, and consolidated (1924) with 5 Aero Squadron, which was organized on 24 Oct 1919. Redesignated: 5 Squadron (Observation) on 14 Mar 1921; 5 Observation Squadron on 25 Jan 1923; 5 Bombardment Squadron on 1 Mar 1935; 5 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 5 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 5 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 20 Oct 1948. Redesignated 5 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Photographic, and activated, on 1 May 1949. Redesignated: 5 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Apr 1950; 5 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 2 Oct 1950. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1966. Redesignated 5 Strategic Reconnaissance Training Squadron on 12 Feb 1986. Activated on 1 Jul 1986. Inactivated on 30 Jun 1990. Redesignated 5 Reconnaissance Squadron on 21 Sep 1994. Activated on 1 Oct 1994.

Assignments:  Unkn, 1917-1918. 3 Observation Group (attached to Eastern Department) 24 Oct 1919; Eastern Department, 24 Mar 1920; Second Corps Area, 20 Aug 1920 (attached to 1 Provisional Air Brigade for operations, 6 May-3 Oct 1921); 9 Observation Group, 1 Aug 1922; 1 Division, Air Service (later, 1 Division, Air Corps; 1 Division, Aviation), 30 Jun 1923 (attached to 9 Observation Group, 30 Jun 1923-15 Feb 1929); 9 Observation (later, 9 Bombardment) Group, 15 Feb 1929-20 Oct 1948. 9 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 9 Bombardment) Group, 1 May 1949 (attached to 9 Bombardment Wing, 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 9 Bombardment (later, 9 Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1966. 9 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1990. 9 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1994-.

Stations:  San Antonio, TX, 5 May 1917; Souther Field, GA, 1 May-11 Nov 1918. Hazelhurst Field, NY, 24 Oct 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, Nov 1919 (operated from Langley Field, VA, 6 May-26 Oct 1921); Rio Hato, Panama, 13 Nov 1940; Beane Field, St Lucia, c. 28 Sep 1941; Orlando AB, FL, 31 Oct 1942; Pinecastle AAFld, FL, 15 Apr 1943; Brooksville AAFld, FL, 7 Jan 1944; Pinecastle AAFld, FL, 13 Feb 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, c. 9 Mar 1944; McCook AAFld, KS, 19 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944-6 Mar 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar 1946; Harmon Field, Guam, 9 Jun 1947-20 Oct 1948. Fairfield-Suisun AFB, CA, 1 May 1949; Mountain Home AFB, ID, 1 May 1953-25 Jun 1966 (deployed at Fairford RAF Station, England, 23 May-8 Jul 1955). Beale AFB, CA, 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1990. Osan AB, South Korea, 1 Oct 1994-.

Commanders:  Unknown, 1917-1942; Maj Earl C. Trees, 28 Nov 1942; Lt Col Rolle E. Stone Jr., 10 Feb 1943; Lt Col Malvern H. W. Brown, 2 Jun 1944-unknown; Maj Homer W. Morris, by 15 Mar 1946; Capt Orien T. Clark, 13 Jul 1946; Capt Richard O. Giles, 16 Sep 1946; Maj Charles G. Allen, 14 Nov 1946; Capt John R. McPherson, 16 Feb 1947; Capt William G. Broach Jr., 13 Mar 1947; none (unmanned), 1 Apr 1947-20 Oct 1948. Maj John M. Clayton, 1 May 1949; Lt Col Walter Y. Lucas, 23 Aug 1949; Lt Col Raymond E. Holsey, 18 Sep 1951; Lt Col Edward A. Vivian, by 2 Sep 1953; Lt Col Charles E. Bailey, 1 Mar 1956; Lt Col Jack D. Templin, Apr 1958; Lt Col Henry W. Ritter, 10 Jul 1961; Lt Col Edward T. Solomon, Mar 1963; Lt Col Dean W. Willson, Apr 1965-25 Jun 1966. Lt Col Charles W. Hinkle, 1 Jul 1986; Lt Col Michael G. Danielle, 9 May 1988; Lt Col Bruce R. Cucuel, 31 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1990. Lt Col Scott D. Mefford, 1 Oct 1994; Lt Col Charles P. Wilson II, 28 Jun 1995; Lt Col John B. Feda, 8 Jul 1996; Lt Col Peter J. Szyjka, 24 Jul 1997; Lt Col Gregory D. Augst, 20 Jul 1998; Lt Col William Schlecht, 19 Jul 1999; Lt Col Gregory A. Kern, 13 Jul 2000; Lt Col Daniel F. Baltrusaitis, 2 Jul 2001; Lt Col Jon L. Engle, 2 Jul 2002; Lt Col Jeffrey W. Stout, 27 Jun 2003; Lt Col Charles D. Cunningham, 27 Jul 2004-.

Aircraft:  Apparently included JN-4 during period 1917-1918. Included DH-4 and O-2 during period 1919-1928; in addition to O-1, O-11, and O-25, included O-31, Y1O-35, O-39, A-3, B-6, and C-8 during period 1928-1936; B-10, 1936-1938; B-18, 1938-1942; B-24, 1942-1943; B-25, 1943; B-26, 1943-1944; B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1947. B/RB-17, 1949-1950; RB-29, 1949-1950; B-29, 1949-1954; B-47, 1954-1966. U-2/TR-1, 1986-1990; SR-71, 1986-1990; T-38, 1986-1990. U-2, 1994-.

Operations:  Flying training unit, 1917-1918. Demonstrations of effectiveness of aerial bombardment on warships, Jun-Sep 1921. Antisubmarine patrols, and reconnaissance of Vichy French fleet at Martinique, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Trained cadres for bombardment units, Nov 1942-Feb 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, 25 Jan-15 Aug 1945. Unmanned, Apr 1947-20 Oct 1948. Maintained alert during Cuban missile crisis, Oct 1962. Reconnaissance pilot training, 1986-1990. Conducted U-2 high-altitude reconnaissance, 1994-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Kawasaki, Japan, 15/16 Apr 1945; Japan, 13-28 May 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1957-31 Jan 1958; 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1990; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc piped with Yellow a Yellow increscent moon and five stars. On the lower horn of the crescent a Black and White owl holding in his right claw a Silver telescope. Approved on 27 May 1924 (K 2661).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 6 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2005.

Table of Contents



99th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 99 Aero Squadron on 21 Aug 1917. Demobilized on 9 Jun 1919. Reconstituted as 99 Corps Observation Squadron [and organized] on 2 Jul 1919. Redesignated: 99 Squadron (Observation) on 14 Mar 1921; 99 Observation Squadron on 25 Jan 1923. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1927. Activated on 9 Nov 1928. Redesignated: 99 Bombardment Squadron on 1 Mar 1935; 99 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 99 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 99 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 20 Oct 1948. Redesignated 99 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Photographic, and activated, on 1 May 1949. Redesignated: 99 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Apr 1950; 99 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 2 Oct 1950; 99 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron on 25 Jun 1966. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1971. Activated on 1 Nov 1972. Redesignated 99 Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  Unkn, 21 Aug-11 Dec 1917; Second Aviation Instruction Center, 12 Dec 1917-9 Mar 1918; unkn, 10 Mar-6 Aug 1918; V Corps Observation Group, 7 Aug-Dec 1918 (attached to Third Artillery Observation School, c. 1 Apr-31 May 1918); unkn, Dec 1918-May 1919; Eastern Department, May-9 Jun 1919. Eastern Department, 2 Jul 1919; Third Corps Area, 20 Aug 1920; District of Washington, c. Jan 1922; 8 Division, Air Service, 24 May 1923; Air Corps Training Center, Jun-31 Jul 1927. 9 Observation (later, 9 Bombardment) Group, attached 9 Nov 1928, assigned 15 Feb 1929-20 Oct 1948. 9 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 9th Bombardment) Group, 1 May 1949 (attached to 9 Bombardment Wing, 10 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 9 Bombardment (later, 9 Strategic Aerospace; 9 Strategic Reconnaissance) Wing, 16 Jun 1952-1 Apr 1971. 100 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, 1 Nov 1972-30 Jun 1976 (attached to Air Division Provisional, 17, 1 Nov 1972-1 Jan 1975); 9 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, 30 Jun 1976; 9 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991-.

Stations:  Kelly Field, TX, 21 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 3-14 Nov 1917; Tours, France, 12 Dec 1917; Haussimont, France, 11 Mar 1918; Amanty, France, 31 May 1918; Luxeuil-les-Bains, France, 1 Jul 1918 (flight operated from Corcieux, 19-24 Jul 1918 and Dogneville 24 Jul-26 Aug 1918); Souilly, France, 7 Sep 1918; Foucaucourt, France, 20 Sep 1918; Parois, France, 4 Nov 1918; Belrain, France, 31 Nov 1918; Chaumont-sur-Aire, France, 13 Dec 1918; Chaumont, France, c. 25 Dec 1918 (flights operated from Prauthoy, Bourbonne-les-Bains, and Montigney-le-Roi, France, until c. 1 Feb 1919); Colombey-les-Belles, France, 19 Feb 1919; Sadirac, France, 5 Mar-8 May 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, 24 May 1919; Hazelhurst Field, NY, 25 May-9 Jun 1919. Mitchel Field, NY, 2 Jul 1919; Camp Alfred Vail, NJ, Jul 1919; Bolling Field, DC, 17 Aug 1919; Kelly Field, TX, 23 Jun-31 Jul 1927. Mitchel Field, NY, 9 Nov 1928-6 Nov 1940; Rio Hato, Panama, 12 Nov 1940; Piarco Field, Trinidad, 17 Oct 1941; Zanderij (later, Zandery) Field, Surinam, c. 27 Nov 1941-31 Oct 1942; Orlando AB, FL, 31 Oct 1942; Montbrook AAFld, FL, 5 Feb 1943; Kissimmee AAFld, FL, 14 Nov 1943; Brooksville AAFld, FL, 5 Jan 1944; Orlando AB, FL, 25 Feb 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, c. 9 Mar 1944; McCook AAFld, NE, 19 May-18 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 28 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar 1946; Harmon Field (later AFB) Guam, 9 Jun 1947-20 Oct 1948. Fairfield-Suisun (later Travis) AFB, CA, 1 May 1949 (detachments operated at Andersen AFB, Guam, c. 7 Aug-17 Sep 1950; 9 Apr-19 Jan 1951; and 17 Jun-22 Sep 1952); Mountain Home AFB, ID, 1 May 1953 (deployed at RAF Fairford, England, 23 May-9 Jul 1955; Andersen AFB, Guam, c. 4 Oct 1947-c. 12 Jan 1958); Beale AFB, CA, 25 Jun 1966-1 Apr 1971. U-Tapao RTNAF, Thailand, 1 Nov 1972-30 Jun 1976; Beale AFB, CA, 30 Jun 1976-.

Commanders:  1Lt W. T. White, 21 Aug 1917; Capt William E. Goodman Jr., 29 Sep 1917; 1Lt Andrew B. Shiland, 23 Feb 1918; Maj Arthur R. Christie, 30 Mar 1918; Capt James E. Meredith, 6 Aug 1918; Capt Lyle S. Powell, 9 Nov 1918; 1Lt Leo D. Quackenbush, 28 Feb 1919; 1Lt Edward Jenkins, 9 Jun 1919; Capt Horace N. Heison, 6 Oct 1920; 2Lt Ray A. Dunn, 17 Nov 1920; 2Lt Paul C. Wilkins, 30 Dec 1920; Capt Ray A. Dunn, 30 Mar 1921; 1Lt Earl J. Carpenter, 22 Aug 1921; 1Lt Howard K. Ramey, 7 Nov 1921; Lt Courtney Whitney, 12 Dec 1921; Maj George E. Lovell, 15 Aug 1922; Capt Clearton H. Reynolds, 16 Apr 1923; 1Lt Howard K. Ramey, 30 Aug 1923; 1Lt Aubrey I. Eagle, Jan 1924; Capt Clearton H. Reynolds, 14 Apr 1924; Maj Millard F. Harmon, 30 Jun-18 Jul 1925; unknown, 19 Jul 1925-22 Jun 1927; none (not manned), 23 Jun-31 Jul 1927. Unknown, 9 Nov 1928-Sep 1929; Capt Frederick W. Evans, Sep 1929-Aug 1933; unknown, Aug 1933-1935; Maj Leo F. Post, c. 1 Mar 1935; Maj Samuel M. Cornell, 2 Jul 1936; Capt Fay R. Upthegrove, 30 Aug-24 Oct 1939; unknown, 25 Oct 1939-22 Apr 1940; Capt Fay R. Upthegrove, 23 Apr-21 Oct 1940; unknown, 22 Oct 1940-1941; Maj Gerald E. Williams, by 21 Oct 1941; Maj Walter W. Gross, 4 Jan 1942; Lt Col Eugene C. Rice, 14 Apr 1942; Capt Richard H. Gunckel, 18 Apr 1942; 1Lt John W. Stock, 20 Apr 1942; Capt Richard H. Gunckel, 29 Apr 1942; Lt Col Randolph L. Wood, 5 May 1942; Maj Harry L. Caswell, 15 Aug 1942; Maj Harry C. Morrison, 9 Sep-31 Oct 1942; none (not manned), 31 Oct 1942-20 Jan 1943; unknown, 20 Jan-7 Feb 1943; Capt Erwin W. Huber, 8 Feb 1943; Maj James I. Hopkins Jr., 17 Jun 1943; Maj James T. McKee, 18 Jun 1943-18 Jan 1944; unknown, 19-20 Jan 1944; Lt Col John W. Chiles, 21 Jan 1944; Maj James I. Hopkins Jr., 28 Feb 1944; Maj Harlold M. Brecht, c. Apr 1944; Maj Folmer J. Sogaard, 9 Jun 1944; Lt Col William L. Hall, 8 Jul 1944; Lt Col Lewis J. Wright, 8 Mar-Aug 1945; unknown, c. Sep 1945-Aug 1946; none (not manned), Aug-26 Sep 1946; Capt Robert T. Henning, 27 Sep 1946; Maj Kenneth E. Hill, 23 Nov 1946; Capt Joseph B. Webb, 17 Mar-25 Apr 1947; none (not manned), 26 Apr 1947-20 Oct 1948. Capt Carl F. Hynek, 1 May 1949; Capt Henry L. Choate, May 1949; Maj James M. Smith, c. 1 Jun 1949; Lt Col Francis E. Tiller, 5 Sep 1949; Maj Mason A. Dula, 30 Jun 1950; Lt Col Rufus H. Holloway, c. 7 Jul 1950; Maj Frank M. Wyman, 7 Aug 1950; Lt Col Rufus H. Holloway, 20 Sep 1950; Capt Roger H. Smith, 9 Apr 1951; Col Rufus H. Holloway, c. 19 Jun 1951; Lt Col Mason A. Dula, 27 Aug 1951; Lt Col Eldridge G. Shelton, 14 Jun 1952; Lt Col Mason A. Dula, c. 22 Sep 1952; Lt Col John P. Wolfe, by 17 Feb 1952; Lt Col Robert L. Rund, 1 Mar 1956; Lt Col Glenn F. Stephens, c. 30 Jun 1957; Lt Col Earl A. Lilley, Apr 1958; Lt Col Glenn F. Stephens, Oct 1958; Lt Col Sherwin G. Desens, 1 Oct 1961; Lt Col Maurice E. Saunders, 15 Dec 1961; Lt Col John W. Grow Jr., C. Aug 1964-c. 25 Jun 1966; none (not manned), 25 Jun-Sep 1966; Lt Col John B. Boynton, c. Sep 1966; Lt Col Robert G. Sowers, c. Jun 1967; Lt Col John C. Kennon, 25 Mar 1968; Lt Col Harlon A. Hain, 5 Dec 1969-1 Apr 1971. Col Jack E. Gatewood, 1 Nov 1972; Col Buddy L. Brown, 18 Dec 1972; Col Russell S. Morton, 12 Dec 1973; Col Roger L. Cooper, 2 Dec 1974; Lt Col David C. Young, 3 Oct 1975-Apr 1976; none (not manned), Apr-30 Jun 1976; Lt Col George V. Freese, 1 Jul 1976; Lt Col Jerry L. Sinclair, 30 Sep 1977; Lt Col William F. Horton Jr., 21 Dec 1978; Lt Col James E. Wrenn, 22 Aug 1980; Lt Col Wilbur F. Furr Jr., 2 Jul 1982; Lt Col Kenneth L. Stanford, 21 Nov 1984; Lt Col Larry W. Driskill, 2 Aug 1985; Lt Col Mark W. Fischer, 19 Jul 1988; Lt Col Richard H. Bishop, 18 May 1990; Lt Col Stephen M. Peterson, 21 Jun 1990; Maj Kenneth R. Flye, 4 May 1992; Lt Col Bruce W. Carmichael, 30 Jul 1992; Lt Col Edward A. Walby, 9 May 1994; Lt Col John J. Jacobson, 23 Aug 1996; Lt Col Paul W. Nelson, 3 Jun 1998; Lt Col Keith E. Gentile, 8 Feb 2000; Lt Col Troy E. Devine, 17 Aug 2001; Lt Col Robert A. Yahn, 1 Jul 2003; Lt Col David L. Russell III, 7 Jul 2005-.

Aircraft:  Sopwith 1, 1918; Salmson 2, 1918-1919. Included DH-4 and SE-5 during period 1919-1927. In addition to O-1, O-11, and O-25, included OA-2, O-31, Y1O-35, O-38, O-39, Y1O-40, O-40, and O-43 during period 1928-1936; in addition to B-10, 1936-1938, included OA-4, 1937; in addition to B-18, 1938-1942, included OA-8, 1939, P-12, 1939, and P-40, 1941-1942; B-25, 1943, B-26, 1943; B-17, 1943-1944; B-29, 1944-1946, 1946-1947. B/RB-17, 1949-1950; RB-29, 1949-1950; B-29, 1949-1954; B-47, 1954-1966; SR-71, 1966-1971. DC-130, 1972-1975; CH-3, 1972-1975; U-2, 1972-1976, 1976-(also carried TR-1 designation, 1981-1991); T-38, 1976-. SR-71, 1994-1997.

Operations:  Combat as corps observation unit with French Eighth Army and American V Army Corps, 22-23 Jun, Sep-Nov 1918; school squadron with V Army Corps Infantry Liaison School, Jul-Sep 1918, during which time one flight of unit, operating in Vosges region of Alsace and Lorraine, participated in combat with French XXXIII Corps and American 5 Division, Jul-Aug 1918. Antisubmarine patrols, and reconnaissance of Vichy French fleet at Martinique, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Trained cadres for bombardment units, Feb 1943-Feb 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, Jan-Aug 1945. Unmanned, Apr 1947-Oct 1948. Global strategic reconnaissance, 1967-1971 and 1972-present, including Southeast Asia, Nov 1972-Jun 1973; Grenada, 1983; Panama, 1989; and Southwest Asia, 1990-1991. Supported global war on terrorism, 2001-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: Lorraine; Alsace; St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific. Vietnam: Vietnam Ceasefire. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Kawasaki, Japan, 15-16 Apr 1945; Japan, 13-28 May 1945. Presidential Unit Citation: 31 Mar-31 Dec 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards With "V" Device: 1 Nov 1972-28 Jan 1973; 1 Nov 1972-30 Jun 1973. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1957-31 Jan 1958; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1970-1 Apr 1971; 1 Jul 1975-30 Jun 1976; 30 Jun 1976-30 Jun 1977; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1982; 1 Jul 1983-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1986; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1990; 1 Sep 1991-30 Jun 1993. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Nov 1972-28 Jan 1973.

Emblem:  The buffalo, red lined with blue. Approved on 4 Mar 1924 (K 2677).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 9 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2005.

Table of Contents



77th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
534th Air Engineering Sq
576th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



504th Bombardment Group


(Jan-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(May 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 504th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 18 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Equipped first with B-17's; later trained for combat with B-29's. Moved to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater late in 1944 for service with Twentieth AF. Began combat operations from Tinian in Jan 1945 with attacks on Japanese airfields and other installations on Maug and Iwo Jima and in the Truk Islands. Flew its first mission against the Japanese home islands early in Feb 1945 when the group bombed the industrial area of Kobe. Continued to attack strategic targets in Japan, operating in daylight and at high altitude to bomb such objectives as aircraft factories, chemical plants, harbors, and arsenals. Received a DUC for striking the industrial center at Yokohama late in May 1945. Began incendiary raids in Mar 1945, flying at night and at low altitude to strike area targets in Japan. Started mining operations against enemy shipping late in Mar, receiving a DUC for mining Korean shipping lanes, the Shimonoseki Strait, and harbors of the Inland Sea, Jul-Aug 1945. In Apr and May 1945 the group hit airfields from which the Japanese launched kamikaze planes against the invasion force during the assault on Okinawa. After the war it dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners, participated in show-of-force missions, and flew over Japan to evaluate damage inflicted by bombardment operations. Moved to the Philippines in Mar 1946. Inactivated on Luzon on 15 Jun 1946.

Squadrons:  393d: 1944. 398th: 1944-1946. 421st: 1944-1946. 507th: 1944. 680th: 1944-1946.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 1944; Fairmont AAFld, Neb, 12 Mar-5 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 23 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 6 Mar-15 Jun 1946.

Commanders:  Capt Basil D Murray, Mar 1944; Col James T Connally, 6 Apr 1944; Col Glen W Martin, 6 Feb 1945; Col Charles B Root, 18 Sep 1945; Col John P Kenny, 2 Apr-15 Jun 1946.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yokohama, Japan, 28 May 1945; Japan and Korea, 27 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Insigne:  None.


Other Sites of Interest:

U.S. Army Air Corp 504th Bomb Group, Tinian

504th Bomb Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



393d Bombardment Squadron

(See listing under 509th Composite Group, below)

Table of Contents



398th Bombardment Squadron


From the scrapbook of Mr. Fred Koble who was an armorer
in the 504th BG, 421st BS on the B-29 "Dina Might".
Mr. Paul West, nephew of Mr. Koble, colorized the original drawings.


This is the KC-97 era version for the 98th AREFS while at Lincoln AFB, Nebraska from 18 Feb 1954-15 Apr 1963. The insignia was approved 11 Aug 1955. The crews came from the 55th AREFS. The squadron insignia came from the 55th AREFS as well. The KB-29M of the 55th were each favored with some nose art design. One in particular was #622 which had a Woody Woodpecker and a gas can as its logo. The aircraft was called the "Big Gas Bird" and "We Change the Range." Lantz Studios refined the emblem for the 98th.

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  398 Bombardment Squadron (Medium) (constituted 8 Reconnaissance Squadron [Medium] on 13 Jan 1942; activated on 1 Feb 1942; redesignated 398 Bombardment Squadron [Medium] on 22 Apr 1942; disbanded on 10 Oct 1943; reconstituted on 19 Sep 1985) consolidated (19 Sep 1985), with 398 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy (constituted on 28 Feb 1944; activated on 11 Mar 1944; inactivated on 15 Jun 1946), and 98 Air Refueling Squadron, Medium (constituted on 1 Aug 1950; activated on 16 Aug 1950; inactivated on 8 Apr 1952; activated on 8 Apr 1952; inactivated on 25 Nov 1953; activated on 18 Feb 1954; discontinued, and inactivated, on 15 Apr 1963). Redesignated 98 Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy on 19 Sep 1985. Redesignated 98 Air Refueling Squadron, and activated, on 1 Apr 1994. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1998. Redesignated 98 Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, and converted to provisional status, on 12 Jun 2002.

Assignments:  21 Bombardment Group, attached on 1 Feb 1942, and assigned 22 Apr 1942-10 Oct 1943. 504 Bombardment Group, 11 Mar 1944-15 Jun 1946. 98 Bombardment Group, 16 Aug 1950-8 Apr 1952. 98 Bombardment Group (attached to 6 Air Division) 8 Apr 1952; 98 Bombardment Wing (attached to 305 Bombardment Wing) 14 Apr 1952; 6 Air Division, 1 Jul 1953; 806 Air Division, 22-25 Nov 1953. 98 Bombardment Wing, 18 Feb 1954-15 Apr 1963 (attached to 98 Air Base Group 18 Feb-1 Aug 1954; unkn, 7 Jan-21 Feb 1955; Ernest Harmon Task Force, 27 Dec 1956-14 Mar 1957 and 28 Dec 1957-25 Mar 1958; Lajes Tanker Task Force, 1 Apr-8 Jul 1959 and 2 Oct 1962-7 Jan 1963). 453 Operations Group, 1 Apr 1994; 92 Operations Group, 1 Jul 1994-1 Jul 1998. Air Mobility Command to activate or inactivate at any time after 12 Jun 2002. Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate at any time after 19 Mar 2003.

Stations:  Bowman Field, KY, 1 Feb 1942; Jackson AAB, MS, 8 Feb 1942; Columbia AAB, SC, 24 Apr 1942; Key Field, MS, 26 May 1942; MacDill Field, FL, 26 Jun 1942-10 Oct 1943. Dalhart AAFld, TX, 11 Mar 1944; Fairmont AAFld, NE, 12 Mar-5 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 23 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 13 Mar-15 Jun 1946. Spokane (later, Fairchild) AFB, WA 16 Aug 1950-8 Apr 1952. MacDill AFB, FL, 8 Apr 1952; Lake Charles AFB, LA, 22-25 Nov 1953. Lincoln AFB, NE, 18 Feb 1954-15 Apr 1963 (deployed at Goose AB, Labrador, 7 Jan-21 Feb 1955; RAF Mildenhall, England, 7 Nov 1955-31 Jan 1956; Ernest Harmon AB, Newfoundland, 27 Dec 1956-14 Mar 1957 and 28 Dec 1957-25 Mar 1958; Lajes AFB, Azores, 1 Apr-8 Jun 1959 and 2 Oct 1962-7 Jan 1963). Fairchild AFB, WA, 1 Apr 1994-1 Jul 1998.

Commanders:  None (not manned), 1-11 Feb 1942; Maj John M. Reynolds, 12 Feb 1942; 2Lt Frank E. Locke, 16 Mar 1942; Capt Gove C. Celio, 28 Apr 1942; Capt George W. Stalnaker, 8 Aug 1942; Capt William H. Garretson, 27 Jan 1943; Maj Manford J. Wetzel, 17 Apr 1943; Maj Kenneth C. Dempster, 9 Aug-10 Oct 1943. None (not manned) 11 Mar-20 Apr 1944; Maj William P. Dwyer, 21 Apr 1944; Lt Col Howard F. Hugos, 19 May 1944; Maj Jack B. Riley, 14 Jan 1945; Maj David R. Cairns, 29 Mar 1945; Lt Col William P. Mullins, 24 May 1945; Capt John F. Swofford, c. Sep 1945; Capt Joseph B. Webb, 2 Dec 1945-15 Jun 1946. None (not manned), 16 Aug 1950-8 Apr 1952. Minimally manned, 8 Apr 1952-Apr 1953; Capt W. H. Riddell, Apr 1953; Maj Robert L. Hundley, by 1 Jun 1953-unkn. Lt Col Daniel T. Rodgers, by May 1954; Lt Col Jasper L. Godwin Jr., 18 May 1957; Lt Col Walter P. Morton, 12 Aug 1960; Maj Charles L. Peterson, Jul 1962-15 Apr 1963. Capt Kimberlei A. Northrop, 1 Apr 1994; Lt Col Michael D. Crane, 26 Jul 1994; Lt Col Jeffrey A. Sponsler, 12 Sep 1995; Lt Col Mark F. Ramsey, 1 Nov 1996-1 Jul 1998.

Aircraft:  B-25, 1942; B-26, 1942-1943. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946. KC-97, 1953. KC–97, 1954-1963. KC-135, 1994-1998.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols in the Gulf of Mexico, 8 Jun 1942 and 31 Jul-8 Aug 1942. Operational training unit, Jun 1942-Jul 1943. Combat in Western Pacific, 16 Jun-14 Aug 1945. Not operational, 16 Aug 1950-8 Apr 1952. Ferried aircraft, Apr 1952-Nov 1953. Worldwide air refueling operations, 1954-1963 and 1994-1998. Deployed to Saudi Arabia, Jul-Dec 1995 to provide refueling support for operations over the no-fly zone in Iraq, and to Panama, Apr-Jun 1996 in support of counter-drug operations.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yokohama, Japan, 28 May 1945; Japan and Korea, 27 Jul-14 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1997; 1 Jan-[1 Jul 1998].

Emblem (398th BS):  Over and through a black disc, a caricatured white elephant with aerial machine guns for tusks, firing, proper, face expressing anger, running and holding with the trunk a very large yellow orange aerial bomb, trimmed red at nose and tail fin, all over a segment of the globe with light blue water area, yellow orange land area, and marked with darker blue lines of latitude and longitude. (Approved 20 Sep 1944.)

Emblem (98th ARS):  On a White disc, edged Red, the character Woody Woodpecker, in his natural colors of Red, Light Blue, White, Yellow, and Black, flying through the air, and carrying with his feet a Red gasoline container with Yellow, White and Black detail. COPYRIGHT-Walter Lantz. Approved on 11 Aug 1955 (153164 A.C.); replaced emblem approved on 20 Sep 1944 (29126 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 19 Mar 2003.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Jul 1998.

Table of Contents



421st Bombardment Squadron


From the scrapbook of Mr. Fred Koble who was an armorer
in the 504th BG, 421st BS on the B-29 "Dina Might".
Mr. Paul West, nephew of Mr. Koble, colorized the original drawings.


421st ARS

421st ARS

421st ARS

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 421st Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 15 Jun 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 421st Air Refueling Sq as the 421st Air Refueling Sq.

Assignments:  504th Bombardment Group, 11 Mar 1944-15 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 194.4; Fairmont AAFld, Neb, 12 Mar-5 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 23 Dec 1944; Clark Field, Luzon, 13 Mar-15 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 16 Jan-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yokohama, Japan, 28 May 1945; Japan and Korea, 27 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  On a light turquoise blue triangle resting on base leg, border white, edged black, a large brown and white ape standing on segment of white globe marked with black latitude and longitude lines, in base, casting a black drop shadow, and hurling a very large white aerial bomb, shadowed black, toward dexter base, with the upraised right arm. (Approved 2 Nov 1944.)

Table of Contents



680th Bombardment Squadron


From the scrapbook of Mr. Fred Koble who was an armorer
in the 504th BG, 421st BS on the B-29 "Dina Might".
Mr. Paul West, nephew of Mr. Koble, colorized the original drawings.

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 680th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 25 Nov 1944. Activated on 4 Dec 1944. Inactivated on 15 Jun 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 37th Air Defense Missile Sq as the 37th Tactical Missile Sq (not active).

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 4 Dec 1944; 504th Bombardment Group: attached, 15 Jun 1945; assigned 14 Nov 1945-15 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Alamogordo AAFld, NM, 4 Dec 1944-10 May 1945; North Field, Tinian, 15 Jun 1945; Clark Field, Luzon, 13 Mar-15 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-29,1945-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 22 Jun-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Yokohama, Japan, 28 May 1945; Japan and Korea, 27 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



358th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
568th Air Engineering Sq
567th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



505th Bombardment Group


(Jan-Apr 45.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

(Apr 45-End of War.
Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 505th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Equipped first with B-17's; later trained for overseas duty with B-29's. Moved to Tinian late in 1944. Assigned to Twentieth AF. Entered combat in Feb 1945 with strikes on Iwo Jima and the Truk Islands. Then began daylight missions against Japan, operating at high altitude to bomb strategic objectives. Received a DUC for a strike against the Nakajima aircraft factory at Ota in Feb 1945. Conducted incendiary raids on area targets in Japan, carrying out these missions at night and at low altitude. Bombed in support of the Allied assault on Okinawa in Apr 1945. Engaged in mining operations against Japanese shipping, receiving second DUC for mining the Shimonoseki Strait and harbors of the Inland Sea, Jun-Jul 1945. After V-J Day, dropped supplies to Allied prisoners, participated in show-of-force missions, and flew over Japan to evaluate bombardment damage. Moved to the Philippine Islands in Mar 1946. Inactivated on Luzon on 30 Jun 1946.

Squadrons:  482d: 1944-1946. 483d: 1944-1946. 484th: 1944-1946. 485th: 1944.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 1 Apr-Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 19 Dec 1944-5 Mar 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar-30 Jun 1946.

Commanders:  Maj George D Roberts, 15 Apr 1944; Col Robert A Ping, 3 May 1944; Lt Col Charles M Eisenhart, 1 Jul 1945; Col John P Kenny, c. Sep 1945-1946.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Ota, Japan, 10 Feb 1945; Japan, 17 Jun-1 Jul 1945.

Insigne:  None.


Other Sites of Interest:  505 Bomb Group Tinian WWII

Table of Contents



482nd Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 70th Aero Squadron on 13 Aug 1917. Redesignated 482d Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 18 Mar 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 482d Bombardment Squadron which was constituted and allotted to the reserve on 31 Mar 1924. Activated, date unkn [personnel assigned, Mar 1925]. Disbanded on 31 May 1942. Reconstituted and consolidated (21 Apr 1944) with 482d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) which was constituted on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 30 June 1946.

Assignments:  Unkn, 13 Aug 1917-Mar 1918; Advance Section, Service of Supply, Mar-Dec 1918; unkn, Dec 1918-18 Mar 1919. Third Corps Area, [1924(?)-31 May 1942(?)]. 505th Bombardment Group, 11 Mar 194-30 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 13 Aug 1917; Camp Morrison, Va, 21 Dec 1917-4 Mar 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 27 Mar 1918; Autreville, France, 28 Mar 1918; Trampot, France, c. 9 Jul 1918; Longeaux, France, 22 Sep 1918; Trampot, France, c. 24 Oct 1918; Braux, France, c. 22 Nov 1918; Pont Rousseau, France, 25 Dec 1918-unkn; Garden City, NY, c. 8-18 Mar 1919. Baltimore, Md, [1924(?)-31 May 1942(?)]. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 12 Mar-6 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 24 Dec 1944-5 Mar 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar-30 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Constructed airfields and related facilities in Zone of Advance, 28 Mar-Dec 1918. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 30 Dec 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  Theater of Operations.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Ota, Japan, 10 Feb 1945; Japan, 17 Jun-1 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  On a gold disc, wide border dark red brown, an aerial bomb in drawn bow, all of the last, pointing toward dexter base, surmounted by a side view of an Indian head, proper, with head band and plait loop red brown, trimmed gold, holding two white feathers tipped and trimmed red brown in the headdress. (Approved 16 Dec 1944.)

Table of Contents



483d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 483d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 30 Jun 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 303rd Transport Sq and the 303rd Air Refueling Sq (M) as the 303rd Air Refueling Sq (H) (see 303d Transport Sq in Transport Units Section).

Assignments:  505th Bombardment Group, 11 Mar 1944-30 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 12 Mar-6 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 24 Dec 1944-5 Mar 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar-30 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, c. 30 Dec 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Ota, Japan, 10 Feb 1945; Japan, 17 Jun-1 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



484th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 72d Aero Squadron on 15 Aug 1917. Redesignated 484th Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 8 Feb 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 484th Bombardment Squadron which was constituted and allotted to the reserve on 31 Mar 1924. Activated, date unkn. Disbanded on 31 May 1942. Reconstituted and consolidated (21 Apr 1944) with 484th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) which was constituted on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 30 Jun 1946.

Assignments:  Unkn, 15 Aug 1917-Mar 1918; Advance Section, Service of Supply, Mar 1918; First Army, 23 Aug 1918; Second Army, 28 Oct-Nov 1918; unkn, Nov 1918-8 Feb 1919. Seventh Corps Area, 1924-1942. 505th Bombardment Group, 11 Mar 1944-30 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 15 Aug 1917; Camp Morrison, Va, 1 Feb-4 Mar 1918; Vinets-sur-Aube, France, 26 Mar 1918; Longeaux, France, 15 Jul 1918; Lay-St Remy, France, c. 26 Aug 1918 (detachments operated from several points in Toul and Verdun sectors, 1-11 Sep 1918; unit from Noviant-aux-Pres and Grosrouvres after 14 Sep 1918); Saizerais, France, c. 10 Oct 1918 (unit operated from Noviant-aux-F'res and Grosrouvres to 13 Oct 1918; detachments from Toul and Manonville, c. 5-c. 21 Nov 1918); Colombey-les-Belles, France, 24 Nov 1918; Brest, France, 16 Dec 1918-2 Jan 1919; Washington, DC, unkn-8 Feb 1919. Unkn, 1924-1942. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 12 Mar-6 Nov 1944; North Field, Tinian, 24 Dec 1944-5 Mar 1946; Clark Field, Luzon, 14 Mar-30 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Constructed airfields and related facilities in Zone of Advance, 1 Apr-Nov 1918. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 30 Dec 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  World War I: St Mihiel. World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Ota, Japan, 10 Feb 1945; Japan, 17 Jun-1 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



359th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
570th Air Engineering Sq
569th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



509th Composite Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)


First post-WWII patch
c. October 1945
Roswell AAF, NM

Operation Crossroads
c. March 1946
Atomic tests at Bikini Atoll


(Arrowhead marking was employed on arrival at Tinian and after VJ Day)

(Various other group markings were employed in action, Jul-Aug 45)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 509th Composite Group on 9 Dec 1944 and activated on 17 Dec. Became the first AAF group to be organized, equipped, and trained for atomic warfare. Moved to Tinian, Apr-Jun 1945. Assigned to Twentieth AF. Flew practice missions in Jun and Jul. On 6 Aug 1945 one of the group's B-29's, the "Enola Gay," piloted by the group commander Col Paul W Tibbets Jr, dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later a B-29, "Bock's Car," piloted by Maj Charles W Sweeney, dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki. These two bombs, the first atomic weapons ever employed, quickly brought the war to an end. The group returned to the US, Oct-Nov 1945. Assigned to Strategic Air Command on 21 Mar 1946, providing the nucleus for the command's atomic striking force. Redesignated 509th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 10 Jul 1946. Participated in atomic tests (Operation Crossroads) in the Marshall Islands in 1946. Redesignated 509th Bombardment Group (Medium) on 2 Jul 1948. Converted from B-29 to B-50 aircraft, 1949-1950. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated 509 Operations Group on 12 Mar 1993. Activated on 15 Jul 1993.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 17 Dec 1944; 315 Bombardment Wing, 18 Dec 1944; 313 Bombardment Wing, c. Jun 1945; Second Air Force, 10 Oct 1945; 58 Bombardment Wing, 17 Jan 1946; Fifteenth Air Force, 31 Mar 1946; Eighth Air Force, 1 Nov 1946; 509 Bombardment Wing, 17 Nov 1947-16 Jun 1952. 509 Bomb Wing, 15 Jul 1993-.

Components

Squadrons:  13 Bomb: 9 Sep 2005-. 320 Troop Carrier: 17 Dec 1944-19 Aug 1946. 325 Bomb (later, 325 Weapons): 6 Jan 1998-9 Sep 2005. 393 Bombardment (later 393 Bomb): 17 Dec 1944-16 Jun 1952 (detached 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948 and 1 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952); 27 Aug 1993-. 394 Bombardment (later, 394 Combat Training): 6 Nov 1996-. 509 Air Refueling: 19 Jul 1948-16 Jun 1952 (detached 19 Jul-14 Sep 1948 and 1 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952). 715 Bombardment: 6 May 1946-16 Jun 1952 (detached 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948 and 1 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952). 830 Bombardment: 6 May 1946-16 Jun 1952 (detached 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948 and 1 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952).

Stations:  Wendover Field, UT, 17 Dec 1944-26 Apr 1945. Tinian, Mariana Islands, 29 May-17 Oct 1945; Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 6 Nov 1945-16 Jun 1952. Whiteman AFB, MO, 15 Jul 1993-.

Commanders:  Col Paul W. Tibbets Jr., 17 Dec 1944; Col William H. Blanchard, 22 Jan 1946; Col John D. Ryan, 15 Sep 1948; Col William H. Blanchard, 21 Jul 1951-16 Jun 1952. Col William M. Fraser III, 15 Jul 1993; Col Gregory H. Power, 23 Jan 1995; Col Wilhelm F. Percival, 15 Jul 1996; Col Anthony A. Imondi, 30 Jun 1998; Col Jonathan D. George, 6 Jan 2000; Col Gregory A. Biscone, 7 Dec 2001; Col Curtiss R. Petrek, 22 May 2003; Col Robert E. Wheeler, 28 Jun 2005; Col Thomas A. Bussiere, 9 Jul 2007-.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1944-1950; C-47, 1944-1945; C-54, 1945-1946; KB-29, 1948-1952; B-50, 1949-1952. B-2, 1993-; T-38, 1993-.

Operations:  The 509 Composite Group, the first Army Air Forces group to be organized, equipped, and trained for atomic warfare, moved to Tinian by Jun 1945 and flew practice missions through July against Truk Island, Caroline Islands and Marcus Island for which group received credit for participation in Eastern Mandates campaign. Conducted high altitude individual aircraft missions against targets on the islands of Japan. On 6 Aug 1945 a B-29 named the "Enola Gay," piloted by the group commander, Col Paul W. Tibbets Jr., dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later "Bock's Car" piloted by Maj Charles W. Sweeney, dropped a similar bomb on Nagasaki. These two bombs, the first atomic weapons ever employed, contributed immensely to the war's end. Completed 50 combat missions and received credit for participation in Air Offensive Japan campaign.

The group moved to Roswell Army Air Field, Roswell, NM, Oct-Nov 1945. In Mar 1946, the group provided the nucleus for the Strategic Air Command's atomic striking force. Later in 1946, participated in atomic tests (Operation CROSSROADS) at Kwajalein Island in the Marshall Islands.

After completion of Operation CROSSROADS, returned to Roswell AAF where the group was nearly demobilized due to loss of personnel and equipment. Returned to operational status Feb 47. Except for two periods when the group was not operational (17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948 and 10 Feb 1951-16 Jun 1952), participated in joint Army-Navy maneuvers called Nullus Operations. Conducted 150 missions in conjunction with Group's Phase III training. Participated in Pacific maneuvers.

Since 1993, supported, maintained and operated aircraft fleet that enabled the 509 Bomb Wing to fulfill its mission of conducting conventional or nuclear operations. Elements flew non-stop bombing missions from stateside base to Kosovo and returned during Kosovo Campaign.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" device: 1 Jul-14 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jun 1999-31 May 2001; 1 Jun 2003-31 May 2005.

Emblem:  Or, in base a label of three points gules, surmounted by an atomic cloud proper, between a pair of wings conjoined in base azure. Crest: On a wreath of the colors, or and azure, an atomic cloud or, with broken pattern gules, between two lightning bolts gules. Motto: Defensor Vindex - Defender Avenger. (Approved 10 Jul 1952.) Group will use the Wing emblem with the Group designation in the scroll.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 Aug 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 15 Aug 2007.



Source:

Lineage:  Established as 509 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, on 3 Nov 1947. Organized on 17 Nov 1947. Redesignated: 509 Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 1 Aug 1948; 509 Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 2 Apr 1966; 509 Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 1 Dec 1969; 509 Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 30 Sep 1990; 509 Bomb Wing on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  Eighth Air Force, 17 Nov 1947 (attached to 3 Air Division, 1 Feb 1951- ); 47 Air Division, 10 Feb 1951 (remained attached to 3 Air Division to 4 May 1951; attached to 7 Air Division, 4 Jun-2 Sep 1952; 3 Air Division, 10 Jul-8 Oct 1954; 7 Air Division, 26 Jan-30 Apr 1956); 817 Air Division, 1 Jul 1958; 45 Air Division, 30 Jun 1971; Eighth Air Force, 29 Mar 1989; 100 Air Division, 30 Sep 1990; Eighth Air Force, 26 Jul 1991-.

Components

Wing:  33 Fighter: attached 17 Nov 1947-15 Nov 1948.

Groups:  33 Fighter: attached 17 Nov 1947-15 Nov 1948. 509 Bombardment (later, 509th Operations): 17 Nov 1947-16 Jun 1952; 15 Jul 1993-.

Squadrons:  34 Air Refueling: 25 Jun 1966-31 Mar 1976. 393 Bombardment: attached 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948; attached 1 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-30 Sep 1990 (detached 18 Jun-c. 18 Sep 1953). 509 Air Refueling: attached 19 Jul-14 Sep 1948; attached 1 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-5 Jan 1958 (detached 10 Jul-5 Nov 1954, 14 Jun- 5 Aug 1955, and 27 Feb-1 May 1957); assigned 8 Jul 1958-25 Jun 1965; assigned 2 Oct 1966-1 Jul 1990. 661 Bombardment: 1 Mar 1959-1 Jan 1962. 715 Bombardment: attached 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948; attached 1 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1966; assigned 1 Jan 1970-30 Sep 1990. 830 Bombardment: attached 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948; attached 1 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952, assigned 16 Jun 1952-25 Jun 1966 (detached 15 Mar-19 Jun 1953). 900 Air Refueling: 2 Apr-25 Jun 1966.

Stations:  Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 17 Nov 1947; Pease AFB, NH, 1 Jul 1958; Whiteman AFB, MO, 30 Sep 1990-.

Commanders:  Col William H. Blanchard, 17 Nov 1947; Col John D. Ryan, 1 Aug 1948; Brig Gen Clarence S. Irvine, 15 Sep 1948; Col James A. DeMarco, 3 Jan 1950; Brig Gen Hunter Harris, Jr., 15 Jan 1950; Col Thomas S. Jeffrey, Jr., 10 Jan 1951; Col John D. Ryan, 1 Feb 1951; Col Berton H. Burns, (by 19) Jul 1951; Col William H. Blanchard, 21 Jul 1951; Col Berton H. Burns, c. 15 Jan 1952; Brig Gen William H. Blanchard, c. 7 Apr 1952; Col Wilson R. Wood, 11 Feb 1953; Col Howard E. Jackson, 22 Apr 1953; Col Harold E. Humfeld, (by 12) May 1953; Col Wilson R. Wood, c. 15 May 1953; Col Harold E. Humfeld, 30 Jul 1953; Col Wilson R. Wood, 23 Nov 1953; Col Clifford F. Macomber, 16 May 1955; Col Neil W. Wemple, (by 8) Jan 1957; Col Clifford F. Macomber, (by 29) Jan 1957; Col Brooks A. Lawhon, 11 Feb 1959; Col Donald G. McPherson, 1 Jun 1960; Col Edward D. Edwards, 10 Mar 1962; Col James O. Frankosky, 21 Oct 1963; Col Joseph V. Adams, Jr., 27 Jan 1966; Col James O. Frankosky, c. 2 Mar 1966; Col Madison M. McBrayer, 23 Jan 1967; Col Joseph V. Adams, Jr., 28 Mar 1968; Col Robert E. Blauw, c. 1 Oct 1968; Col William R. Thorstenson, 19 Mar 1969; Col Robert E. Blauw, 20 Sep 1969; Col William R. Thorstenson, 18 Nov 1969; Col Winston E. Moore, 11 Dec 1969; Col John M. Parker, 22 Feb 1972; Col Alan L. Hichew, 14 Jun 1972; Col Isaac M. Glass, 26 Mar 1973; Col Paul W. Maul, 21 Aug 1973; Col Richard A. Burpee, 26 Feb 1974; Col Fredric E. Roth, 1 Apr 1975; Col Guy L. Hecker, Jr., 3 May 1976; Col James M. Greer, 11 Jan 1978; Col Samuel H. Swart, Jr., 4 May 1979; Col John A. Dramesi, 22 Jun 1981; Col Trevor A. Hammond, 21 Dec 1981; Col Denis L. Walsh, 10 May 1983; Col Frederick A. Fiedler, 13 Jun 1984; Col Robert J. McCracken, 14 May 1985; Col Thad A. Wolf, 27 Feb 1987; Col Orin L. Godsey, 25 Feb 1988; Col William C. Brooks, 28 Feb-30 Sep 1990; none (not manned) 30 Sep 1990-31 Mar 1993; Brig Gen Ronald C. Marcotte, 1 Apr 1993; Brig Gen Thomas B. Goslin, Jr., 26 Mar 1996; Brig Gen Leroy Barnidge, Jr., 8 Jun 1998; Brig Gen Anthony F. Przybyslawski, 7 Jun 2000; Brig Gen Douglas L. Raaberg, 22 Apr 2002; Brig Gen Christopher D. Miller, 24 Apr 2004; Brig Gen Gregory A. Biscone, 1 May 2006-.

Aircraft:  F-51, 1947-1948; F-84, 1948; B-29, 1947-1952; B-50, 1949-1951; KB-29, 1951-1954; KC-97, 1954-1958, 1958-1965; B-47, 1955-1965; B-52, 1966-1969; KC-135, 1966-1990; FB-111, 1970-1990. None, 1991-1992. B-2, 1993-; T-38, 1993-.

Operations:  Maintained combat proficiency with B-29 bombers and F-51 and F-84 fighters, 1947-1948. Added air refueling capability in Sep 1948, initially with B-29M hose-type tankers and later with B/KB-29P boom-type tankers. Charged with strategic bombardment training and air refueling, 1949-1958. Deployed as a wing several times in the early 1950s, three times to England and once to Guam, and also deployed individual squadrons at other times. Temporarily had no refueling unit during 1958. Phased down for inactivation in late 1965, but was converted to a B-52/KC-135 wing in 1966. Supported SAC combat and contingency operations in Southeast Asia with KC-135 aircraft and crews, Nov 1966-Dec 1975, with B-52 aircraft and crews, Nov 1966-Sep 1969, and with B-52 crews, 1970. From 1 Apr to 1 Oct 1968 and 26 Mar to c. 20 Sep 1969, more than one-half of the wing was involved in SAC operations in Southeast Asia. From Nov 1969 to Dec 1970, the wing had no bombardment aircraft but continued refueling operations and performed FB-111 ground training. Resumed bombardment flying training in Dec 1970 and assumed FB-111 alert commitments from 1 Jul 1971 until Sep 1990. Won the SAC Bombing and Navigation competition and the Fairchild trophy in 1979, 1981, 1982, and 1983. Awarded the Sanders trophy for best air refueling unit in 1982. Moved on paper to Whiteman AFB, MO on 30 Sep 1990, but not manned until Apr 1993. Received first B-2 aircraft on 17 Dec 1993. Participated in Operation Allied Force in 1999, Operation Enduring Freedom in 2001, and Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003. Flew nonstop bombing missions from Whiteman AFB, MO to Kosovo and returned. Since 1993, furnished USAF's only source of stealth heavy bomber capability. Maintained combat-ready resources to conduct conventional or nuclear operations.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Apr-1 Oct 1968; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1982; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jun 1999-31 May 2001; 1 Jun 2003-31 May 2005.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 509th Operations Group prior to 17 Nov 1947:

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  Or, in base a label of three Gules below an atomic cloud proper between a pair of wings elevated Azure. Motto: DEFENSOR VINDEX-Defender avenger. Approved on 10 Jul 1952 (K 17356).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 Aug 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 15 Aug 2007.


Wing's Emblem Symbolizes the 'First'

by History Office
509th Bomb Wing

11/7/2007 - WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. (AFPN) -- The shield of the 509th Bombardment Wing is rich in tradition as each symbol on the shield represents some part of the past. The wing's emblem was approved July 10, 1952 and has remained unchanged for 55 years.

The yellow shield has a representation of an atomic cloud between a pair of blue stylized wings with a red tripod in the center. The colors allude to Air Force colors with blue representing the Air Force, and yellow alludes to the excellence required of Air Force people. .

The Air Force blue wings represent the branch of service but are not in the familiar outstretched position. When the ancient Greeks approached a stranger, they raised their arms with palms outward to show they were carrying no weapons, a sign of peace. The 509th BW obtained special permission to display the wings in this configuration to show that it, too, comes in peace.

The atomic cloud burst represents two things: The 509 is the only unit to ever drop atomic bombs in wartime representing a new era of weaponry and that it uses airpower as a deterrent to war and defender of peace. Finally, the red tripod which is the eldest son symbol shows that the wing is the oldest atomic trained military unit in the world.

In the scroll is the wing's motto, "Defensor Vindex," Latin for Defender Avenger.


Other Sites of Interest:

History Of The 509th Composite Group (AFHRA)

AFHRA Photos - 509th Composite Group

Olive-Drab: 509TH COMPOSITE GROUP

B-29 Superfortress Then and Now

509th Bomb Wing - SAC - Pease AFB

509th Bomb Wing

Enola Gay - Former Exhibition Information

Enola Gay Remembered - The Official Website of Ret. General Paul W. Tibbets

509th Operations Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



320th Troop Carrier Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 320th Troop Carrier Squadron on 9 Dec 1944. Activated on 17 Dec 1944. Inactivated on 19 Aug 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 302nd Transport Sq and the 302nd Tactical Reconnaissance Sq as the 302nd Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (see 302nd Transport Sq in Transport Units Section).

Assignments:  509th Composite Group, 17 Dec 1944-19 Aug 1946.

Stations:  Wendover Field, Utah, 17 Dec 1944-26 Apr 1945; North Field, Tinian, 30 May-17 Oct 1945; Roswell AAFld, NM, 6 NOV 1945-19 Aug 1946.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1944-1945; C-54, 1945-1946.

Operations:  Aerial transportation in support of the 509th Composite Group's atomic warfare activities in 1945, and for atomic tests in the Marshall Islands in 1946.

Service Streamers:  Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a disc divided per fess debased, grayed orange and light turquoise blue, border equally divided blue green and white, a caricatured, tan-and-brown, winged donkey in front of a white cloud formation, leaping, from a small, tan and brown island, in dexter fess, with white water marks about shore line and three palm trees, proper, thereon, toward a like island in sinister base. (Approved 27 Jun 1945.)

Table of Contents



393d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 393d Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Redesignated: 393d Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 2 Jul 1948; 393d Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 2 Apr 1966; 393d Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 1 Dec 1969. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1990. Redesignated 393d Bomb Squadron on 12 Mar 1993. Activated on 27 Aug 1993.

Assignments:  504th Bombardment Group, 11 Mar 1944; Second Air Force, 25 Nov 1944; 509th Composite (later, 509th Bombardment) Group, 17 Dec 1944 (attached to 509th Bombardment Wing, 17 Nov 1947-14 Sep 1948 and 1 Feb 1951-15 Jun 1952); 509th Bombardment Wing, 16 Jun 1952-30 Sep 1990 (probably attached to Twentieth Air Force, 18 Jun-c. 18 Sep 1953). 509th Operations Group, 27 Aug 1993-.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, TX, 11 Mar 1944; Fairmont AAFld, NE, 12 Mar 1944; Wendover Field, UT, 14 Sep 1944-26 Apr 1945; North Field, Tinian, 30 May-17 Oct 1945; Roswell AAFld (later, Walker AFB), NM, 6 Nov 1945 (deployed at Kwajalein, 1 May-Jul 1946; Mildenhall RAF, England, 4 Jun-2 Sep 1952; Andersen AFB, Guam, 18 Jun-c. 18 Sep 1953 and 10 Jul-8 Oct 1954; RAF Upper Heyford, England, 26 Jan-30 Apr 1956); Pease AFB, NH, 1 Jul 1958-30 Sep 1990. Whiteman AFB, MO, 27 Aug 1993-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1952; B-50, 1949-1955; B-47, 1955-1965; B-52, 1966-1969; FB-111, 1970-1990.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 1 Jul-14 Aug 1945. Only squadron trained for atomic warfare in World War II; dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, on 6 Aug 1945, and the second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, on 9 Aug 1945. Participated in atomic bomb tests on Bikini Atoll, Jul 1946, while deployed on Kwajalein. Rotated aircraft and crews to Andersen AFB, Guam, in support of Southeast Asia Operations, 1966-1969. Not operational, Nov 1969-Jun 1971.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaigns Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: Apr-1 Oct 1968; 1 Jul 1977-30 Jun 1979; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1982; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1988-30 Jun 1990. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 5 Mar-14 Oct 1969.

Emblem (White version):  On a disc Argent, a circle Vert fimbriated Or in fess point charged with a mushroom shaped atomic cloud issuant from a blast in base Argent detailed Sable charged with an arrow in base pointing to dexter Or surmounted by a tiger's head Proper, eyed of the first, armed of the second and langued Gules, all within a narrow border Black. Attached below the disc, a Yellow scroll edged with a narrow Black border and inscribed "393D BOMB SQ" in Black letters. Approved on 15 Jul 1957 (K 7984); replaced emblem approved on 19 Dec 1944 (9925 A.C.).

Emblem (Green version):  On a Green disc edged Air Force Yellow, a mushroom- shaped atomic cloud issuing from a blast, White; all surmounted by a snarling tiger's head in profile, proper (Air Force Yellow with Black stripes, White teeth, Red tongue and eyeball, Green iris and Black pupil); on the blast below the atomic cloud and tiger's head, an arrow of the second pointing to dexter, all outlines and details Black throughout. Revised unit emblem approved 12 Jul 2007.

Significance:  Ultramarine blue and Air Force yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The snarling tiger indicates that the squadron fulfills its mission with determination and fearlessness. The blast and atomic cloud signify the squadron's history as a member of the 509th Composite Group, the first US Air Force unit with atomic capability. The arrow is symbolic of insignia used by the unit during World War II. It means "Follow Me."



Other Sites of Interest:

Brief History of the 393rd Bomb Squadron

393d Bomb Squadron

Table of Contents



1st Ordnance Squadron (Spl Avn)

Source:  History Of The 509th Composite Group (AFHRA)

Activated 6 Mar 1945, Wendover Field, UT. Departed in stages from 4-17 June 45 for Tinian.


Source:  Nuclear Weapons History

1st Ordnanace Squadron

The members of the 1st Ordnance Squadron were responsible for assembling the atomic bombs. In a unit unique to all standard Army organization, they worked closely with Manhattan Project scientists.

The technical and military security requirements for the squadron were exacting. The Army Air Forces accepted only one-fifth of those who met the basic qualifications. They warned those chosen that their jobs would be hazardous due to the experimental stage of the work.


Source:  Air Force History Index

Reactivated 1 Nov 46. Assigned to Strategic Air Command. Mission statement: assist Manhattan District in aerial experimentation in connection with development of atomic bomb and act as liaison agency between Strategic Air Force and Manhattan District.



1st Ordnance Sq Area


Source:  EOD History (www.geocities.com/littlerockeod/eodhistory - NO LONGER ACTIVE)

The Air force began EOD training as soon as they became a separate branch of the armed forces in 1947. On 21 May 1951, the Air Force assumed explosive ordnance disposal responsibilities and assigned EOD operational duties within the Zone of Interior (ZI) to Headquarters Air Material Command (HQ AMC). Accordingly, the AMC activated its first explosive ordnance disposal squadron, effective 16 June 1952, when the 1st Ordnance Squadron, Aviation, was redesignated as the 1st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Squadron, pursuant to authority contained in the HQ AMC General Order Number 29. Assignment was at Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio, with an authorized strength of 11 officers and 65 airmen. The 1st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Squadron was entitled to the history, battle honors, and any colors belonging to the 1st Ordnance Squadron, Aviation, deactivated 1 October 1948.

On 24 November 1953, Headquarters, 1st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Squadron at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, had eleven detachments in the United States which were responsible generally for EOD within an Air Force installation's geographical area. These detachments performed emergency EOD work at the following locations:

1. Tinker AFB, OK
2. Griffis AFB, NY
3. Norton AFB, CA
4. Eglin AFB, FL
5. Hill AFB, UT
6. Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
7. McClellan AFB, CA
8. Robins AFB, GA
9. Olmsted AFB, PA
10. Kelly AFB, TX

Table of Contents



1st Technical Service Detachment, War Department Misc. Group

Source:  History Of The 509th Composite Group (AFHRA)

Attached June 1945.  This technical service detachment had been activated for the purpose of administering a variety of scientists, security officers and Naval personnel needed in the Atomic Bomb project.  Among these personnel were physicians whose assignment was to examine the physiological effects of the Atomic Bomb upon crew members and the enemy.  There were Navy officers who aided in designing the bomb, counter-intelligence officers, fuze experts, radar specialists and, of course some of the vast number of scientists who contributed so handsomely to the development and perfection of the Atomic Bomb and Atomic Bombing.



Source:  Image Gallery - John Healey Collection

(From website www.childrenofthemanhattanproject.org - no longer active)

Table of Contents



1395th Military Police Company (Avn)

Source:  History Of The 509th Composite Group (AFHRA)

Activated 17 Dec 44 at Wendover Field, UT. Departed 26 Apr 45. Arrived Tinian 29 May 45.



Source:  Nuclear Weapons History

SOMETHING NEW: A MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

Attaching a military police squadron to a bomber squadron was "something entirely new," according to the 509th yearbook. Guarding the 509th's atomic secrets, however, was a full-time job. While Tibbets prepared his air crews to deliver the bomb, the 1395th Military Police Company completed a rigorous training program that prepared them to meet any enemy ground forces as well as curious fellow troops or civilians.

Table of Contents



390th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
603d Air Engineering Sq
1027th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



314th Bombardment Wing

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (314th Air Division)

Lineage:  Established as 314 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 15 Apr 1944. Activated on 23 Apr 1944. Redesignated 314 Composite Wing on 15 Apr 1946. Inactivated on 20 Aug 1948. Redesignated 314 Air Division on 21 Nov 1950. Activated on 1 Dec 1950. Inactivated on 1 Mar 1952. Activated on 15 Mar 1955. Consolidated (1 Jul 1978) with organization established as 314 Air Division on 13 Aug 1948, organized on 18 Aug 1948, and discontinued on 1 Mar 1950. Inactivated on 8 Sep 1986.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 23 Apr 1944; XXI Bomber Command, 8 Jun 1944; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul 1945; Fifth Air Force, 15 May 1946; V Bomber Command, 30 May 1946; Fifth Air Force, 31 May 1946-1 Mar 1950. Fifth Air Force, 1 Dec 1950; Far East Air Forces, 18 May 1951-1 Mar 1952. Fifth Air Force, 15 Mar 1955-8 Sep 1986.

Components

Wings:  3 Bombardment (later, 3 Tactical Fighter): 18 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1950. 15 Mar 1971-16 Sep 1974. 4 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 22 Dec 1950-7 May 1951. 8 Tactical Fighter: 16 Sep 1974-8 Sep 1986. 18 Fighter-Bomber: 1 Mar 1955-31 Jan 1957. 35 Fighter (later, 35 Fighter-Interceptor): 18 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1950. 25 May 1951-1 Mar 1952. 49 Fighter (later, 49 Fighter-Bomber): 18 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1950. 51 Air Base (later, 51 Composite; 51 Tactical Fighter): 1 Nov 1971-8 Sep 1986. 58 Fighter-Bomber: attached 15 Mar 1955-31 Dec 1956, assigned 1 Jan 1957-1 Jul 1958. 116 Fighter-Bomber: 24 Jul 1951-1 Mar 1952. 374 Troop Carrier: 1 Dec 1950-25 Jan 1951 (detached entire period). 437 Troop Carrier: 1 Dec 1950-25 Jan 1951 (detached entire period). 452 Bombardment: 1 Dec 1950-25 May 1951. 6013 Operations (Northern Area): 2 Nov 1951-1 Mar 1952. 6014 Operations (Central Area): 2 Nov 1951-1 Mar 1952. 6015 Operations (Southern Area): 2 Nov 1951-1 Mar 1952.

Groups:  3 Bombardment: 31 May 1946-18 Aug 1948. 19 Bombardment: c. 9 Dec 1944-15 May 1946. 29 Bombardment: c. 9 Nov 1944-15 May 1946 (not operational, 12 Feb-15 May 1946). 35 Fighter: 31 May 1946-18 Aug 1948. 58 Tactical Missile: 24 Apr 1959-25 Mar 1962. 71 Reconnaissance: 15 Apr 1947-18 Aug 1948 (not operational, 15 Apr-31 Oct 1947; detached 31 Oct 1947-18 Aug 1948). 330 Bombardment: c. 9 Nov 1944-c. 21 Nov 1945. 6146 Air Force Advisory (Republic of Korea Air Force) (later, 6146 Flying Training; 6146 Air Force Advisory): 15 Mar-24 Sep 1955; 18 Sep 1956-1 Apr 1971.

Squadrons:  6 Night Fighter: 10 Jun 1946-20 Feb 1947 (detached 7 Sep 1946-20 Feb 1947). 8 Photographic Reconnaissance (later, 8 Tactical Reconnaissance): 31 May 1946-28 Feb 1947 (not operational, 31 May-16 Dec 1946; detached 16 Sep-16 Dec 1946); attached 28 Feb-c. 31 Oct 1947; attached 18 Apr 1949-1 Mar 1950. 9 Reconnaissance: 20 Jun 1946-20 Oct 1947 (detached 25 Sep 1946-20 Oct 1947). 19 Tactical Air Support: 15 Jan 1972-30 Sep 1974. 20 Reconnaissance: 31 May-20 Jun 1946. 41 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 1 Dec 1950-25 May 1951. 56 Strategic Reconnaissance: attached 18 May 1951-1 Mar 1952. 63 Bombardment: attached 1-29 Sep 1947. 65 Bombardment: 1-29 Jan 1947. 68 Fighter (later, 68 Fighter-Interceptor): 1 Dec 1950-1 Mar 1952 (detached entire period). 82 Tactical Reconnaissance (later, 82 Reconnaissance): 31 May 1946-28 Feb 1947; attached 28 Feb-Nov 1947. 91 Strategic Reconnaissance: attached 18 May 1951-1 Mar 1952. 157 Liaison: 31 May-1 Jun 1946. 310 Fighter-Bomber: 1-15 Jul 1958 (not operational). 334 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 7 May-27 Jun 1951. 335 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 20 Sep-4 Nov 1951. 336 Fighter-Interceptor: attached 27 Jun-20 Sep 1951. 339 Fighter (later, 339 Fighter-Interceptor): attached 15 Dec 1946-20 Feb 1947 (not operational); attached 20 Feb 1947-18 Aug 1948; assigned 1 Dec 1950-1 Mar 1952 (detached entire period). 342 Bombardment: attached 1-28 August 1947. 431 Fighter: attached 1 Mar-unkn 1947. 436 Bombardment: attached 1-30 May 1947. 492 Bombardment: attached 2-30 Jul 1947. 6156 Flying Training (Trans ROKAF): 15 Mar-14 Sep 1955.

Flights:  B, 15 Liaison Squadron: attached 25 Oct 1946-17 Feb 1947. B, 157 Liaison Squadron: attached 11-25 Oct 1972. 314 Operations: 1 Feb 1971-31 May 1972. 6113 All Weather: 26 Jan-10 Apr 1949 (detached entire period).

Stations:  Peterson Field, CO, 23 Apr-9 Dec 1944; North Field, Guam, 16 Jan 1945; Johnson AFB, (later, AB), Japan, 15 May 1946-1 Mar 1950. Nagoya AB, Japan, 1 Dec 1950-1 Mar 1952. Osan Ni (later, Osan) AB, Korea, 15 Mar 1955; Yong San, Korea, 7 Nov 1978; Osan AB, Korea, 1 Apr 1979-8 Sep 1986.

Commanders:  None (not manned), 23 Apr-20 May 1944; Lt Col Donald Mace, 21 May 1944; Brig Gen Roger M. Ramey, 1 Jun 1944; Lt Col Hewitt T. Wheless, 15 Jun 1944; Col John G. Fowler, 24 Jun 1944; Brig Gen Thomas S. Power, 29 Aug 1944; Col Carl R. Storrie, 23 Jul-Sep 1945; unkn, Sep-Nov 1945; Col Elbert D. Reynolds, 1 Dec 1945-unkn; none (not manned), c. 15-30 May 1946; Brig Gen Jarred V. Crabb, 31 May 1946; Col Clarence D. Wheeler, 30 Jul 1946; Brig Gen David W. Hutchison, 23 Aug 1946; Brig Gen Herbert B. Thatcher, 18 Feb 1947; Col Edward H. Underhill, 3 Jun 1947; Col Ray W. Clifton, 28 May 1948; Col Thomas B. Hall, 5-18 Aug 1948; unkn, 18 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1950. Brig Gen Delmar T. Spivey, 1 Dec 1950-1 Mar 1952. Col William W. Momyer, 15 Mar 1955; Col Thomas L. Mosley, c. Oct 1955; Brig Gen Thomas J. Gent Jr., 15 May 1956; Col Paul T. Hanley, Jul 1957; Brig Gen Virgil L. Zoller, Aug 1957; Brig Gen James B. Tipton, 7 Jul 1959; Brig Gen John M. Hutchison, 16 May 1961; Brig Gen William L. Mitchell Jr., 6 Sep 1963; Col Arthur C. Carlson Jr., 9 Jul 1965; Brig Gen Pinkham Smith, 1 Aug 1965; Brig Gen John W. Harrell Jr., 1 Jul 1967; Brig Gen Arthur W. Holderness Jr., 1 Jul 1968; Maj Gen Robert W. Maloy, 30 Apr 1970; Brig Gen Travil R. McNeil, 5 Jun 1972; Brig Gen Winfield W. Scott, 23 May 1973; Brig Gen Walter P. Paluch Jr., 12 Jul 1974; Maj Gen Don D. Pittman, 11 Aug 1975; Maj Gen Robert C. Taylor, 9 Apr 1977; Maj Gen George A. Edwards Jr., 27 Jul 1978; Lt Gen Charles A. Gabriel, 7 Nov 1978; Lt Gen Evan W. Rosencrans, 15 Mar 1979; Maj Gen George A. Edwards Jr., 1 Apr 1979; Maj Gen Fred A. Haeffner, 1 Aug 1980; Maj Gen Craven C. Rogers, 17 Jun 1983; Maj Gen James P. Smothermon, 23 Jul 1985; Maj Gen James T. Callaghan, 1 Aug-8 Sep 1986.

Aircraft and Missiles:  B-29, 1944-1946, 1947; B-17, 1946-1947; F-2, 1946-1947; F-6, 1946-1947; F-7, 1946-1947; F-9, 1946-1947; P-47, 1946-1948; P-51, 1946-1948; P-61, 1946-1947; F-13, 1947; F-15, 1947, 1949; RB-17, 1947-1948; RB-29, 1947-1948, 1951-1952; RF-51, 1947-1948; RF-61, 1947-1948; RF-80, 1947-1950; B-26, 1948-1950; F-51, 1950-1951, 1951-1952; C-46, 1950-1951; C-47, 1951; F-86, 1951; WB-29, 1951-1952. F-86, 1955-1958; Matador, 1959-1962; F-4, 1971-1974, 1974-1986; OV-10, 1974-1982; F-16, 1981-1986; A-10, 1982-1986.

Operations:  The 314th moved to Guam in Jan 1945. From then until the end of the war in Aug 1945, its subordinate units conducted daylight raids against strategic objectives, bombing aircraft factories, chemical plants, oil refineries, and other targets in Japan. These units also participated in several incendiary raids on Tokyo and other Japanese cities. Later in 1945, they mixed their missions between precision attacks against specific targets and fire raids against urban areas. Immediately after the end of the war, wing aircraft carried supplies to American prisoners of war. For approximately two years (1946-1948) the 314th served as one of Fifth Air Force's major components. It maintained intensive training schedules, participated in training exercises and took part in the post-hostilities program of mapping Japan. Activated at Nagoya AB, Japan, on 1 Dec 1950, the organization immediately assumed the missions of the air defense of Japan, logistical support for Fifth Air Force during the Korean conflict, and airfield construction in Japan. The division maintained assigned and attached forces at a high degree of combat readiness, Mar 1955-Sep 1986. In fulfilling its mission, the division supported numerous military exercises in the region, such as Commando Bearcat, Commando Jade, and Commando Night.

Service Streamers:  Korean Service.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific (Air).

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jan 1980-31 Dec 1981. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 19-20 Aug 1972.

Emblem:  On a shield argent a roundle azure, charged with a sphere of the field, land areas sable edged or; a demi wing superimposed over the dexter area of the sphere of the first, highlighted or. (Approved 9 May 1956.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 8 Sep 1986.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 8 Sep 1986.



Other Sites of Interest:

314th Air Division Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



19th Bombardment Group





Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


Monument located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


Monument located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (19th Operations Group)

AFHRA Records

Lineage:  Authorized as 19 Observation Group on 18 Oct 1927. Redesignated as 19 Bombardment Group on 8 May 1929. Activated on 24 Jun 1932. Redesignated as: 19 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 17 Oct 1939; 19 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated as 19 Bombardment Group, Medium on 10 Aug 1948. Inactivated on 1 Jun 1953. Redesignated as: 19 Air Refueling Group, Heavy on 31 Jul 1985; 19 Operations Group on 29 Aug 1991. Activated on 1 Sep 1991. Redesignated as: 19 Air Refueling Group on 1 Jul 1996; 19 Operations Group on 1 October 2008.

Assignments:  IX Corps Area, 24 Jun 1932; 1 Wing (later, 1 Bombardment Wing), 2 Mar 1935; IV Bomber Command, 19 Sep 1941; United States Air Forces in the Far East, c. 23 Oct 1941; V Bomber Command, 16 Nov 1941; U. S. Army Forces in Australia, c. Mar 1942; Allied Air Forces, Southwest Pacific Area, 18 Apr 1942; V Bomber Command, Sep 1942; 15 Bombardment Wing, 9 Dec 1942; 16 Bombardment Wing, 3 Jan 1943; 46 Bombardment Operational Training Wing, 4 Sep 1943-1 Apr 1944. Second Air Force, 1 Apr 1944; XXI Bomber Command, 14 Dec 1944; 314 Bombardment (later, 314 Composite) Wing, 27 Jan 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 15 May 1946; North Army Air Base Command (Provisional), 20 Dec 1947; 19 Bombardment Wing, 17 Aug 1948-1 Jun 1953 (attached to Far East Air Forces Bomber Command [Provisional] for operational control, 8 Jul 1950-1 Jun 1953). 19 Air Refueling Wing, 1 Sep 1991; Twenty-First Air Force, 1 Jul 1996; Eighteenth Air Force, 1 Oct 2003; 19 Airlift Wing, 1 Oct 2008-.

Components

Squadrons:  7 Air Refueling: 1 Jun 1992-1 Jan 1993. 14 Bombardment: attached 2 Dec 1941-c. 14 Mar 1942. 23 Observation: 24 Jun 1932-12 Oct 1938 (detached entire period). 28 Bombardment: 16 Nov 1941-1 Apr 1944; 1 Apr 1944-1 Jun 1953. 30 Airlift: 1 Oct 2008-. 30 Observation (later, Bombardment): 24 Jun 1932-1 Apr 1944; 1 Apr 1944-1 Jun 1953. 32 Observation (later, Bombardment): 24 Jun 1932-16 Dec 1941 (detached 22 Oct-16 Dec 1941). 40 Reconnaissance (later, 435 Bombardment): 14 Mar 1942-1 Apr 1944 (detached c. 17 Jul-c. 24 Sep 1942); 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 41 Airlift: 1 Oct 2008-. 50 Airlift: 1 Oct 2008-. 52 Airlift: 1 Oct 2009-. 53 Airlift: 1 Oct 2008-. 61 Airlift: 1 Oct 2008-. 93 Bombardment: 20 Oct 1939-1 Apr 1944; 1 Apr 1944-1 Jun 1953. 99 Air Refueling: 1 Sep 1991-1 Sep 2008. 345 Airlift: 6 Aug 2010-. 384 Air Refueling: 1 Jun 1992-1 Jan 1994. 712 Air Refueling: 1 Apr 1994-1 Jul 1996. 912 Air Refueling: 1 Sep 1991-1 Apr 1994.

Stations:  Rockwell Field, CA, 24 Jun 1932; March Field, CA, 25 Oct 1935; Albuquerque, NM, 7 Jun-29 Sep 1941; Clark Field, Philippines, 26 Oct 1941; Batchelor, Australia, 24 Dec 1941; Singosari, Java, 30 Dec 1941; Melbourne, Australia, 2 Mar 1942; Garbutt Field, Australia, 18 Apr 1942; Longreach, Australia, 18 May 1942; Mareeba, Australia, 26 Jul 1942; Townsville, Australia, 30 Nov-2 Dec 1942; Pocatello AAB, ID, 9 Dec 1942; Pyote AAB, TX, 3 Jan 1943-1 Apr 1944. Great Bend AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 26 May 1944; Great Bend AAFld, KS, 23 Aug 1944; Fort Lawton, WI, 11-19 Dec 1944; North Field (later, North Guam AFB; Andersen AFB), Guam, 16 Jan 1945; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 5 Jul 1950-1 Jun 1953. Robins AFB, GA, 1 Sep 1991; Little Rock AFB AR, 1 Oct 2008-.

Commanders:  Capt Harold M. McClelland, 24 Jun 1932; Lt Col Howard C. Davidson, 26 Jul 1935; Lt Col Hubert R. Harmon, 17 Aug 1936; Lt Col Harvey S. Burwell, Jun 1937; Maj Eugene L. Eubank, 2 Apr 1940; Maj David R. Gibbs, 10 Dec 1941; Maj Emmett O'Donnell Jr., 12 Dec 1941; Lt Col Cecil E. Combs, Jan 1942; Lt Col Kenneth B. Hobson, 14 Mar 1942; Lt Col James T. Connally, 15 Apr 1942; Lt Col Richard N. Carmichael, 10 Jul 1942; Lt Col Felix M. Hardison, 1 Jan 1943; Lt Col Ebert Helton, 13 Feb 1943; Col Louie P. Turner, 5 May 1943; Lt Col Frank P. Sturdivant, 27 Jan 1944; Col Bernard T. Castor, 11 Feb-1 Apr 1944. Maj Joseph H. Selliken, 28 Apr 1944; Col John G. Fowler, 20 May 1944; Lt Col John C. Wilson, 29 May 1944; Lt Col Philip L. Mathewson, 30 Jun 1944; Col John A. Roberts Jr., 16 Jul 1944; Lt Col George T. Chadwell, Sep 1945; Col Vincent M. Miles Jr., 1 Mar 1946; Col Elbert D. Reynolds, 13 Apr 1946; Col David Wade, 26 Apr 1947; Col Francis C. Shoemaker, 8 Nov 1947; Col Robert V. DeShazo, 2 Dec 1947; Lt Col Clarence G. Poff, Jul 1948; Lt Col Warren M. Miller Jr., 17 Aug 1948; Col Clarence G. Poff, 6 Oct 1948; Col Theodore Q. Graff, 17 Sep 1949; Col Payne Jennings Jr., 26 Sep 1950; Col Donald O. Tower, 29 Mar 1951; Col Adam K. Breckenridge, 26 Jul 1951; Col Julian M. Bleyer, 6 Feb 1952; Col Willard W. Smith, 8 Jul 1952; Col Harvey C. Dorney, 24 Dec 1952-1 Jun 1953. Col James G. Dickensheets, 1 Sep 1991; Col Richard A. Mentemeyer, 27 Aug 1993; Col Karl B. Young, 3 Jun 1994; Col Kurt F. Bock, 16 Nov 1995; Col Norman R. Flemens, 1 Jul 1996; Col David R. Lefforge, 4 Jun 1998; Col Bruce E. Hurd, 9 Jun 1999; Col Barbara J. Faulkenberry, 6 Jul 2001; Col Raymond J. Rottman, 9 Jul 2003; Col Steven W. Bernard, 30 Dec 2004; Col Christopher J. Bence, 5 Jul 2006; Lt Col Franklin T. Robinson, 3 May 2008 (interim); Col Jeffrey A. Hoffer, 1 Oct 2008; Col David Kasberg, 19 Jun 2009; Col Andrew McIntyre, 2 Jun 2011; Col Johnnie Martinez, 31 Jul 2013-.

Aircraft:  B-3, 1932-1935; OA-4, 1932-1935; OA-9, 1932-1935; B-10, 1935-1937; B-12, 1935-1937; B-18, 1937-1940; B-17, 1940-1944; B-24, 1942; LB-30, 1942. B-29, 1944-1953. KC-135, 1991-2008; EC-135, 1991-1997; EC-137, 1991-1994; C-130, 2008-.

Operations:  The group flew training missions along the California coast for coastal defense between 1932 and 1935. Began bombardment training in 1935. First to fly B-17s from California to Hawaii in May 1941. Suffered numerous casualties and lost many aircraft when the Japanese attacked Clark Field in the Philippine Islands on 8 Dec 1941, but B-17s on maneuvers at Del Monte escaped. During December 1941, the 19th began reconnaissance and bombardment operations against Japanese shipping and landing parties. By the end of the year, ground personnel joined infantry units defending the Philippines, while the air echelon moved to Australia to transport supplies from there to the Philippines and to evacuate personnel. The group flew B-17s, B-24s, and LB-30s from Java against enemy airfields, shipping, and ground installations during the Japanese offensive in the Philippines and Netherlands East Indies during early 1942. It participated in the Battle of the Coral Sea, 7-8 May 1942, and raided enemy transportation and communications targets as well as troop concentrations during the Japanese invasion of Papua, New Guinea. The group bombed enemy airdromes, ground installations, and shipping near Rabaul, New Britain in Aug 1942. It served in the United States as a replacement training organization from Jan to Nov 1943. The group was largely unmanned from Dec 1943 to Apr 1944. Remanned at Great Bend AAB, Kansas, the group began training for B-29 combat missions. From Guam, it conducted its first B-29 bombing raid on 25 Feb 1945, against Tokyo. Bombed strategic targets in Japan, participated in incendiary bomb attacks against Japanese cities, and attacked kamikaze airfields during the American invasion of Okinawa in Apr and May 1945. When the Japanese surrendered, the group had flown 65 raids on their home islands. In the late 1940s, the 19th conducted sea-search, photographic mapping, and training missions in the western Pacific. When the Korean War broke out in late Jun 1950, the group attacked North Korean invasion forces. In Jul 1950, it detached from the 19 Bombardment Wing, moved to Okinawa, and continued bombardment operations against North Korean troops, supply dumps, airfields, steel mills, hydroelectric plants, bridges, and light metal industries until its inactivation in 1953. The group conducted worldwide aerial refueling for U.S. and allied aircraft and supported worldwide tanker task forces, contingency operations, and humanitarian operations from Sep 1991-. The group provided command control support for US Central Command and, until 1994, for US Special Operations Command. In the fall of 1994, it added the mission of flying cargo-only missions. The 19 Air Refueling Group in Jul 1996 took over the inactivating wing's in-flight refueling mission. One of only two special operations qualified tanker units, it provided critical support to the special operations task force that rescued a downed USAF F-117A pilot in Serbia, Mar 1999. Provided air refueling support for special operations against the Taliban in Operation Enduring Freedom, 2002-2003; and Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003. Trained personnel in C-130 airlift; included humanitarian airlift to victims of disasters; airdropped troops and supplies to contingency operations in hostile areas, 2008-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Philippine Islands; East Indies; Papua; Guadalcanal; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan. Korea: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippine Islands, 7 Dec 1941-10 May 1942; Philippine Islands, 8-22 Dec 1941; Philippine Islands and Netherlands Indies, 1 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Philippine Islands, 6 Jan-8 Mar 1942; Papua, 23 Jul-[Oct 1942]; New Britain, 7-12 Aug 1942; Japan, 9-19 Mar 1945; Kobe, Japan, 5 Jun 1945; Korea, 28 Jun-15 Sep 1950. Meritorious Unit Awards: 1 Jul 2006-30 June 2007; 1 Aug 2009-31 Jul 2011. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 1999; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2002; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2003; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jun 2005; 1 Jul 2005-30 Jun 2006. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (World War II). Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 7 Jul 1950-1 Jun 1953.

Emblem (WWII):  A Mohawk Indian head in profile with scalp lock, single feather and wampum necklace, above the head a blue diamond. (Approved 14 February 1924 from World War I emblem.) Current: Approved 19 Oct 1936; modified on 19 Sep 1983.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through Feb 2014.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Jul 2013.


Source:

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (19th Airlift Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 19 Bombardment Wing, Medium, on 10 Aug 1948. Activated on 17 Aug 1948. Redesignated as: 19 Bombardment Wing, Heavy, on 1 Jul 1961; 19 Air Refueling Wing, Heavy, on 1 Oct 1983; 19 Air Refueling Wing on 1 Sep 1991. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1996. Redesignated as 19 Airlift Wing on 18 Sep 2008. Activated on 1 Oct 2008.

Assignments:  Twentieth Air Force, 17 Aug 1948; Far East Air Forces, 16 May 1949; Twentieth Air Force, 17 Oct 1949 (attached to Far East Air Forces Bomber Command, Provisional, 1 Jun 1953-c. 28 May 1954); Second Air Force, 11 Jun 1954 (attached to Air Division Provisional, 813, 11 Jun-14 Jul 1954); 813 Air Division, 15 Jul 1954 (attached to 5 Air Division, 7 Jan-11 Apr 1956); 823 Air Division, 1 Jun 1956 (attached to 5 Air Division, 8 May-7 Jul 1957); 57 Air Division, 25 Jul 1968; 823 Air Division, 2 Jul 1969; 42 Air Division, 30 Jun 1971; Eighth Air Force, 16 Jun 1988; Fifteenth Air Force, 1 Sep 1991; Twenty-First Air Force, 1 Jul 1993-1 Jul 1996. Eighteenth Air Force (Air Forces Transportation), 1 Oct 2008-.

Components

Groups:  19 Bombardment (later, 19 Operations): 17 Aug 1948-1 Jun 1953 (detached 28 Jun 1950-1 Jun 1953); 1 Sep 1991-1 Jul 1996; 1 Oct 2008-. 457 Operations: 1 Jul 1993-1 Oct 1994.

Squadrons:  19 Air Refueling: 1 Feb 1956-1 Apr 1960 (detached 1 Feb-1 Jun 1956). 21 Troop Carrier: attached 12 Jan-1 Feb 1950. 28 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1953-1 Oct 1983. 30 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1953-1 Jan 1962. 93 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1953-1 Aug 1961. 99 Air Refueling: 1 Oct 1983-1 Sep 1991. 100 Air Refueling: attached 2 Feb 1955-16 Aug 1956. 303 Air Refueling: 1 Nov 1959-1 Apr 1961. 407 Air Refueling: 1 Apr 1962-2 Jul 1968. 525 Bombardment: 9 Jan-15 Mar 1961. 526 Bombardment: 9 Jan-1 Jun 1961. 659 Bombardment: 1 Nov 1958-1 Jul 1961. 912 Air Refueling: 25 Jul 1968-1 Sep 1991.

Stations:  North Guam (later, Andersen) AFB, Guam, 17 Aug 1948; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 1 Jun 1953-28 May 1954; Pinecastle AFB, FL, 11 Jun 1954; Homestead AFB, FL, 1 Jun 1956; Robins AFB, GA, 25 Jul 1968-1 Jul 1996. Little Rock AFB, AR, 1 Oct 2008-.

Commanders:  Lt Col Clarence G. Poff, 17 Aug 1948; Col Robert V. DeShazo, 24 Sep 1948; Maj Gen Alvan C. Kincaid, 16 May 1949; Brig Gen Alfred R. Maxwell, 1 Jun 1949; Col Frederick E. Calhoun, 26 Nov 1949; Brig Gen Adlai H. Gilkeson, 29 Nov 1949; Brig Gen Robert W.C. Wamsatt, 27 May 1951; Col Harvey C. Dorney, 1 Jun 1953; Col Lloyd H. Dalton Jr., 31 Aug 1953; Col John W. Livingston, 24 Apr 1954; Col Virgil M. Cloyd Jr., 26 Jul 1954; Col John W. Livingston, 9 Feb 1958; Col James H. Thompson, 14 Apr 1958; Col Roland W. Bergamyer, 1 Aug 1960; Col Richard R. Stewart, 5 Jul 1961; Col Mason A. Dula, 24 Oct 1963; Col Edward D. Edwards, 14 Dec 1963; Col Gordon F. Goyt, 4 Jun 1966; Col Clifford W. Hargrove, 1 Aug 1967; Col James S. Howard, 1 Jul 1968; Col Wesley L. Pendergraft, 25 Jul 1968; Col Gerhard R. Abendhoff, 1 Apr 1969; Col William R. Thorstenson, 13 Feb 1970; Col Dudley G. Kavanaugh, 3 Sep 1971; Col Stanley C. Beck, 9 Aug 1972; Col Nathaniel A. Gallagher, 1 Dec 1972; Col John F. Wylam, 9 Apr 1973; Col William E. Masterson, 9 Jul 1973; Col Nathaniel A. Gallagher, 29 Oct 1973; Col Frank H. McArdle, 15 Feb 1974; Col Edwin L. Smith, 11 Jul 1975; Col Charles W. Reeves Jr., 28 Jun 1977; Col Donald O. Pflugrath, 26 Jun 1978; Col Ellie G. Shuler Jr., 16 Jan 1980; Col Donald L. Marks, 10 Jul 1980; Col Richard L. Purdum, 18 Aug 1981; Col Norman R. Butler, 6 Oct 1983; Col Thomas M. Mooney, 28 Sep 1984; Col James M. Hembree, 25 Jul 1986; Col John D. Lunt, 13 Aug 1987; Col Dennis M. Lane, 4 Apr 1989; Col Robert A. Plebanek, 22 Jun 1990; Col Terrance J. Phelps, 19 Dec 1991; Col Tome H. Walters Jr., 9 Feb 1993; Col Paul W. Essex, 29 Mar 1994; Col Norman R. Flemens, 1 Dec 1995-1 Jul 1996. Brig Gen Rowayne A. Schatz Jr., 1 Oct 2008; Col Gregory S. Otey, 28 Jan 2009; Col Michael A. Minihan, 2 Aug 2010; Brig Gen Brian S. Robinson, 31 Jan 2012; Col Patrick J. Rhatigan, 9 Jul 2013-.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1948-1950, 1953-1954; B-47, 1954-1961; KC-97, 1955-1961; B-52, 1962-1968, 1968-1972, 1973-1983; KC-135, 1962-1968, 1968-1972, 1973-1996; EC-135, 1984-1996; EC-137, 1991-1994; T-37, 1993; C-12, 1993-1995. C-130, 2008-.

Operations:  Formed in 1948 from resources of the former North Guam Air Force Base Command (Provisional), the 19 Bombardment Wing operated Andersen AFB and maintained proficiency in B-29s. In May 1949, it assumed responsibility for three bases plus various support facilities and units. When the Korean War began, the 19 Bombardment Group was immediately detached for operations from Kadena AB, Okinawa. Three years later, wing headquarters moved without personnel or equipment to Kadena and absorbed personnel and equipment of the inactivating group. Through 27 Jul 1953 the wing flew 281 combat sorties (23 missions) over Korea. In May-Jun 1954, it turned in its B-29s at Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, while enroute to Florida, where initially it received B-47s. The wing gained an air refueling unit early in 1955. It deployed to Sidi Slimane AB, French Morocco, Jan-Apr 1956, and to Ben Guerir AB, Morocco, May-Jul 1957. From Jul 1957 to Apr 1961, the wing maintained a portion of its tactical resources on overseas alert. It won the Fairchild Trophy in the SAC bombing and navigation competition for 1966. Moving without personnel or equipment to Robins AFB, GA, in mid-1968, it absorbed resources of the 465 Bombardment Wing. The 19th deployed virtually all its B-52 and KC-135 aircraft and crews for combat operations in Southeast Asia in 1972. Regaining aircraft and crews, the wing resumed normal operations in Nov 1973. It won the Omaha Trophy as the "outstanding wing in SAC" for 1981. In 1983, the 19 Air Refueling Wing undertook worldwide aerial refueling missions for various operations and exercises and supported the European Tanker Task Force. It flew aerial refueling missions supporting Grenada operations, 23-24 Oct 1983. Beginning in 1984, it provided two EC-135 aircraft and crews to support the United States Central Command in Southwest Asia. With conversion to KC-135R aircraft, the wing started supporting the Pacific and Alaska Tanker Task Forces in Mar 1988 and the Caribbean Tanker Task Force in Mar 1990. It flew aerial refueling missions for the invasion of Panama, 18-21 Dec 1989 and deployed resources to Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-Mar 1991, providing aerial refueling, cargo, and command, control and communications support. From Jan 1992, it provided an EC-137 and crews to support the United States Special Operations Command, and from Aug 1992 the wing supported the Saudi Tanker Task Force. It provided air refueling support to NATO fighters in Bosnia in Sep-Oct 1995. Several KC-135R tankers deployed to Southwest Asia to support Operation Southern Watch, Jan-Mar 1996 and to Turkey for Provide Comfort, Apr-Jun 1996. Since 2008, trained personnel and performed airlift and airdropping of troop and supplies in contingency operations, and humanitarian operations, 2008-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  Korea: Korea, Summer, 1953. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Grenada, 1983.

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Aug 2009-31 Jul 2011. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1964-30 Jun 1965; 1 Jul 1967- 30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1984-30 Jun 1986; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1996. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: [1 Jun]-27 Jul 1953.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 19 Bombardment Group prior to 17 August 1948. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippine Islands, 7 Dec 1941-10 May 1942; Philippines Islands, 8-22 Dec 1941; Philippine Islands and Netherlands Indies, 1 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Philippine Islands, 6 Jan-8 Mar 1942; Papua, 23 Jul-[Oct] 1942; New Britain, 7-12 Aug 1942; Japan, 9-19 Mar 1945; Kobe, Japan, 5 Jun 1945. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Philippine Islands; East Indies; Papua; Guadalcanal; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippine Islands, 1 Dec 1941- 10 May 1942; Philippines Islands, 8-22 Dec 1941; Philippine Islands and Netherlands Indies, 1 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Philippine Islands, 6 Jan-8 Mar 1942; Papua, 23 Jul-[Oct] 1942; New Britain, 7-12 Aug 1942; Japan, 9-19 Mar 1945; Kobe, Japan, 5 Jun 1945. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation.

Emblem:  Azure, within a pattern of four mullets Or a winged stylized sword point to base of the like detailed Azure all within a diminished bordure Or. Approved for the 19th Group on 19 Oct 1936 and for the 19th Wing on 9 May 1952; modified on 19 Sep 1983. Motto: CHECKMATE TO AGGRESSION, approved c. 3 Oct 1969.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through Feb 2014.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Feb 2014.


19th Air Refueling Group to Furl Flags Today

By Gene Rector, Macon Telegraph
May 28, 2008

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE --They're holding it a few days early, these celebrated Black Knights.

The official transfer won't take place until October, but by then all the aircraft and virtually all the people will be gone - ending a storied, 40-year relationship with Robins Air Force Base and Middle Georgia.

So the 19th Air Refueling Group will ceremonially furl their flags this afternoon - four squadron and one group banner - and declare "mission complete." Hundreds of group members, visiting dignitaries, local supporters and Black Knight alumni are expected to attend.

The flags and visiting dignitaries will then board the 19th's flagship KC-135H aircraft, the "Cherokee Rose" - named after Georgia's state flower. They plan to be airborne at precisely 3:19 p.m., corresponding to 19:19 in Greenwich Mean Time, or "Zulu" in military parlance.

"We're doing it now because our last airplane leaves June 23," Maj. Donnie Starling reported. "We wanted to do it when most of our leadership and people are still here. We wanted to put on a class Black Knight act."

The breakup of the 19th was directed by the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission. The unit's 13 aircraft will be split among three bases: McConnell Air Force Base and Forbes Field in Kansas and McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey.

The people, about 300 remaining from more than 500 when the drawdown began, will scatter to units Air Force wide.

The good news for the Black Knights - both current and alumni - is that the 19th designation will be transferred, not inactivated. The 19th group, with lineage back to 1927, will become the 19th Operations Group at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark.

It will be an element of a newly designated 19th Airlift Wing flying C-130J aircraft. The 19th at Robins lost its wing designation in 1996. The Little Rock mission will be the first airlift role for the 19th in its more than 80-year history.

After its 1927 beginning as an observation group, the unit transitioned to bombers in 1932 and transferred to the Philippines in 1941 shortly before the Japanese attacked. The 19th was the first U.S. bomber unit to strike back at the Japanese before escaping the Philippines, providing transport for Gen. Douglas MacArthur and his family to Australia.

Later during World War II, the 19th fought at the Battle of the Coral Sea and attacked the Japanese at Rabaul, New Guinea. The unit shifted to B-29 bombers in 1944 and bombed Japan from bases in Guam. The Black Knights remained on Guam after the war and later saw extensive Korean War action in the early 1950s.

The wing returned to the U.S. in 1954, eventually moving to Homestead Air Force Base, Fla., flying new B-47 jet bombers. It acquired B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers and came to Robins 14 years later.

During its Robins tenure, the unit has been tasked extensively in every major U.S. conflict, logging thousands of flying hours in Vietnam, Operation Just Cause, Desert Storm and Desert Shield, Southern Watch and the current war on terror.

The 19th was redesignated a refueling wing in 1983 when the last of its B-52s were transferred. It became a group in 1996 when it lost one of its squadrons.

Maj. Gen. Jim Hawkins, 18th Air Force commander, will be the presiding officer for today's program. He will speak, as will Col. Chris Bence, the 19th commander. Bence also will receive the Legion of Merit. He is transferring to a command position in the war on terror.

Maj. Gen Frederick Roggero, director of air, space and information operations for Air Mobility Command, also will attend. Roggero is a Black Knights alumnus, serving four years in the unit from 1978 to 1982.

The 19th also will officially receive the Air Force's Meritorious Unit Award for support of the war effort in 2007. The Robins group was one of two AMC organizations to win the honor last year and only the fourth in AMC history.

Starling said Black Knight morale remains high. "We have a lot on our plate," he confirmed. "We've not stopped supporting missions wherever we're needed and of course our folks are out processing and getting their household goods shipped."

The KC-135 senior navigator stressed that the 19th's airmen are sad to be leaving Middle Georgia. Part of today's ceremony will be devoted to thanking the local area for its many years of support, Starling indicated.

"We will do that by honoring some 11 members of the local community with flags that have flown over Iraq, Afghanistan and places in the U.S.," he said.


Other Sites of Interest:

Home of the 19th Bombardment Association

Fact Sheets: 19th Air Refueling Group (Robins AFB website)

19th Bomb Group, USAAF in Australia during WW2

19th Air Refueling Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



28th Bombardment Squadron

 

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 28th Aero Squadron on 22 Jun 1917. Demobilized on 16 Jun 1919. Reconstituted, and consolidated (9 Jan 1922) with 28th Squadron (Bombardment), which was authorized on 30 Aug 1921. Organized on 20 Sep 1921. Inactivated on 28 Jun 1922. Activated on 1 Sep 1922. Redesignated: 28th Bombardment Squadron on 25 Jan 1923; 28th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 6 Dec 1939; 28th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 16 Nov 1941; 28th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated: 28th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 10 Aug 1948; 28th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Jul 1961. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1983. Activated on 1 Jul 1987. Redesignated 28th Bomb Squadron on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  Unkn, 22 Jun 1917-Mar 1918; attached to RAF for operations and training, Mar-Jun 1918; unkn, Jun-Aug 1918; 3d Pursuit Group, Aug 1918; 2d Pursuit Group, Dec 1918-Apr 1919; unkn, Apr-16 Jun 1919. Ninth Corps Area, 20 Sep 1921-28 Jun 1922. Philippine Department, 1 Sep 1922; 4th Composite Group, 2 Dec 1922; 19th Bombardment Group, 16 Nov 1941-1 Apr 1944 (ground echelon attached to the 5th Interceptor Command, c. 24 Dec 1941-May 1942). 19th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944; 19th Bombardment Wing, 1 Jun 1953-1 Oct 1983. 384th Bombardment Wing, 1 Jul 1987; 384th Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991; 384th Bomb Group, 1 Jan 1994; 7th Operations Group, 1 Oct 1994-.

Stations:  Camp Kelly, TX, 22 Jul 1917; Toronto, Canada, 25 Aug 1917; Deseronto, Canada, 1 Sep 1917; Taliaferro Field No. 1, TX, 5 Nov 1917; Garden City, NY, 25 Jan-25 Feb 1918; St Marie-Cappel, France, 20 Mar 1918 (flights operated from various Stations in Nord, Pas-de-Calais, and Somme, until squadron reassembled at St Omer on 24 Jun); Boisdinghem, France, 13 Apr 1918; Alquines, France, 15 Apr 1918; St Omer, France, 24 Jun 1918; Issoudun, France, 26 Jun 1918; Orly, France, 8 Jul 1918; Vaucouleurs, France, 16 Aug 1918; Lisle-en-Barrois, France, 20 Sep 1918; Foucaucourt, France, 6 Nov 1918; Grand, France, 15 Feb 1919; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 15 Apr 1919; Le Mans, France, 4-19 May 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, 31 May-16 Jun 1919. Mather Field, CA, 20 Sep 1921-28 Jun 1922. Clark Field, Luzon, 1 Sep 1922; Kindley Field, Corregidor, Sep 1922; Camp Nichols, Luzon, Nov 1922; Clark Field, Luzon, Dec 1922; Camp Nichols, Luzon, 4 Jun 1923; Clark Field, Luzon, 16 Jun 1938; Batchelor, Australia, c. 24 Dec 1941 (ground echelon in Luzon and Mindanao, c. 24 Dec 1941-May 1942); Singosari, Java, 30 Dec 1941; Melbourne, Australia, c. 4 Mar 1942; Cloncurry, Australia, c. 28 Mar 1942 (detachment operated from Perth, Australia, c. 28 Mar-18 May 1942); Longreach, Australia, c. 5 May 1942; Mareeba, Australia, 24 Jul-c. 18 Nov 1942; Pocatello, ID, c. 30 Dec 1942; Pyote AAB, TX, 24 Jan 1943-1 Apr 1944. Great Bend AAFld, KS, 1 Apr-8 Dec 1944; North Field, Guam, 16 Jan 1945; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 27 Jun 1950-14 May 1954; Pinecastle AFB, FL, c. 28 May 1954; Homestead AFB, FL, c. 25 Jun 1956; Robins AFB, GA, 25 Jul 1968-1 Oct 1983. McConnell AFB, KS, 1 Jul 1987; Dyess AFB, TX, 1 Oct 1994-.

Aircraft:  JN-4, 1917; in addition to Spad XIII, briefly included Spad VII during period 1918-1919. Apparently included DH-4, 1921-1922. In addition to DH-4, 1922-c. 1928, and NBS-1, 1924-1930, included LB-5 and OA-1 during period 1929-1931; B-3, c. 1931-1937; B-10, 1937-1941; B-18 and B-17, successively during 1941; B-17s, LB-30s, and probably B-24s, 1941-1942; B-17, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1954; B-47, 1954-1961; B-52, 1962-1972, 1973-1983. B-1, 1988-.

Operations:  Flying training unit, Nov-Dec 1917; combat training with units of RAF serving on the front with British Second and Fifth Armies, 20 Mar-c. 24 Jun 1918 (C flight participated in Somme Defensive, 21 Mar-6 Apr 1918); combat as pursuit unit with American First Army, 2 Sep-10 Nov 1918. Combat in Southwest Pacific, 7 Dec 1941-c. 16 Nov 1942; ground echelon fought with infantry units in Philippine Islands, c. 24 Dec 1941-May 1942; replacement training, 1 Feb 1943-1 Apr 1944; combat in Western Pacific, c. 12 Feb-15 Aug 1945. Combat in Korea, 28 Jun 1950-25 Jul 1953. Furnished B-52 aircraft and crews to other SAC organizations involved in combat operations in Southeast Asia until Oct 1973.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: Flanders; Lys; Picardy; Lorraine; St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Philippine Islands; East Indies; Air Offensive, Japan; Papua; Guadalcanal; Western Pacific; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Korea: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea Summer-Fall, 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippine Islands, 7 Dec 1941-10 May 1942; Philippine Islands, 8-22 Dec 1941; Philippines and Netherlands Indies, 1 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Philippine Islands, 6 Jan-8 Mar 1942; Papua, 23 Jul-[c. 16 Nov 1942]; New Britain, 7-12 Aug 1942; Japan, 9-19 Mar 1945; Kobe, Japan, 5 Jun 1945; Korea, 28 Jun-15 Sep 1950. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1964-30 Jun 1965; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1982-1 Oct 1983; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (WWII). Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 7 Jul 1950-27 Jul 1953.

Emblem:  Khaki, an American Indian (Mohawk) warrior's head couped with face markings, necklace, hair ornament and headband Proper, in dexter chief a lozenge Azure; all within a diminished bordure of the last. Approved on 14 Feb 1924 and modified in 1996; based on World War I emblem.

Table of Contents



30th Bombardment Squadron


3600th Air Demonstration Sq

1993 F-16

1999 F-16

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 30 Aero Squadron on 13 Jun 1917. Demobilized on 14 Apr 1919. Reconstituted, and redesignated as 30 Bombardment Squadron, on 24 Mar 1923. Activated on 24 Jun 1932. Redesignated as: 30 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 Dec 1939; 30 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated as: 30 Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 10 Aug 1948; 30 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Jul 1961. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Feb 1963. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with unit constituted as USAF Air Demonstration Squadron, and activated, on 13 Feb 1967. Organized on 25 Feb 1967.

Assignments:  Unkn, 13 Jun-Sep 1917; Third Aviation Instruction Center, Sep 1917-Jan 1919; unkn, Jan-14 Apr 1919. 19 Bombardment Group, 24 Jun 1932-1 Apr 1944 (ground echelon attached to 5 Interceptor Command, c. 20 Dec 1941-May 1942). 19 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944; 19 Bombardment Wing, 1 Jun 1953; 4133 Strategic Wing, 1 Jan 1962-1 Feb 1963. Tactical Air Command, 13 Feb 1967; USAF Tactical Fighter Weapons Center, 25 Feb 1967; 57 Fighter Weapons (later, 57 Tactical Training; 57 Fighter Weapons; 57 Fighter; 57) Wing, 15 Feb 1974-.

Stations:  Camp Kelly (later, Kelly Field), TX, 13 Jun 1917; Fort Totten, NY, 16-22 Aug 1917; Southampton, England, 15 Sep 1917; Etampes, France, 19 Sep 1917; Issoudun, France, 23 Sep 1917; Bordeaux, France, c. 6 Jan-c. 18 Mar 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, c. 5-14 Apr 1919. Rockwell Field, CA, 24 Jun 1932; March Field, CA, 25 Oct 1935; Albuquerque, NM, c. 1 Jun-27 Sep 1941; Clark Field, Philippines, c. 23 Oct 1941; Batchelor, Australia, c. 20 Dec 1941 (ground echelon in Luzon and Mindanao, Philippines, c. 20 Dec 1941-May 1942); Singosari, Java, c. 31 Dec 1941; Melbourne, Australia, c. 5 Mar 1942; Cloncurry, Australia, c. 27 Mar 1942; Longreach, Australia, c. 13 May 1942; Mareeba, Australia, c. 24 Jul-c. 10 Nov 1942; Pocatello, ID, c. 9 Dec 1942; Pyote AAB, TX, 24 Jan 1943-1 Apr 1944. Great Bend AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 26 May 1944; Great Bend AAFld, KS, 23 Aug-7 Dec 1944; Fort Lawton, WA, 11-19 Dec 1944; North Field (later, Andersen AFB), Guam, 16 Jan 1945; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 1 Jul 1950-16 May 1954; Pinecastle AFB, FL, 30 May 1954; Homestead AFB, FL, 1 Jun 1956; Grand Forks AFB, ND, 1 Jan 1962-1 Feb 1963. Nellis AFB, NV, 25 Feb 1967-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 13 Jun 1917-14 Apr 1919. Unkn, 24 Jun 1932-1939; Maj Thomas B. Blackburn, c. 1939; Maj David R. Gibbs, May 1941; Maj Raymond V. Schwanbeck, 14 Mar 1942; Maj Dean C. Hoevet, Jul 1942; Maj John A. Rouse, Sep 1942; Maj Paul E. Cool, 14 Feb 1943; Capt Edson P. Sponable, May 1943-unkn. Unkn, 1 Apr-10 May 1944; Maj Arthur D. Sullivan, 11 May 1944; Maj Leon L. Lowry, 28 May 1944; Maj Robert B. Irwin, 1 Sep 1944-unkn; unkn, c. 1945-1947; Maj Charles J. Boise, c. 1948; Capt Richard H. Partrick, 7 Feb 1949; Maj James S. Howard, 19 May 1949; Maj Edward M. Osander, by Dec 1949-unkn; Lt Col Warren C. Stirling, c. 1952; Lt Col Ralph W. Jones, by Jan 1953; Lt Col Harold E. Brown, 23 Apr 1954; Maj Louis W. Park, c. Jul 1954 (acting); Maj William J. Gregory, c. Sep 1954 (acting); Maj Ermine L. Hales, 3 Oct 1954 (acting); Lt Col Curtis N. Youngblood, 19 Oct 1954 (acting); Lt Col Harold E. Brown, 5 Nov 1954; Lt Col Fred R. Peck Jr., by Jan 1956; Lt Col Charles W. Ryckman, 24 Jun 1957; Maj Haldene A. Cope, by May 1959-unkn; Lt Col Robert J. Horrigan, 1 Jan 1962-1 Feb 1963. Unkn, 13-24 Feb 1967; Lt Col Ralph J. Maglione Jr., 25 Feb 1967; Maj Neil L. Eddins, 4 Jun 1967; Lt Col Joseph D. Moore, c. 1969; Lt Col Thomas S. Swalm, 28 Jul 1970; Maj Roger K. Parrish, 31 Jan 1973; Maj Chris Patterakis, by Dec 1975; Lt Col Edward D. Cherry, 12 Jan 1977; Lt Col David L. Smith, 16 Apr 1979; Maj Norman L. Lowry III, 8 Sep 1981; Lt Col Shumpert C. Jones, 18 Jan 1982; Maj James D. Latham, 7 Jun 1982; Lt Col Lawrence E. Stellmon, 3 Feb 1984; Lt Col Roger D. Riggs, 7 Feb 1986; Lt Col Stephen E. Trent, 5 Feb 1988; Lt Col Charles N. Simpson, Jan 1990; Lt Col Daniel J. Darnell, 1 Jan 1992; Lt Col Stephen J. Anderson, 11 Feb 1994; Lt Col Ronald A. Mumm, 19 Jan 1996; Lt Col Brian J. Bishop, 23 Jan 1998; Lt Col John R. Venable, 21 Jan 2000; Lt Col Richard G. McSpadden, 25 Jan 2002; Lt Col Michael Chandler, c. Jan 2004; Lt Col Kevin J. Robbins, 15 Feb 2006; Lt Col Greg Thomas, 18 Jan 2008-.

Aircraft:  Included O-27, OA-4, YOA-5, B-3, and B-12 during period 1932-1936; included B-10, B-18, and B-17, successively, during period 1935-1941; B-17, and probably B-24 and LB-30, 1941-1942; B-17, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1954; B-47, 1954-1961; B-52, 1962-1963. F-100, 1967-1968; F-4, 1969-1973; T-38, 1974-1986; F-16, 1982-.

Operations:  Repaired and overhauled aircraft engines in France, Sep 1917-Nov 1918. Combat in Southwest Pacific, 7 Dec 1941-c. 16 Nov 1942; ground echelon fought with infantry units, in the Philippines Islands, c. 20 Dec 1941-May 1942. Replacement training in the US, 1943-1944. Combat in Western Pacific c. 12 Feb-15 Aug 1945. Combat in Korea, 28 Jun 1950-25 Jul 1953. Gained the mission of precision aerobatic demonstrations in 1967. Designated as the USAF Aerial Demonstration Squadron, the new squadron carried on the popularly known name "Thunderbirds", coined by various provisional units which had performed the aerial demonstration function prior to 1967. The first such organization, the 3600 Air Demonstration Flight (Acro-Jet), later 3600 Air Demonstration Flight (Thunder Birds) activated at Luke AFB, AZ on 25 May 1953 and performed the function until inactivation on 23 Jun 1956. At that time, a second provisional organization designated as 3595 Air Demonstration Flight (Thunderbirds) activated at Nellis AFB, NV. Following two redesignations of this unit, first to 4520th Air Demonstration Flight (Thunderbirds) and then to 4520th Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds), the Air Force decided to activate a permanent unit to perform precision aerobatics and the 4520th Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds) was discontinued on 25 Feb 1967. Since Feb 1967, when the permanent organization was organized as the USAF Air Demonstration Squadron, it has traveled the US and the world performing precision aerobatics as premier USAF ambassadors.

Service Streamers:  World War I Theater of Operations.

Campaigns Streamers:  World War II: Philippine Islands; East Indies; Papua; Guadalcanal; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Korea: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korean Summer-Fall,1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer, 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippine Islands, 7 Dec 1941-10 May 1942; Philippine Islands, 8-22 Dec 1941; Philippines and Netherlands Indies, 1 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Philippine Islands, 6 Jan-8 Mar 1942; Papua, 23 Jul-[c. 10 Nov] 1942; New Britain, 7-12 Aug 1942; Japan, 9-19 Mar 1945; Kobe, Japan, 5 Jun 1945; Korea, 28 Jun-15 Sep 1950. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: [25 Feb 1967]-31 Dec 1968; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1973; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1974; 1 Jan 1979-31 Dec 1980; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jun 2001-31 May 2003; 1 Jun 2004-31 May 2006. Air Force Organizational Excellence Awards: 1 Jan 1984-31 Dec 1985; 1 Jan 1986-31 Dec 1987; 30 Sep 1989-30 Sep 1991; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1998. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (WWII). Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 7 Jul 1950-27 Jul 1953.

Emblem (Bombardment Sq):  On a blue disc bordered yellow between four cardinal compass points indicated by three yellow triangles and a green fleur-de-lis outlined white for the north point, a white skull in profile with black shadows and with a yellow wing protruding diagonally upward from its back and extending over the disc and from the eye a white lightning flash streaked red extending diagonally downward over the disc. (Approved 8 Sep 1953.)

Emblem ("Thunderbirds"):  On a White disc with an attached White scroll below the disc, all edged Black, a Blue Thunderbird with Yellow beak and eye, surmounted by a Red disc charged with a White five-pointed star, all above an arced inscription, THUNDERBIRDS, in Black script. Approved on 14 Jun 1977 (KE 62880); replaced emblems approved on 8 Sep 1953 (47563 A.C.) and 9 Jan 1933 (8545 A.C.). Newest rendition approved on 1 Feb 2008.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 16 Jul 2009.

Commanders through Jan 2008, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2002.

Table of Contents



93d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 93 Aero Squadron on 21 Aug 1917. Demobilized on 31 Mar 1919. Reconstituted, and consolidated (14 Oct 1936) with 93 Bombardment Squadron which was constituted on 1 Mar 1935. Activated on 20 Oct 1939. Redesignated: 93 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 Dec 1939; 93 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated: 93 Bombardment Squadron, Medium on 10 Aug 1948; 93 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy on 1 Jul 1961. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Feb 1963. Redesignated 93 Bomb Squadron, and activated in the Reserve, on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  3 Pursuit Group, by 28 Jul 1918; 1 Air Depot, 11 Dec 1918-4 Mar 1919; unkn, 13-31 Mar 1919. 19 Bombardment Group, 20 Oct 1939-1 Apr 1944 (ground echelon attached to 5 Interceptor Command, c. 19 Dec 1941-May 1942). 19 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944; 19 Bombardment Wing, 1 Jun 1953; 4239 Strategic Wing, 1 Aug 1961-1 Feb 1963. 917 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1993-.

Stations:  Kelly Field, TX, 21 Aug-29 Sep 1917; England, 29 Oct 1917; Beaulieu, England, Jan-24 Jun 1918; Issoudun, France, c. 7 Jul 1918; Vaucouleurs, France, 28 Jul 1918; Lisle-en-Barrois, France, 24 Sep 1918; Foucaucourt, France, 6 Nov 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, c. 15 Dec 1918; Romorautin, France, 2 Feb 1919-4 Mar 1919; Garden City, NY, 13-31 Mar 1919. March Field, CA, 20 Oct 1939; Albuquerque, NM, Jun-27 Sep 1941; Clark Field, Luzon, c. 23 Oct 1941; Batchelor Field, Australia, c. 19 Dec 1941 (ground echelon on Luzon and Mindanao, c. 19 Dec 1941-May 1942); Singosari, Java, c. 1 Jan 1942; Melbourne, Australia, c. 1 Mar 1942; Cloncurry, Australia, 29 Mar 1942; Longreach, Australia, 18 May 1942; Mareeba, Australia, 23 Jul-c. 25 Oct 1942; Pocatello AAFld, ID, c. 28 Dec 1942; Pyote AAFld, TX, c. 18 Jan 1943-1 Apr 1944. Great Bend AAFld, KS, 1 Apr-7 Dec 1944; North Field (later, Andersen AFB), Guam, 16 Jan 1945; Kadena AB, Okinawa, 27 Jun 1950-18 May 1954; Pinecastle AFB, FL, c. 2 Jun 1954; Homestead AFB, FL, c. 25 Jun 1956; Kincheloe AFB, MI, 1 Aug 1961-1 Feb 1963. Barksdale AFB, LA, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  1Lt Henry T. Fleitman, 1917; 1Lt Max A. Montgomery, 1918; 1Lt Frank M. Condon, May 1918; Maj Jean Huffer, 1918; Capt Charles Rockwell, 1918-unkn. Maj Hilbert M. Wittkop, 20 Oct 1939; Capt Jack W. Wood, Apr 1941; Capt William E. McDonald, Jun 1941; Maj Cecil E. Combs, Jul 1941; Maj James T. Connally, 18 Mar 1942; Capt W. H. Smith, 27 Apr 1942; Lt Col Felix M. Hardison, 18 May 1942; Capt Robert J. Hughey, 1 Jan 1943; Capt Bernice S. Barr, 4 Feb 1943; Capt Richard T. Hernlund, 27 Mar 1943-unkn. Capt Jesse R. Womble, May 1944; Capt Lee C. Free, Jun 1944; Maj Sam Bakshas, Jul 1944; Lt Col Leon L. Lowry, 1945; Capt Earle F. Riley, 12 Oct 1945; Maj Russell J. Smith, 28 Feb 1946; Capt Joseph Svejkar, 24 Feb 1947; Maj Edsel L. Lyon, Mar 1947; Maj Walter B. Sams, 27 May 1947; Lt Col Dalson E. Crawford, Aug 1947; Maj David L. Henderson, 13 Nov 1947; Capt John C. Alexander, 6 May 1949; Lt Col Earl L. Johnson, 8 Jul 1949; Maj Jack W. Williams, 6 Nov 1949; Lt Col Douglas H. Hatfield, 28 Mar 1950; Lt Col William J. Would, 13 Apr 1951; Lt Col James E. Brewer, 10 Oct 1951; Lt Col James F. Sapp, 26 Jun 1952; Lt Col Melvin H. Slate, 30 Dec 1952; Lt Col Lyle C. Maritzen, 14 Sep 1953; Lt Col Ralph W. Jones, 24 Apr 1954; Lt Col Vernon N. Luber, Oct 1954; Lt Col Winfred O. Craft, 21 Nov 1954; Lt Col Curtis N. Youngblood, 8 Feb 1955; Lt Col Ralph W. Jones, Oct 1955; Lt Col George H. Koehne Jr., Jun 1956-unkn; Maj Howard Richardson, unkn-Jul 1961; Lt Col Richard E. Murray, Jul 1961; Lt Col D. K. Kasselman, by Jan 1962-1 Feb 1963. Unkn, 1 Oct 1993-Jul 1994; Lt Col Lindell Mabus, 4 Jul 1994-.

Aircraft:  In addition to SPAD XIII, briefly flew SPAD VII, 1918. B-18 and B-17, successively, 1939-1941; B-17, and probably B-24 and LB-30, during period 7 Dec 1941-Oct 1942; B-17, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1954; B-47, 1954-1961; B-52, 1961-1963. B-52, 1993-.

Operations:  Combat in France as a pursuit unit, 11 Aug-10 Nov 1918. Combat in Southwest Pacific, 7 Dec 1941-c. 24 Oct 1942; ground echelon fought with infantry units in Philippine Islands, c.19 Dec 1941-May 1942; replacement training unit, 1 Feb 1943-1 Apr 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 12 Feb-15 Aug 1945. Combat in Korea, 28 Jun 1950-25 Jul 1953. Bombardment training, 1954-1963 and 1993-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: Lorraine; St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Philippine Islands; East Indies; Air Offensive, Japan; Papua; Guadalcanal; Western Pacific; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Korean War: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea Summer 1953.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Philippine Islands, 7 Dec 1941-10 May 1942; Philippine Islands, 8-22 Dec 1941; Philippines and Netherlands Indies, 1 Jan-1 Mar 1942; Philippine Islands, 6 Jan-8 Mar 1942; Papua, 23 Jul-[24 Oct 1942]; New Britain, 7-12 Aug 1942; Japan, 9-19 Mar 1945; Kobe, Japan, 5 Jun 1945; Korea, 28 Jun-15 Sep 1950. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1993-1 Jul 1995; 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (WWII). Korean Presidential Unit Citation: 7 Jul 1950-27 Jul 1953.

Emblem:  A screaming Indian's head in war paint with two feathers and a necklace of teeth, all proper. (Approved 24 Apr 1942 from World War I emblem.)

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 2 Jul 2001.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 1996.

Table of Contents



31st Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
56th Air Engineering Sq
574th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



29th Bombardment Group



Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 29th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 22 Dec 1939. Activated on 1 Feb 1940. Equipped with B-17's and B-18's. Trained and took part in aerial reviews. Flew patrol missions in the Caribbean area, Dec 1941-Jun 1942. Equipped with B-24's in 1942. Functioned as an operational training and later as a replacement training unit. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944.

Redesignated 29th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy). Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Prepared for overseas duty with B-29's. Moved to Guam, Dec 1944-Feb 1945, and assigned to Twentieth AF. Flew its first mission against Japan with an attack on Tokyo on 25 Feb 1945. Conducted a number of missions against strategic targets in Japan, operating in daylight and at high altitude to bomb factories, refineries, and other objectives. Beginning in Mar 1945, carried out incendiary raids on area targets, flying at night and at low altitude to complete the assignments. S/Sgt Henry E Erwin was awarded the Medal of Honor for action that saved his B-29 during a mission over Koriyama, Japan, on 12 Apr 1945. When a phosphorus smoke bomb exploded in the launching chute and shot back into the plane, Sgt Erwin picked up the burning bomb, carried it to a window, and threw it out. During the Allied assault on Okinawa, the group bombed airfields from which the enemy was sending out suicide planes against the invasion force. Received a DUC for an attack on an airfield at Omura, Japan, on 31 Mar 1945. Received second DUC for strikes on the industrial area of Shizuoka, the Mitsubishi aircraft plant at Tamashima, and the Chigusa arsenal at Nagoya, in Jun 1945. After the war, dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and participated in several show-of-force missions over Japan. Inactivated on Guam on 20 May 1946.

Consolidated 31 Jan 84 with the 29th Flying Training Wg, which was constituted 22 Mar 72, activated 1 Jul 72, inactivated 30 Sep 77.

Assignments:  Twentieth AF, Dec 1944. Air Training Cd 1972-1977.

Squadrons:  6th: 1940-944; 1944-1946. 43d (formerly 29th) 1940-1944; 1944-1946. 52d: 1940-1944; 1944-1946. 411th: 1942-1944. 761st (later 9th Reconnaissance): 1945-1946.

Stations:  Langley Field, Va, 1 Feb 1940; MacDill Field, Fla, 21 May 1940; Gowen Field, Idaho, 25 Jun 1942-1 Apr 1944. Pratt AAFld, Kan, 1 Apr-7 Dec 1944; North Field, Guam, 17 Jan 1945-20 May 1946. Craig AFB AL 1972-1977.

Commanders:  Maj Vincent I Meloy, 1 Feb 1940; Maj Charles W Lawrence, 15 Jan 1941; Lt Col James P Hodges, 1 Feb 1941; Maj Frank H Robinson, 1 Oct 1941; Lt Col James M Fitzmaurice, 1 Dec 1941; Lt Col Robert F Travis, 30 Mar 1942; Lt Col William B David, 28 Aug 1942; Maj Henry H Covington, 2 Feb 1943; Lt Col Walter E Arnold Jr, 20 Feb 1943; Lt Col Horace M Wade, 20 Sep 1943-1 Apr 1944. 2d Lt Philip J Lamm, 21 Apr 1944; Capt Samuel W Bright, 28 Apr 1944; Maj Quinn L Oldaker, 2 May 1944; Col Carl R Storrie, 28 May 1944; Col Robert L Mason, 23 Jul 1945; Lt Col Loran D Briggs, 9 Oct 1945-unkn; Col Vincent M Miles Jr, 1946.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 31 Mar 1945; Japan, 19-26 Jun 1945.

Insigne:  Shield: Azure, a drop bomb and lightning flash saltirewise or. Motto: Power For Peace. (Approved 14 Oct 1940.)



Other Sites of Interest:

29th Bomb Group - Official Site

29th Bombardment Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



6th Bombardment Squadron


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 6 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Dec 1939. Activated on 1 Feb 1940. Redesignated as 6 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 20 May 1946. Activated in the Reserve on 15 Jun 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 6 Air Refueling Squadron, Medium, which was constituted on 6 Apr 1951. Activated on 10 Apr 1951. Inactivated on 1 Aug 1951. Redesignated as 6 Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Apr 1957. Activated on 1 Nov 1957. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jan 1967. Activated on 3 Jan 1989. Redesignated as 6 Air Refueling Squadron on 1 Sep 1991.

Assignments:  29 Bombardment Group, 1 Feb 1940-1 Apr 1944. 29 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-20 May 1946. Tenth Air Force, 15 Jun 1947; 482 Bombardment Group, 30 Sep 1947-27 Jun 1949. 6 Bombardment Group, 10 Apr-1 Aug 1951. Fifteenth Air Force, 1 Nov 1957; 6 Bombardment (later, 6 Strategic Aerospace) Wing, 3 Jan 1958-25 Jan 1967. 22 Air Refueling Wing, 3 Jan 1989; 22 Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991; 722 Operations Group, 1 Jan 1994; 60 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1995-.

Stations:  Langley Field, VA, 1 Feb 1940; MacDill Field, FL, 21 May 1940; Gowen Field, ID, 25 Jun 1942-1 Apr 1944. Pratt AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 25 May 1944; Pratt AAFld, KS, 17 Jul-6 Dec 1944; North Field, Guam, 17 Jan 1945-20 May 1946. Barksdale Field (later, AFB), LA, 15 Jun 1947-27 Jun 1949. Walker AFB, NM, 10 Apr-1 Aug 1951. Bergstrom AFB, TX, 1 Nov 1957; Walker AFB, NM, 3 Jan 1958-25 Jan 1967. March AFB, CA, 3 Jan 1989; Travis AFB, CA, 1 Aug 1995-.

Commanders:  Maj Hugo Rush, 1 Feb 1940-unkn; Capt Erwin L. Tucker, unkn; Maj James S. Sutton, unkn; Maj Wray, unkn; 2Lt William B. David, by 7 Dec 1941; Capt Robert B. Sutterwhite, unkn-31 Dec 1942; Capt Thomas E. Fenton, 1 Jan 1943; Capt Benjamin Kelly, 24 May 1943; Maj Robert B. Sullivan, 2 Jun 1943; Capt James A. Anderson, 22 Jul-31 Dec 1943; unkn, Jan-Mar 1944. None (not manned), 1 Apr-3 May 1944; Capt Samuel W. Bright, 4 May 1944; Maj James D. Baird, 30 Jun 1944; Maj Gerald R. Jorgensen, by 1 Aug 1945-unkn; none (not manned), 15 Feb-20 May 1946. Lt Col James E. Bailey, c. 15 Jun 1947-unkn. None (not manned) 10 Apr-1 Aug 1951. Maj Gover E. Sims. 1 Nov 1957; Lt Col Rowland H. Worrel Jr., 7 Jan 1958; Lt Col Donald W. Brookie, Mar 1960; Lt Col Joseph R. Hanley, Nov 1961; Lt Col Keith L. Gillespie, 1 Sep 1964-25 Jan 1967. Lt Col Robert D. Glass, 3 Jan 1989, Lt Col Andrew S. Miller, 8 Jun 1990; Lt Col Ronald M. Varely, 1 Sep 1991; Lt Col Richard P. Packard, 2 Sep 1992; Lt Col Brooks L. Bash, 1 Aug 1995; Lt Col Raymond Torres, 10 Jun 1997; Lt Col Mark A. Stank, 12 Jul 1999; Lt Col Michael R. Mendonca, 6 Apr 2001; Lt Col Kevin J. Kilb, 4 Apr 2003; Lt Col Shaun B. Turner, 6 Jan 2005; Lt Col James H. Craft, 26 Jan 2007; Lt Col Joel D. Jackson, 16 May 2008-.

Aircraft:  YB-17, 1940; B-17, 1940-1943; B-18, 1940-1941; B-24, 1943-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946. AT-6, 1947-1949; AT-11, 1947-1949. KC-135, 1958-1967. KC-10, 1989-.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrol missions in the Caribbean, Jan-Jun 1942. Operational and later replacement training, 1942-1944. Combat in the Western Pacific, c. 16 Feb-15 Aug 1945. Air refueling training, 1959-1962. Worldwide air refueling, 1963-1967, including support of tactical aircraft flying in Southeast Asia. Stood operation alerts to support exercises of the Strategic Air Command, Jan 1964-Feb 1994. Worldwide air refueling since 1989, including deployments to Southwest Asia, 1990-1991, and humanitarian airlift to Somalia, 1992-1993. Refueling support for the Global War on Terrorism, 2001-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 31 Mar 1945; Japan, 19-26 Jun 1945. Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Jul 2005-30 Jun 2007. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 May 1960-31 May 1962; 1 Feb-30 Jun 1989; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Aug 1995-30 Jul 1997; [31 Jul] 1997-30 Jun 1999; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jul 2005; 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2009.

Emblem:  Celeste, a Taeguk Or and Azure charged with a pegasus soaring Argent garnished Sable, all within a diminished bordure of the third. Approved on 9 Dec 1994; replaced emblems approved on 12 Oct 1960 (K 12078) and on 6 Apr 1942 (K 2661). MOTTO: VIS EXTENSA-Strength Extended. Approved on 12 Oct 1960. Modified and approved on 9 Dec 1994.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 27 Apr 2010.

Aircraft, Commanders, Operations 27 Apr 2010.

Table of Contents



43d Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 29 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Dec 1939. Activated on 1 Feb 1940. Redesignated as 43 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 13 Mar 1940. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated as 43 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated, on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 20 May 1946. Redesignated as 43 Flying Training Squadron on 22 Mar 1972. Activated on 1 Jul 1972. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1977. Activated on 25 Jun 1990. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1992. Redesignated as 43 Flying Training Flight, and activated in the Reserve, on 1 Apr 1997. Redesignated as 43 Flying Training Squadron on 1 Apr 1998.

Assignments:  29 Bombardment Group, 1 Feb 1940-1 Apr 1944. 29 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-20 May 1946. 29 Flying Training Wing, 1 Jul 1972-30 Sep 1977. 14 Flying Training Wing, 25 Jun 1990; 14 Operations Group, 15 Dec 1991-1 Oct 1992. 610 Regional Support Group, 1 Apr 1997; 340 Flying Training Group, 1 Apr 1998-.

Stations:  Langley Field, VA, 1 Feb 1940; MacDill Field, FL, 21 May 1940; Pope Field, NC, c. 7 Dec 1941; MacDill Field, FL, 1 Jan 1942; Gowen Field, ID, 25 Jun 1942-1 Apr 1944. Pratt AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 25 May 1944; Pratt AAFld, KS, 17 Jul (ground echelon only to 21 Aug)-7 Dec 1944; North Field, Guam, 17 Jan 1945-20 May 1946. Craig AFB, AL, 1 Jul 1972-30 Sep 1977. Columbus AFB, MS, 25 Jun 1990-1 Oct 1992. Columbus AFB, MS, 1 Apr 1997-.

Commanders:  Maj William D. Old, 1 Feb 1940; unkn, c. 1 Mar-4 May 1941; Maj Robert F. Travis, 5 May 1941; Capt James H. Walsh, 21 Oct 1941; Maj C.W. Bicking, c. Mar 1942; Maj Roland J. Bernick, c. Jul 1942; Capt Chester C. Cox, 30 Jan 1943; Maj George H. Blasé, 2 Apr 1943; Capt Robert T. Marland, 16 Apr 1943; Maj Everett C. Wessman, 29 Sep 1943-c. Mar 1944. None (not manned), 1 Apr-3 May 1944; Capt William J. Barter, 4 May 1944; Maj James D. Baird, 25 May 1944; Lt Col Joseph G. Perry, 30 Jun 1944; Maj William Marchesi, Sep 1945-c. Jan 1946; none (not manned) Feb-20 May 1946. Lt Col William M. Pugh, 1 Jul 1972; Lt Col Robert L. Oliver, by Dec 1973; Lt Col William F. Hoeft, by Jun 1976; Lt Col Max L. Hearn, 13 Dec 1976-Jun 1977; unkn, Jul-30 Sep 1977. Lt Col Gregory H. Landers, 25 Jun 1990; Lt Col William H. Barker, 31 Jan-1 Oct 1992. Unkn, 1 Apr 1997-Mar 1998; Col Leonard R. Kight, 1 Apr 1998; Lt Col Roger L. Henry, 1 Aug 1998; Lt Col Dean F. Matcheck, 6 Dec 2002; Lt Col Gerard A. Rowe, 9 Dec 2004; Lt Col Michael J. Gibbons, 9 Dec 2006; Lt Col Brian S. Bowman, 8 Jan 2009 -.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1940-1941; B-17, 1940-1943; B-24, 1943-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946. T-37, 1972-1977. T-37, 1990-1992. Unkn, 1997; T-37, 1998-; T-38, 1998-; T-1, 1998-; T-6, 2007-.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols, Dec 1941-Jun 1942; operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c.16 Feb-15 Aug 1945. Conducted undergraduate pilot training at Craig AFB, AL, from Jul 1972 until inactivated when the base closed in 1977 and at Columbus AFB, MS, 25 Jun 1990-1 Oct 1992. Trained Air Force pilots and instructor pilots, 1997-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations (Japan): 31 Mar 1945; 19-26 Jun 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan-31 Dec 1973; 1 Oct 2001-30 Sep 2003; 1 Oct 2003-30 Sep 2004.

Emblem (WWII):  On a white disc edged in black a white and gray condor with black outlines, rising and grasping in both claws a red aerial bomb with black markings. (Approved 18 Apr 1942.) Emblem (current):  Approved on 30 May 1973.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 2 Nov 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 28 Oct 2009.

Table of Contents



52nd Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 52 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Dec 1939. Activated on 1 Feb1940. Redesignated 52 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 20 May 1946. Redesignated 52 Flying Training Squadron on 22 Mar 1972. Activated on 1 Jul 1972. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1977. Activated on 11 May 1990. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1997. Redesignated 52 Expeditionary Flying Training Squadron, and converted to provisional status, on 23 Mar 2007. Activated on 29 Mar 2007.

Assignments:  29 Bombardment Group, 1 Feb 1940-1 Apr 1944. 29 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-20 May 1946. 29 Flying Training Wing, 1 Jul 1972-30 Sep 1977. 64 Flying Training Wing, 11 May 1990; 64 Operations Group, 15 Dec 1991-1 Apr 1997. 370 Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, 29 Mar 2007-.

Stations:  Langley Field, VA, 1 Feb 1940; MacDill Field, FL, 21 May 1940; Gowen Field, ID, 25 Jun 1942-1 Apr 1944. Pratt AAFld, KS, 1 Apr-c. 6 Dec 1944; North Field, Guam, 17 Jan 1945-20 May 1946. Craig AFB, AL, 1 Jul 1972-30 Sep 1977. Reese AFB, TX, 11 May 1990-1 Apr 1997. Kirkuk, IZ, 29 Mar 2007-.

Commanders:  Capt Frank H. Robinson, 1 Feb 1940; Unknown, 3-9 May 1941; Capt Bockman, 10 May 1941; 1 Lt John D. Harcos, 27 Oct 1941; Capt James A. Walsh, 5 Nov 1941; Maj Edgar M. Wittan, 14 Feb 1942; Capt Lewellyn T. Boatwright, 21 Jun 1942; Capt Robert H. Warren, 5 Sep 1942; Maj Seldon L. McMillin, 7 Nov 1942; Capt James Kirkpatrick, 28 Jan 1943; Maj Robert L. Cox, 27 Apr 1943; Capt Delbert R. Hetrick, 15 Oct 1943-c. 1944. None (not manned), 1 Apr-3 May 1944; Capt John A. Martin, 4 May 1944; Lt Col Eugene O. Strouse, 23 May 1944; Maj Thomas W. Abbott Jr., 26 Jul 1945-c. 1946. Lt Col Charles E. Irwin, by 1 Jul 1972; Lt Col Max L. Hubrich, by 31 Dec 1973; Lt Col George B. Lapham, by Jun 1975-c. 30 Sep 1977. Lt Col Stanley R. Osborne, 11 May 1990; Lt Col Barry C. Hall, 5 Jun 1992; Lt Col Clarence A. McFarland, 1 Oct 1992; Lt Col Gerald R. Scroggins, 25 Jun 1993; Lt Col John Mazurowski, 31 Oct 1993; Lt Col Mark Richardson III, 20 Jan 1995; Lt Col LeeRoy A. Martin, 3 May 1996-1 Apr 1997. Lt Col Mark S. Bennett, 8 Sep 2007; Lt Col Nathan S. Brauner, 24 Jul 2008-.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1940-1941; B-17, 1940-1943; B-24, 1943-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1946. T-38, 1972-1977. T-38, 1990-1992; T-1, 1992-1997. C-172, 2007-; C-208, 2007-.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols, Jan-Jun 1942. Operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in western Pacific, c. 16 Feb-15 Aug 1945. Undergraduate pilot training, 1972-1977 and 1990-1997. Began training the Iraqi air force for training its own flight crews, 2007-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 31 Mar 1945; Japan, 19-26 Jun 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan-31 Dec 1973; 1 Jan 1976-28 Feb 1977; 1 Oct 1995-[1 Apr] 1997.

Emblem:  On a White disc edged in Black a Brown alligator with tail raised and holding a Black bomb sparked at the fuse. Approved on 18 Apr 1942 (K 2669) and reinstated in Jun 1994; replaced emblem approved c. Jun 1990 (DFSC 91-03023).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 3 Sep 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 3 Sep 2008.

Supersedes statement prepared on 30 Mar 2007.

Table of Contents



69th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
305th Air Engineering Sq
575th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



39th Bombardment Group


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 39th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Assigned to Second AF. Equipped with B-17's. Patrolled the northwest coast of the US after the nation entered the war. Equipped with B-24's in 1942. Served as an operational training and later as a replacement training unit. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944.

Redesignated 39th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy). Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Trained with B-29's. Moved to Guam early in 1945 for duty with Twentieth AF. Bombed enemy-held Maug early in Apr 1945. Conducted its first mission against the Japanese home islands by hitting the Hodagaya chemical plant at Koriyama on 12 Apr. Supported the Allied invasion of Okinawa, Apr-May 1945, by attacking airfields that served as bases for kamikaze pilots. Bombed military and industrial targets in Japan and participated in incendiary raids on urban areas from mid-May until the end of the war. Received a DUC for an attack against the Otake oil refinery and storage area on Honshu in May 1945. Received second DUC for bombing industrial and dock areas in Yokohama and manufacturing districts in Tokyo, 23-29 May 1945. Dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and took part in show-of-force missions over Japan after V-J Day. Returned to the US, Nov-Dec 1945. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945.

Squadrons:  60th: 1941-1944; 1944-1945. 61st: 1941-1944; 1944-1945. 62d: 1941-1944; 1944-1945. 402d: 1942-1944; 1944.

Stations:  Ft Douglas, Utah, 15 Jan 1941; Geiger Field, Wash, 2 Jul 1941; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 5 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Apr 1944-8 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-17 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, Calif, 15-27 Dec 1945.

Commanders:  Maj Newton Longfellow, 15 Jan 1941; Capt Maurice A Preston, 1 Feb 1941; Lt Col Elmer E Adler, 17 Mar 1941; Capt George W Hansen, 13 May 1941; Maj Charles B Overacker Jr, 12 Nov 1941; Lt Col George W Hansen, 25 Jan 1942; Col James H Wallace, 16 Feb 1942; Col Fay R Upthegrove, 12 Jul 1942; Lt Col Samuel C Mitchell, 13 Sep 1942; Maj Marden M Munn, 17 Dec 1942; Lt Col Horace D Aynesworth, 1 Mar 1943; Lt Col Charles A Watt, 1 Jul 1943; Lt Col Frank R Pancake, 25 Nov 1943; Col Clyde K Rich, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944. Capt Claude Hilton, 28 Apr 1944; Maj Gordon R Willis, 6 May 1944; Maj Campbell Weir, 11 May 1944; Lt Col Robert W Strong Jr, 10 Jun 1944; Col Potter B Paige, 15 Jun 1944; Col John G Fowler, 22 Feb 1945; Col George W Mundy, 16 Mar 1945; Col James E Roberts, 16 Aug 1945; Lt Col James C Thompson, 9 Oct 1945; Col Robert Mason, 13 Oct 1945-unkn.

Campaigns:  American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 10 May 1945; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945.

Insigne:  None.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (39th Air Base Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 39 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated 39 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Redesignated 39 Tactical Group, and activated, on 14 Mar 1966. Organized on 1 Apr 1966. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 39 Bombardment Wing, Heavy, which was established, and activated, on 15 Nov 1962. Organized on 1 Feb 1963. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1965. Redesignated: 39 Wing on 1 Oct 1993; 39 Air Base Group on 16 Jul 2003; 39 Air Base Wing on 12 Mar 2004.

Assignments:  5 Bombardment Wing, 15 Jan 1941; II Bomber Command, 5 Sep 1941; 16 Bombardment Operational Training Wing, 4 Sep 1943-1 Apr 1944. XXI Bomber Command, 1 Apr 1944 (attached to 17 Bombardment Operational Training Wing, Very Heavy, c. 15 Apr 1944-8 Jan 1945); 314 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, c. 18 Feb-27 Dec 1945. Strategic Air Command, 15 Nov 1962; 822 Air Division, 1 Feb 1963-25 Jun 1965. United States Air Forces in Europe, 14 Mar 1966; 7217 Air Division (Command), 1 Apr 1966; Sixteenth Air Force, 9 Sep 1970; TUSLOG, [The United States Logistics Group], 15 Oct 1971 (attached to Composite Wing Provisional, 7440, 16 Jan 1991-30 Nov 1995); Sixteenth Air Force, 17 Jul 1992; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Nov 2005; Air Command Europe, 18 Nov 2005; Third Air Force (Air Forces Europe), 1 Dec 2006-.

Components

Group:  39 Operations: 1 Oct 1993-16 Jul 2003.

Squadron:  12 Reconnaissance (later, 402 Bombardment): attached 15 Jan 1941-24 Feb 1942, assigned 25 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944; assigned 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 39 Operations: 16 Jul 2003-. 60 Bombardment: 15 Jan 1941-1 Apr 1944; 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. 61 Bombardment: 15 Jan 1941-1 Apr 1944; 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. 62 Bombardment: 15 Jan 1941-1 Apr 1944; 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945; 1 Feb 1963-25 Jun 1965.

Stations:  Ft Douglas, UT, 15 Jan 1941; Geiger Field, WA, 2 Jul 1941; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 5 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944- 8 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-17 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, 15-27 Dec 1945. Eglin AFB, FL, 1 Feb 1963-25 Jun 1965. Incirlik AB, TU, 1 Apr 1966-.

Commanders:  Maj Newton Longfellow, 15 Jan 1941; Capt Maurice A. Preston, 1 Feb 1941; Lt Col Elmer E. Adler, 17 Mar 1941; Capt George W. Hansen, 13 May 1941; Maj Charles B. Overacker Jr., 12 Nov 1941; Lt Col George W. Hansen, 25 Jan 1942; Col James H. Wallace, 16 Feb 1942; Col Fay R. Upthegrove, 12 Jul 1942; Lt Col Samuel C. Mitchell, 13 Sep 1942; Maj Marden M. Munn, 17 Dec 1942; Lt Col Horace D. Aynesworth, 1 Mar 1943; Lt Col Charles A. Watt, 1 Jul 1943; Lt Col Frank R. Pancake, 25 Nov 1943; Col Clyde K. Rich, 1 Dec 1943-1 Apr 1944. None (not manned), 1-27 Apr 1944; Capt Claude J. Hilton, 28 Apr 1944; Maj Gordon R. Willis, 6 May 1944; Maj Campbell Weir, 11 May 1944; Lt Col Robert W. Strong Jr., 10 Jun 1944; Col Potter B. Paige, 15 Jun 1944; Col John G. Fowler, 22 Feb 1945; Col George W. Mundy, 16 Mar 1945; Col James E. Roberts, 16 Aug 1945; Lt Col James C. Thompson, 9 Oct 1945; Col Robert J. Mason, 13 Oct 1945-unkn. None (not manned), 15 Nov 1962-31 Jan 1963; Col Earl L. Johnson, 1 Feb 1963; Col Fred W. Miller, 26 Jul 1963-25 Jun 1965. None (not manned), 14-31 Mar 1966; Col Leslie J. Westberg, 1 Apr 1966; Col Stephen P. Ham, 16 Jul 1966; Col Albert S. J. Tucker Jr., 9 Jun 1968; Col Robert J. Rudd, 1 Aug 1968; Col Robert H. Clark, 2 Aug 1968; Col Dwaine L. Weatherwax, 13 May 1970; Col Bobby J. Mead, 20 Jun 1971; Col James A. Minish, 8 Jul 1971; Col William W. Gray, 23 Jan 1973; Col Clyde H. Garner, 17 Jun 1974; Col Richard L. Meyer, 11 Mar 1975; Col William L. Gibson, 9 Sep 1975; Col Elmer E. Nelson, 17 Sep 1975; Col Ellis C. Vander Pyl Jr., 10 Jun 1977; Col Wade L. Green, 23 Mar 1979; Col Paul N. Chase, 20 Aug 1980; Col Robert M. Thompson, 5 Feb 1981; Col William T. Williams IV, 4 Jun 1982; Col Gordon L. Clouser, 13 May 1983; Col William J. Hentges, 18 Jun 1984; Col Harold C. Byrd, 25 Mar 1985; Col William M. Douglass, 26 Jun 1986; Col Roger C. Taylor, 29 Jun 1987; Col Thomas J. Lennon, 29 Feb 1988; Col John L. Nystrom Jr., 3 May 1989; Col Gary R. Lorenz, 21 Dec 1990; Col John W. Rutledge, 20 Jun 1991; Col James D. Kula, 2 Sep 1992; Col Curtis H. Emery II, 7 Oct 1992; Col James D. Kula, 12 Apr 1994; Col John L. Barry, 2 Aug 1994; Col Jonathan S. Gration, 30 Jul 1996; Col Robertus C. N. Remkes, 5 Jun 1998; Col Thomas B. Wright, 16 Jun 2000; Col Marc D. Felman, 10 Dec 2001; Col William E. Maclure, 16 Jul 2003; Col Michael C. Gardiner, 12 Mar 2004; Col Murrell F. Stinnette, Jul 2005; Col Philip McDaniel, Jun 2007-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1941-1942; B-25, 1941; B-24, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1945. B-52, 1963-1965. Controlled deployed aircraft, 1966-1997.

Operations:  The 39 Bombardment Group patrolled the northwest coast after the United States entered World War II. Served as an operational training and later as a replacement training unit, 1942-Apr 1944. Trained as a heavy bombardment unit in 1944. Moved to Guam early in 1945 as part of Twentieth Air Force. Conducted its first mission against the Japanese home islands in Apr 1945. Supported Allied invasion of Okinawa by attacking airfields that served as bases for kamikaze pilots. Bombed military and industrial targets in Japan and participated in incendiary raids on urban areas from mid-May until the end of the war. Received a Distinguished Unit Citation for an attack against the Otake oil refinery and storage area on Honshu on 10 May 1945. Received a second Distinguished Unit Citation for bombing industrial and dock areas in Yokohama and manufacturing districts in Tokyo, 23-29 May 1945. Returned to the United States, Nov-Dec 1945. Between 1963 and 1965, 39 Bombardment Wing maintained combat readiness for strategic bombardment. Maintained airborne and ground alerts, and participated in numerous exercises until inactivation. 39 Tactical Group replaced the 7216 Combat Support Group on 1 Apr 1966 to control permanent support units and deployed weapons training detachments at Incirlik, Turkey. Known as TUSLOG (The United States Logistics Group) Detachment 10 within Turkey until 1 Oct 1982, it supported USAFE and NATO operational missions in the Middle East. Provided disaster relief and mercy missions as required during fires, floods, earthquakes, and other such disasters. Provided support for US and NATO forces during operations in Southwest Asia and Eastern Europe, Aug 1990-. From Oct 1993, provided operational and logistical support for all US forces in Turkey and operated a Supreme Allied Command Europe Quick Reaction Alert Force. From Sep 1997-May 2003, became major force provider for the 39 Air and Space Expeditionary Wing, which supported Operations Northern Watch, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Supported earthquake relief to Pakistan, Oct-Nov 2005, and Lebanon non-combatant evacuation operations (NEO), Jul 2006.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 10 May 1945; Japan, 23-29 May 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1974-30 Jun 1975; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 24 Jun-1 Jul 1985; 1 Sep 1985-31 Aug 1987; 1 Sep 1988-31 Jul 1990; 15 Dec 2001-14 Jul 2003; 15 Jul 2002-31 Oct 2004; 1 Nov 2004-31 Oct 2005; 1 Nov 2005-31 Dec 2006.

Emblem:  Approved on 21 Nov 1994.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 Jan 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 11 Jan 2008.



Other Sites of Interest:

39th Bombardment Group [VH] Association

39th Air Expeditionary Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



60th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 60 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated 60 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated, on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with 960 Airborne Early Warning and Control Squadron, which was constituted on 8 Dec 1954. Activated on 8 Mar 1955. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1969. Redesignated 960 Airborne Warning and Control Support Squadron on 31 Jul 1979. Activated on 1 Sep 1979. Redesignated 960 Airborne Warning and Control Squadron on 1 Jan 1982. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1992. Redesignated 960 Airborne Air Control Squadron on 26 Jan 2001. Activated on 1 Mar 2001.

Assignments:  39 Bombardment Group, 15 Jan 1941-1 Apr 1944. 39 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. 551 Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 8 Mar 1955-31 Jul 1969. 552 Airborne Warning and Control Wing (later, 552 Airborne Warning and Control Division), 1 Sep 1979; 28 Air Division, 1 Apr 1985; 552 Operations Group, 29 May-1 July 1992. 552 Operations Group, 1 Mar 2001-.

Stations:  Ft Douglas, UT, 15 Jan 1941; Felts Field, WA, 2 Jun 1941; Geiger Field, WA, 2 Jul 1941; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 2 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 27 May 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 17 Jul 1944-8 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-16 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, 15-27 Dec 1945. Otis AFB, MA, 8 Mar 1955-31 Jul 1969. Keflavik Naval Installation, Iceland, 1 Sep 1979-1 Jul 1992. Tinker AFB, OK, 1 Mar 2001-.

Commanders:  1st Lt Horace M. Wade, 15 Jan 1941; 1st Lt William K. Martin, by Mar 1941; Maj James H. Wallace, by Jun 1941-c. 17 Jan 1942; unkn, Feb-Dec 1942; Capt James A. Gunn III, by Jan 1943; Maj Elwood P. Donohue, 5 Sep 1943; Maj Paul E. Johnson, 25 Nov 1943-unkn. None (not manned), 1-30 Apr 1944; Capt Daniel H. Foxwell, 1 May 1944; Capt Rodger L. Howard, 22 Jun 1944; Lt Col Woodward B. Carpenter, by Sep 1944; Capt William S. Dickey, Oct 1945-unkn. Unkn, 8 Mar 1955-c. 16 Jan 1956; Lt Col Gary L. Brunnemer, 16 Jan 1956; Lt Col James L. Tyson, 8 Oct 1958; Lt Col William M. Cabral, 15 Aug 1959; Maj Orrin S. Merrill, by Mar 1962; Lt Col Normand H. Traverso, 27 Jul 1962; Maj Robert L. Eldred, 17 Jun 1963; Lt Col Reedis N. Morris, 15 Jul 1963; Lt Col James L. McCall, 6 Aug 1963; Lt Col Francis V. Hooven Jr., c. Jan 1967; unkn, 5 Dec 1968-31 Jul 1969. Lt Col James R. Sterk, 1 Sep 1979; Lt Col Joseph A. Price III, 28 Apr 1980; Lt Col Richard S. Moseley, c. 13 May 1981; Lt Col Steg Egede-Nissen, 4 Jun 1982; Lt Col Gary W. Clark, 12 May 1983; Lt Col Daniel J. Eramo, 13 Jun 1985; Lt Col Frank D. Ruiz, 17 Oct 1986; Lt Col John M. Howell, 3 Oct 1988, Lt Col Daniel D. Metzler, 26 Jul 1990-1 Jul 1992.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1941-1942; B-25, 1941; B-24, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1945. C-121, 1955-1969. E-3A, 1979-1992.

Operations:  A replacement training unit, 1941-1944. Conducted bombardment missions against Japan, c. 6Apr-14 Aug 1945. Provided early warning radar surveillance along the East Coast, 1955-1969. Supported two deployed rotating aircraft with crews in Iceland to provide early detection of Soviet aircraft flying between Iceland and Greenland, 1979-1992.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 10 May 1945; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1957-31 Oct 1958; [1 Sep 1979]-30 Jun 1980; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Apr 1987-31 Mar 1989; 1 Dec 1989-1 Dec 1991.

Emblem:  Approved on 8 May 1980.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 9 Apr 2002.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Jul 1992.

Table of Contents



61st Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 61 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated as 61 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated, on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 961 Airborne Early Warning and Control Squadron, which was constituted on 11 Oct 1954. Activated on 18 Dec 1954. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1969. Redesignated as 961 Airborne Warning and Control Support Squadron on 31 Dec 1979. Activated on 1 Oct 1979. Redesignated as: 961 Airborne Warning and Control Squadron on 1 Jan 1982; 961 Airborne Air Control Squadron on 1 Aug 1994.

Assignments:  39 Bombardment Group, 15 Jan 1941-1 April 1944. 39 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. 551 Airborne Early Warning and Control Wing, 18 Dec 1954-31 Dec 1969. 552 Airborne Warning and Control Wing (later, 552 Airborne Warning and Control Division), 1 Oct 1979; 28 Air Division, 1 Apr 1985; 313 Air Division (attached to Fifth Air Force for operational control) 1 Oct 1990; 18 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1991-.

Stations:  Ft Douglas, UT, 15 Jan 1941; Felts Field, WA, 2 Jun 1941; Geiger Field, WA, 2 Jul 1941; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 2 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 27 May 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 17 Jul 1944-8 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-16 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, 15-27 Dec 1945. Otis AFB, MA, 18 Dec 1954-31 Dec 1969. Kadena AB, Japan, 1 Oct 1979-.

Commanders:  1 Lt John A. Way, 15 Jan 1941-unkn. Unkn, 1 Apr-1 May 1944; 1 Lt Joe Glickman, 1 May 1944; Maj Thomas L. McKissack, 19 Jun 1944; Maj Gordon R. Willis, c. Aug 1944; Capt James S. Howard, c. Sep 1944; Maj William J. Crumm, c. Oct 1944-unkn. Unkn, 18 Dec 1954-c. 31 Dec 1955; Lt Col Robert E. Harrington, c. Jan 1956; Lt Col Alfred W. Barrett Jr., by 31 Dec 1957; Lt Col Ted H. Ostendorf, 24 Apr 1958; Maj Robert A. Bostick, 27 Aug 1958; Lt Col Clarence E. Franks, 7 Oct 1958; Lt Col Robert C. Kerr, 1 Feb 1960; Lt Col Henry M. O'Connor, 12 Dec 1961; Maj Burkhead M. Herndon , by 30 Dec 1962; Lt Col Frank P. Klotz Jr., 25 Aug 1963; Maj Edward J. Hennegan, 1 Jul 1964; Lt Col Robert V. Mitchell Sr., 30 Jul 1964; Lt Col Jack January Jr., by 30 Sep 1966-unkn; unkn, 1 Oct 1967-31 Dec 1969. Lt Col Howard T. Cariveau, 1 Jan 1980; Col Walter E. Kowalik, 14 Apr 1982-unkn; Col Bruce J. Gold, 24 Jan 1983; Col Richard A. Riegel, 25 Jun 1985; Col Stig Egede-Nissen, 17 Jul 1987; Col Michael A. Gould, 27 Jul 1989; Lt Col Mark F. Benda, 31 Jul 1991; Lt Col Christopher J. Budinski, 23 Jun 1993; Lt Col Joseph M. Marchino, 16 Jun 1995; Lt Col Guy J. Wills III, 30 Jun 1997; Lt Col Derrick A. Hoxie III, 10 Jun 1999; Lt Col Mark E. Ware, 6 Jul 2001; Lt Col Keith A. Swenson, 13 Feb 2003; Lt Col Robert L. Guerrero, 7 Jan 2005; Lt Col Renee Romera, 4 Apr 2007; Lt Col Frank Samuelson. 19 May 2009-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1941-1942; B-24, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1945. C-121, 1955-1969. E-3, 1979-.

Operations:  Operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 6 Apr-14 Aug 1945. Radar surveillance along eastern coast of US, 18 Dec 1954-31 Dec 1969. Coverage of salvage operations of downed Korean Airliner, Flight 007, 1-10 Sep 1983. Provided airborne command and control for Commander-in-Chief, United States Pacific Command; supported US forces counter air interdiction, close air support, rescue, reconnaissance, airlift operations, and special operations, 1980-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 10 May 1945; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1957-31 Oct 1958; [1 Oct 1979]-30 Jun 1980; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1-10 Sep 1983; 1 Sep 1995-31 Aug 1997; 1 Oct 1998-30 Sep 2000; 1 Oct 2000-30 Sep 2002; 1 Oct 2002-30 Sep 2004; 1 Oct 2005-30 Sep 2007; 31 Oct 2009-[1 Nov] 2010; 2 Nov 2010-1 Nov 2012.

Emblem (WWII):  On an emerald green disc a caricatured horse yellow, outlined in black, trimmed in brown, wearing coveralls; aviator's helmet and goggles of brown, shoes black, trimmed in yellow, with three zigzag speed lines of black issuing from left foot, carrying under his right arm a white aerial bomb outlined in black, shaded in yellow. (Approved 15 May 1943.)

Emblem (Current):  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Black border a White ray issuant bendwise from dexter chief throughout charged with a Yellow lightning bolt between in chief a White eight pointed star shaded Black, and in base a Yellow winged Red disc edged White bearing a White star pierced of the field details of wings Black. Approved on 2 Mar 1981 (KE 72236), newest rendition approved on 7 Nov 1995; replaced emblems approved on 25 Jun 1956 (154825 A.C.) and 15 May 1942 (K 2670).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Feb 2014.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2010.

Table of Contents



62nd Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 62d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated 62d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy). Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Redesignated 62nd Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), and activated on 15 Nov 1962. Organized on 1 Feb 1963. Redesignated 62nd Bomb Sq on 1 Sep 1991, inactivated 18 Jan 1993.

Assignments:  39th Bombardment Group, 15 Jan 1941-1 Apr 1944. 39th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. Strategic Air Command, 15 Nov 1962; 39th Bombardment Wing, 1 Feb 1963; 39th Bombardment Wg -25 Jun 65, 2nd Bombardment Wg -1 Sep 91, 2nd Operations Gp -1993.

Stations:  Ft Douglas, Utah, 15 Jan 1941; Geiger Field, Wash, 2 Jul 1941; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 5 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 27 May 1944; Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 17 Jul 1944-8 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-16 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, Calif, 14-27 Dec 1945. Eglin AFB, Fla, 1 Feb 1963-25 Jun 65, Barksdale AFB LA -1993.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1941-1942; B-24, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1945. B-52, 1963-.

Operations:  Operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 6 Apr-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 10 May 1945; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan, 23-29 May 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



89th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
502nd Air Engineering Sq
501st Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



330th Bombardment Group


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 330th Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 1 Jul 1942 and activated on 6 Jul. Assigned to Second AF. Functioned as an operational training and later as a replacement training unit, using B-24 aircraft. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944.

Redesignated 330th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy). Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Prepared for combat with B-29's. Moved to Guam, Jan-Apr 1945, and assigned to Twentieth AF. Entered combat on 12 Apr 1945 with an attack on the Hodogaya chemical plant at Koriyama, Japan. From Apr to May 1945, struck airfields from which the Japanese were launching suicide planes against the invasion force at Okinawa. After that, operations were principally concerned with incendiary attacks against urban-industrial areas of Japan. Received a DUC for incendiary raids on the industrial sections of Tokushima and Gifu and for a strike against the hydroelectric power center at Kofu, Japan, in Jul 1945. Received another DUC for attacking the Nakajima-Musashino aircraft engine plant near Tokyo in Aug 1945. Dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners and participated in several show-of-force missions over Japan after the war. Returned to the US, Nov-Dec 1945. Inactivated on 3 Jan 1946.

Redesignated 330th Bombardment Group (Medium). Allotted to the reserve. Activated on 27 Jun 1949. Ordered to active duty on 1 May 1951. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1951.

Redesignated 330th Troop Carrier Group (Medium) and allotted to the reserve. Activated on 14 Jun 1952. Inactivated on 14 Jul 1952.

Redesignated 330th Military Airlift Group 31 Jul 1985, 330th Tactical Airlift Sustainment Gp 31 Jan 2005, activated 4 Mar 2005, redesignated 330th Aircraft Sustainment Gp 17 Apr 2006. Inactivated 30 Jun 2010 per DAF/A1M 213t, 22 Jun 2010; SO #GA-23, HQ AFMC, 23 Jun 10.

Assignments:  Second AF, Jul 1942-Apr 1944. Twentieth AF, Jan 1945. 330th Bombardment Wing, 1949-1951. 330th Troop Carrier Wing, 1952. 330th Aircraft Sustainment Wg 2005-30 Jun 2010.

Squadrons:  457th: 1942-1944; 1944-1945; 1949-1951; 1952. 458th: 1942-1944; 1944-1945; 1952. 459th: 1942-1944; 1944-1945; 1952. 460th: 1942-1944; 1944.

Stations:  Salt Lake City AAB, Utah, 6 Jul 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 1 Aug 1942; Biggs Field, Tex, 5 Apr 1943-1 Apr 1944. Walker AAFld, Kan, 1 Apr 1944-7 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-15 Nov 1945; Camp Stoneman, Calif, unkn-3 Jan 1946. March AFB, Calif, 27 Jun 1949-16 Jun 1951. Greater Pittsburgh Aprt, Pa, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Robins AFB, GA 2005-30 Jun 2010.

Commanders:  Maj Leroy A Rainey, 1 Aug 1942; Lt Col John R Sutherland, 5 Sep 1942; Lt Col John A Way, 1 Dec 1942; Lt Col Samuel C Mitchell, 6 Mar 1943; Lt Col Frank P Bostrom, 15 May 1943; Lt Col Troy W Crawford, 27 Jul 1943; Col Frank P Bostrom, 11 Nov 1943; Lt Col Troy W Crawford, 27 Nov 1943-1 Apr 1944. 1st Lt James J Shaffner, 29 Apr 1944; Maj John G Reiber, 3 May 1944; Col Estley R Farley, 26 May 1944; Col Elbert D Reynolds, 23 Jun 1944; Col Douglas C Polhamus, 12 Aug 1944-unkn. Unkn, 1 May-16 Jun 1951.

Campaigns:  American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 3-9 Jul 1945; Tokyo, Japan, 8 Aug 1945.

Insigne (WWII):  None.

Emblem (330th ASW):  Azure, a conjoined winged gear Or in middle base with a five pointed mullet Argent in sinister chief charged with a torteau. Overall, above the center mullet, five smaller five-pointed mullets of the third, arranged in descending order in sinister chief, all within a diminished bordure Yellow. Attached below the shield, a White scroll edged with a narrow Yellow border and inscribed "330TH AIRCRAFT SUSTAINMENT WING” in Blue letters.

Symbolism:  Ultramarine blue and Air Force yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The winged gear represents the translation of practical knowledge into the war winning capability of the unit’s aircraft. The star, representative of the Air Force emblem, is five-pointed to symbolize the five components of the United States Total Force: Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard, which come together to achieve and sustain the mission. The five smaller stars represent the unique groups within the Wing. Though distinct in their missions, each is dedicated to bridging the gap between the gear and the wing, knowledge and victory.


Other Sites of Interest:

330th Bomb Group [VH] (Official Site)

B-29 Superfortress Then and Now

330th Aircraft Sustainment Wing

330th Aircraft Sustainment Group (Tactical Airlift)

330th Aircraft Sustainment Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



457th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (457th Airlift Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted 457th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 1 Jul 1942. Activated on 6 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated 457th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Redesignated 457th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 16 May 1949. Activated in the Reserve on 27 Jun 1949. Ordered to active service on 1 May 1951. Inactivated on 16 Jun 1951. Redesignated 457th Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium, on 26 May 1952. Activated in the Reserve on 14 Jun 1952. Inactivated on 14 Jul 1952. Redesignated 457th Troop Carrier Squadron, and activated, on 12 Oct 1966. Organized on 1 Jan 1967. Redesignated 457th Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Aug 1967. Inactivated on 30 Apr 1972. Consolidated (1 Dec 1991) with the 1402 Military Airlift Squadron, which was designated, and activated, on 1 Apr 1975. Redesignated 457th Airlift Squadron on 1 Dec 1991.

Assignments:  330th Bombardment Group, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 330th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. 330th Bombardment Group, 27 Jun 1949-16 Jun 1951. 330th Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Pacific Air Forces, 12 Oct 1966; 483d Troop Carrier (later, 483d Tactical Airlift) Wing, 1 Jan 1967-30 Apr 1972. 89th Military Airlift Wing (later, 89th Military Airlift Group), 1 Apr 1975; 375th Aeromedical (later, 375th Military) Airlift Wing, 15 Mar 1978; 375th Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991; 89th Operations Group, 1 Apr 1993-.

Stations:  Salt Lake City AAB, UT, 6 Jul 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 1 Aug 1942; Biggs Field, TX, c. 2 Sep 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 29 Nov 1942; Biggs Field, TX, 5 Mar 1943-1 Apr 1944. Walker AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944, Dalhart AAFld, TX, 25 May 1944; Walker AAFld, KS, 1 Aug 1944-7 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-21 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, c. 19-27 Dec 1945. March AFB, CA, 27 Jun 1949-16 Jun 1951. Greater Pittsburgh Aprt, PA, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Cam Ranh Bay AB, South Vietnam, 1 Jan 1967-30 Apr 1972. Andrews AFB, MD, 1 Apr 1975-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1942; B-24, 1942-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945. Unkn, 1949-1951. C-7, 1967-1972. T(later, CT)-39, 1975-1984; VC 131, 1975-1977; C-12, 1976-1977, 1984-; C-21, 1984-.

Operations:  Replacement training, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 12 Apr-14 Aug 1945. Intratheater airlift in Vietnam, including airland and airdrop assault missions, 1967-1972. Pilot readiness training, 1975-1984 and administrative airlift, 1975-1993. Supported intratheater airlift in Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-Apr 1991. Airlift support for high-ranking dignitaries of the US and foreign governments, 1993-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air/Ground 1968; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/ Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII.

Air Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 3-9 Jul 1945; Tokyo, Japan, 8 Aug 1945. Presidential Unit Citations (Southeast Asia): 21 Jan-12 May 1968; 1 Apr-30 Jun 1970. Navy Presidential Unit Citation: Vietnam, 20 Jan-1 Apr 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jan-30 Apr 1967; 1 May 1967-30 Apr 1968; 1 Jul 1970-31 Dec 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul-31 Dec 1975; 1 Jan 1976-31 Jan 1977; 1 Jun 1981-31 May 1982; 1 Jun 1982-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jun 1986-31 Jul 1988; 1 Jul 1991-30 Jun 1992. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Jan 1967-30 Apr 1972.

Emblem (Current):  On a Blue disc with a narrow Yellow border encircled by a stylized Yellow wreath a White star pierced Red all within a narrow Black border. MOTTO: THE WINGS OF COMMAND. Approved on 20 Jul 1984; replaced emblem approved on 3 Jul 1967 (KE 26188).

Table of Contents



458th Bombardment Squadron

 

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 458th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 1 Jul 1942. Activated on 6 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated 458th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated, on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945. Redesignated 458th Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium, on 26 May 1952. Activated in the Reserve on 14 Jun 1952. Inactivated on 14 Jul 1952. Redesignated 458th Troop Carrier Squadron, and activated, on 12 Oct 1966. Organized on 1 Jan 1967. Redesignated 458th Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Aug 1967. Inactivated on 1 Mar 1972. Consolidated (1 Dec 1991) with the 1401st Military Airlift Squadron, which was designated, and activated, on 1 Apr 1975. Redesignated 458th Airlift Squadron on 1 Dec 1991.

Assignments:  330th Bombardment Group, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 330th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-27 Dec 1945. 330th Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Pacific Air Forces, 12 Oct 1966; 483d Troop Carrier (later, 483d Tactical Airlift) Wing, 1 Jan 1967-1 Mar 1972. 89th Military Airlift Wing (later, 89th Military Airlift Group), 1 Apr 1975; 375th Aeromedical (later, 375th Military Airlift) Wing, 15 Mar 1978; 375th Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-.

Stations:  Salt Lake City AAB, UT, 6 Jul 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 1 Aug 1942; Biggs Field, TX, 1 Sep 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 29 Nov 1942; Biggs Field, TX, 5 Apr 1943-1 Apr 1944. Walker AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 25 May 1944; Walker AAFld, KS, 1 Aug 1944-7 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-21 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, c.22-27 Dec 1945. Greater Pittsburgh Aprt, PA, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Cam Ranh Bay AB, South Vietnam, 1 Jan 1967-1 Mar 1972. Scott AFB, IL, 1 Apr 1975-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1942; B-24, 1942-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945. C-7, 1967- 1972. CT-39, 1975-1984; C-21, 1984-; C-12, 1984-.

Operations:  Replacement training, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 12 Apr- 14 Aug 1945. Tactical airlift in Southeast Asia, Jan 1967-Feb 1972. Military airlift operations worldwide, 1975-1978; worldwide aeromedical evacuation, 1978-1990. Airlift in Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-May 1991.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/ Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 3-9 Jul 1945; Tokyo, Japan, 8 Aug 1945. Presidential Unit Citations (Southeast Asia): 21 Jan-12 May 1968; 1 Apr 30- Jun 1970. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jan-30 Apr 1967; 1 May 1967-30 Apr 1968; 1 Jul 1970-31 Dec 1971. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul-31 Dec 1975; 1 Jan 1976-31 Jan 1977; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jul 1986-31 Jul 1988. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Jan 1967-1 Mar 1972.

Emblem (WWII):  Over and through a light blue disc, a gray fortress in a large, white cloud formation, having three, jagged, yellow lightning flashes striking toward base, over the top segment of an ultramarine blue globe, marked with white lines of latitude and longitude. (Approved 27 Jun 1945.)

Emblem (Current):  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Yellow border, in chief a sword palewise with the point up White detailed Blue and issuing from the edges of the sword blade eight Yellow rays rising from the base a Red trapezoid terminating below the silhouette of a stylized White aircraft bendwise all between four White five-pointed stars two each in pale at dexter and sinister. Approved on 18 May 1983 (DFSC 83-08020); replaced emblems approved on 27 Mar 1968 (KE 29506) and 27 Jun 1945 (29920 A.C.).

Table of Contents



459th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 459 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 1 Jul 1942. Activated on 6 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated 459 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, and activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 21 Dec 1945. Redesignated 459 Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium, on 26 May 1952. Activated in the Reserve on 14 Jun 1952. Inactivated on 14 Jul 1952. Redesignated 459 Troop Carrier Squadron, and activated, on 12 Oct 1966. Organized on 1 Jan 1967. Redesignated 459 Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Aug 1967. Inactivated on 1 Jun 1970. Consolidated (1 Dec 1991) with the 1400 Military Airlift Squadron, which was designated, and activated, on 1 Apr 1975. Redesignated 459 Airlift Squadron on 1 Dec 1991. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1993. Activated on 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  330 Bombardment Group, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 330 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-21 Dec 1945. 330 Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Pacific Air Forces, 12 Oct 1966; 483 Troop Carrier (later, 483 Tactical Airlift) Wing, 1 Jan 1967-1 Jun 1970. 89 Military Airlift Wing (later, 89 Military Airlift Group), 1 Apr 1975; 375 Aeromedical (later, 375 Military) Airlift Wing, 15 Mar 1978; 375 Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991; 22 Operations Group, 1 Apr-1 Oct 1993. 374 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1993-.

Stations:  Salt Lake City AAB, UT, 6 Jul 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 1 Aug 1942; Biggs Field, TX, 2 Sep 1942; Alamogordo, NM, 29 Nov 1942; Biggs Field, TX, 5 Apr 1943-1 Apr 1944. Walker AAFld, KS, 1 Apr 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 25 May 1944; Walker AAFld, KS, 1 Aug 1944-7 Jan 1945; North Field, Guam, 18 Feb-19 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, c. 18-21 Dec 1945. Greater Pittsburgh Aprt, PA, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Phu Cat AB, Vietnam, 1 Jan 1967-1 Jun 1970. Norton AFB, CA, 1 Apr 1975; March AFB, CA, 15 Oct 1992-1 Oct 1993. Yokota AB, Japan, 1 Oct 1993-.

Commanders:  Capt Harris K. McCauley, 1942-unkn; Capt Campbell, unkn-1 Jun 1943; Capt DeBord, 1 Jun 1943-unkn; 2 Lt Sol I. Lobe, 30 May 1944; Capt Tullie W. Cato, c. 6 Jun 1944; Lt Col Robert W. Ryder, 1 Aug 1944; Maj Frank J. Rinehart, 18 Aug 1945; Capt Dennie R. Curtis, 30 Oct 1945; 1 Lt Sol I. Lobe, 15 Nov 1945-unkn. Unkn, 14 Jun-14 Jul 1952. Lt Col Edward J. Thielen, 1 Jan 1967; Lt Col David P. Hopwood, 24 Aug 1967; Lt Col James K. Secrest, 1 May 1968; Lt Col John Kozey Jr., Aug 1968; Lt Col Arthur T. Rossing, c. Jul 1969; Lt Col Russell C. Draper, 13 Mar 1970-unkn. Lt Col Everett A. Cheney, 1 Apr 1975; Lt Col Bert E. Grigsby, c. Jul 1976; Lt Col Anthony A. Vanagas, 19 Jun 1978; Lt Col Neil Sorenson, 14 Aug 1980; Lt Col Geoffrey R. Hickman, 1 Dec 1981; Lt Col James H. White, 25 Nov 1983; Lt Col James M. Murphy, 14 Mar 1984; Lt Col Lester H. Ideker Jr., 3 Oct 1986; Lt Col Eric B. House II, 16 Sep 1988; Lt Col Richard A. Mallahan, 30 May 1990; Lt Col William R. Short, 10 Jun 1992-unkn; unkn-16 Apr 1995; Lt Col Thomas S. Kingsley, 17 Apr 1995; Lt Col Jeffery A. Worthing, 5 Sep 1996; Lt Col John C. McKoy, 7 May 1998; Lt Col Walter Leach, c. 2000; Lt Col Christopher R. Valle, 16 Apr 2002; Lt Col Michael Smith, 8 Jun 2004; Lt Col Thad A. Hunkins, 19 Jun 2006-.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1942; B-24, 1942-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1944-1945. C-7, 1967-1970. CT-39, 1975-1985; C-12, 1984-1993; C-21, 1985-; UH-1, 1993-.

Operations:  Replacement training, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 12 Apr-14 Aug 1945. Intratheater airlift in Southeast Asia, Jan 1967-May 1970. Airlift of key Department of Defense personnel, Apr 1975-Mar 1978; aeromedical airlift, Mar 1978-Nov 1991; operational support airlift, Dec 1991-Oct 1993. Airlifted distinguished visitors, priority personnel and cargo throughout Japan and the Pacific theater, 1993-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall,1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Japan, 3-9 Jul 1945; Tokyo, Japan, 8 Aug 1945. Presidential Unit Citations (Southeast Asia): 1 Jan-12 May 1968; 1 Apr-31 May 1970. Presidential Unit Citation (Navy): Khe Sanh, 20 Jan-31 Mar 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 1 Jan-30 Apr 1967; 1 May 1967-30 Apr 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul- 31 Dec 1975; 1 Jan 1976-31 Jan 1977; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jun 1986-31 Jul 1988; 1 Jul-1 Oct 1993; [1 Oct 1993]-1 Oct 1994; 1 Oct 1994-30 Sep 1996; 1 Oct 1996-30 Sep 1997; 1 Oct 1998-30 Sep 2000; 1 Oct 2000-30 Sep 2002; 1 Oct 2003-30 Sep 2005. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm; 1 Jan 1967-30 Jun 1970.

Emblem (WWII):  On a light turquoise blue disc, border red, piped white, a red centaur having gold tail, white face, and gray hoofs, wearing a red helmet, winged gold, and gray gloves, reared up on hind legs on white cloud formation in base, facing toward sinister, and shooting a jagged, gold lightning bolt affixed to bow string of curved bow of the last, all beneath a white cloud formation in dexter chief and flecked with white, five-point stars. (Approved 9 Apr 1945.)

Emblem (Current):  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Red border a White undulating aerodynamic shape fesswise throughout between in base a Yellow sun emitting seven Yellow rays and in the top of the disc a constellation of ten White stars palewise four, three, two and one, overall five contrails bendwise, Red, White, Blue, White, Red, terminating at a White aircraft ascending bendwise garnished Black. Approved on 10 Jun 1982 (DFSC 82-05845); replaced emblem approved on 19 Dec 1942 (29396 A.C.). Newest rendition approved on 13 Oct 2011.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 22 Oct 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Dec 2006.

Table of Contents



90th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
508th Air Engineering Sq
507th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



315th Bombardment Wing

Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (315th Air Division)

Lineage:  Established as 315 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy on 7 Jun 1944. Activated on 17 Jul 1944. Redesignated 315 Composite Wing on 8 Jan 1946. Inactivated on 20 Aug 1948. Redesignated 315 Air Division (Combat Cargo) on 10 Jan 1951. Activated on 25 Jan 1951. Redesignated 315 Air Division on 1 Aug 1967. Consolidated (1 Jul 1978) with organization established as 315th Air Division on 13 Aug 1948, organized on 18 Aug 1948, and discontinued on 1 Mar 1950. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1969.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 17 Jul 1944 (attached XXII Bomber Command, c. 14 Aug-c. 7 Dec 1944); Twentieth Air Force, c. 25 Mar 1945; XXI Bomber Command, 5 Apr 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul 1945; Fifth Air Force, 30 May 1946; V Fighter Command, 30 May 1946; Fifth Air Force, 1 Jun 1946-1 Mar 1950. Far East (later, Pacific) Air Forces, 25 Jan 1951-15 Apr 1969.

Components

Wings:  8 Fighter (later, 8 Fighter-Bomber): 18 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1950. 38 Bombardment: 18 Aug 1948-1 Apr 1949. 314 Troop Carrier (later, 314 Tactical Airlift): attached 22-26 Jan 1966, assigned 27 Jan 1966-1 Nov 1968; attached 1 Nov 1968-8 Apr 1969. 315 Troop Carrier (later, 315 Air Commando): 10 Jun 1952-18 Jan 1955; 8 Mar-15 Oct 1966 (detached entire period). 347 Fighter: 18 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1950. 374 Troop Carrier (later, 374 Tactical Airlift): 25 Jan 1951-1 Jul 1957; 8 Aug 1966-1 Nov 1968; attached 1 Nov 1968-8 Apr 1969. 403 Troop Carrier: attached 14 Apr 1952-1 Jan 1953. 437 Troop Carrier: 25 Jan 1951-10 Jun 1952. 463 Troop Carrier (later, 463 Tactical Airlift): 23 Nov 1965-1 Nov 1968; attached 1 Nov 1968-8 Apr 1969. 475 Fighter: 18 Aug 1948-1 Apr 1949. 483 Troop Carrier: attached 1 Jan 1953-30 Jun 1954, assigned 1 Jul 1954-25 Jun 1960.

Groups:  8 Fighter: 31 May 1946-18 Aug 1948. 16 Bombardment: attached 15 Apr-1 Jun 1945. 38 Bombardment: 31 May 1946-18 Aug 1948. 61 Troop Carrier: attached 25 Jan 1951-21 Nov 1952. 314 Troop Carrier: attached 25 Jan 1951-15 Nov 1954. 315 Troop Carrier (later, 315 Air Commando): 8 Dec 1962-8 Mar 1966 (detached entire period). 316 Troop Carrier: attached 15 Nov 1954-18 Mar 1955, assigned 18 Mar 1955-18 Jan 1957 (detached entire period). 331 Bombardment: attached 12 May-22 Jun 1945, assigned 23 Jun 1945-15 Apr 1946 (not operational, c. 15 Feb-15 Apr 1946). 347 Fighter: 25 Sep 1947-18 Aug 1948. 501 Bombardment: attached 15 Apr-18 Jun 1945, assigned 19 Jun 1945-15 May 1946. 502 Bombardment: attached 12 May-25 Jun 1945, assigned 26 Jun 1945-15 Apr 1946). 6315 Operations: 20 Oct 1964-8 Aug 1966. Combat Cargo (Troop Carrier) Provisional 6492: attached 21 Sep-8 Dec 1962.

Squadrons:  21 Troop Carrier: 25 Jun 1960-8 Aug 1966 (detached entire period). 24 Helicopter: 13 Oct 1956-8 Mar 1960. 25 Tactical Reconnaissance: 31 May 1946-28 Feb 1947, attached 28 Feb 1947-15 Apr 1948. 29 Troop Carrier: 27 Jan-25 Mar 1966. 35 Troop Carrier: 8 Jan 1963-8 Aug 1966 (detached entire period). 38 Tactical Airlift: attached 8 Feb-19 Jul 1968. 41 Photographic Reconnaissance: 18 Sep 1945-4 Jan 1946. 41 Troop Carrier: c. 21 Nov 1965-8 Aug 1966 (detached entire period). 50 Troop Carrier: attached 1 Oct 1951-15 Nov 1954; assigned 26 Dec 1965-23 Feb 1966. 68 Fighter: attached 10 Apr-24 Nov 1947. 345 Troop Carrier: 1 Jun 1962-8 Jan 1963; 27 Nov 1965-25 Mar 1966 (detached entire period). 346 Tactical Airlift: attached 7 Jan-25 Mar 1969. 347 Tactical Airlift: attached 19 Jul-18 Oct 1968. 348 Tactical Airlift: 18 Oct 1968-7 Jan 1969. 421 Night Fighter: 31 May 1946-20 Feb 1947. 433 Fighter: attached 15 Oct 1946-18 Nov 1947. 776 Troop Carrier: 26 Dec 1965-25 Mar 1966. 777 Tactical Airlift: attached 31 Mar-1 Aug 1968. 778 Tactical Airlift: attached 1-23 Aug 1968. 779 Tactical Airlift: attached 7 Feb-31 Mar 1968. 815 Troop Carrier (later, 815 Tactical Airlift): 25 Jun 1960-1 Nov 1968. 817 Troop Carrier: 25 Jun 1960-8 Aug 1966 (detached entire period). 6461 Troop Carrier (later, 6461 Air Transport): 1 Dec 1952-24 Jun 1955 (detached entire period). 6475 Flying Training: 25 Nov 1954-18 May 1955 (detached entire period). 6485 Operations: 17 Sep 1956-1 Sep 1968; attached 1 Dec 1968-8 Apr 1969.

Stations:  Peterson Field, CO, 17 Jul 1944; Fort Lawton, WA, 10 17 Mar 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, Marianas Islands, 5 Apr 1945; Ashiya AAB, Japan, 30 May 1946; Itazuke AAB (later, Airfield; AB), Japan, 31 May 1946-1 Mar 1950. Ashiya AS, Japan, 25 Jan 1951; Fuchu, Japan, 5 Feb 1951; Tachikawa AB, Japan, 24 Apr 1954-15 Apr 1969.

Commanders:  1st Lt Philip F. Locke, 17 Jul 1944; Lt Col Robert A. Koeper, 28 Jul 1944; Lt Col Stanley A. Zidiales, 11 Aug 1944; Brig Gen Frank A. Armstrong Jr., 29 May 1945; Col Leland S. Stranathan, 24 Oct 1945; Brig Gen Frank A. Armstrong Jr., c. Dec 1945-17 Jan 1946; unkn, 18-24 Jan 1946; Col Leland S. Stranathan, 25 Jan 1946; Col Vincent M. Miles Jr., 15 Apr-15 May 1946; none (not manned), 16-30 May 1946; Col Hanlon H. Van Auken, 31 May 1946; Col Hugh A. Parker, 19 Jul 1946; Col Travis M. Hetherington, 10 Jun 1947; Col Joshua H. Foster Jr., 21 Jun 1948; Col Marden M. Munn, 6 Aug 1948; Brig Gen Edward J. Timberlake Jr., 14 Sep 1948; Col Leo H. Dawson, 19 Jun 1949; Col Gerry L. Mason, 22 Jun 1949; Col Leo H. Dawson, c. 5 Jul 1949; Col Gerry L. Mason, 12 Jul 1949; Col Marden M. Munn, 29 Sep 1949; Brig Gen Oliver S. Picher, 23 Oct 1949-1 Mar 1950. Maj Gen William H. Tunner, 25 Jan 1951; Brig Gen John P. Henebry, 8 Feb 1951; Col Cecil H. Dhildre, 26 Feb 1952; Maj Gen Chester E. McCarty, 10 Apr 1952; Col Adriel N. Williams, 15 Nov 1954; Maj Gen Russell L. Waldren, 3 Dec 1954; Col William M. Brown, 15 May 1957; Brig Gen Charles H. Pottenger, 1 Jul 1957; Brig Gen Theodore G. Kershaw, 10 Jul 1959; Col Lopez J. Mantoux, 30 Jul 1963; Brig Gen Richard H. Ellis, 1 Sep 1963; Col Lester R. Ferriss Jr., 16 Jun 1965; Col Charles W. Howe, 13 Jul 1965; Col Robert D. Brown, 26 Jul 1968-15 Apr 1969.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1945-1946; F-5, 1945-1946; B-17, 1946-1947; B-25, 1946-1950; B-26, 1946-1949; L-5, 1946, 1948-1950; P-51, 1946-1948; P-51/F-6, 1946-1948; P-61, 1946-1948; UC-64, 1946; C-45, 1948-1950; C-46, 1948-1950; C-47, 1948-1950; F-51, 1948-1950; F-61, 1948-1950; H-5, 1948-1950; H-6, 1948-1950; SB-17, 1948-1950; T-6, 1948-1950; F-80, 1949-1950; F-82, 1949-1950. C-46, 1951-1955; C-47, 1951-1957; C-54, 1951-1965; C-119, 1951-1959; C-124, 1952-1957; H-21, 1956-1960; H-19, 1957-1958; C-130, 1958-1969; C-118, 1963-1969; C 123, 1963-1966.

Operations:  The 315th moved to Guam in Apr 1945. At first, subordinate units flew "shakedown" missions against Japanese targets on Moen Island, Truk, and other points in the Carolines and Marianas. Bombing missions commenced against targets in the Japanese homeland on 26 Jun 1945 when the wing damaged the Utsube River oil refinery at Yokkaichi. Thereafter, oil targets in Japan served as its primary targets. When hostilities ended, the wing's B 29s carried relief supplies to Allied prisoner of war camps in Japan and Manchuria. In Jan 1951 at Ashiya AB, Japan, the 315th Division replaced and absorbed the resources of the Far East Air Forces Combat Cargo Command (Provisional). During the Korean conflict, its components evacuated wounded from Korea, airdropped supplies and personnel, hauled emergency supplies, materiel, replacement troops, mail, rations and ammunition, participated in joint training exercises in Japan, took part in numerous combat missions, and operated regular transport schedules within the Far East area. Before combat operations ceased in Korea, the division began supporting French forces engaged in a war in Indo-China. From May 1953-Jul 1954, it provided C-119s to the French, trained French air crews and maintenance personnel, performed additional airlift missions in support of the French, and finally evacuated wounded French troops from Indo-China during operation Wounded Warrior. In Jul 1954, the 315th resumed normal airlift operations and participated in training exercises in Japan. In 1962, it established airlift support for the expanding conflict in Southeast Asia. Meantime, the division continued its routine airlift in the Far East, flew humanitarian missions, and participated in training exercises when possible. The crisis prompted by the North Korean seizure of the USS Pueblo in Jan 1968, found the 315th supporting an emergency airlift to the Republic of Korea.

Service Streamers:  World War II: Asiatic Pacific Theater; Korean Service

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan-30 Jun 1961; 1 Jul 1964-30 Jun 1966; 1 Nov 1966-31 Oct 1968. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations: 25 Jan-30 Jun 1951; 1 Jul 1951-27 Jul 1953.

Emblem:  Or, within and beneath a torii gate gules a representation of a parachute argent lowering a winged cargo box in perspective, one edge to front, light brown, its top bearing overall a two edged sword of the third, hilt azure, all outlined white, surmounted by a cross of the second, all within a diminished bordure of the fifth, fimbriated and outlined of the third. (Approved 11 Oct 1954.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 Apr 1969.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 15 Apr 1969.

Photos courtesy of Mr. Glenn Pendleton


Other Sites of Interest:

315th Bomb Wing

315th Air Division Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



16th Bombardment Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 16th Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Trained for combat with B-29's. Moved to Guam, Mar-Apr 1945, and assigned to Twentieth AF. Entered combat on 16 Jun 1945 with a bombing raid against an airfield on Moen. Flew first mission against the Japanese home islands on 26 Jun 1945 and afterwards operated principally against the enemy's petroleum industry. Flying unescorted in the face of severe enemy attack, the 16th bombed the oil refinery at Shimotsu, the Mitsubishi refinery and oil installations at Kawasaki, and the coal liquefaction plants at Ube, Jul-Aug 1945, and was awarded a DUC for the missions. After the war the group dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners of war in Japan, Manchuria, and Korea, and participated in several show-of-force missions over Japan. Inactivated on Guam on 15 Apr 1946. Redesignated 16th Bombardment Training Wg 31 Jul 1985 (not active).

Squadrons:  15th: 1944-1946. 16th: 1944-1946. 17th: 1944-1946. 21st: 1944.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Apr 1944; Fairmont AAFld, Neb, 15 Aug 1944-7 Mar 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-15 Apr 1946.

Commanders:  Unkn, Apr-Jun 1944; Capt William W Hosler Jr, 24 Jun 1944; Maj Richard W Lavin, 1 Jul 1944; Col Samuel C Gurney Jr, 11 Jul 1944; Lt Col Andre F Castellotti, 11 Jul 1945-1946.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 29 July Aug 1945.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:

16th Air Expeditionary Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



15th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  The 15 Antisubmarine Squadron (Heavy) (constituted as 520 Bombardment Squadron [Heavy] on 13 Oct 1942; activated on 18 Oct 1942; redesignated as 15 Antisubmarine Squadron [Heavy] on 29 Nov 1942; disbanded on 2 Nov 1943; reconstituted on 19 Sep 1985) consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 15 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy (constituted on 28 Mar 1944; activated on 1 Apr 1944; inactivated on 15 Apr 1946; activated in the Reserve on 1 Aug 1947; inactivated on 27 Jun 1949) and the 15 Special Operations Squadron (constituted as 15 Air Commando Squadron, and activated, on 13 Feb 1968; organized on 15 Mar 1968; redesignated as 15 Special Operations Squadron on 1 Aug 1968; inactivated on 31 Oct 1970). Activated on 1 Oct 1992.

Assignments:  378 Bombardment Group, 18 Oct 1942 (attached to 25 Antisubmarine Wing, 20 Nov 1942-); 26 Antisubmarine Wing, 14 Dec 1942 (remained attached to 25 Antisubmarine Wing to c. Jul 1943); Second Air Force, 17 Oct-2 Nov 1943. 16 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-15 Apr 1946. 445 Bombardment Group, 1 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949. Pacific Air Forces, 13 Feb 1968; 14 Air Commando (later, 14 Special Operations) Wing, 15 Mar 1968-31 Oct 1970. 1 Special Operations (later, 16 Operations; 1 Special Operations) Group, 1 Oct 1992-.

Stations:  Jacksonville Muni Aprt, 18 Oct 1942 (air echelon operated from Langley Field, VA, 3 Jun-3 Jul 1943 and from Drew Field, FL, Jul 1943); Batista Field, Cuba, 25 Jul 1943; Jacksonville AAFld, FL, c. 1 Oct 1943; Wendover Field, UT, 17 Oct-2 Nov 1943. Dalhart AAFld, TX, 1 Apr 1944; Fairmont AAFld, NE, 15 Aug 1944-7 Mar 1945 (air echelon operated from Boringuen Field, Puerto Rico, c. 9-25 Jan 1945); Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-15 Apr 1946. Hill Field, (later, AFB), UT, 1 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949. Nha Trang AB, South Vietnam, 15 Mar 1968-31 Oct 1970. Eglin Air Force Aux Field #9 (Hurlburt Field), FL, 1 Oct 1992-.

Commanders:  Maj Albert J. Wheeler, 18 Oct 1942; Maj Frederick M. O'Neill, 9 Feb 1943-unkn (at least through Sep 1943). None (unmanned), 1 Apr-10 Jul 1944; Maj William A. Garland, 11 Jul 1944; Lt Col Richard W. Kline, 1 Mar 1945- c. 27 Feb 1946; none (unmanned), c. 28 Feb-15 Apr 1946. Unkn, 1 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949. Lt Col Dow A. Rogers Jr., 15 Mar 1968; Lt Col Thomas F. Hines, 29 Apr 1968; Lt Col Russell A. Bunn, 4 Sep 1968; Lt Col John R. Dummer, 27 Mar 1969; Lt Col John F. Newell Jr., 5 Aug 1969; Lt Col Leo W. Tubay, 23 Feb-31 Oct 1970. Lt Col William E. Saier, 1 Oct 1992; Lt Col Charles R. Lovett, 30 Jun 1994; Lt Col Clarence E. Glausier III, 24 May 1996; Lt Col Steven K. Weart, 17 Jul 1998; Lt Col David H. Sammons Jr., 1 Jun 2000; Lt Col Frank E. Fields, 4 Jun 2002; Lt Col Robert Toth, 1 Jun 2004; Lt Col Tony D. Baurenfiend, 5 Jul 2006; Lt Col Christopher J. Ireland, 22 May 2008; Lt Col David W. Diehl, 3 Jun 2009; Lt Col Patrick Wolfe, 27 Jul 2010-.

Aircraft:  O-47, 1942; B-25, 1942-1943; B-34, 1942-1943; B-24, 1943. B-17, 1944-1945; B-29, 1944-1946. C-130, 1968-1970. MC-130, 1992-.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols, Oct 1942-Sep 1943. Combat in Western Pacific, 16 Jun-14 Aug 1945. Combat and combat rescue in Southeast Asia, 15 Mar 1968-31 Oct 1970. Conducted day and night infiltration/exfiltration, resupply, and reconnaissance missions into unfriendly territory, 1993-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 29 Jul-6 Aug 1945. Presidential Unit Citations (Southeast Asia): 1 Jan 1966-15 Nov 1970; 21 Jun 1968-30 Jun 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 15 Mar-20 Jun 1968; 1 Jul-31 Oct 1970; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 1 Jul 2003-30 Jun 2005; 1 Sep 2006-30 Jun 2007. Gallant Unit Citation: 6 Oct 2001-30 May 2003. Meritorious Unit Award: 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2009. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1992-15 Apr 1994; 1 Jun 1995-31 May 1997; 1 Jul 1999-30 Jun 2001; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Sep 2004-31 Aug 2006. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 15 Mar 1968-31 Oct 1970.

Emblem (WWII):  On a medium blue sphere, marked with white lines of latitude and longitude, within border yellow orange, a red sword winged and hilted white, striking surface of sphere with point, in bomb burst impact mark at dexter base, proper, and casting drop shadow on surface of sphere between five, like bomb bursts arranged two to dexter and three to sinister, all surmounting a large, dark blue aerial bomb, trimmed white, nose to dexter base. (Approved 13 Apr 1945.)

Emblem (Current):  Azure gridlined as a globe Argent a dagger point to base Argent, hilt Or winged Silver Gray throughout above and between five flames of fire pilewise proper, all within a diminished bordure Yellow. Approved on 27 Nov 1992 (DFSC 94-01135); replaced emblem approved on 13 Apr 1945 (K 3259).

Emblem Significance:  Blue represents the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow signifies the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The globe reflects the worldwide scope of special operations. The winged dagger is symbolic of the squadron's ability to deliver precision operations anywhere and anytime. The flames allude to bomb blasts and recall the squadron's predecessor unit (15th Bombardment Squadron). They also signify the five theater commands to which the squadron provides support and point out the specialized nature of most special operations missions.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Aug 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Aug 2011.



Other Sites of Interest:  15th Special Operations Squadron (Hurlburt Field website)

Table of Contents



16th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 16th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946.

Assignments:  16th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-15 Apr 1946.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Apr 1944; Fairmont AAFld, Neb, 15 Aug 1944-7 Mar 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-15 Apr 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1944-1945; B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 16 Jun-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 29 Jul-6 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  A large, gray, caricatured hippopotamus, winged light yellow orange, wearing a brown fatigue cap, and holding a large, brown and yellow aerial bomb under the forelegs, while running toward dexter, in front of and around a large blue sphere marked with black land areas and encircled by a yellow and brown ribbon. (Approved 3 Aug 1945.)

Table of Contents



17th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 17 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated o 15 Apr 1946. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 17 Tactical Missile Squadron, which was constituted on 4 May 1955. Activated on 8 Sep 1955. Inactivated on 8 Jul 1958. Consolidated (1 Jan 1993) with the 3613 Combat Crew Training Squadron (Water), which was designated, and activated on 27 Jun 1971. Redesignated as: 17 Crew Training Squadron on 8 Jan 1993; 17 Training Squadron on 1 Apr 1994. Inactivated on 2 Jan 1997.

Assignments:  16 Bombardment Group, 1 Apr 1944-15 Apr 1946. Ninth Air Force, 8 Sep 1955; 588 Tactical Missile Group, 8 Jan 1957; Thirteenth Air Force, 1 Feb-8 Jul 1958. 363 Combat Crew Training Wing (later, 336 Crew Training Group; 336 Training Group), 27 Jun 1971-2 Jan 1997.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, TX, 1 Apr 1944; Fairmont AAFlc, NE, 15 Aug 1944-7 Mar 1945; Northwest Fld, Guam, 15 Apor 1945-15 Apr 1946. Orlando AFB, FL, 8 Sep 1955-2 Feb 1958; Tainan AB, Taiwan, 6 Feb-8 Jul 1958. Homestead AFB, FL, 27 Jun 1971; Tyndall AFB, FL, 1 Nov 1992; Pensacola NAS, FL, 17 Jun 1994-2 Jan 1997.

Aircraft & Missiles:  B-17, 1944-1945; B-29, 1944-1946. T-33, 1956-1958; Matador, 1956-1958.

Operations:  Combat in western Pacific, 16 Jun-14 Aug 1945. Operated tactical ground-launched missiles in Florida and Taiwan, 1956-1958. Training aircrews to survive over-water ejection/bailout situations.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 29 Jul-6 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan-31 Dec 1972; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1974; 1 Jan 1978-30 Apr 1979; 1 May 1982-30 Apr 1984; 1 May 1984-30 Apr 1986; 1 May 1986-30 Sep 1987; 1 May 1987-30 Apr 1988; 1 May 1988-30 Apr 1989; 1 May 1989-30 Apr 1990; 1 May 1990-30 Apr 1991; 1 Jul 1991-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995.

Emblem (WWII):  On a grayed emerald green disc, border gray, edged red, a silhouette, light green aerial bomb bendwise, surmounted by a white sword, winged gold, hilt, pommel, and guard of the last, set with a square red jewel at the guard, all between gray speed lines arched toward rear. (Approved 30 Jun 1945.)

Emblem (post-WWII):  Approved on 11 Jun 1956 (17 Tactical Missile Squadron); 3 Jul 1972 (3613 Combat Crew Training Squadron).



Other Sites of Interest:  66th Training Squadron Det. 2

Table of Contents



24th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
551st Air Engineering Sq
552nd Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



331st Bombardment Group


(Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (331st Air Expeditionary Group)

Lineage:  Established as 331 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 1 Jul 1942. Activated on 6 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Redesignated as 331 Bombardment Group, Very Heavy, and activated, on 12 Jul 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946. Redesignated as 331 Air Expeditionary Group, and converted to provisional status, on 21 Oct 2005. Activated on 1 Sep 2008. Inactivated on 17 Sep 2008. Activated on 5 Apr 2010.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. Second Air Force, 7 Jul 1944; 315 Bombardment Wing, Very Heavy, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946. 1 Air and Space Expeditionary Task Force, 1-17 Sep 2008. 320 Air Expeditionary Wing, 5 Apr 2010-.

Squadrons:  355 Bombardment, 12 Jul 1944-15 Apr 1946. 356 Bombardment, 12 Jul 1944-15 Apr 1946. 357 Bombardment, 12 Jul 1944-15 Apr 1946. 461 Bombardment, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 462 Bombardment, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 463 Bombardment, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944. 464 Bombardment, 6 Jul 1942-1 Apr 1944.

Stations:  Salt Lake City AAB, UT, 6 Jul 1942; Casper AAFld, WY, 15 Sep 1942-1 Apr 1944. Dalhart AAFld, TX, 12 Jul 1944; McCook AAFld, NE, 14 Nov 1944-(ground echelon) 7 Apr 1945, (air echelon) May 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, (ground echelon) 12 May 1945, (air echelon) 2 Jun 1945-15 Apr 1946. Jackson, MS, 1 Sep 2008; Randolph AFB, TX, 11-17 Sep 2008. Andrews AFB, MD, 5 Apr 2010-.

Commanders:  None (not manned), 6 Jul-16 Sep 1942; 2 Lt William B. Moeser, 17 Sep 1942; Lt Col Frank P. Hunter Jr., 29 Sep 1942; Lt Col William Lewis Jr., 5 Mar 1943; Lt Col Marcus A. Mullen, 1 Feb-1 Apr 1944. None (not manned), 12-25 Jul 1944; Maj Willard W. Wilson, 26 Jul 1944; Lt Col Hadley V. Saehlenou, 30 Jul 1944; Col Hoyt L. Prindle, 19 Aug 1944; Col James N. Peyton, 24 Jan 1945; Lt Col Roland J. Barnick, Oct 1945-16 Feb 1946; none, (not manned), 17 Feb-15 Apr 1946.

Aircraft:  B-17, 1942-1943; B-24, 1943-1944. B-29, 1945-1946.

Operations:  331 Bombardment Group served as a replacement training unit, Sep 1942-Mar 1944. The group bombed Japanese-held Truk Island late in Jun 1945 on a practice mission. It flew its first combat mission on 9 Jul 1945 against an oil refinery in Yokkaichi, Japan. In a dozen missions before the war's end, the group operated mostly against the enemy's petroleum industry on Honshu. Received a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for the Jul 1945 bombing of the coal liquefaction plant at Ube, the Mitsubishi-Hayama petroleum complex at Kawasaki, and the oil refinery and storage facilities at Shimotsu; all missions were conducted despite bad weather, fighter attacks, and heavy flak. After the war, the group dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners of war in Japan.

Campaigns:  American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 22-29 Jul 1945.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Insigne:  Shield: Azure, three sea gulls volant or, on a chief of the last a thunderbolt gules, irradiated of the field. Motto: Imparido Pectore - With Undaunted Heart. (Approved 22 Dec 1942.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 7 Apr 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Apr 1946.



Other Sites of Interest:

331st Bombardment Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



355th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 355th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Jun 1942. Inactivated on 10 Apr 1944. Redesignated 355th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 27 Jun 1944. Activated on 7 Jul 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946.

Redesignated 355th Troop Carrier Squadron (Medium) on 16 May 1949. Activated in the reserve on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated 355th Troop Carrier Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1950. Ordered to active service on 1 Jun 1951. Inactivated on 8 Jun 1951. Redesignated 355th Troop Carrier Squadron (Medium on 26 May 1952. Activated in the reserve on 14 Jun 1952. Ordered to active service on 28 Oct 1962. Relieved from active duty on 28 Nov 1962. Redesignated 355th Tactical Airlift Sq on 1 Jul 1967, 355th Special Operations Sq on 25 Jan 1970, 355th Tactical Airlift Sq on 26 Jul 71, inactivated 1 Jul 1982.

Assignments:  302d Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1942-10 Apr 194. 331st Bombardment Group, 7 Jul 1944-15 Apr 1946. 302d Troop Carrier Group, 27 Jun 1949-8 Jun 1951. 302d Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jun 1952; 302d Troop Carrier Wing, 14 Apr 1959; 906th Troop Carrier Gp (later 906th Tactical Airlift Gp, 906th Special Operations Gp, 906th Tactical Airlift Gp) 11 Feb 1963-1 Sep 75, 302nd Tactical Airlift Wg -1 Apr 81, 906th Tactical Airlift Gp -1982.

Stations:  Geiger Field, Wash, 1 Jun 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 23 Jun 1942; Wendover Field, Utah, 30 Jul 1942; Pueblo AAB, Colo, 30 Sep 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Dec 1942; Clovis, NM, 29 Jan 1943; Langley Field, Va, 17 Dec 1943; Chatham AAFld, Ga, 9 Mar-10 Apr 1944. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 7 Jul 1944; McCook AAFld, Neb, 22 Nov 1944-8 Apr 194.5; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946. McChord AFB, Wash, 27 Jun 1949-8 Jun 1951. Clinton County AFB 14 Jun 1952-26 Jul 1971, Rickenbacker AFB (later ANGB) -1982. Jun 1952.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1942-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29,1945-1946. C-119, 1962.

Operations:  Operational and later replacement training unit, 1943-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 7 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 22-29 Jul 1945.

Emblem (355th TCS):  On an Air Force blue disc bordered white, three white parachutes palewise, carrying cargo, one large one between two smaller ones, all between four stars, one in dexter, one in chief, one in sinister, and one in base, all white; outlines and details Air Force blue throughout. Motto: On a white scroll edged and inscribed Air Force blue, YOU CALL, WE HAUL. (Approved 7 Jul 1961.)

Table of Contents



356th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 356 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Jun 1942. Inactivated on 10 Apr 1944. Redesignated 356 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy on 27 Jun 1944. Activated on 7 Jul 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946. Redesignated 356 Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium on 16 May 1949. Activated in the Reserve on 27 Jun 1949. Inactivated on 28 Jan 1950. Activated in the Reserve on 14 Jun 1952. Ordered to Active Service on 28 Oct 1962. Relieved from Active Duty on 28 Nov 1962. Redesignated: 356 Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Jul 1967; 356 Special Operations Squadron on 25 Jun 1970; 356 Tactical Airlift Squadron on 26 Jul 1971; 356 Airlift Squadron on 1 Feb 1992. Inactivated on 30 Jun 2006 per DAF/DPM 558s, 4 Nov 2006; SO #GB-0019, Hq AFRC, 13 Mar 2006. Activated in the Reserve on 9 Jan 2007 per DAF/A1M 763s, 11 Dec 2006; SO #GB-0008, Hq AFRC, 12 Dec 2006.

Assignments:  302 Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1942-10 Apr 1944. 331 Bombardment Group, 7 Jul 1944-15 Apr 1946. 302 Troop Carrier Group, 27 Jun 1949-28 Jan 1950. 302 Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jun 1952; 302 Troop Carrier Wing, 14 Apr 1959; 907 Troop Carrier (later, 907 Tactical Airlift; 907 Special Operations; 907 Tactical Airlift) Group, 11 Feb 1963; 302 Tactical Airlift Wing, 1 Sep 1975; 907 Tactical Airlift (later, 907 Airlift) Group, 1 Apr 1981; 907 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992; 445 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1994-30 Jun 2006. 433 Operations Group, 9 Jan 2007-.

Stations:  Geiger Field, WA, 1 Jun 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 23 Jun 1942; Wendover Field, UT, 30 Jul 1942; Pueblo AAB, CO, 30 Sep 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 1 Dec 1942; Clovis, NM, 29 Jan 1943; Langley Field, VA, 17 Dec 1943; Chatham AAFld, GA, 27 Jan-10 Apr 1944. Dalhart AAFld, TX, 7 Jul 1944; McCook AAFld, NE, 22 Nov 1944-8 Apr 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946. McChord AFB, WA, 27 Jun 1949-28 Jan 1950. Clinton County AFB, OH, 14 Jun 1952; Lockbourne (later, Rickenbacker) AFB (later ANGB), OH, 26 Jul 1971; Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, 1 Apr 1993-30 Jun 2006. Kelly Field Annex, Lackland AFB, TX, 9 Jan 2007-.

Commanders:  1st Lt Ronald V. Kramer, 21 Jun 1942; Capt Earl D. Carlson, 4 Jul 1942; Capt Walter Cross, 23 Jul 1942; Capt Benjamin M. Sheldon, 23 Sep 1942; Capt Horace S. Carswell, 23 Jan 1943; Capt Frank L. Smith, 20 May 1943; Capt Zane L. Abbott, 23 Aug 1943; unkn, 5 Mar-10 Apr 1944. Maj Thomas E. Whitson, by Aug 1944; Maj Joesph S. Grimm, by Oct 1944; Capt Louis C. Carr, by Jun 1945; Maj Andrew F. Gordon, 18 Jul 1945-unkn. Unkn, 27 Jun 1949-28 Jan 1950. Unkn, 14 Jun 1952-1955; Maj Darl C. Brickner, by Dec 1955; Maj Carl B. Yerian, by Dec 1959; Lt Col Richard M. Griswold, Nov 1961; Lt Col Carl B. Yerian, by Jun 1964; Lt Col Justin L. Townsley, by Dec 1965; Lt Col James K. Riddle, by Jun 1970; Lt Col David R. Laird, 21 Jun 1972; Lt Col Richard D. Evans, Jul 1975; Col John A. Hellwege, 17 Feb 1976; Lt Col Morris J. Turkelson, 22 Oct 1979; Lt Col Virgil P. Fryburger Jr., by Jun 1981; Lt Col James Maurer, by Feb 1982-unkn; Lt Col Earnest M. Conant Jr., by Oct 1984; Lt Col Jerry E. Trott, 23 Jul 1986; Lt Col Paul M. Lavin, 1 Dec 1991; Lt Col Kirk A. Baker, 18 Aug 1992; Lt Col Robert G. Shondel, 1 Oct 1994; Lt Col Keith D. Kries, 1 Dec 1999-unkn.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1942-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1945-1946. C-54, 1949-1950. C-46, 1952-1957; C-119, 1956-1973; C-123, 1972-1981; C-130, 1981-1992; C-141, 1992-2006; C-5, 2007-.

Operations:  Trained aircrews for bombardment missions, Jun 1942-Apr 1944; combat in the Western Pacific, c. 1 Jul-14 Aug 1945. Trained for C-54 airlift operations, 1949-1950 and for troop carrier missions, 1952-1967. Airlifted troops and their equipment during the Cuban missile crisis, Oct-Nov 1962. Since then, except for the period 1970-1971 when the squadron trained for special operations, it trained for and flew airlift missions, participating in exercises, supporting unit deployments, taking part in special assignment airlift missions, and rotating periodically to Panama in the 1970s and 1980s. Supported liberation of Kuwait in 1991. Converted from tactical to strategic aircraft in 1992 and provided strategic airlift to 30 Jun 2006. C-5 Galaxy training unit, 2007. Responsible for conducting several C-5 training courses whereby students earn their initial qualification.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific. Southwest Asia: Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 22-29 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jan 1977-31 Dec 1978; 1 Oct 1999-30 Sep 2001. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm, 14 Feb-11 Mar 1968.

Emblem (WWII):  On a light blue green disc, edged black, a caricatured "stripped down" duck yellow orange, in flight toward dexter, with red feet, black wing tips, and light magenta eyelids, wearing a brown aviator’s helmet, and having a knot tied in the neck, while holding a large black aerial bomb in the feet, and having a small, black cannon lighted at the fuse, proper, tied on back with brown string, beside six, small, black cannon balls resting on duck's back, all between a white cloud formation in chief and a like cloud formation in base. (Approved 21 Mar 1945.)

Emblem (Current):  Approved on 7 Jul 1969; modified on 29 Jul 1996.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 15 Jan 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Jun 2006.



Source:  Reserve Flying Squadron Inactivates (445 AW)

by Maj. Ted Theopolos
445th Airlift Wing

6/6/2006 - WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- The 356th Airlift Squadron furl and cased its squadron guidon during a small ceremony June 3 as the unit will inactivate on June 30. The ceremony was held this pasted drill weekend for reservists to participate and say good-bye.

"The squadron leaves a tremendous legacy," said Brig. Gen. Bruce Davis, 445th Airlift Wing commander. The squadron is a subordinate unit to the 445 AW.

Col. Jim Blackman, 445th Operations Group commander followed along the same lines as the wing commander. "Since 1942 the 356th AS has been in every operation since. It’s never been better than the last mission you’ve flown. It’s a great credit to the people in the squadron."

The reserve airlift squadron last mobilized mission for two and half years was transporting wounded, sick and injured patients on C-141 aircraft out of the Middle East and back to the states for Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The guidon was furl and cased by squadron commander Lt. Col. Steve Johnson, signifying the end of the unit’s mission which serves as a final symbol of closure for those past and present that were a part of this organization. "Thank you all from the bottom of my heart for your support," said the last squadron commander. "Thank you for your service to our country."

Although the 356 AS inactivated assigned pilots, loadmasters, flight engineers and support personnel will be transferred to the existing 89th Airlift Squadron to fly and operate the C-5 galaxy aircraft. The 89 AS is also assigned to the 445th Airlift Wing.

(NOTE:  Unit inactivated 6/30/2006 per DAF/DPM 558s, 4 Nov 2006; SO #GB-0019, Hq AFRC, 13 Mar 2006.)

Table of Contents



357th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 357 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 28 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Jun 1942. Inactivated on 10 Apr 1944. Redesignated 357 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy on 27 Jun 1944. Activated on 7 Jul 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946. Redesignated 357 Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium on 26 May 1952. Activated in the Reserve on 14 Jun 1952. Ordered to active duty on 28 Oct 1962. Relieved from active service on 28 Nov 1962. Redesignated: 357 Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Jul 1967; 357 Tactical Air Support Squadron on 25 Apr 1969; 357 Tactical Airlift Squadron on 15 Dec 1971; 357 Airlift Squadron on 1 Feb 1992.

Assignments:  302 Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1942-10 Apr 1944. 331 Bombardment Group, 7 Jul 1944-15 Apr 1946. 302 Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jun 1952; 445 Troop Carrier Group, 16 Nov 1957; 446 Troop Carrier Group, 25 Mar 1958; 446 Troop Carrier Wing, 14 Apr 1959; 302 Troop Carrier Wing, 8 May 1961; 908 Troop Carrier (later, 908 Tactical Airlift; 908 Tactical Air Support; 908 Tactical Airlift; 908 Airlift) Group, 11 Feb 1963; 908 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992-.

Stations:  Geiger Field, WA, 1 Jun 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 23 Jun 1942; Wendover Field, UT, 30 Jul 1942; Pueblo AAB, CO, 30 Sep 1942; Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 1 Dec 1942; Clovis, NM, 29 Jan 1943; Langley Field, VA, 17 Dec 1943; Chatham AAFld, GA, 9 Mar-10 Apr 1944. Dalhart AAFld, TX, 7 Jul 1944; McCook AAFld, NE, 22 Nov 1944-8 Apr 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946. Clinton County AFB, OH, 14 Jun 1952; Donaldson AFB, SC, 16 Nov 1957; New Orleans NAS, LA, 25 Mar 1958; Bates Field, AL, 8 May 1961; Brookley AFB, AL, 1 Oct 1964; Maxwell AFB, AL, 25 Apr 1969-.

Commanders:  1st Lt David E. Kunkel Jr., 21 Jun 1942; Capt Hugh R. Graff, unkn-c. May 1943; Capt Orville L. Buchanan, 1943; Maj Ralph E. Caldwell, Nov 1943; Capt Orville L. Buchanan, 22 Dec 1943-unkn. Maj Andrew F. Gordon, by Aug 1944; Lt Col Thaddeus L. Woltanski, 12 Oct 1944; Lt Col Gerald J. Crosson, Nov 1944-unkn. Unkn, 1952-c.1958; Lt Col Charles D. Burpee Jr., c.1958; Lt Col William A. Willis, 1961; Lt Col William G. McDowell, 1963; Lt Col Joe M. Wilson, c.1969-c.1971; Lt Col Joseph M. Davis, 1971; Maj Melvin Howe, by Mar 1972; Lt Col Prince A. Wiginton, by Sep 1972; Lt Col George D. Leadbetter, 1 Jul 1975; Lt Col Gordon W. Tyrrell, 22 Sep 1976; Lt Col David J. Turner, 31 Jul 1978; Lt Col John D. Edrington Jr., by Apr 1979; Lt Col Robert J. Osik, 9 Jan 1981; Lt Col Charles L. Burnett, 12 Feb 1982; Lt Col Hoyle B. Williams Jr., 1 Oct 1983; Lt Col Lee H. Richey, 3 Feb 1989; Lt Col Daniel J. Manix, 10 Oct 1990; Lt Col Wallace S. Drage, 1 Nov 1992; Lt Col Robert C. Martin, 3 Dec 1995-.

Aircraft:  B-24, 1942-1944. B-17, 1944; B-29, 1945-1946. C-46, 1952-1957; C-119, 1956-1969; U-3, 1969-1970; O-2, 1970-1971; C-7, 1971-1983; C-130, 1983-.

Operations:  Operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, Jul-Aug 1945. Since 1963, the squadron flew numerous, worldwide airlift missions, including missions in the Persian Gulf War and the Bosnian relief effort.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 22-29 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1972-15 Mar 1974; 1 Jan 1976-30 Nov 1977; 1 Feb 1980-31 Jan 1982; 1 Sep 1986-31 Aug 1988; 1 Sep 1991-31 Aug 1993.

Emblem (WWII):  Over and through a light turquoise blue disc, a caricatured waiter attired, proper, stalking toward dexter across a white cloud formation in base, with smug look of satisfaction on face, having a white napkin folded over the left forearm, and holding aloft with the right hand a large metal tray, supporting two, very large, red aerial bombs, banded white, resting on top, of four, varied-size aerial bombs of green, blue, yellow, and red, reading from left to right respectively, emitting wisps of vapor toward rear. (Approved 20 Nov 1945.)

Emblem (current):  Approved on 26 Jun 1986.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 22 Feb 2001.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Sep 1996

Supersedes Maurer Maurer (ed.), Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (Washington: USGPO, 1969).

Table of Contents



30th Photo Lab  (disbanded 8 Oct 48)

DAF/MO Ltr 325r, 21 May 92 Subj: Redesignation of the 1369th Audiovisual Squadron (Combat Camera) reconstitutes the 30th Photo Lab, Bomb Group, Very Heavy effective 1 May 92 and consolidates it with the active 1369th Audiovisual Squadron as the 30th Audiovisual Squadron. The squadron was active at least through 1995.

Table of Contents



73d Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
586th Air Engineering Sq
580th Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



501st Bombardment Group


(Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (501st Combat Support Wing)

Lineage:  Constituted as 501st Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 25 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Moved to Guam, Mar-Apr 1945, and assigned to Twentieth AF. Inactivated on Guam on 10 Jun 1946. Consolidated (11 Jan 1982) with 701 Tactical Missile Wing, which was established on 3 Aug 1956. Activated on 15 Sep 1956. Inactivated on 18 Jun 1958. Redesignated 501 Tactical Missile Wing on 11 Jan 1982. Activated on 1 Jul 1982. Inactivated on 31 May 1991. Redesignated 501 Combat Support Wing on 22 Mar 2005. Activated on 12 May 2005.

Assignments:  Second Air Force, 1 Jun 1944; XXI Bomber Command, 14 Apr 1945 (attached to 315 Bombardment Wing, 15 Apr-18 Jun 1945); 315 Bombardment Wing, (later, 315 Composite Wing), 19 Jun 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 15 May-10 Jun 1946. Twelfth Air Force, 15 Sep 1956; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Jan-18 Jun 1958. Third Air Force, 1 Jul 1982-31 May 1991. Third Air Force, 12 May 2005-.

Components

Groups:  585 Tactical Missile: 15 Sep 1956-18 Jun 1958. 586 Tactical Missile: 15 Sep 1956-18 Jun 1958. 587 Tactical Missile: 15 Sep 1956-18 Jun 1958.

Squadrons:  11 Tactical Missile: 1 Oct 1982-31 May 1991. 21 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1944-10 Jun 1946 (not operational, c. 21 May-10 Jun 1946). 41 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1944-10 Jun 1946 (not operational, c. 21 May-10 Jun 1946). 485 Bombardment: 1 Jun 1944-10 Jun 1946 (not operational, c. 21 May-10 Jun 1946).

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, TX, 1 Jun 1944; Harvard AAFld, NE, 22 Aug 1944; Fort Lawton, WA, 10-17 Mar 1945; Territory of Hawaii, 25-30 Mar 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-10 Jun 1946. Hahn AB, Germany, 15 Sep 1956-18 Jun 1958. RAF Greenham Common, England, 1 Jul 1982-31 May 1991. RAF Mildenhall, England, 12 May 2005-29 Sep 2007. RAF Alconbury, England, 30 Sep 2007-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 1-26 Jun 1944; Capt Harry L. Young, c. 27 Jun 1944; Lt Col Arch G. Campbell Jr., 6 Jul 1944; Col Boyd Hubbard Jr., 11 Aug 1944; Col Vincent M. Miles Jr., 15 Apr-20 May 1946; none (not manned), 21 May-10 Jun 1946. Lt Col Robert F. Zachmann, 15 Sep 1956; Col Theodore H. Runyon, 7 Jan 1957-18 Jun 1958. Col Robert M. Thompson, 1 Jul 1982; Col John Bacs, 25 Jan 1985; Col William E. Jones, 2 Jun 1987; Col Richard R. Riddick, 21 Jun 1988; Col Wendell S. Brande, 7 Jan-31 May 1991. Col Blake F. Lindner, 12 May 2005-.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1944-1946. Matador, 1956-1958. BGM-109, 1982-1990; unkn, 1991.

Operations:  Trained in the U.S. for heavy bombardment operations overseas, Jun 1944-Mar 1945. Combat in the Pacific, 19 Jun-14 Aug 1945. Flew first mission against Japanese fortifications on Truk Island, 19 Jun 1945. Began raiding Japan on 27 Jun and subsequently operated primarily against the enemy's petroleum industry on Honshu. Earned a Distinguished Unit Citation for attacks on the Maruzen Oil Refinery at Shimotsu, the Utsubo Oil Refinery at Yokkaichi, and the petroleum center at Kawasaki, in Jul 1945. Following the end of hostilities, dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners in Japan, China, Korea, and Manchuria. Not operational, c. 21 May-10 Jun 1946. Between Sep 1956 and Jun 1958, served in Germany as the first tactical missile wing in the U.S. Air Force. Between Jul 1982 and 1991, maintained readiness to strike enemy targets in Europe as first ground-launched cruise missile wing in Europe. Implementation of the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union eliminated the wing's mission and weapon system.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 6-13 Jul 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 15 Sep 1956-30 Apr 1958; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Jul 1987-31 May 1989; 1 Jun 1989-31 May 1991.

Emblem:  Approved on 27 Jul 2004.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 20 May 2005.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 12 May 2005.



Other Sites of Interest:

501st Combat Support Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



21st Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 21st Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 10 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 10 Jun 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 21st Tactical Air Support Sq as the 21st Tactical Air Support Sq.

Assignments:  16th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 50lst Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1944-10 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Jun 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 23 Aug 1944-7 Mar 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-10 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Apparently not manned, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, 16 Jun-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 6-13 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



41st Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 41st Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 10 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 10 Jun 1946. Activated in the reserve on 12 Ju1 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 41st Air Refueling Sq as the 41st Air Refueling Sq.

Assignments:  6th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 501st Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1944-10 Jun 1946. 448th Bombardment Group, 12 Jul 1947-27 Jun 1949.

Stations:  Dalhart AAFLD, Tex, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Jun 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 23 Aug 1944-7 Mar 195; Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-10 Jun 1946. Long Beach Mun Aprt, Calif, 12 Jul 1947-27 Jun 1949.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 16 Jun-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 6-13 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  On a disc, orange in base, shaded up to sky blue, within an ultramarine blue border, a large, gray elephant with white tusks, running toward dexter, and holding aloft in the trunk a very large, red aerial bomb, in front of white, cirrus cloud formations, edged light turquoise blue, and marked red violet on under side, all leaving white vapor trails to rear. (Approved 17 Apr 1945.)

Table of Contents



485th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 73d Aero Squadron on 14 Aug 1917. Redesignated 485th Aero Squadron on 1 Feb 1918. Demobilized on 20 May 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1936) with 485th Bombardment Squadron which was constituted and allotted to the reserve on 31 Mar 1924. Activated, date unkn [personnel assigned, Sep 1925]. Disbanded on 31 May 1942. Reconstituted and consolidated (21 Apr 1944) with 485th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) which was constituted on 28 Feb 1944. Activated on 11 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 10 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 10 Jun 1946.

Assignments:  Unkn, 14 Aug 1917-Mar 1918; Air Service Production Center No. 2, Mar 1918; Air Service Spares Depot, Sep 1918-Jan 1919; unkn, Jan- 20 May 1919. Fifth Corps Area, [1925(?)-31 May 1942]. 505th Bombardment Group, 11 Mar-10 May 1944. 501st Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1944-10 Jun 1946.

Stations:  Kelly Field, Tex, 14 Aug 1917; Camp Morrison, Va, 21 Dec 1917-4 Mar 1918; Romorantin, France, 25 Mar 1918 (detachment operated from St Nazaire to 3 Apr 1918; unit from Gievres, 17 May-9 Jun 1918; detachment from Chatenay-sur-Seine from 11 Sep 1918); Chatenay-sur-Seine, France, 21 Sep 1918; Bordeaux, France, c. 1 Feb 1919-unkn; Mitchel Field, NY, c. 2-20 May 1919. Dayton, Ohio, [1925 (?)- 31 May 1942 (?)]. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 11 Mar 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 12 Mar-10 May 1944. Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 1 Jun 1944; Harvard AAFld, Neb, 23 Aug 1944-7 Mar 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 14 Apr 1945-10 Jun 1946.

Aircraft:  B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Constructed and maintained facilities (in Zone of Advance after Sep 1918), Mar-c. Dec 1918. Combat in Western Pacific, 23 Jun-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  Theater of Operations.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 6-13 Jul 1945.

Emblem:  On a grayed, dark blue green disc, flecked with gray clouds in base and three, yellow, five-point stars at chief, sinister fess, and base points, within a black border, a caricatured, vari-colored bird in reverse flight, wearing a radio headset and peering into a radar scope while adjusting dials on set with right foot, and holding a red, blue and yellow aerial bomb in the claws of the left foot, all emitting speed lines toward dexter. (Approved 26 Jun 1945.)

Table of Contents



75th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
587th Air Engineering Sq
581st Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



502nd Bombardment Group


(Courtesy of Mr. Scott Burris.
Used with permission.)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 502d Bombardment Group (Very Heavy) on 25 May 1944 Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Trained for combat with B-29's. Moved to Guam, Apr-Jun 1945, and assigned to Twentieth AF. Entered combat on 30 Jun 1945 when the group bombed enemy installations on Rota. Bombed Japanese-held Truk early in Jun 1945. Flew its first mission against the Japanese home islands on 15 Jul 1945, and afterward operated principally against the enemy's petroleum industry. Awarded a DUC for attacks on the coal liquefaction plant at Ube, the tank farm at Amagasaki and the Nippon oil refinery at Tsuchizaki in Aug 1945. After the war, dropped food and supplies to Allied prisoners in Japan and participated in several show-of-force missions over Japan. Inactivated on Guam on is Apr 1946.

Squadrons:  402d: 1944-1946. 411th: 1944-1946. 430th: 1944-1946.

Stations:  Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Jun 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 5 Jun 1944; Grand Island AAFld, Neb, 26 Sep 1944-7 Apr 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946.

Commanders:  Lt Col Estley R Farley, 9 Jul 1944; Lt Col Robert C McBride, 1 Aug 1944; Col Kenneth O Sanborn, 6 Oct 1944-15 Apr 1946.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 5-15 Aug 1945.

Insigne:  None.



Other Sites of Interest:

502nd Bombardment Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



402nd Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 12th Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 402d Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1942; 402d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 10 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946. Consolidated 19 Sep 1985 with the 702nd Tactical Air Support Sq as the 702nd Tactical Air Support Sq.

Assignments:  39th Bombardment Group, attached on 15 Jan 1941, and assigned 25 Feb 194-1 Apr 1944. 39th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 502d Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1944-15 Apr 1946.

Stations:  Ft Douglas, Utah, 15 Jan 1941; Geiger Field, Wash, 2 Jul 1941; Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 5 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. Smoky Hill AAFld, Kan, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Jun 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 5 Jun 1944; Grand Island AAFld, Neb, 26 Sep 1944-7 Apr 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946.

Aircraft:  B-25, 1941; B-17, 1941-1942; B-24, 1942-1944. B-29, 1944-1946.

Operations:  Antisubmarine patrols, Dec 1941-Jan 1942. Operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, 30 Jun-15 Aug. 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 5-15 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  On a disc divided per fess wavy debased blue and white three gold airplanes, radiating from the middle base. (Approved 23 Oct 1941.)

Table of Contents



411th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  OOrganized as 16 Aero Squadron, c. 15 May 1917. Redesignated 21 Aero Squadron on 13 Jun 1917. Demobilized on 14 Apr 1919. Reconstituted, and redesignated 21 Observation Squadron, on 24 Mar 1923. Disbanded on 1 Oct 1933. Reconstituted, and consolidated (2 Dec 1936) with 21 Reconnaissance Squadron which was constituted as 21 Observation Squadron (Long Range, Amphibian), and activated, on 1 Mar 1935. Redesignated: 21 Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 Sep 1936; 21 Reconnaissance Squadron (Long Range) on 6 Dec 1939; 21 Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 411 Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1942; 411 Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1944. Activated on 1 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 10 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with 911 Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, which was constituted on 28 May 1958. Activated on 1 Dec 1958. Redesignated 911 Air Refueling Squadron on 1 Jul 1992. .Inactivated 30 Jun 2007 per DAF/A1M 786s, 23 Feb 2007; SO#GAA1-15, Hq AMC, 5 Mar 2007. Activated 12 Apr 2008 per DAF/A1M 951s, 9 Apr 2008; SO #GAA1-11, Hq AMC, 9 Apr 2008.

Assignments:  Unkn, 1917; Third Aviation Instruction Center, 1918-unkn. 2 (later, 2 Bombardment) Wing, 1 Mar 1935 (attached to 2 Bombardment Group from 1 Sep 1936; attached to 7 Naval District for operations, Sep 1939-Aug 1940); 3 Bombardment Wing, 15 Nov 1940 (attached to Newfoundland Base Command for operations, May-Aug 1941); 29 Bombardment Group, attached 5 Sep 1941, assigned 25 Feb 1942-1 Apr 1944. 29th Bombardment Group, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. 502 Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1944-15 Apr 1946 (attached to 6 Bombardment Group, Sep 1944-Jan 1945). 4241 Strategic Wing, 1 Dec 1958; 68 Bombardment Wing, 15 Apr 1963; 68 Air Refueling Group (later, 68 Air Refueling Wing), 30 Sep 1982; 4 Operations Group, 22 Apr 1991; 319 Operations Group, 29 Apr 1994-30 Jun 2007. 6 Operations Group, 12 Apr 2008-.

Stations:  Kelly Field, TX, May 1917; Scott Field, IL, 11 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 23 Dec-c. 4 Jan 1918; St Maxient, France, 23 Jan 1918; Issoudun, France, 21 Feb 1918; Bordeaux, France, c. Jan-c. 18 Mar 1919; Hazelhurst Field, NY, c. 5-14 Apr 1919. Bolling Field, DC, 1 Mar 1935; Langley Field, VA, 1 Sep 1936; Miami Muni Aprt, FL, 9 Sep 1939-22 Apr 1941; Newfoundland Aprt, Newfoundland, 1 May-30 Aug 1941; MacDill Field, FL, c. 3 Sep 1941; Gowen Field, ID, 25 Jun 1942-1 Apr 1944. Pratt AAFld, KS, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. Davis-Monthan Field, AZ, 1 Jun 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 5 Jun 1944; Grand Island AAFld, NE, 26 Sep 1944-7 Apr 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946. Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, 1 Dec 1958; Grand Forks AFB, ND, 29 Apr 1994-30 Jun 2007. Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, 12 Apr 2008-.

Commanders:  Sgt Tony Bruns, c. 15 May 1917; Maj Seth W. Cook, 16 Jun 1917; 2 Lt Edwin P. Doll, 21 Jul 1917; 1 Lt C. W. Connell, 27 Jul 1917, Maj C. K. Rhinehardt, 4 Aug 1917; 1 Lt C. B. Ammon, 7 Oct 1917; 1 Lt C. F. McIntosh, 10 Nov 1917; 1 Lt Gibson, 30 Dec 1917; 1 Lt Welles, 19 Feb 1918; Capt R. E. Bell, 19 Feb 1918; 1 Lt Frank L. Doty, 19 Feb 1918; Capt K. G. Pulliman Jr., c. Mar 1918-unkn; 1 Lt Frank L. Doty, unkn. Unkn, 1 Mar 1935-27 May 1940; Maj James M. Fitzmaurice, 28 May 1940; Maj James P. Hodges, 15 Jul 1940-unkn; Maj J. V. Crabb, 9 May 1941-unkn; Capt Baskin R. Lawrence Jr., 6 Apr 1942; Maj Archie J. Old, 30 May 1942; 1 Lt Francis E. Tiller, 1 Jul 1942; Capt Elliott Vandervantes, c. 27 Aug 1942; Maj Frank L. Davis, 10 Sep 1942; Capt Robert E. Smith c. 30 Jan 1943; Capt Louis M. Sowers, c. Aug 1943-unkn. Unkn, 1 Apr-10 May 1944. Capt William J. Barter, 12 Jul 1944; Capt Frank E. Boyd, c. Aug 1944; Maj Rudolph R. Seymour, c. Sep 1944-unkn. Lt Col Colin C. Hamilton, c. Mar 1959; Lt Col George F. Brodie, 15 Aug 1960; Lt Col Arnold W. Vincent, 27 Sep 1961; Lt Col Arthur G. Ray Jr., 18 Sep 1962; Lt Col Raleigh H. McQueen, 20 Jun 1964; Lt Col Leonard Reeves, 1 Nov 1964; Lt Col Robert L. Holladay, 1 Jun 1966; Lt Col Robert E. Rush, 21 Jun 1967; Lt Col Dempsey B. Clinard Jr., 16 Jul 1969; Lt Col Robert W. Dees, 15 Jan 1972; Lt Col Donald Bornkessel, Mar 1973; Lt Col James Murray, Aug 1974; Lt Col David L. Tawater, 24 Nov 1974; Lt Col Samuel G. Jewell, 20 Jul 1976; Lt Col Kenneth L. Barrett Jr., 27 Dec 1976; Lt Col Howard Kravetz, 1 Apr 1978; Lt Col Gregory A. Kuehner, 19 Mar 1980; Lt Col David Casperson, Feb 1981; Lt Col Charles Coolidge, Jun 1982; Lt Col Dennis Carpenter, Aug 1983; Lt Col Robert Burke, Mar 1985; Lt Col James G. Dickensheets Jr., 7 Oct 1985; Lt Col Charles E. Bailey, 7 Jul 1987; Lt Col Lawrence R. Keller, 23 Feb 1989; Lt Col Dennis D. Storck, 22 Apr 1991; Lt Col David R. Lefforge, 2 Jul 1992; Maj William R. Kunzweiler, 29 Apr 1994; Lt Col Timothy D. Gann, 7 Jul 1994; Lt Col Anthony L. H. Haney, 3 Jul 1996; Lt Col Stephen J. Apple, 1 Jun 1998; Lt Col Joseph T. Rohret, 15 Jun 1999; Lt Col James W. Harper, 9 Jan 2001; Lt Col Jon D. Klaus, 7 Jan 2003; Lt Col Murray R. Clark, 8 Jun 2004-.

Aircraft:  In addition to Nieuport 27 and Nieuport 80, apparently included Avro 504K, 1918. O-38, 1935-1936; OA-4, YOA-5, and B-10, 1936-1937; B-18, 1937-1941 (additionally included A-17, B-17, Y1OA-8, OA-9, and apparently OA-10, 1939-1941); B-17, 1939-1943; A-29, 1941-1942; B-24, 1943-1944. B-29, 1944-1946. KC-135, 1958-1972, 1973-1985; 1993-; KC-10, 1985-1992.

Operations:  Flying training unit, Feb-c. Dec 1918. Neutrality, sea search, and weather reconnaissance missions, Oct 1939-Aug 1940, Jun-Aug 1941. Antisubmarine patrols, Jan-Jun 1942. Operational and later replacement training unit, 1942-1944. Combat in Western Pacific, Jul-Aug 1945. Supported air refueling operations in Southeast Asia, May 1972-Jul 1973. Air refueling support for the invasion of Panama, Dec 1989 and for combat operations in Southwest Asia (SWA), Aug 1990-Mar 1992. Transferred to Air Mobility Command; moved without personnel or equipment to Grand Forks AFB, ND, 29 Apr 1994. During 1990s, supported operations in the Balkans and in Southwest Asia, and flights for the national leadership. After terrorists attacked the US on 11 Sep 2001, supported OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM (2001-) and IRAQI FREEDOM (2003-).

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War I Theater of Operations.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 5-15 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1965-30 Jun 1966; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1987; 26 Apr 1989-1 Apr 1991; 23 Apr 1991-31 May 1993, 1 Oct 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jun-31 Oct 1994; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1997; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2002; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jun 2005; 1 Jul 2005-30 Jun 2006; 1 Jul 2006-30 Jun 2007.

Emblem (WWII):  On an ultramarine blue circle within a gold border a representation of the Greek god Mercury (figure, proper; helmet, sandals and purse, brown; wings and scroll, white). (Approved 7 Aug 1937.)

Emblem (Current):  Per fess Celeste and Azure a barrulet Sable and overall an eagle stooping Gules, head and feet proper, all within a diminished bordure of the fourth. Approved on 16 Nov 1994; replaced emblems approved on 24 Jul 1987 (DFSC 87-11182) and on 7 Aug 1937 (10039 A.C.).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 17 Apr 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2004.

Supersedes published information contained in: Judy G. Endicott (ed.), USAF Active Flying, Space, and Missile Squadrons as of 1 October 1995 (Washington: USGPO, 1999).



Source:  911th Air Refueling Squadron [911th ARS]

The 911th Air Refueling Squadron traces its lineage to the 16th Aero Squadron, which was organized c. 15 May 1917 at Kelly Field, TX. It was redesignated as the 21st Aero Squadron on 13 June 1917. The squadron operated as a flying training unit from February-c. December 1918, flying Nieuport 27 and Nieuport 80, and also apparently the Avro 504K. The squadron deployed to France before returning home, to Hazelhurst Field, NY, and being demobilized on 14 April 1919.

The squadron was reconstituted, and redesignated 21st Observation Squadron, on 24 March 1923, before being disbanded on 1 October 1933. It was reconstituted, and consolidated (2 December 1936) with the 21st Reconnaissance Squadron which itself was constituted as the 21st Observation Squadron (Long Range, Amphibian), and activated, on 1 March 1935, at Bolling Field, DC, flying the O-38 aircraft. The squadron was assigned to the 2nd (later, 2nd Bombardment) Wing (though the squadron was attached to 2nd Bombardment Group from 1 September 1936; and to the 7th Naval District for operations, September 1939–August 1940).

The squadron was redesignated as the 21st Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 September 1936, upon its move to Langley Field, VA. 1936 also saw the unit transition to the OA–4, YOA–5, and B–10 aircraft.

Redesignated as the 21st Reconnaissance Squadron (Long Range) on 6 December 1939, the squadron relocated to Miami Municipal Airport on 9 September 1939 before being reassigned to the 3rd Bombardment Wing, on 15 November 1940 (but attached to Newfoundland Base Command for operations, where it deployed from 1 May–30 August 1941). A few days later, the squadron changed its designation to the 21st Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) on 20 November 1940.

The squadron relocated to McDill Field, Florida c. 3 September 1941, and on 5 September, became attached to the 29th Bombardment Group, to which it became assigned on 25 February 1942. It was redesignated as the 411th Bombardment Squadron (heavy) on 22 April 1942 and as the 411th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 28 March 1944. A few days later, on 1 April 1944, the squadron inactivated. That very same day, the squadron reactivated and became attached to the 29th Bombardment Group. It inactivated again on 10 May 1944 and reactivated on 1 June 1944, as part of the 502nd Bombardment Group. The squadron was briefly attached to the 6th Bombardment Group, from September 1944–January 1945. The squadron inactivated on 15 April 1946 at Northwest Field, Guam, where it had been stationed since 12 May 1945. Prior to that, the squadron had been stationed Pratt AAFld, KS (1 April–10 May 1944); Davis-Monthan Field, AZ (1 June 1944); Dalhart AAFld, TX (5 June 1944); and Grand Island AAFld, NE (26 September 1944–7 April 1945).

During the course of World War II, missions with which the squadron was tasked included: Neutrality, sea search, and weather reconnaissance missions (October 1939–August 1940, June–August 1941); Antisubmarine patrols(January–June 1942); Operational and later replacement training unit (1942–1944); and combat in the Western Pacific (July–August 1945). Aircraft flown at various points by the squadron from 1937 to 1941 comprised the B-18 (1937–1941); the A–17, B–17, Y1OA–8, OA–9, and apparently OA–10 (1939–1941); the B–17 (1939–1943); the A–29 (1941–1942); the B–24 (1943–1944) and the B–29 (1944–1946).

The squadron was consolidated on 19 September 1985, with the 911th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy, which was constituted on 28 May 1958 and activated on 1 December 1958 as a unit of the 4241st Strategic Wing at Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, and flying the KC-135.

The 911th was reassigned to the 68th Bombardment Wing, on 15 April 1963. The squadron supported air refueling operations in Southeast Asia, from May 1972–July 1973.

Reassigned to the 68th Air Refueling Group (later, 68th Air Refueling Wing), on 30 September 1982, the 911th transitioned to the KC-10 in 1985 and provided air refueling support for the invasion of Panama, in December 1989 and for combat operations in Southwest Asia, from August 1990–March 1992. The 911th became assigned to the 4th Operations Group, on 22 April 1991.

The 911th was redesignated as the 911th Air Refueling Squadron on 1 July 1992.

The 911 ARS relocated to Grand Forks AFB, ND, on 29 April 1994, when it became assigned to the 319th Air Refueling Wing's Operations Group, transitioning, in the process, back to the KC-135 Stratotanker. That same year, the 911th ARS took part, at Eglin AFB, FL, and Edwards AFB, CA, in efforts to complete USAF operational testing on B-2 and C-17 weapon systems among others. The squadron subsequently deployed to Mildenhall RAF Base, United Kingdom, in support of the European Tanker Task Force.

1995 saw the squadron deploy, during the months of January and February, to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch, off-loading in the process more than 20 million pounds of fuel to United States' Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and coalition forces aircraft. Thereafter, the 911th provided support, from March to June, to exercises conducted by Air Combat Command, Pacific Air Forces and Air Mobility Command, while still flying Atlantic and Pacific channel missions transporting cargo to and from Europe and the Pacific Rim. That same year, the squadron provided support of Operation Northern Viking, a multinational exercise testing NATO's ability to defend Naval Air Stations Keflavik, Iceland. That same summer, back in the United States, the 911th ARS supported a Maintainability and Availability Evaluation of the C-17 aircraft.

Following this, the 911th ARS simultaneously provided support to the European Tanker Task Force for Operation Phoenix Illusion (air bridge to Jordan), Operation Provide Comfort and Operation Deliberate Force. The squadron then deployed for two months to Panama for Operations Constant Vigil and Green Clover, in support of counter-drug operations there.

As 1998 ended and 1999 began, the 911th was deployed to Operation Northern Watch, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. As world tension increased, half of the squadron deployed to Moron Air Base, Spain, to support the Kosovo crisis in Operation Allied Force. The remaining half deployed to the desert to support Operation Southern Watch. After 1 month, this half redeployed to RAF Mildenhall to assist with Operation Allied Force.

The mission of the 911th Air Refueling Squadron is to organize, train, and equip KC-135R/T aircrew members as a combat force multiplier for rapid global mobilization, worldwide deployment, aerial refueling, and airlift operations for the US and its allies. The 911th ARS enables Global Engagement by maintaining an all-weather warfighting capability in support of conventional and special operations, contingency taskings, and the nation’s Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP).

Table of Contents



430th Bombardment Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 44th Aero Squadron on 30 Jun 1917. Redesignated: Squadron K, Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, in Oct 1918; Squadron P, Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, in Nov 1918. Demobilized on 30 Apr 1919. Reconstituted and consolidated (1924) with 44th Squadron which was authorized on 10 Jun 1922. Organized on 26 Jun 1922. Redesignated 44th Observation Squadron on 25 Jan 1923. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1927. Activated on 1 Apr 1931. Redesignated: 44th Reconnaissance Squadron on 1 Sep 1937; 44th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium Range) on 6 Dec 1939; 44th Reconnaissance Squadron (Heavy) on 20 Nov 1940; 430th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 22 Apr 1942; 430th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 28 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 10 May 1944. Activated on 1 Jun 1944. Inactivated on 15 Apr 1946.

Assignments:  Unkn, 1917-1919. Eighth Corps Area, 26 Jun 1922 (attached to Field Artillery School, c. Aug 1922); Air Corps Training Center, Jun-31 Jul 1927. 6th Composite Group, 1 Apr 1931 (attached to 16th Pursuit Group, c. Dec 1932); 16th Pursuit Group, assigned on 1 Sep 1937, and attached on 1 Feb 1940; 9th Bombardment Group, attached on 20 Nov 1940, and assigned 25 Feb 1942-10 May 1944. 502d Bombardment Group, 1 Jun 1944-15 Apr 1946.

Stations:  Camp Kelly, Tex, 30 Jun 1917; Wilbur Wright Field, Ohio, 25 Aug 1917-30 Apr 1919. Post Field, Okla, 26 Jun 1922; March Field, Calif, 25 Jun-31 Jul 1927. France Field, CZ, 1 Apr 1931; Albrook Field, CZ, 13 May 1932; Howard Field, CZ, 8 Jul-27 Oct 1941; Atkinson Field, British Guiana, 4 Nov 1941; Orlando AB, Fla, 31 Oct 1942; Brooksville AAFld, Fla, 6 Jan 1944; Orlando AB, Fla, 25 Feb 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 6 Mar-l0 May 1944. Davis-Monthan Field, Ariz, 1 Jun 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 5 Jun 1944; Grand Island AAFld, Neb, 26 Sep 1944-7 Apr 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 12 May 1945-15 Apr 1946.

Aircraft:  Apparently included S J-1, JN-4, and possibly DH-4 during period 1917-1919. Included DH-4 and evidently O-2 during period 1922-1927. In addition to O-19, 1932-1937, and B-l0, 1936-1937 included OA-4 during period 1931-1939; B-18, 1938-1942; B-17, 1943-1944; B-24, 1943-1944; B-25, 1943-1944; B-26, 1943-1944; c-73, 1943-1944. B-29,1944-1946.

Operations:  Evidently flying training unit during period 1917-1919. Good-will flight to Guatemala, 7-12 Feb 1938. Antisubmarine patrols, and reconnaissance of Vichy French fleet at Martinique, Dec 1941-Oct 1942. Unmanned, Nov 1942-Mar 1943. Tested equipment, Apr 1943-Feb 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, c. 1 Aug-15 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 5-15 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  An Indian in war bonnet in silhouette couped at the breast, arm raised, hand shading eyes, in blue on a yellow disc piped with red. (Approved 20 Jan 1925.)

Table of Contents



76th Air Service Group

Hq and Base Services Sq
588th Air Engineering Sq
582nd Air Material Sq

(See Air Svc Cmd Units)

Table of Contents



301st Fighter Wing

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (301st Fighter Wing)

Air Force History Index

Lineage:  Established as 301 Fighter Wing on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 20 Jan 1949. Redesignated as 301 Tactical Fighter Wing on 19 May 1972. Activated in the Reserve on 1 Jul 1972. Redesignated as 301 Fighter Wing on 1 Feb 1992.

Assignments:  First Air Force (attached to I Fighter Command), 15 Oct 1944; Twentieth Air Force, 21 May 1945 (attached to Army Air Forces, Pacific Ocean Area, 21 May 1945; Seventh Air Force, 1 Jun-14 Aug 1945); Eighth Air Force, 15 Aug 1945; 1 Air Division, 7 Jun 1946; Thirteenth Air Force, 1 Dec 1948-20 Jan 1949. Central Air Force Reserve Region, 1 Jul 1972; Tenth Air Force, 8 Oct 1976-.

Components

Groups:  44 Fighter, 1 Feb 2010-. 51 Fighter: 15 Oct 1946-18 Aug 1948. 301 Operations: 1 Aug 1992-. 318 Fighter: attached 21 May-Nov 1945. 413 Fighter: 28 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946. 414 Fighter: 28 Oct 1944-17 Apr 1945. 506 Tactical Fighter: 8 Jul 1972-25 Mar 1973. 507 Fighter (later 507 Tactical Fighter): 26 Jun 1945-27 May 1946; 25 Jul 1972-25 Mar 1973; 17 Oct 1975-1 Oct 1982. 508 Tactical Fighter: 1 Jan-25 Mar 1973; 17 Oct 1975-1 Oct 1982. 924 Tactical Fighter (later 924 Fighter): 1 Oct 1982-1 Oct 1994. 926 Fighter: 1 Aug 1992-1 Oct 1994. 945 Military Airlift: 1 Jul 1972-1 Jan 1973.

Squadrons:  418 Night Fighter: 20 Mar 1946-20 Feb 1947. 457 Tactical Fighter (later, 457 Fighter): 25 Mar 1973-1 Aug 1992. 465 Tactical Fighter: 25 Mar 1973-17 Oct 1975. 466 Tactical Fighter: 25 Mar 1973-17 Oct 1975. 548 Night Fighter: attached 8 Jun-14 Jul 1945.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Headquarters Squadron transferred from Seymour Johnson Field, Goldsboro, NC to Mitchel Field, NY 22 Oct 44; Mitchel Field, NY, 1 Nov 1944-30 May 1945; Fort Lawton Staging Area, Seattle, WA-6 Jun 45. Boarded ship 6 Jun 45 arriving Okinawa 24 Jul 45. Moved to Ie Shima, Ryukyus, 19 May 1945 (air echelon) and 31 Jul 1945 (ground echelon); Kadena, Okinawa, 29 Nov 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, c. 1 Apr 1946; Bisha Gawa, Okinawa, Nov 1946; Naha AAB (later, AB), Okinawa, 12 May 1947-20 Jan 1949. Carswell AFB (later, ARS), TX, 1 Jul 1972-.

Commanders:  Lt Col George H. Hollingsworth, 15 Oct 1944; Col Thayer S. Olds, 19 Oct 1944; Brig Gen Francis H. Griswold, 23 Aug 1945; Col Emmett F. Yost, 11 Sep 1945; Col Hanlon H. Van Auken, 1 Nov 1945; Col Mark E. Bradley, Jr., 4 Feb 1946; Col Loring F. Stetson, Jr., 30 Oct 1946; Brig Gen Robert C. Oliver, 1 Jan 1947; Col Loring F. Stetson, Jr., 24 Mar 1947; Col Joseph E. Barzynski, Jr., 21 Apr 1947; Brig Gen Hugo P. Rush, 1 May 1947-18 Aug 1948; none (not manned), 19 Aug 1948-20 Jan 1949. None (not manned), 1 Jul-31 Dec 1972; Brig Gen John E. Taylor, Jr., 1 Jan 1973; Brig Gen Roger P. Scheer, 15 May 1978; Col Daly R. Bales, Jr., 1 Apr 1983; Brig Gen Ralph D. Erwin, 16 May 1983; Brig Gen William H. Lawson, 30 Jun 1987; Brig Gen Bob L. Efferson, 15 Jul 1994; Brig Gen Thomas A. Dyches, 10 Mar 1999; Brig Gen Neil A. Rohan, 4 Jan 2003; Col Kevin E. Pottinger, 9 Jul 2006; Col Richard W. Scobee, 4 April 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1948; P-61, 1945-1948; P-80, 1947-1948. F-105, 1972-1982; F-4, 1981-1991; F-16, 1990-.

Operations:  Trained to escort heavy bombers, 1944-1945. From Ryukyus Islands in the western Pacific Ocean, air echelon commenced combat operations in Jun 1945. Escorted B-29 and B-24 bombers and attacked shipping and Japanese lines of communication. Provided air defense of Ryukyus in the immediate post-war period. Since 1972, trained in the Reserve for tactical air missions, including counter-air, interdiction, and close air support. Participated in many exercises, both within the United States and abroad. Elements of the wing deployed 12-27 Aug 1977 at Norvenich AB, Germany; 8-25 May 1979 at Gioia del Colle AB, Italy; 2-17 Oct 1982 at Cigli AB, Turkey; 12-26 May 1984 at Cold Lake, Canada; 4-19 May 1985 at Sivrihisar AB, Turkey; May 1989 and 25 Apr-23 May 1992 at NAS Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; 1 Dec 1993-2 Jan 1994 at Aviano AB, Italy; 25 Oct-17 Nov 1994 in Australia; 2 Jan-9 Mar 1996 at Aviano AB, Italy; and 24 May-Jun 1997 at Karup AS, Denmark. Deployed a security police flight to southwest Asia during Operation Desert Storm, Jan-Mar 1991. Supported Operation Deny Flight in the Balkans in the mid-1990s. In 1997, practiced counter-air operations against Allied MIG-29 aircraft over Germany and supported Allied naval exercises in the Baltic Sea. Elements participated in Operation Northern Watch in 1999-2000; participated in training exercises and deployments; Operation Noble Eagle after 11 Sep 2001; Operation Southern Watch in 2001, and Operation Iraqi Freedom after Mar 2003. Supported humanitarian relief operations, including those after the devastating Hurricane Katrina in Sep 2005.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Ryukyus.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 14 May 1992-13 May 1994; 30 Jun 1995-1 Jul 1997; 1 Oct 2000-30 Sep 2002; 1 Oct 2002-30 Sep 2004; 1Oct 2004-30 Sep 2006; 1 Oct 2006-30 Sep 2008.

Emblem (WWII):  None.

Emblem (Current):  Approved on 19 Dec 1978; modified on 20 Dec 2007.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, and Honors through 10 Aug 2010.



Other Sites of Interest:

301st Fighter Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



318th Fighter Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)

(On loan to 301st Fighter Group from 7th Fighter Command)


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 318th Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 2 Feb 1942. Redesignated 318th Fighter Group in May 1942. Activated in Hawaii on 15 Oct 1942. Assigned to Seventh AF. Trained and flew patrols, using P-39, P-40, and P-47 aircraft. Moved to the Marianas in Jun 1944. Supported ground forces on Saipan, Tinian, and Guam; attacked enemy airfields; flew protective patrols over US bases; and, using some P-38's acquired in Nov 1944, flew missions to the Volcano and Truk Islands to escort bombers and to attack Japanese bases. Moved to the Ryukyu Islands in Apr 1945. Used P-47's to bomb and strafe airfields, railroad bridges, and industrial plants in Japan, escort bombers to China, and provide air defense for US bases in the Ryukyus. Assigned to Eighth AF in Aug 1945, shortly after V-J Day. Moved to the US, Dec 1945-Jan 1946. Inactivated on 12 Jan 1946.

Redesignated 102d Fighter Group. Allotted to ANG (Mass) on 24 May 1946. Extended federal recognition on 22 Oct 1946. Redesignated 102d Fighter-Interceptor Group in Aug 1952.

Squadrons:  19th: 1943-1946. 44th: 1942-1943. 72d: 1942-1944. 73d: 1942-1946. 333d: 1943-1946.

Stations:  Hickam Field, TH, 15 Oct 1942; Bellows Field, TH, 9 Feb 1943; Saipan, Jun 1944; Ie Shima, c. 30 Apr 1945; Okinawa, Nov-Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, Wash, 11-12 Jan 1946.

Commanders:  Col Lorry N Tindal, 20 Oct 1942; Lt Col Charles B Stewart, 3 Mar 1943; Col Lewis M Sanders, 21 Aug 1943; Lt Col Harry C McAfee, 31 Jul 1945; Maj Glen H Kramer, 5 Oct 1945; Maj Burton M Woodward, 22 Oct 1945-unkn.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Insigne:  Shield: The upper part blue, with one small aircraft gray with white trail; the center part a portion of the globe showing the Northeastern portion of the Western Hemisphere in green and light blue with the North Pole in white and across it the front part of a gray aircraft: with white outline and cockpit, firing three black rockets, tail flashes red, trails white, all headed toward upper right; in lower part on a bank of white clouds two small black aircraft climbing vertically, all within a red border. Motto: Omnis Vir Tigris - Every Man a Tiger. (Approved 11 Jan 1954.)

Table of Contents



19th Fighter Squadron


14th Aero Sq
 


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


P-26A of the 19th Pursuit Squadron
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 14 Aero Squadron on 14 Jun 1917. Redesignated as 19 Aero Squadron on 26 Jun 1917. Demobilized on 14 Apr 1919. Reconstituted, and consolidated (20 Dec 1923) with 19 Squadron, which was authorized on 30 Aug 1921. Organized on 1 Oct 1921. Inactivated on 29 Jun 1922. Redesignated as 19 Pursuit Squadron on 25 Jan 1923. Activated on 1 May 1923. Redesignated as: 19 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 6 Dec 1939; 19 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 19 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 20 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 12 Jan 1946. Redesignated as 19 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 11 Dec 1981. Activated on 1 Apr 1982. Redesignated as 19 Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1993. Activated on 1 Jan 1994.

Assignments:  Unkn, 14 Jun 1917-Feb 1918; Seventh Aviation Instruction Center, Feb-Dec 1918; unkn, Jan-Apr 1919. Ninth Corps Area, 1 Oct 1921-29 Jun 1922. 17 Composite Group, 1 May 1923; 5 Composite Group, 15 Jan 1924; 18 Pursuit (later, 18 Fighter) Group, Jan 1927; 318 Fighter Group, 16 Mar 1943-12 Jan 1946. 363 Tactical Fighter (later, 363 Fighter) Wing, 1 Apr 1982; 363 Operations Group, 1 May 1992-31 Dec 1993. 3 Operations Group, 1 Jan 1994; 15 Operations Group, 1 Oct 2010-.

Stations:  Camp Kelly, TX, 14 Jun 1917; Wilbur Wright Field, OH, 1 Aug 1917; Garden City, NY, 31 Oct-3 Dec 1917; St Maxient, France, 1 Jan 1918; Clermont-Ferrand, France, 6 Feb 1918; Cenac-Bordeaux, France, c. 29 Dec 1918-c. 18 Mar 1919; Mitchel Field, NY, c. 5-14 Apr 1919. March Field, CA, 1 Oct 1921-29 Jun 1922. Wheeler Field, TH, 1 May 1923; Luke Field, TH, 15 Jan 1924; Wheeler Field, TH, 11 Jan 1927; Bellows Field, TH, 20 Feb 1942; Kualoa Field, TH, 22 May 1942; Bellows Field, TH, 20 Oct 1942; Barbers Point, TH, 9 Feb 1943; Kipapa Field, TH, 30 May 1943; Stanley Field, TH, 4 Sep 1943; Kualoa Field, TH, 26 Dec 1943; Bellows Field, TH, 18 Apr 1944; Saipan, 29 Jun 1944; Ie Shima, 30 Apr 1945; Okinawa, Nov-Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, WA, 11-12 Jan 1946. Shaw AFB, SC, 1 Apr 1982-31 Dec 1993. Elmendorf AFB, AK, 1 Jan 1994; Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, 1 Oct 2010-.

Commanders:  Capt Thomas J. Hanley Jr., 1 Jun 1917; Capt Norman J. Boots, 25 Jul 1917; 1 Lt Frank P. McCreery, 16 Oct 1917; Lt James E. Woolley, 1 Feb 1918; 1 Lt Joseph I. Dise, 16 Dec 1918-16 Apr 1919. Lt Chilton F. Wheeler, Sep 1923; Capt Hugh M. Elmendorf, 20 Oct 1923; Lt Claire L. Chennault, 16 Apr 1924; Lt Arthur G. Hamilton, Jun 1925-unkn; Capt Auby C. Strickland, by Mar 1932; Lt Robert C. Oliver, 11 Mar 1932; Lt Demas T. Craw, 4 Aug 1932-unkn; Lt Glenn O. Barcus, by 1934; Capt Ray H. Clark, unkn; Capt James E. Briggs, unkn; Capt William Council, unkn; Capt James A. Ellison, c. Jul 1937; Capt Roger M. Ramey, Jul 1939; Capt Clarence F. Hegg, Jan 1940; Lt Worley, 17 Mar 1941; Maj Joseph A. Morris, 22 Mar 1941; Maj T. A. Ahola, 14 Sep 1942; Maj Harry E. McAfee, 14 Jun 1943; Maj De Jack Williams, 28 Aug 1944-12 Jan 1946. Lt Col Joseph C. Rively, 1 Jul 1982; Lt Col Jeffrey S. Pilkington, 5 Jul 1984; Lt Col Wayne A. Ivan, Oct 1986; Lt Col Thomas E. Cedel, Sep 1988; Lt Col Dale E. Irving, Jul 1990; Lt Col Rocky P. Capozzi, Jul 1992; Lt Col Michael T. Cantwell, 25 Oct-31 Dec 1993. Lt Col John E. Vandendries Jr., 1 Jan-16 Jun 1994; Lt Col Rick E. Odegard, 17 Jun 1994; Lt Col Archie D. Rippeto, 21 Mar 1996; Lt Col William G. Reese III, 21 Dec 1997; Lt Col Tod D. Wolters, 5 Jan 1999; Lt Col Kenneth S. Wilsbach, 9 Jun 1999; Lt Col George M. Henkel, 31 May 2002; Lt Col Richard A. Hand, 6 Jul 2004; Lt Col Roger J. Witek, 15 Jul 2005; Lt Col Samuel S. Fedak, 15 Jul 2007; Lt Col David E. Graff, 21 Nov 2008; Lt Col Harvey F. Newton, 4 Oct 2010; Lt Col Robert Jackson, 15 Jun 2012-.

Aircraft:  Apparently included JN-6 and SE-5, 1921-1922. In addition to MB-3 and SE-5, included DH-4 and JN-6 during period 1923-1926; primarily PW-9 during period 1927-1930; primarily P-12 during period 1931-1937; in addition to P-26 and P-36, included A-12, BT-9, OA-3, and P-12 during period 1938-1941; P-40, 1941-1943; P-47, 1943-1945; P-38, 1944-1945. F-16, 1982-1993. F-15, 1994-2010; F-22, 2010-.

Operations:  Maintained aircraft, 1918. Stationed at Wheeler Fld, TH during surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 Dec 1941. Patroled over the Pacific and trained in Hawaii, Feb 1942-Apr 1944. Earned excellent combat record in Western Pacific, 22 Jun 1944-14 Aug 1945. Flew into Battle at Saipan from Navy escort carrier Natoma Bay, Jun 1944. From 1982-1993, trained for close ground support, air-to-air superiority and maintained a state of readiness to deploy worldwide. In Sep 1992, deployed to Southwest Asia to fly combat air patrol missions to enforce terms of UN cease fire agreement. On 1 Jan 1994, took over personnel, facilities and equipment of 43 FS at Elmendorf AFB, AK. Since 1994, mobilized, deployed, and employed fighter aircraft worldwide to accomplish air superiority in support of warfighting commanders. Received Hughes Trophy in recognition as the top air superiority squadron in the USAF for 2001. The unit also earned the 2009 Raytheon Trophy (formerly the Hughes Trophy) for 2009. The squadron moved from Alaska to Hawaii in Oct 2010 and began flying F-22s that year.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War I Theater of Operations.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-PacificTheater. Southwest Asia: Southwest Asia Ceasefire.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: [1 Apr 1982]-1 Jun 1983; 1 Jan 1994-31 Dec 1995; 1 Jan 1996-30 Sep 1998; 1 Jan 2000-31 Dec 2001; 1 Jan 2002-30 Sep 2003; 1 Oct 2003-30 Sep 2005; 1 Oct 2005-1 Nov 2006; 2 Nov 2006-1 Nov 2008; 2 Nov 2008-1 Nov 2009.

Emblem:  Or, a gamecock rising Gules, neck and tail Sable, garnished on the wing of the first, spurred Argent; a bordure Azure charged with nineteen mullets Argent, each wreathed of five plates diminished of the like, within a diminished bordure Sable. Approved on 12 Nov 1993 (DFSC 94-02413); replaced emblems approved on 10 Dec 1981 (DFSC 82-01580), and 20 Apr 1928 (K 4522).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Feb 2014.

Commanders through Jun 2012; Aircraft, and Operations through Dec 2011.



Other Sites of Interest:  19th Fighter Squadron (Elmendorf AFB website)

Table of Contents



73d Fighter Squadron


73d BS

73d BS

73d ERS

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 73 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 4 Oct 1941. Activated on 5 Oct 1941. Redesignated as 73 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 12 Jan 1946. Activated in the Reserve on 1 Aug 1947. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949. Redesignated as 73 Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron, Heavy, on 4 Jun 1952. Activated on 16 Jun 1952. Redesignated as 73 Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, on 1 Oct 1955. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 15 Apr 1963. Redesignated as 73 Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron, and converted to provisional status, on 22 Jul 2010.

Assignments:  18 Pursuit (later, 18 Fighter) Group, 5 Oct 1941; 318 Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1942-12 Jan 1946. 72 Reconnaissance Group, 1 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949. 72 Strategic Reconnaissance (later, 72 Bombardment) Wing, 16 Jun 1952; 4241 Strategic Wing, 5 Jan 1959-15 Apr 1963. Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate at any time on or after 22 Jul 2010.

Stations:  Wheeler Field TH, 5 Oct 1941; Bellows Field, TH, 22 May 1942; Midway, 17 Jun 1942; Kaneohe, TH, 26 Jan 1943; Mokuleia Field, TH, 5 May 1943; Bellows Field, TH, 8 Nov 1943; Saipan, c. 23 Jun 1944; Ie Shima, 30 Apr 1945; Okinawa, Nov-Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, WA, 11-12 Jan 1946. Hamilton Field, CA, 1 Aug 1947-27 Jun 1949. Ramey AFB, PR, 16 Jun 1952; Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, 5 Jan 1959-15 Apr 1963.

Commanders:  Maj John S. Evans, 1941; Maj Charles H. Chapin, 19 Apr 1943; Maj James M. Meng, 1 Nov 1943; Maj John J. Hussey Jr., 14 Apr 1944; Maj Wilmur M. McCown, 22 Jun 1945; Maj Lewis A. Nelson, 12 Aug 1945; Maj Frank A. Cronican, 4 Oct 1945; Capt Ernest J. Whittle Jr., 22 Oct 1945-unkn. Lt Col Schmid, unkn-1949. Maj R. O. Breeze, 1952; Lt Col Frederick D. Barry Jr., 1952; Lt Col Franklyn W. Haines, 15 Jun 1954; Lt Col Robert I. Langford, 2 Aug 1955; Lt Col Robert L. Jones, 16 Aug 1956; Lt Col George C. Player Jr., 1957; Lt Col William H. McVey, 26 Jun 1958; Capt Vernon C. McKenzie, 1 Sep 1958; Capt Ted C. Frey, Oct 1958; Capt Lyle B. Bordeaux, 5 Jan 1959; Maj William C. Selsor III, 23 Mar 1959; Lt Col Clarence J. Deaton, 20 Apr 1959; Lt Col Colin C. Hamilton, 15 Aug 1960; Lt Col Edgar S. Harris Jr., 11 Oct 1961-unkn.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1941-1943; P-26, 1941; P-47, 1943-1945; P-38, 1944-1945. RB-36, 1952-1958; B-52, 1959-1963.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific, Jan 1942-Apr 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, 24 Jun 1944-14 Aug 1945. Provided radar scope photography, 1952-1955. Converted to bombing mission in 1955. Conducted worldwide strategic bombardment training missions and provided nuclear deterrent, 1959-1963.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Oct 1957-1 Jun 1958.

Emblem:  On an Air Force blue disc edged white, a red stylized delta-winged aircraft, chevronwise throughout, edged white, emitting upward two white lightning bolts one to dexter chief, one to sinister chief; all above an atomic symbol of two white orbits encircling a red nucleus; in base four Air Force golden yellow stylized quail in flight upward in an arched formation; in chief a ring of seven white stars encircling three Air Force golden yellow stars, all four pointed. (Approved 6 Ju1 1962.)

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Sep 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Apr 1963.

Table of Contents



333d Fighter Squadron


Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 333d Fighter Squadron on 18 Aug 1942. Activated on 23 Aug 1942. Inactivated on 12 Jan 1946. Redesignated 131st Fighter Squadron, and allotted to ANG, on 24 May 1946.

Assignments:  18th Fighter Group, 23 Aug 1942; 318th Fighter Group, 11 Jan 1943-12 Jan 1946.

Stations:  Bellows Field, TH, 23 Aug 1942; Canton, 11 Sep 1942; Hilo, TH, 6 Apr 1943; Bellows Field, TH, 28 Jul 1943; Saipan, 6 Jul 1944; Ie Shima, 30 Apr 1945; Okinawa, Nov-Dec 1945; Ft Lewis, Wash, 11-12 Jan 1946.

Aircraft:  P-39, 1942-1944; P-47, 1944- 1945; P-38,1944-1945.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific, Sep 1942-Jul 1943. Replacement training, Jul 1943-June 1944. Combat in Western Pacific, 20 Jul 1944-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater; Antisubmarine, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None.



Source:  Philippe's Aviation Pages

The 131st Fighter Squadron (SE) was federally recognized at Barnes Field, Westfield, Mass, on February 24, 1947. The squadron traces its origins from the 333d FS constituted and activated at Bellows Field, HI, in August 1942. The squadron initially flew patrols in Hawaii, serving as a replacement training unit from July 1943 to June 1944. Equipped with P-47D/Ns, It flew combat sorties in the Western Pacific from July 1944 until VJ Day. The unit was inactivated at Ft Lewis, WA in January 1946. In May 1946, was reconstituted and redesignated the 131st FS and was allotted to the Massachusetts NG. The squadron was first equipped with P-47Ds until November 1951 when it converted to F-51Hs and was redesignated the 131st FIS. In the Spring of 1954, it converted to the F-94A/Bs. Three years later, received F-94Cs. Early 1958 saw the 131st converting to F-86Hs and redesignated 131st TFS on November 10, 1958. On October 1, 1961, the squadron was called to active duty as part of the Berlin Crisis call-up. Followed by a move to Phalsbourg AB, France in November. During August 1962, the 131st returned to state control at Barnes Field, MA. On October 1962, the unit reached group status with federal recognition of the 104th TFG. March 1964 saw the 131st converting to the F-84Fs followed by another conversion in 1971 to the F-100D/Fs. In July 1979, the unit received the A-10As to replace its old F-100s. Joined Air Combat Command in June 1992. Redesignated the 131st Fighter Squadron on October 1, 1995. The 104th Fighter Wing saw combat action over Bosnia-Herzegovina during Operation Deny Flight and Deliberate Force in 1995. In 1999, the unit deployed to Trapani AB, Italy in support of NATO's Operation Allied Force in Kosovo.

Table of Contents



413th Fighter Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (413th Flight Test Group)

Lineage:  Established as 413 Fighter Group, Single Engine on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated 413 Fighter-Day Group on 27 Oct 1954. Activated on 11 Nov 1954. Inactivated on 8 Oct 1957. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 413 Strategic Fighter Wing, which was established on 23 Mar 1953. Redesignated 413 Fighter-Day Wing on 26 Sep 1957. Activated on 8 Oct 1957. Redesignated 413 Tactical Fighter Wing on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 15 Mar 1959. Redesignated 413 Flight Test Group on 18 Jul 2003. Activated in the Reserve on 1 Oct 2003.

Assignments:  First Air Force, 15 Oct 1944; 301 Fighter Wing, 2 Nov 1944-15 Oct 1946. Ninth Air Force, 11 Nov 1954 (attached to 479 Fighter-Day Wing, 11 Nov 1954-7 Oct 1957); Eighteenth Air Force, 1 Oct 1957; 831 Air Division, 8 Oct 1957-15 Mar 1959. Twenty-Second Air Force, 1 Oct 2003-.

Components

Squadrons:  1: Fighter (later, 1 Fighter-Day; 1 Tactical Fighter): 15 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946; 11 Nov 1954-15 Mar 1959 (detached 27 Jun-c. 12 Nov 1958). 10 Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-. 21: Fighter (later, 21 Fighter-Day; 21 Tactical Fighter): 15 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946; 11 Nov 1954-15 Mar 1959 (detached 14-15 Mar 1959). 34: Fighter (later 34 Fighter-Day; 34 Tactical Fighter): 15 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946; 11 Nov 1954-15 Mar 1959. 339 Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-. 370Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-. 474: Fighter-Day (later, 474 Tactical Fighter): 8 Oct 1957-15 Mar 1959 (detached 11 Nov 1958-15 Mar 1959). 514 Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-.

Flights:  313 Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-. 415 Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-. 420 Flight Test: 1 Oct 2003-.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 9 Nov 1944-6 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 19 May 1945 (ground echelon), c. 15 Jun 1945 (air echelon); Kadena, Okinawa, Nov 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, 29 Jan-15 Oct 1946. George AFB, CA, 11 Nov 1954-15 Mar 1959. Robins AFB, GA, 1 Oct 2003-.

Commanders:  Lt Col George H. Hollingsworth, 15 Oct 1944; Col Harrison R. Thyng, 1 Nov 1944; Lt Col John B. Coleman, 14 Oct 1945; Col Loring F. Stetson Jr., c. Jun-15 Oct 1946. Col George Laven Jr., 11 Nov 1954; Lt Col Maurice G. Long, 4 Oct 1955; Col Gordon F. Blood, 16 Jan 1956; Col Robert W. Stephens, 13 Jul 1958-15 Mar 1959.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-86, 1954-1956; F-100, 1955-1959.

Operations:  Trained for very-long-range operations with P-47s. The air echelon left Bluethenthal Field in mid-Mar 1945. Flew combat missions from Saipan to the Truk Islands in May before joining the ground echelon on Ie Shima in mid-Jun. Initially served as part of Twentieth Air Force in the Pacific; reassigned to Eighth Air Force in mid-Aug 1945. Engaged in dive-bombing and strafing attacks on factories, radar stations, airfields, small ships, and other targets in Japan. Made several attacks on shipping and airfields in China during Jul. Flew its only escort mission on 8 Aug 1945 when it covered B-29s during a raid against Yawata, Japan. Served as part of the air defense and occupation force for the Ryukyu Islands after the war. Inactivated on Okinawa on 15 Oct 1946. Activated as part of Tactical Air Command in 1954. Trained to achieve and maintain combat readiness by participation in tactical exercises, firepower demonstrations, joint training with US Army and US Marine Corps units, and tactical evaluations. Provided augmentation of Sixteenth Air Force in Spain, through deployment of assigned squadrons on a rotational basis, 1958-1959.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  None

Emblem:  Argent, within a diminutive border per border of the like and azure a sheaf of broad swords points upward gules of the second, vert and or, all with hilts of the first. Motto: Siva. (Approved 16 Apr 1955.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Oct 2003.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 15 Mar 1959.



Other Sites of Interest:

413th Flight Test Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



1st Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 1st Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated 1st Fighter-Day Squadron on 26 Aug 1954. Activated on 11 Nov 1954. Redesignated 1st Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 15 Mar 1959. Redesignated 1st Tactical Fighter Training Squadron on 14 Oct 1983. Activated on 1 Jan 1984. Redesignated 1st Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated 15 Dec 2006.

Assignments:  413th Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946. 413th Fighter-Day Group, 11 Nov 1954; 413th Fighter-Day (later, 413th Tactical Fighter) Wing, 8 Oct 1957-15 Mar 1959 (attached to Sixteenth Air Force, 27 Jun-c. 12 Nov 1958). 325th Tactical Training Wing, 1 Jan 1984; 325th Operations Group, 1 Sep 1991-15 Dec 2006.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 9 Nov 1944-7 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 19 May 1945; Kadena AB, Okinawa, c. 17 Nov 1945; Yontan AB, Okinawa, 29 Jan-15 Oct 1946. George AFB, CA, 11 Nov 1954-15 Mar 1959 (deployed at Moron AB, Spain, 27 Jun-c. 12 Nov 1958). Tyndall AFB, FL, 1 Jan 1984-15 Dec 2006.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-86, 1954-1956; F-100, 1956-1959. F-15, 1984-2006.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 20 May-14 Aug 1945. Air superiority and dissimilar air combat training, 1984-. NORAD alert duty, 1988-1990. F-15 flight training, 1991-2006.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: [1 Jan 1984]-31 May 1985.

Emblem:  On a Yellow disc, edged Blue, a stylized representation of one of the Furies (mythical Greek goddesses of vengeance), wearing a Black form-fitting gown, and cape trimmed on under side Red, and Red boots, seated on a large, White cloud formation in base, facing toward sinister, and holding a skull, proper, in the right hand. Originally approved on 1 Mar 1945 (K 8809) and most recently modified and reinstated in 1994; replaced emblem approved for use May 1984-Jan 1986 and Apr 1986-c. Jun 1994.



Other Sites of Interest:

1st Fighter Squadron (Tyndall AFB website)

NOTE:  1st FS inactivated 15 Dec 2006 (Tyndall AFB site)

Table of Contents



21st Fighter Squadron



Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 21 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated as 21 Fighter-Day Squadron on 26 Aug 1954. Activated on 11 Nov 1954. Redesignated as 21 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 15 Mar 1959. Redesignated as 21 Tactical Fighter Training Squadron on 27 Oct 1972. Activated on 1 Dec 1972. Redesignated: 21 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 9 Oct 1980; 21 Tactical Fighter Training Squadron on 1 Jul 1983. Inactivated on 28 Jun 1991. Redesignated as 21 Fighter Squadron, and activated, on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1993. Activated on 8 Aug 1996.

Assignments:  413 Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946. 413 Fighter-Day Group, 11 Nov 1954; 413 Fighter-Day (later, 413 Tactical Fighter) Wing, 8 Oct 1957-15 Mar 1959 (attached to Sixteenth Air Force, 14-15 Mar 1959). 35 Tactical Fighter (later, 35 Tactical Training; 35 Tactical Fighter) Wing, 1 Dec 1972-28 Jun 1991. 507 Air Control Wing, 1 Nov 1991; 363 Operations Group, 1 May 1992-31 Dec 1993. 56 Operations Group, 8 Aug 1996-.

Stations:  Seymour-Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 9 Nov 1944-7 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 19 May 1945; Kadena, Okinawa, 21 Nov 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, 29 Jan-15 Oct 1946. George AFB, CA, 11 Nov 1954-10 Mar 1959; Moron AB, Spain, 11-15 Mar 1959. George AFB, CA, 1 Dec 1972-28 Jun 1991. Shaw AFB, SC, 1 Nov 1991-31 Dec 1993. Luke AFB, AZ, 8 Aug 1996-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 15 Oct 1944-11 Oct 1945; Lt Col William B. Whisonant, 12 Oct 1945; Capt Francis J. Vetort, 13 Oct 1945; 1 Lt Robert W. Faas, 1 Apr 1946-unkn; Capt Samuel H. Henton, unkn-26 Sep 1946; Capt Louis A. Guin, 26 Sep 1946-unkn. Maj Stephen L. Bettinger, 11 Nov 1954-unkn. Col Roger L. Sprague, 1 Dec 1972; Lt Col William E. Whitten, c. 1 Mar 1973; Lt Col D. L. Wagner, 17 Apr 1975; Lt Col Paul Marsh, 2 May 1977; Lt Col Wallace L. Mekkers, 5 Jul 1979; unkn, c. 1980-11 Nov 1987; Lt Col Dick E. Willis, 12 Nov 1987; Lt Col Mark D. Gilson, 26 Jul 1989; Lt Col David M. McLaughlin, 9 Nov 1990-28 Jun 1991. Lt Col Bobby G. Smith, 1 Nov 1991; Lt Col John A. Neubauer, 1 Oct-31 Dec 1993. Lt Col James R. Mitchell, 8 Aug 1996; Lt Col Dean A. Profitt III, 2 Apr 1998; Lt Col Walter E. Grace III, 18 Jun 1999; Lt Col Mark J. Warner, 19 Dec 2000; Lt Col Walter G. Farrar III, 18 Jul 2002; Lt Col Christopher Roeder, 4 Dec 2003; Lt Col Thomas G. Abbot, 8 Jun 2005; Lt Col Dennis J. Malfer, 28 Apr 2006; Lt Col James G. Sturgeon, 20 Sep 2007-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-86, 1954-1956; F-100, 1956-1959. F-4, 1972-1981; F-16, 1981-1991. OA-10, 1991-1993. F-16, 1996-.

Operations:  Combat in western Pacific Ocean, 20 May-14 Aug 1945. Among occupation forces in Okinawa, 1945-1946. Conducted tactical exercises, firepower demonstrations, and joint training missions, 1954-1959. Between 1972 and 1981, flew "wild weasel" radar detection and suppression practice missions with F-4s. Converted to F-16s for tactical exercises and training, 1981-1991. Between Nov 1991 and Dec 1993, practiced forward air control missions. Provided continuation training for Taiwan Air Force (TAF) pilots in TAF-owned F-16 aircraft, Aug 1996-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 2 Feb 1976-31 Mar 1977; 1 Jun 1985-31 May 1987; 1 Mar 1990-28 Jun 1991; 1 Jan 1992-31 Dec 1993; 8 Aug 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2001-30 Jun 2003; 1 Jun 2003-30 Jun 2005; 1 Jul 2005-30 Jun 2006; 1 Jul 2006-30 Jun 2007; 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2008.

Emblem (WWII):  On a yellow disc, within a border equally divided red and white, a jagged, red lightning flash passing from chief to dexter fess, behind large, black head of panther, affronte, trimmed red and white, issuing from a grayed medium blue cloud formation in base, extending up and around sinister edge with small, grayed medium blue lightning flash issuing at sinister fess point. (Approved 5 Jan 1946.)

Emblem (current):  Approved on 18 March 2008.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 7 May 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Sep 2008.

Table of Contents



34th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 34th Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated 34th Fighter-Day Squadron on 26 Aug 1954. Activated on 11 Nov 1954. Redesignated 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 15 Mar 1959. Activated on 2 May 1966. Organized on 15 May 1966. Redesignated 34th Fighter Squadron on 1 Nov 1991. Inactivated 16 Jul 10 (DAF/A1M Ltr 208t, 16 Jun 10, ACC SO GB-111, 30 Jun 10).

Assignments:  413th Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1944-15 Oct 1946. 413th Fighter-Day Group, 11 Nov 1954 (attached to Ninth Air Force, 6 Jun-c. 13 Jul 1956); 413th Fighter-Day (later, 413th Tactical Fighter) Wing, 8 Oct 1957-15 Mar 1959. Pacific Air Forces, 2 May 1966; 41st Air Division, 15 May 1966 (attached to 388th Tactical Fighter Wing, 15 May 1966-); 347th Tactical Fighter Wing, 15 Jan 1968 (remained attached to 388th Tactical Fighter Wing to 14 Mar 1971); 388th Tactical Fighter (later, 388th Fighter) Wing, 15 Mar 1971; 388th Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-2010.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 9 Nov 1944-7 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 19 May 1945; Kadena AB, Okinawa, c. 17 Oct 1945; Yontan AB, Okinawa, 29 Jan-15 Oct 1946. George AFB, CA, 11 Nov 1954-15 Mar 1959 (deployed at Shaw AFB, SC, 6 Jun-c. 13 Jul 1956; Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico, 17-22 Jun 1957; Luke AFB, AZ, 13-26 Jul 1958). Korat RTAFB, Thailand, 15 May 1966-23 Dec 1975 (operated from Takhli RTAFB, Thailand, 1-27 Feb 1969); Hill AFB, UT, 23 Dec 1975-2010.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-86, 1954-1956; F-100, 1956-1959. F-105, 1966-1969; F-4, 1969-1974, 1974-1975, 1976-1979; F-16, 1979-2010.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 20 May-14 Aug 1945. Combat in Southeast Asia, by 1 Jul 1966-15 Aug 1973. Combat air cover for the evacuation of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and Saigon, Vietnam, Apr 1975. Air cover during the recovery of the SS Mayaguez and its crew, May 1975. F-16 replacement training unit for US and foreign pilots, 27 Sep 1979-1 Jul 1982. Contributed personnel and aircraft for attrition reserves in Southwest Asia at Torrejon AB, Spain, 18-27 Feb 1991. Deployed aircraft and personnel to Southwest Asia to ensure that Iraq complied with treaty terms, 13 Dec 1991-14 Jun 1992.

Honors

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive. Vietnam: Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsoon; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII; Vietnam Ceasefire.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation: Southeast Asia, 10 Mar -1 May 1967. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 29-30 Jun 1966; 1 Jul 1966-30 Jun 1967; 1 Jul 1967-30 Jun 1968; 1 Jul 1968-15 Sep 1969; 15 Mar-20 May 1971; 18 Dec 1972-15 Aug 1973; 15 Oct 1974-12 May 1975; 13-15 May 1975. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 15 May 1966-28 Jan 1973.

Emblem:  On a Black disc, border Red, a jagged, Red lightning flash across chief, surmounted by a White ram's head caboshed, eyes and nostrils Red, snorting a cloud of White vapor from each nostril, and having a ring in the nose in the shape of the ace of spades, with two, Red chain segments affixed thereto. Approved on 9 Nov 1945 (151885 A.C.).

Table of Contents



414th Fighter Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947-1977, Charles A. Ravenstein, AFHRC, 1984  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (414th Fighter Group)

Lineage:  Established as 414 Fighter Group, Single Engine on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1946. Redesignated as 414 Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 20 Jun 1955. Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Inactivated on 31 Dec 1969. Redesignated as: 414 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985; 414 Fighter Group on 22 Jun 2010. Activated in the Reserve on 15 Jul 2010.

Assignments:  FFirst Air Force, 15 Oct 1944; Unkn, 1 Jun-4 Aug 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 5 Aug 1945; Thirteenth Air Force, 23 Dec 1945; XIII Fighter Command, 1 Jan-30 Sep 1946. 27 Air Division, 18 Aug 1955; Los Angeles Air Defense Sector, 1 Oct 1959; 27 Air Division, 1 Apr 1966; Tenth Air Force, 19 Nov-31 Dec 1969. 482 Fighter Wing, 15 Jul 2010; 944 Fighter Wing, 1 Oct 2012-.

Squadrons:  66 Fighter-Interceptor: 1 Dec 1957-8 Jan 1958. 307 Fighter: 14 Jul 2010-. 413 Fighter: 15 Oct 1944-30 Sep 1946. 437 Fighter (later, 437 Fighter-Interceptor): 15 Oct 1944-30 Sep 1946; 18 Aug 1955-30 Sep 1968. 456 Fighter: 15 Oct 1944-25 Aug 1946. 460 Fighter-Interceptor: 30 Sep 1968-1 Dec 1969.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Selfridge Field, MI, 15 Nov 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 19 Mar-11 May 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 7 Jul 1945; Clark Field, Luzon, 23 Dec 1945-30 Sep 1946. Oxnard AFB, CA, 18 Aug 1955-31 Dec 1969. Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, 15 Jul 2010-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 15-27 Oct 1944; Lt Col Robert C. Bagby, 28 Oct 1944; Col Henry G. Thorne Jr., 6 Dec 1944-unkn. Lt Col Edwin F. Carey Jr., 1955; Col Dyson W. Cox, by Jan 1958; Col Lee R. Lambert, by Jun 1959; Col Louis T. Seith, by Sep 1961; Col Roy L. Tweedie, by Jun 1963; Col Walter R. Hardee Jr., by Sep 1965; Col K. D. Dunaway, by Jun 1967; Col Henry P. Rettinger, by Jun 1968-31 Dec 1969. Col Keith A. Acree, 15 Jul 2010; Col Kevin R. Fesler, 13 Jul 2012-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1945. F-94, 1955; F-89, 1955-1959; F-101, 1960-1968; T-33, 1965-1969; C-47, 1965-1969; F-106, 1968-1969. F-15, 2010-.

Operations:  Served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater, Jun-Aug 1945, attacked Truk Island in July and enemy airfields and other targets in Japan during August. Trained combat-ready aircrews to provide air defense for the continental United States, 1955-1969. Increased alert status during Cuban Missile Crisis, Oct-Nov 1962. Trained aircrews and assisted in maintaining F-15 aircraft, 2010-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Jul 1966-30 Jun 1968.

Emblem:  Shield: Azure, a bend or, between two martlets volant argent, lightning bolts gules streaming from each of their tails. (Approved 26 Jul 1956.) Emblem should be modified to meet the standards of AFI 84-105, chapter 3 (scroll lettering color).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through Aug 2013.
Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Jul 2012.


Other Sites of Interest:

7th Fighter Command Association

414th Fighter Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



413th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 413th Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1946. Redesignated 413th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 23 Mar 1953. Activated on 8 Jul 1954. Inactivated on 18 Aug 1955.

Assignments:  414th Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1944-30 Sep 1946. 28th Air Division, 8 Jul 1954-18 Aug 1955.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Selfridge, Field, Mich, 20 Nov 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 9 Mar-5 Jun 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 7 Jul 1945; Clark Field, Luzon, 23 Dec 1945; Floridablanca, Luzon, unkn-30 Sep 1946. Travis AFB, Calif, 8 Jul 1954-18 Aug 1955.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-86, 1954-1955.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 15 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a disc gold, within a border black, a knight's helmet, surmounting a sword and olive branch in saltire, all black, detail of the first. (Approved 11 Apr 1955.)

Table of Contents



437th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 437th Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1946. Redesignated 437th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 14 Nov 1952. Activated on 27 Nov 1952. Inactivated 29 Apr 1968; Activated 18 Jul 1968, inactivated and discontinued 30 Sep 1968.

Assignments:  414th Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1944-30 Sep 1946. 4707th Defense Wing, 27 Nov 1952; 564th Air Defense Group, 16 Feb 1953; 414th Fighter Group, 18 Aug 1955-29 Apr 1968; 414th Fighter Gp 18 Jul-30 Sep 1968.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Selfridge, Field, Mich, 21 Nov 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 19 Mar-5 Jun 194-5; North Field, Iwo Jima, 7 Jul 1945; Clark Field, Luzon, 23 Dec 1945; Floridablanca, Luzon, unkn-30 Sep 1946. Otis AFB, Mass, 27 Nov 1952; Oxnard AFB, Calif, 18 Aug 1955-29 Apr 1968; Oxnard AFB 18 Jul-30 Sep 1968.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-94, 1952-1955, 1955-1956; F-89, 1955, 1956-1960; F-101, 1960-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 13 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a white disk with a light green border, a tiger's face, in natural colors except for the eyes which are green with red pupils, on and over a rocket (gray with blue nose and red bands) diagonally placed on and over the disk with nose to dexter base. (Approved 1 Sep 1953.)

Table of Contents



456th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

"A Handbook of Air Defense Organization", Air Defense Command History Office

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 456th Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 15 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 25 Aug 1946. Redesignated 456th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 23 Mar 1953. Activated on 8 Aug 1954. Inactivated on 18 Aug 1955. Activated on 18 Oct 1955. Inactivated 18 Jul 1968.

Assignments:  414th Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1944-25 Aug 1946. 520th Air Defense Group, 8 Aug 1954-18 Aug 1955. 28th Air Division, 18 Oct 1955; San Francisco Air Defense Sector, 1 Jul 1960-1 Aug 1963, Los Angeles Air Defense Sctr 1 Aug 1963-1 Apr 1966, 26th Air Div 1 Apr 1966-1 Jul 1968, 27th Air Div 1 Jul-18 Jul 1968.

Stations:  Seymour Johnson Field, NC, 15 Oct 1944; Selfridge Field, Mich, 21 Nov 1944; Bluethenthal Field, NC, 19 Mar-5 Jun 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 7 Ju1 1945; Clark Field, Luzon, 23 Dec 1945; Floridablanca, Luzon, unkn-25 Aug 1946. Truax Fld, WI, 8 Aug 1954-18 Aug 1955. Castle AFB, Calif, 18 Oct 1955-18 Jul 1968.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-86, 1954-1955. F-86, 1955-1958; F-102, 1958-1959; F-106, 1959-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 13 Jul-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Over and through an ultramarine blue disc, a caricatured, ferocious, red octopus, affronte, winged gold, having yellow eyes with green pupils, three tentacles on either side focused and emanating a golden fluid toward center base; area enclosed within tentacles and fluid of the field. (Approved 21 Mar 1945.)

Table of Contents



506th Fighter Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 506th Fighter Group on 5 Oct 1944 and activated on 21 Oct. Equipped with P-51 aircraft. Moved to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater, Feb-Apr 1945, the air echelon flying patrols from Tinian before joining the rest of the group on Iwo Jima. The group, assigned to Twentieth AF, flew its first mission from Iwo on 18 May when it bombed and strafed an airfield in the Bonin Islands. Afterward attacked airfields, antiaircraft emplacements, shipping, barracks, radio and radar stations, railway cars, and other targets in the Bonin Islands or Japan. Also provided air defense for Iwo and escorted B-29's during bombardment mission from the Marianas to Japan. Received DUC for defending B-29's against attack by fighter aircraft during the period 7-10 Jun 1945. Returned to the US in Dec 1945. Inactivated on 16 Dec 1945.

Squadrons:  457th: 1944-1945. 458th: 1944-1945. 462nd: 1944-1945.

Stations:  Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 2 Oct 1944-16 Feb 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 24 Apr-3 Dec 1945; Camp Anza, Calif, 15-16 Dec 1945.

Commanders:  Col Bryan B Harper, 25 Oct 1944-1945.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7-10 Jun 1945.

Insigne:  Shield: On a barry wavy of four argent and azure, second bar semee of stars of the first, over-all an escutcheon, per pale argent and or, a crest of a stylized wing of the first, fimbriated of the second, the escutcheon surmounting a sword bendwise, hilt and pommel or, blade of the last, shaded gules; on a chief of the second, a sphere argent, land areas vert, over two lightning flashes in saltire gules, fimbriated of the first. (Approved 21 Jul 1955.)



Source:  506th Air Expeditionary Group  (with updates courtesy of Mr. Bernie Shearon)

506TH AIR EXPEDITIONARY GROUP

The 506th Air Expeditionary Group, located at Kirkuk Regional Air Base, Iraq, was activated April 23, 2003 and is assigned to the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing. The 506th AEG facilitates the reconstruction, operation, maintenance and defense of the base.

MISSION
Kirkuk Air Base is home to the 506th AEG. The group's mission is to facilitate the reconstruction, operation, maintenance and base defense of Kirkuk Regional Air Base in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and other U.S. Central Command contingency plans.

The base also hosts the 3d Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the 25th Infantry Division, deployed to the Army's Forward Operating Base Warrior.

PERSONNEL AND RESOUCES
Approximately 900 active-duty Air Force, Guard and Reserve members are assigned to the 506th AEG during any given Air Expeditionary Force rotation. About 3,000 Soldiers are assigned to FOB Warrior.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
The group's forces are organized under seven squadrons: 506th Expeditionary Medical Services Squadron, 506th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron, 506th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron, 506th Expeditionary Logistic Readiness Squadron, 506th Expeditionary Communications Squadron, 506th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron and the 506th Expeditionary Services Squadron. The 727th Expeditionary Air Control Squadron, Detachment 1 is also located at Kirkuk AB.

HISTORY
The air base is located at the edge of Kirkuk, which is 250 kilometers north of Baghdad near the foot of the Zagros Mountains. The Kirkuk Region is rich in oil fields and farmlands. It sits on top of an estimated 6 percent of the world's oil supply which amounts to almost half of all Iraqi oil exports.

The 506th Air Expeditionary Group was assigned to Kirkuk Regional Air Base on April 23, 2003, nearly one month after Operation Iraqi Freedom started. At that time, the group flew A-10 Thunderbolts, which flew close air support and focused intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. The last A-10 departed the base in the Spring of 2004.

The 506th AEG traces its history back to the 506th Fighter Group, Single Engine, which was established on Oct. 5, 1944 and activated on Oct. 21, 1944, at Lakeland Army Air Field, Fla. Flying the P-51 Mustang, the group trained in fighter formation flying, long range navigation and gunnery prior to deploying to Guam in March 1945. The group consisted of three squadrons: 457th, 458th and the 459th Fighter Squadrons.

The 506th served in the Western Pacific from March 1945 to December 1945. The group was stationed at North Field, Iwo Jima, from April 25, 1945 to Dec. 3, 1945. From March 23, 1945, to May 11, 1945, the group's air echelon operated from West Field, Tinian. From Tinian the air echelon flew combat patrol missions under the control of Air Defense Command, Saipan, from March 28, 1945 to April 28, 1945. The air echelon joined the ground echelon at Iwo Jima in May 1945.

From Iwo Jima, the 506th's squadrons attacked airfields, antiaircraft emplacements, shipping, barracks, radio and radar stations, railway cars, and other targets in the Bonin Islands and Japan. The group also provided air defense of Iwo Jima and escorted B-29s bombers in raids against Japan.

In December 1945 the group moved to Camp Anza, Calif., and was inactivated Dec. 16, 1945.

The 506th Strategic Fighter Wing was established Nov. 20, 1952, and activated Jan. 20, 1953, at Dow Air Force Base, Maine. It was redesignated three times - 506th Fighter-Day Wing, 506th Fighter-Bomber Wing and 506th Tactical Fighter Wing - between 1957 and 1959.

As a fighter wing, the 506th provided air defense from Dow AFB between 1953 and 1955 and from Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., starting in March 1955. The 506th flew the F-84 Thunderjet from 1953 to 1957. From August to November 1953, the 506th provided air defense of northern Japan while deployed to Misawa Air Base, Japan. The group started flying the F-100 Supersaber in 1957. From 1957 to 1958 the 506th participated in tactical exercises and rotated squadrons to Europe. It was inactivated April 1, 1959.

The 506th was redesignated the 506th Tactical Fighter Group on May 4, 1972 and activated in the Air Force Reserve on July 8, 1972 at Carswell Air Force Base, Texas. During that time, the 506th trained in F-105 Thunderchief fighter operations. The group was inactivated on March 25, 1973.

The 506th Tactical Fighter Wing was consolidated with the 506th Tactical Fighter Group as the 506th Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jan 1984 (not active).

The 506th was redesignated the 506th Air Expeditionary Group and converted to provisional status on April 22, 2003, and assigned to Kirkuk AB. The group has been supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom ever since.

POINT OF CONTACT
506th Air Expeditionary Group Public Affairs, Kirkuk Air Base, Iraq

(Current as of August 2006)



Other Sites of Interest:

7th Fighter Command Association

506th Air Expeditionary Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



457th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 457 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 21 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 16 Dec 1945. Redesignated as 457 Strategic Fighter Squadron on 20 Nov 1952. Activated on 20 Jan 1953. Redesignated as: 457 Fighter-Day Squadron on 1 Jul 1957; 457 Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 1 Jan 1958; 457 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1959. Activated in the Reserve on 8 Jul 1972. Redesignated as 457 Fighter Squadron on 1 Feb 1992.

Assignments:  506 Fighter Group, 21 Oct 1944-16 Dec 1945. 506 Strategic Fighter (later, 506 Fighter-Day; 506 Fighter-Bomber; 506 Tactical Fighter) Wing, 20 Jan 1953-1 Apr 1959. 506 Tactical Fighter Group, 8 Jul 1972; 301 Tactical Fighter (later, 301 Fighter) Wing, 25 Mar 1973; 301 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992-.

Stations:  Lakeland AAFld, FL, 21 Oct 1944-16 Feb 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 25 Apr-3 Dec 1945 (air echelon operated from Tinian, 23 Mar-11 May 1945); Camp Anza, CA, 15-16 Dec 1945. Dow AFB, ME, 20 Jan 1953; Tinker AFB, OK, 20 Mar 1955-1 Apr 1959. Carswell AFB (later, ARS) TX, 8 Jul 1972-.

Commanders:  Maj Malcolm C. Watters, Oct 1944; Maj Daun G. Anthony, 12 Jun 1945; Capt Jack H. Folsom, 10 Sep 1945-unkn. 2Lt Francis E. Cabrillias III, Jan 1953; Maj John M. Porter, Feb 1953; Maj Thomas E. Stewart, Oct 1954; Maj Alfred N. King, May 1955; Maj Charles E. Francis, 1 Dec 1957; Lt Col Ralph E. Keyes, 1 Oct 1958; Maj Charles E. Francis, 12 Jan 1959; Capt Frederick T. Hiebert, 22 Jan 1959; 1Lt Douglas W. Case, 2 Feb 1959; Maj George J. Hayes, 13 Feb-1 Apr 1959. Maj Gordon W. Goodier, Jul 1972; Lt Col Jervis W. McEntee, by Dec 1973; Lt Col Leo J. Canavan, 5 Mar 1977; Lt Col Robert H. Jones, 16 Jan 1979; Lt Col Randolph S. Reynolds, by May 1984; Lt Col Frederick R. Flom, 13 Dec 1984; Lt Col Eugene L. Haggerty, by Oct 1987; Lt Col Courtlan Hazelton, Apr 1988; Lt Col Floyd G. Whitehouse III, by Oct 1990; Lt Col Michael L. Goode, 7 Mar 1992; Lt Col Carl M. Gough Jr., Mar 1993; Lt Col James M. Sluder III, 4 Jun 1994; Lt Col Thomas R. Coon, 15 Jun 1996; Lt Col Frank E. Anderson, 3 Jan 1998; Lt Col William Schauffert, 25 Apr 2001; Lt Col Kenneth Bachelor, 25 Sep 2002; Lt Col Tommy Williams, 1 Jun 2004; Lt Col Robert Mortensen, 4 Mar 2006; Lt Col Keith A. Knudson, 1 Mar 2008; Lt Col Christopher Yancy, 7 Nov 2009-.

Aircraft:  P-51, 1944-1945. F-84, 1953-1957; F-100, 1957-1958. F-105, 1972-1982; F-4, 1981-1991; F-16, 1990-.

Operations:  Trained in the continental United States, Oct 1944-Feb 1945. Moved to western Pacific Ocean in spring of 1945. Escorted B-29 bombers in raids against Japan, and attacked targets such as enemy airfields, May-Aug 1945. Between 1953 and 1959, and again since July 1972, trained for a variety of tactical air missions. Frequently deployed for training exercises, some of them overseas. Took part in Operation Deny Flight, enforcing a no-fly zone over Bosnia, in mid-1990s. Participated in training exercises and deployments. Provided resources for Operations Northern Watch (1999-2000), Southern Watch (2001), Noble Eagle (2001-), and Iraqi Freedom (2003-).

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7-10 Jun 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 14 May 1992-13 May 1994; 30 Jun 1995-1 Jul 1997; 1 Oct 2000-30 Sep 2002; 1 Oct 2002-30 Sep 2004; 1 Oct 2004-30 Sep 2006; 1 Oct 2006-30 Sep 2008.

Emblem:  On a white disc, flecked with irregular red patches, a caricatured, black and green mosquito, wearing yellow aviator’s helmet, gloves, and white radio head set and goggles, in flight toward dexter base, holding a very large gray aerial machine gun beneath the body, with hind legs, and striking a blow with a red and white hatchet, with brown handle held aloft in right foreleg, while firing a black automatic revolver downward with the left foreleg, all emitting gray speed lines to rear. (Approved on 20 Jan 1945, modified on 27 Apr 2000.)

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, and Honors through 10 Aug 2010.

Table of Contents



458th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 458th Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 21 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 16 Dec 1945. Redesignated 458th Strategic Fighter Squadron on 20 Nov 1952. Activated on 20 Jan 1953. Redesignated: 458th Fighter-Day Squadron on 1 Jul 1957; 458th Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 1 Jan 1958; 458th Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1959.

Assignments:  506th Fighter Group, 21 Oct 1944-16 Dec 1945. 506th Strategic Fighter (later Fighter-Bomber; Tactical Fighter) Wing, 20 Jan 1953-1 Apr 1959.

Stations:  Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 21 Oct 1944-16 Feb 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 24 Apr-3 Dec 1945; Camp Anza, Calif, 15-16 Dec 1945. Dow AFB, Maine, 20 Jan 1953; Tinker AFB, Okla, 20 Mar 1955-1 Apr 1959.

Aircraft:  P-51, 1944-1945. F-84, 1953-1957; F-l00,1957-1958.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 18 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7-10 Jun 1945.

Emblem:  On a light blue disc with yellow border heavily edged in black, a black crow in cartoon style standing on a yellow lightning flash in base, his bill, feet, and scarf yellow; eyebrows and eyeballs white, eyes dark blue, wearing a pair of dark red boxing gloves and holding from the left side of his bill a brown cigar, with yellow and dark red band and red ashes, which is emitting a white atomic cloud formation; in the background seven white stars and three white clouds formations-one on the right, one on the left, and one issuing from base-extending above and in back of the Crow's right foot and lightning flash. (Approved 14 Apr 1954.)

Table of Contents



462nd Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 462d Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 21 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 16 Dec 1945. Redesignated 462d Strategic Fighter Squadron on 20 Nov 1952. Activated on 20 Jan 1953. Redesignated: 462d Fighter-Day Squadron on 1 Jul 1957; 462d Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 1 Jan 1958; 462d Tactical Fighter Squadron on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1959.

Assignments:  506th Fighter Group, 21 Oct 1944-16 Dec 1945. 506th Strategic Fighter (later Fighter-Bomber; Tactical Fighter) Wing, 20 Jan 1953-1 Apr 1959.

Stations:  Lakeland AAFld, Fla, 21 Oct 1944-16 Feb 1945; North Field, Iwo Jima, 24 Apr-3 Dec 1945; Camp Anza, Calif, 15-16 Dec 1945. Dow AFB, Maine, 20 Jan 1953; Tinker AFB, Okla, 20 Mar 1955-1 Apr 1959.

Aircraft:  P-51, 1944-1945. F-84, 1953-1957; F-100, 1957-1958.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 17 May-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7-10 Jun 1945.

Emblem:  On a light turquoise blue disc, border yellow, a prancing, black thoroughbred horse with white face and shanks, reared up on a light turquoise blue cloud formation, edged dark blue, in base, in front of a jagged, red lightning flash striking from sinister chief toward dexter base. (Approved 12 Feb 1945.)

Table of Contents



507th Fighter Group

 

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (507th Air Refueling Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 507 Fighter Group on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 12 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 27 May 1946. Redesignated as 507 Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 20 Jun 1955. Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Feb 1961. Redesignated as 507 Tactical Fighter Group on 4 May 1972. Activated in the Reserve on 20 May 1972. Inactivated on 25 Mar 1973. Activated in the Reserve on 17 Oct 1975. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 507 Fighter Wing (Air Defense), which was established, and activated, on 28 Dec 1960. Organized on 1 Feb 1961. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1968. Consolidated organization retained designation 507 Tactical Fighter Group. Redesignated as: 507 Fighter Group on 1 Feb 1992; 507 Air Refueling Group on 1 Apr 1994; 507 Air Refueling Wing on 1 Oct 1994; 507 Wing on 15 Mar 1996; 507 Air Refueling Wing on 1 Aug 1997.

Assignments:  72 Fighter Wing, 12 Oct 1944; 301 Fighter Wing, 24 Jun 1945-27 May 1946. 4706 Air Defense Wing, 18 Aug 1955; 37 Air Division, 8 Jul 1956; 30 Air Division, 1 Apr 1959; Sault Sainte Marie Air Defense Sector, 1 Apr 1960; Duluth Air Defense Sector, 1 Oct 1963; 29 Air Division, 1 Apr 1966-30 Sep 1968. 442 Tactical Airlift Wing, 20 May 1972; 301 Tactical Fighter Wing, 25 Jul 1972-25 Mar 1973. 301 Tactical Fighter Wing, 17 Oct 1975; 419 Tactical Fighter (later, 419 Fighter) Wing, 1 Oct 1982; 452 Air Refueling Wing, 1 Apr 1994; Fourth Air Force, 15 Apr 1994-.

Components

Group:  507 Operations: 1 Aug 1992-. 513 Air Control: 15 Mar 1996-1 Apr 1997. 931 Air Refueling: 1 Mar 1999-1 Oct 2008.

Squadrons:  438 Fighter Interceptor: 18 Aug 1955-30 Sep 1968. 463 Fighter: 12 Oct 1944-27 May 1946. 464 Fighter: 12 Oct 1944-27 May 1946. 465 Fighter: 12 Oct 1944-24 May 1946; 20 May 1972-25 Mar 1973; 17 Oct 1975-1 Aug 1992.

Stations:  Peterson Field, CO, 12 Oct 1944; Bruning AAFld, NE, 20 Oct 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 15 Dec 1944-24 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands, 24 Jun 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, 29 Jan-27 May 1946. Kinross (later, Kincheloe) AFB, MI, 18 Aug 1955-30 Sep 1968. Tinker AFB, OK, 20 May 1972-25 Mar 1973. Tinker AFB, OK, 17 Oct 1975-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 12-27 Oct 1944; Col Loring F. Stetson Jr., 27 Oct 1944; Lt Col Woodrow W. Korges, 12 Sep 1945; Maj Byron W. Foreman, 2 Nov 1945; Capt Franklin L. Fisher, 20 Nov 1945-unkn. Col John L. Locke, 18 Aug 1955; Col Robert W. Holmes, Jun 1956; Lt Col Claud E. Ford, 20 Jun 1959; Col Dean W. Dutrack, 27 Jul 1959; Col Thomas W. Hornsby, 12 Sep 1960; Col Ward W. Martindale, 5 Aug 1963; Col Robert L. Hinchee, 1 Jul 1967; Col William P. Brierty, 31 Aug 1967; Col Howard C. Johnson, 10 Jun 1968; Col Robert L. Hinchee, 1 Jul 1968; Col Howard C. Johnson, 12 Aug 1968; Col Robert L. Hinchee, 19 Aug-30 Sep 1968. Col John E. Taylor Jr., c. 20 May 1972; Maj Roger P. Scheer, Jan-25 Mar 1973. Col Roger P. Scheer, 17 Oct 1975; unkn, 15 May-1 Jul 1978; Col Jervis W. McEntee, 2 Jul 1978; Lt Col Jerry A. Wrucha, 9 Sep 1984; Col James L. Turner, 5 Jan 1986; Col Robert E. Lytle, 1 Dec 1990; Col Martin M. Mazick, 13 Aug 1995; Brig Gen Jon S. Gingerich, 6 Mar 1999; Col Timothy J. Wrighton, 5 Feb 2001; Brig Gen Dean J. Despinoy, Feb 2002; Col Jeffery R. Glass, 9 Aug 2006; Col Russell A. Muncy; 23 Oct 2011-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1946. F-89, 1955-1957; F-102, 1957-1960; F-106, 1960-1968. F-105, 1972-1973. F-105, 1975-1980; F-4, 1980-1988; F-16, 1988-1994; KC-135, 1994-; E-3, 1996-1997.

Operations:  Trained for overseas combat from late 1944 to late April 1945, when it departed for the Pacific. On 1 Jul 1945, began flying airstrikes from the Ryukyu Islands, targeting enemy ships, railroad bridges, airfields, factories, and barracks in Japan, Korea, and China. On 8 Aug 1945, escorted B-29 bombers on a raid, shooting down several Japanese fighters. Earned a Distinguished Unit Citation for outstanding performance in engaging and destroying Japanese interceptor aircraft during a long-range fighter sweep to Korea on 13 Aug 1945. Inactivated in Okinawa in May 1946. From Aug 1955 to Sep 1968 served in an air defense role, training with interceptor aircraft and participating in various exercises. Trained for tactical fighter missions, participating in numerous tactical, joint, and combined exercises, May 1972-Mar 1973 and Oct 1975-Sep 1994. The 507th was the first Air Force Reserve group to participate in RED FLAG exercises (1978), and the first to deploy to Turkey for an annual tour (1982). Converted from fighter to worldwide air refueling operations, 1994-. From Mar 1996 to Apr 1997, the wing also administered the 513 Air Control Group, the only Reserve organization flying the E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft. Supported Global War on Terrorism; deployed aircraft and personnel in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, 2001-. Participated in post-Hurricane Katrina relief, 2005.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific; Ryukyus; Air Offensive, Japan; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Korea, 13 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jun 1966-1 Jun 1968; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1978; 1 Jul 1985-1 Jul 1986; 1 Jul 1987-31 Aug 1989; 1 Jan 1992-31 Dec 1993; 1 Jan 1994-31 Dec 1995; 1 Aug 1996-31 Jul 1998; 1 Jan 2009-1 Aug 2010.

Emblem:  Shield: Azure, edged argent, over a point pointed in point bendwise and arched gules, fimbriated of the second, a falcon flying downward per bend argent; between two planets and a star in sinister chief, and the Great Dipper in dexter base all proper. Motto: Defendimus Usque Ad Astra - We Defend Even to the Stars. Approved 17 Aug 1956. Slightly modified on 13 Mar 1995; newest rendition approved on 15 Feb 2007.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through Sep 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 2011.


Other Sites of Interest:

507th Air Refueling Wing

507th Air Refueling Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



463d Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 463d Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 12 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 27 May 1946. Redesignated 198th Fighter Squadron, and allotted to ANG, on 28 May 1946.

Assignments:  507th Fighter Group, 12 Oct 1944-27 May 1946.

Stations:  Peterson Field, Colo, 12 Oct 1944; Bruning AAFld, Neb, 20 Oct 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 15 Dec 1944-30 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 24 Jun 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, 29 Jan-27 May 1946.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 1 Jul 1945-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Korea, 13 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



464th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 464th Fighter Squadron on 5 Oct 194. Activated on 12 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 27 May 1946. Redesignated 199th Fighter Squadron, and allotted to ANG, on 28 May 1946.

Assignments:  507th Fighter Group, 12 Oct 1944-27 May 1946.

Stations:  Peterson Field, Colo, 12 Oct 1944; Bruning AAFld, Neb, 20 Oct 1944; Dalhart AAFld, Tex, 15 Dec 1944-30 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, 24 Jun 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, 29 Jan-27 May 1946.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1945.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 1 Jul 1945-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Korea, 13 Aug 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



465th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted as 465 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine on 5 Oct 1944. Activated on 12 Oct 1944. Inactivated on 24 May 1946. Redesignated as 465 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 3 Feb 1953. Activated on 18 Feb 1953. Inactivated on 18 Aug 1955. Activated on 8 Oct 1955. Discontinued on 15 Mar 1960. Redesignated as 465 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 4 May 1972. Activated in the Reserve on 20 May 1972. Redesignated as: 465 Fighter Squadron on 1 Feb 1992; 465 Air Refueling Squadron on 1 Apr 1994.

Assignments:  507 Fighter Group, 12 Oct 1944-24 May 1946. 567 Air Defense Group, 18 Feb 1953-18 Aug 1955. 4711 Air Defense Wing, 8 Oct 1955; 32 Air Division, 1 Mar 1956; 4727 Air Defense Group, 8 Feb 1957; Boston Air Defense Sector, 1 Jul 1959-15 Mar 1960. 507 Fighter Group, 20 May 1972; 301 Tactical Fighter Wing, 25 Mar 1973; 507 Tactical Fighter (later, 507 Fighter) Group, 17 Oct 1975; 507 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992-.

Stations:  Peterson Field, CO, 12 Oct 1944; Bruning AAFld, NE, 20 Oct 1944; Dalhart AAFld, TX, 15 Dec 1944-30 Apr 1945; Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands, 24 Jun 1945; Yontan, Okinawa, 29 Jan-24 May 1946. McChord AFB, WA, 18 Feb 1953-18 Aug 1955. Griffiss AFB, NY, 8 Oct 1955; Laurence G. Hanscom Field, MA, 1 Jul 1959-15 Mar 1960. Tinker AFB, OK, 20 May 1972-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 12-29 Oct 1944; Maj Jerome I. Stevens, 30 Oct 1944; Maj Arthur T. Rice, 13 Nov 1944; Maj Robert F. Hemphill, c. 24 Sep 1945-unkn. Capt Gordon A. Reynolds, 18 Feb 1953; Lt Col William H. Holt, 9 Mar 1953; Maj Charles V. Garino, Jul 1954-Aug 1955. Maj John S. Wallace, c. 1955; Lt Col Harold F. Knowles, 1956; Maj Stephen D. Armstrong, c. 1957; Lt Col John A. Bell, Dec 1958; Lt Col Norman W. Campion, 1 Jul 1959; Maj Carl H. Brown, 1959-c. 1960. Lt Col Carroll C. Ballard, by Jun 1973; Maj James W. Parker, by Dec 1974; Lt Col John J. Closner III, by Dec 1975; Lt Col Ronald K. Williams, by Dec 1978; Lt Col Jerry A. Wrucha, Jun 1981; Maj Mark Jensen, Jun 1983; Maj James P. Feighny, by Feb 1986; Lt Col Bruce Brandt, 16 Mar 1987; Lt Col James P. Feighny, 1 Jun 1989; Lt Col Hugh H. Forsythe, 19 Dec 1989; Lt Col Jack Ekl, 1 Oct 1991; Lt Col Charles M. Sublett, 1 Apr 1994; Lt Col David A. Ortman, 16 Jul 1995; Lt Col James Jackson, 12 Jul 1997; Lt Col William L. Erickson, 4 Nov 2000-unkn; Lt Col Michael F. Mahon, 8 Aug 2005; Lt Col William H. Mason, 6 Sep 2008; unkn, May 2010-.

Aircraft:  P-47, 1944-1945. F-86, 1953-1955. F-89, 1955-1959; F-86, 1959-1960. F-105, 1972-1980; F-4, 1980-1988; F-16, 1988-1994; KC-135, 1994-.

Operations:  Combat in Western Pacific, 1 Jul 1945-14 Aug 1945. Occupation duty in Okinawa, Jan-May 1946. Air defense, 1953-1960. Trained for fighter missions, 1972-1994. Worldwide air refueling missions, 1994-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Air Offensive, Japan; Western Pacific; Ryukyus; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Korea, 13 Aug 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan-31 Dec 1978; 1 Jul 1985-1 Jul 1986; 1 Jul 1987-31 Aug 1989; 1 Jan 1992-31 Dec 1993; 1 Jan 1994-31 Jul 1995; 1 Aug 1996-31 Jul 1998; 1 Jan 2009-1 Aug 2010.

Emblem:  On an irregular shaped Air Force yellow disc, with two red lightning bolts encircling the outer edge of the disc, a stylized black falcon with spread wings, and white beak and eye; the falcon surmounted by a third red lightning bolt in the position of a sinister bend, the bolt extending over the upper left [sinister] edge of the disc. (Approved 22 Aug 1955.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through Sep 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through May 2010.

Supersedes published information contained in Maurer Maurer (ed.), Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (Washington: USGPO, 1984) and addendum c. 1972.

Table of Contents



15th Fighter Group

(Assigned to Twentieth AF during the summer of 1945)


Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (15th Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 15 Pursuit Group (Fighter) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Dec 1940. Redesignated as: 15 Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 12 Feb 1942; 15 Fighter Group on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated as 15 Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 20 Jun 1955. Activated on 18 Aug 1955. Discontinued on 1 Jul 1960. Consolidated (31 Jan 1984) with the 15 Tactical Fighter Wing, which was established, and activated, on 17 Apr 1962. Organized on 1 Jul 1962. Inactivated on 1 Oct 1970. Redesignated as 15 Air Base Wing on 20 Oct 1971. Activated on 1 Nov 1971. Redesignated as: 15 Airlift Wing on 28 Apr 2003; 15 Wing on 18 May 2010.

Assignments:  14 Pursuit Wing, 1 Dec 1940; 7 Interceptor (later, VII Fighter) Command, 23 Jan 1942; United States Army Strategic Air Forces, 16 Jul 1945; VII Fighter Command, 5 Aug 1945; Pacific Air Command, US Army, 25 Nov 1945 (attached to 7 Fighter Wing, 25 Nov-31 Dec 1945); 7 Fighter Wing, 1 Jan 1946; Seventh Air Force, 1 Mar-15 Oct 1946. 4707 Air Defense Wing, 18 Aug 1955; 4708 Air Defense Wing, 1 Mar 1956; 30 Air Division, 8 Jul 1956; Syracuse Air Defense Sector, 1 Sep 1958-1 Jul 1960. Tactical Air Command, 17 Apr 1962; 836 Air Division, 1 Jul 1962-1 Oct 1970. Pacific Air Forces, 1 Nov 1971; Thirteenth Air Force (later, Thirteenth Air Force [Air Forces Pacific] ) , 6 Oct 2006-.

Components

Groups:  15 Operations: 13 Apr 1992-.

Squadrons:  6 Night Fighter: attached 6-25 Mar 1943, assigned 26 Mar 1943-5 Jun 1944; attached 1-30 Sep 1944. 9 Airborne Command and Control: 1 Nov 1971-31 Mar 1992. 12 Fighter: 23 Aug-1 Dec 1942. 13 Bombardment Squadron, Tactical: 8 Feb 1969-1 Oct 1970 (detached 15 Sep-1 Oct 1970). 22 Tactical Air Support: 1 Nov 1971-4 Apr 1980. 43 Tactical Fighter: 8 Jan 1964-15 Jul 1970 (detached 17 Aug 1965-c. 4 Jan 1966). 45 Pursuit (later, 45 Fighter; 45 Tactical Fighter): 1 Dec 1940-15 Oct 1946; 1 Jul 1962-1 Oct 1970 (detached 4 Apr-10 Aug 1965). 46 Pursuit (later, 46 Fighter; 46 Tactical Fighter): 1 Dec 1940-24 Apr 1944; 1 Jul 1962-1 Oct 1970 (detached 11 May-22 Aug 1965 and 1-10 Nov 1965). 47 Pursuit (later, 47 Fighter; 47 Fighter-Interceptor; 47 Tactical Fighter): 1 Dec 1940-15 Oct 1946; 18 Aug 1955-1 Jul 1960; 1 Jul 1962-1 Oct 1970 (detached 22 Jul-27 Nov 1965). 65 Airlift: 10 Mar-13 Apr 1992. 78 Fighter: attached 6-17 Mar 1943; assigned 26 Mar 1943-15 Oct 1946 (detached 26 Mar-10 Apr 1943). 421 Tactical Fighter: 25 Apr-1 Jul 1967. 4424 Combat Crew Training: 15 Oct 1968-1 Oct 1970.

Flight:  34 Crash-Rescue Boat: 18 Aug 1955-8 Jun 1956.

Stations:  Wheeler Field, Territory of Hawaii, 1 Dec 1940; Bellows Field, Territory of Hawaii, 3 Jun 1944-5 Feb 1945; South Field, Iwo Jima, 6 Mar 1945; Bellows Field, Territory of Hawaii, 25 Nov 1945; Wheeler Field, Territory of Hawaii, 9 Feb-15 Oct 1946. Niagara Falls Municipal Airport, NY, 18 Aug 1955-1 Jul 1960. MacDill AFB, FL, 1 Jul 1962-1 Oct 1970. Hickam AFB, HI, 1 Nov 1971-.

Commanders:  Maj Clyde K. Rich, 1 Dec 1940; Maj Lorry N. Tindal, 6 Dec 1940; Maj Clarence F. Hegy, 17 Mar 1941; Maj Lorry N. Tindal, 25 Apr 1941; Lt Col Paul W. Blanchard, 20 Sep 1941; Lt Col William S. Steele, 12 Feb 1942; Lt Col Sherwood E. Buckland, 5 Mar 1943; Lt Col Kenneth R. Powell, 17 Jun 1943 (temporary); Lt Col Sherwood E. Buckland, 7 Jul 1943; Lt Col William A. Bowen, 23 Aug 1943 (temporary); Lt Col Sherwood E. Buckland, 15 Sep 1943; Col James O. Beckwith Jr., 27 Sep 1943; Lt Col Dewitt S. Spain, 16 Apr 1945; Lt Col Julian E. Thomas, 17 May 1945; Lt Col Elmer E. Booth, 19 Jul 1945 (temporary); Col John W. Mitchell, 21 Jul 1945; Col William Eades, by Nov 1945; Col Oswald W. Lunde, 25 Nov 1945-15 Oct 1946. Col Stanley E. Matthews, 1955; Col Wayne B. Curren, c. 1956; Col Thomas L. Wiper, c. 1957; Col Vic L. Byers Jr., 23 Mar 1959-1 Jul 1960. None (not manned), 17 Apr-30 Jun 1962; Col George L. Jones, 1 Jul 1962; Col Francis J. Vetort, 8 Jun 1964; Col Levi R. Chase, 6 Jul 1964; Col Raymond A. Bradley, 4 Oct 1965; Col Woodrow W. Ramsey, 6 Oct 1965; Col Donald N. Stanfield, 12 Jun 1966; Col Charles J. Bowers, 29 Jul 1966; Col James D. Catington, 15 Aug 1966; Col Roy D. Carlson, 21 Jun 1967; Col Clifford H. Meier, 20 May 1968; Col Travis R. McNeil, 1 Feb-1 Oct 1970. Col Ernest W. Pate, 1 Nov 1971; Col Howard R. Inks, 3 Jun 1972; Col Wilmot E. Y. Paxton, 23 Aug 1972; Col Richard L. Thompson, 1 May 1976; Col Howard F. O'Neal, 17 May 1976; Col Sharman R. Stevenson, 7 Jul 1978; Col John A. Parrish Jr., 15 Aug 1980; Col Charles F. Luigs, 21 Jul 1983; Col Keith B. Connolly, 18 Apr 1984; Col Wayne E. Clark, 19 Apr 1985; Col Timothy D. Gill, 22 May 1987; Col William J. Kennedy, 9 Nov 1987; Col Don A. Lyon, 20 Sep 1988; Col William C. Van Meter, 23 Jul 1991; Brig Gen Dwight M. Kealoha, 25 Jun 1993; Col Bruce A. Brown, 26 Jan 1996; Col Ann M. Testa, 14 Aug 1997; Brig Gen Steven J. Redmann, 8 Jul 1999; Col Albert F. Riggle, 14 Jun 2001; Col Raymond G. Torres, 28 Apr 2003; Col William J. Changose, 23 Mar 2005; Col John J. Torres, 29 Jun 2006; Col Giovanni K. Tuck, 20 Jun 2008; Col Sam C. Barrett, 18 May 2010 -.

Aircraft:  A-12, 1940-1942; OA-9, 1940-1942; P-26, 1940-1942; P-36, 1940-1942; B-12, 1941-1942; P-39, 1941-1944; P-40, 1941-1944; P-47, 1943-1945, 1945-1946, 1946; P-70, 1943-1944; A-24, 1944; P-51, 1944-1946; P-61, 1944; A-26, 1946. F-86, 1955-1958; F-102, 1958-1960. F-84, 1962-1964; T-33, 1962-1970; F-4, 1964-1970; B-57, 1968-1970. EC-135, 1971-1992; O-2, 1972-1980; T-33, 1972-1987; C-135, 1992-2003; C-37, 2002-; C-40, 2003; C-17, 2006-.

Operations:  Served as part of the defense force for Hawaiian Islands. Suffered numerous casualties and lost aircraft during Japanese attack on Hawaii, 7 Dec 1941, but was remanned and reorganized, and remained part of the Hawaiian defense system until 1944. Sent squadrons to the Central and South Pacific at various times for operations against the Japanese. Reequipped with P-51 aircraft in 1944 and trained for very-long range escort missions. Moved to Iwo Jima in Feb 1945, and in Mar, supported the invasion force, and began bombing Bonin Islands. In Apr and May 1945, escorted B-29 raids into Japan and struck airfields to curtail enemy attacks on invasion force at Okinawa. Continued fighter sweeps and long-range escort missions to Japan until end of war. In Nov 1945, transferred back to Hawaii without personnel and equipment. Remanned and reequipped but inactivated less than a year later, on 15 Oct 1946. Activated on 18 Aug 1955 at Niagara Falls Municipal Airport, NY, and equipped with F-86 and later, F-102 aircraft. Performed air defense operations for the Syracuse Air Defense Sector until Jul 1960, when it was discontinued. The 15 Tactical Fighter Wing activated on 17 Apr 1962 at MacDill AFB, FL. Conducted tactical fighter combat crew training, 1962-1963. Reorganized as a mission-capable unit at the time of the Cuban missile crisis of 1962, returning afterwards to a training mission. Deployed the 43, 45, 46, and 47 Squadrons to Southeast Asia in 1965. Functioned as a replacement training unit for F-4 aircrews, 1965-1970. Also began B-57 light-bomber aircrew training in 1968. Deployed 16 F-4s at Seymour Johnson AFB, NC, during the Pueblo crisis in 1968. Inactivated in 1970. Activated as an Air Base Wing on 1 Nov 1971 at Hickam AFB, HI, with control over Hickam, Wheeler, Dillingham, and Johnston Island AF Bases, Bellows AFS, and several smaller subsidiary bases. Commanded, maintained, operated, and provided security for all AF installations in the Hawaiian Islands, Wake Island, and other island groups in Central and South Pacific Ocean. Wing's EC-135Es provided airborne command and control support for the Commander-in-Chief Pacific, Nov 1971-Mar 1992. Sheltered over 93,000 orphans, refugees, and evacuees from Southeast Asia during Operations Babylift and New Life, 6 Apr-30 Sep 1975. From May 1977 to Apr 1980, participated in Project Lagoon, a joint service operation to remove radioactive waste from Enewetak (formerly Eniwetok) Atoll. From 1983, supported the space shuttle program by maintaining Hickam as a designated emergency landing site. Beginning in 1992, assigned C-135 executive aircraft, provided special air transport for Commander, US Pacific Command; Commander, Pacific Air Forces; Commander, US Army Pacific; and for the Commander, Hawaiian Air National Guard. Deployed support personnel and equipment to Southwest Asia to assist in the liberation of Kuwait, Aug 1990-Mar 1991. Continued to deploy personnel worldwide in support of contingency and relief efforts, and supported deployments to the Pacific as it hosted deploying units in stopovers enroute to Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia locations. Supported tanker task forces assigned to Operation Enduring Freedom in response to 11 Sep 2001 terrorist attack on the United States. In 2006, transitioned to a C-17 mission.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1965-1 Jun 1966; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1969; 4 Apr-3 Sep 1975; 25 Feb-25 Mar 1986; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1991-30 Jun 1993; 1 Oct 1993-30 Sep 1995; 1 Oct 1995-1 Aug 1997; 2 Aug 1997-1 Aug 1999; 29 Nov 1999-30 Nov 2001; 1 Nov 2002-31 Oct 2004; 1 Nov 2004-31 Oct 2006; 1 Nov 2006-31 Oct 2007.

Emblem:  On a bend azure, two terrestrial lightning flashes issuant from base of the first, overall a gun sight counterchanged. Approved on 5 Oct 1942, updated on 25 Jun 2010.

Significance:  In the ultramarine blue and gold of the Air Force, the lightning flashes are symbolic of the speed of modern aviation, and the gun sight reflects the combat mission of the wing's predecessors.

Motto:  Original emblem for the 15th Fighter Group, reflected "PROSEQUOR ALIS" (I pursue with wings) instead of "15TH AIR BASE WING" on scroll below shield. On 10 December 1992, the Air Force Historical Research Agency approved the 15 ABW Commanders request to delete this motto from the wing's heraldry record since it was no longer applicable to the 15th Air Base Wing's current mission.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through Jun 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Jun 2010.


Other Sites of Interest:

15th Airlift Wing

Airlift Wing Carries Legacy into the Future

15th Fighter Group Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



45th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 45 Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Dec 1940. Redesignated as: 45 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 12 Feb 1942; 45 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated as 45 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 11 Sep 1952. Activated on 1 Nov 1952. Redesignated as 45 Fighter-Day Squadron on 8 Oct 1954. Inactivated on 8 Jan 1958. Redesignated as 45 Tactical Fighter Squadron, and activated, on 17 Apr 1962. Organized on 8 May 1962. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1971. Activated on 1 Oct 1973. Redesignated as 45 Fighter Squadron on 1 Feb 1992. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1994. Activated on 1 Nov 2009 per DAF/A1M 148t, 6 Oct 2009; SO #GB-0001, Hq AFRC, 15 Oct 2009.

Assignments:  15 Pursuit (later, 15 Fighter) Group, 1 Dec 1940-15 Oct 1946. 4709 Defense Wing, 1 Nov 1952; 519 Air Defense Group, 16 Feb 1953; Seventeenth Air Force, 1 Jun 1953 (attached to Air Defense Division [Prov], 8 Jun 1953); 316 Air Division, 18 Sep 1953-8 Jan 1958. Tactical Air Command, 17 Apr 1962 (attached to 12 Tactical Fighter Wing, 8 May 1962); 15 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Jul 1962; 1 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Oct 1970-1 Jul 1971. 930 Tactical Fighter Group, 1 Oct 1973; 434 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Jul 1975; 930 Tactical Fighter (later, 930 Fighter; 930 Operations) Group, 1 Jul 1987-30 Sep 1994. 917 Operations Group, 1 Nov 2009-.

Stations:  Wheeler Field, Territory of Hawaii (TH), 1 Dec 1940; Haleiwa Field, TH, 21 Dec 1941; Mokuleia Field, TH, 27 Dec 1941; Hilo Field, TH, 20 Oct 1942; Stanley Field, TH, 20 Dec 1942; Bellows Field, TH, 14 Aug 1943; Baker Island, 1 Sep 1943; Nanumea, 28 Nov 1943; Abemama, 4 Jan 1944 (operated from Makin, 15 Jan-24 Mar 1944); Mokuleia Field, TH, 6 Apr 1944; Bellows Field, TH, 19 Jun 1944-5 Feb 1945; South Field, Iwo Jima, 4 Mar 1945; Bellows Field, TH, 25 Nov 1945; Wheeler Field, TH, 9 Feb-15 Oct 1946. Suffolk County AFB, NY, 1 Nov 952; Sidi Slimane, French Morocco, 28 May 1953-8 Jan 1958. MacDill AFB, FL, 8 May 1962-1 Jul 1971. Grissom AFB, IN, 1 Oct 1973-30 Sep 1994. Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, 1 Nov 2009-.

Commanders:  Capt Aaron W. Tyer, 1 Dec 1940; Maj Harold E. Kofahl, 24 Dec 1941; Maj Thomas B. Summers, 8 May 1942; Maj George W. MacNichol, 16 Oct 1943; Capt Joseph L. Laughlin, 20 Jan 1943; Lt Col Julian E. Thomas, 1 Mar 1943; Maj Gilmer L. Snipes, 4 Apr 1944; Maj Arthur H. Bridge, 16 Apr 1945; Capt Harold A. Collins, 4 Jun 1945; Maj Robert W. Moore, 19 Jul 1945; Maj Edwin T. Bayley, 1945; Lt Col Edward S. G. Newbury, 18 Dec 1945; Maj Eugene L. Kleiderer, c. 1946; Maj James D. Catington, Sep 1946-1946. Lt Col Morgan S. Tyler Jr., 1 Nov 1952; Maj Raymond A. Poerschke, 17 Jan 1955; Maj Robert O. Shimp, 30 Nov 1955; Lt Col Henry W. Brown, 8 May 1956; Maj William H. Fairbrother, Jul 1957; Lt Col Wallace B. Frank, Aug 1957-c. 1958. Lt Col Ivan L. McGuire, 1962; Lt Col William A. Alden, 1964; Capt Jack A. Giglio, 8 Oct 1965; Lt Col James Hollingsworth, 20 Nov 1965; Lt Col Paul R. Henderson Jr., 19 Jan 1966; Lt Col Frederick D. Ellis, 14 Aug 1967; Lt Col Solomon D. Whitten Jr., 24 Nov 1968; Lt Col David C. Smith, 15 Jun 1970-1 Jul 1971. Unkn, 1 Oct 1973; Maj John J. Clark Jr., c. Jan 1974; Maj Stanley Smith, c. Apr 1974; Lt Col H. Heuss, c. Jul 1975; Lt Col Henry Q. Long, c. Aug 1975; Lt Col Stanley F. Smith, c. Oct 1976; Lt Col Malcolm Jamieson, 1 Mar 1980; Lt Col Gordon C. Grieder, c. Jul 1981; Lt Col Boyd L. Ashcraft, 1 Feb 1984; Lt Col Robert A. Nester, c. Jul 1987; unkn, c. 1989-1990; Lt Col Edwin C. Girton, 19 May 1990; Lt Col Leon A. Johnson, 27 Jun 1992-unkn.

Aircraft:  P-26, 1940-1941; P-36, 1941; P-40, 1942-1944; P-47, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944-1946. F-86, 1952-1956; F-100, 1956-1957. F-84, 1962-1964; F-4, 1964-1971. A-37, 1973-1981; A-10, 1981-1994, 2009-.

Operations:  Endured Japanese attack on Oahu, 7 Dec 1941. Provided air defense for Hawaiian Islands, Jan 1942-Oct 1943 and for central Pacific islands, 23 Oct 1943-11 Mar 1944 and the Western Pacific, 12 Mar-14 Aug 1945. Provided air defense in the northeastern United States, Sep 1952-Apr 1953, and in northwest Africa, Jun 1953-Feb 1956 and Jan-Oct 1957. Participated in Tactical Air Command exercises, operations and tests, Oct 1962-Jun 1971 including combat missions while on temporary duty in Southeast Asia, Apr-Aug 1965. Trained to maintain combat ready status, 1973-1994.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Vietnam: Winter-Spring, 1970.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1965-1 Jun 1966; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1969; 1 Jun 1992-31 Aug 1993.

Emblem:  On a lemon yellow disc, border equally divided tan and black, a caricatured red Indian, wearing light blue and white headdress and moccasins, holding forward in the right hand a red tomahawk with light green handle, trimmed white, while seated on fuselage of light green caricatured aircraft, having eye and teeth to form grinning face on nose of fuselage. (Approved 24 Aug 1944.) Current emblem approved on 19 Mar 2010.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 28 Jan 2010.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Sep 1994.



45th Fighter Squadron to rejoin A-10 community

Source:  917th Wing Website

by Senior Airman Crystal Marie Jordan
917 Wing Public Affairs

12/30/2009 - Barksdale Air Force Base, La. -- The United States Air Force plans to reactivate the historic 45th Fighter Squadron at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., during a ceremony on base Jan. 7 at 3 pm.

The reactivation of the 45th FS, by order of the Secretary of the Air Force Mr. Michael B. Donley, will place the unit under the command of the 917th Wing Operations Group on Barksdale Air Force Base, La.

Retired Maj. Gen. Robert A. Nester is scheduled as the guest speaker for the event.

Col. Keith D. Schultz the 917th Operations Group deputy commander will act as the presiding official for the ceremony.

Also in attendance will be Lt. Gen. Charles E. Stenner, commander, Air Force Reserve Command, Big. Gen. Robert S. Arthur, vice commander, 10th Air Force, and Col. Edmund D. Walker, commander, 917th Wing.

In command of the 45th Fighter Squadron is Lt. Col. Terry W. McClain.

"I'm excited about the reactivation of the 45th FS mainly because my last interaction occurred while the A-10s were taken from the unit during a transitional phase," said Col. McClain. "I'm excited because I can bring the 45th FS back into the A-10 community."

This unit has a rich history dating as far back as the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor Naval Station, on the Territory of Hawaii.

Throughout history, the 45th FS has aided the U.S. Armed Forces in missions at home and abroad, providing air defense during both World War II and the Vietnam War.

Today, they have a new mission. The reactivation of the 45th FS will occur in support of A-10 Formal Training Unit (FTU) training. The FTU will provide Initial Qualification in the A-10 as well as Transition, Instructor Pilot Upgrade and Senior Officer Course training.



Other Sites of Interest:

45th Fighter Squadron (45thfs.com no longer active)

Hawgsmoke - 45th Fighter Squadron

Table of Contents



47th Fighter Squadron


Bench located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 47 Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Dec 1940. Redesignated: 47 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 12 Feb 1942; 47 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 47 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine on 20 Aug 1944. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated 47 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 10 Oct 1952. Activated on 1 Dec 1952. Discontinued on 1 Jul 1960. Redesignated 47 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 17 Apr 1962. Organized on 1 Jul 1962. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1971. Activated in the Reserve on 1 Oct 1973. Redesignated 47 Fighter Squadron on 1 Feb 1992.

Assignments:  15 Pursuit (later, 15 Fighter) Group, 1 Dec 1940-15 Oct 1946. 4708 Defense Wing, 1 Dec 1952; 518 Air Defense Group, 16 Feb 1953; 15 Fighter Group, 18 Aug 1955-1 Jul 1960. Tactical Air Command, 17 Apr 1962; 15 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Jul 1962 (attached to 2 Air Division, 25 Jul-22 Nov 1965); 1 Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Oct 1970-1 Jul 1971. 917 Tactical Fighter Group (later, 917 Tactical Fighter Wing; 917 Fighter Wing), 1 Oct 1973; 917 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992-.

Stations:  Wheeler Field, TH, 1 Dec 1940; Bellows Field, TH, 22 Feb 1942; Haleiwa Field, TH, 25 Mar 1942; Barking Sands, TH, 29 Jul 1943; Mokuleia Field, TH, 8 Nov 1943; Bellows Field, TH, 8 Jun 1944-27 Jan 1945; South Field, Iwo Jima, 27 Feb-25 Nov 1945; Bellows Field, TH, 25 Nov 1945; Wheeler Field, TH, 9 Feb-15 Oct 1946. Niagara Falls Muni Aprt, NY, 1 Dec 1952-1 Jul 1960. MacDill AFB, FL, 1 Jul 1962-1 Jul 1971 (deployed at Ubon RTAFB, Thailand, 25 Jul-22 Nov 1965). Barksdale AFB, LA, 1 Oct 1973-.

Commanders:  Maj Gordon H. Austin, 1 Dec 1940; Maj Joseph F. Hunker, 12 Feb 1942; Maj Jack M. Hounsom, 16 Sep 1942; Lt Col Norval K. Heath, 6 Mar 1943; Maj Thomas W. Mackey, 16 Apr 1944; Maj John A. Piper, 11 Nov 1944; Maj Theon E. Markham, May 1945; Capt Walter H. Powell, 19 Jul 1945; Capt Ernest W. Hostetler, 31 Jul 1945; Maj Theon E. Markham, 5 Aug 1945-unkn. Maj Orrell Culwell, 1 Dec 1952; Lt Col Rufus Woody Jr., 1953; Maj James L. Price, 1955; Lt Col Harold D. Collins, 1956; Lt Col Leonard L. Thomas, 1 Jun 1958-unkn. Lt Col Maurice Morrison, 1962; Lt Col Jack A. Robinson, 1964; Lt Col Aubrey C. Edinburgh, c. Jul 1967; Lt Col William M. Conner, 20 Sep 1968; Lt Col Solomon D. Whitten Jr., 20 Apr 1970; Lt Col Donald W. Martin, 25 Nov 1970-1 Jul 1971. Unkn, 1 Oct 1973-1976; Lt Col Benjamin Voss, by Jun 1976; Lt Col Stanley F. Smith, by Mar 1980; Lt Col Gerald P. Huckabee, by Jun 1980; Lt Col William D. Tracy, 17 Oct 1981; Lt Col Gerald P. Huckabee, 1982; Maj Ty Gregory, 1982; Lt Col Francis A. Rauch Jr., Dec 1982; Maj George C. Rhymes, by Dec 1986; Lt Col Jerry D. Prather, 24 Apr 1989; Lt Col Robert L. White, 1 Jan 1991; Lt Col John H. Bordelon, 1 Oct 1993; Lt Col James W. Graves, 27 Jul 1996-.

Aircraft:  P-26, 1941; P-40, 1941-1943; P-36, 1941-1943; P-47, 1943-1945; P-51, 1944-1946. F-47, 1952-1953; F-86, 1954-1958; F-102, 1958-1960. F-84, 1962-1964; F-4, 1964-1971. A-37, 1973-1980; A-10, 1980-.

Operations:  Engaged enemy aircraft with P-40s during the attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 Dec 1941; patrols over the Pacific, 8 Dec 1941-Dec 1944; combat in western Pacific, 10 Mar-14 Aug 1945. Air defense in northeastern United States, 1952-1958. Combat in Southeast Asia, 26 Jul-c. 21 Nov 1965. Replacement training, 1966-1971. Trained for A-37 close air support and special operations, 1972-1980 and for A-10 close air support and battlefield interdiction, 1980-. Periodically deployed A-10s and personnel to Italy to support NATO operations in the Balkans, 1993-1996. Provided A-10 training for reserve pilots, 1996-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Vietnam: Vietnam Defensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with the Combat "V" Device: 25 Jul-22 Nov 1965. Air Force Outstanding unit Awards: 1 Jan 1965-1 Jun 1966; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1969; 2 Jul 1993-1 Jul 1995; 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999.

Emblem:  Over and throught a medium blue disc, border black, the caricatured figure, TURNIP TERMITE, body yellow, face and legs orange, ears and wings yellow green, riding a large, black, jagged lightning bolt toward dexter base. (Approved 19 Sep 1944.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 2 Jul 2001.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 1996.

Supersedes published information contained in Maurer Maurer (ed.), Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (Washington: USGPO, 1969) and 1982 addendum.

Table of Contents



78th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Organized as 78 Aero Squadron on 28 Feb 1918. Redesignated as Squadron A, Taliaferro Field, TX, on 23 Jul 1918. Demobilized on 15 Nov 1918. Reconstituted, and consolidated (25 Apr 1933) with 78 Observation Squadron, which was constituted on 18 Oct 1927. Redesignated as 78 Pursuit Squadron on 8 May 1929. Activated on 1 Apr 1931. Inactivated on 1 Sep 1937. Redesignated as 78 Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 22 Dec 1939. Activated on 1 Feb 1940. Redesignated as: 78 Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942; 78 Fighter Squadron, Single Engine, on 20 Aug 1943. Inactivated on 15 Oct 1946. Redesignated as 78 Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 11 Sep 1952. Activated on 1 Nov 1952. Redesignated as: 78 Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 1 Apr 1954; 78 Tactical Fighter Squadron on 8 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 1 May 1992. Redesignated as 78 Fighter Squadron on 22 Dec 1993. Activated on 1 Jan 1994. Inactivated on 30 Jun 2003. Redesignated as 78 Reconnaissance Squadron on 19 Apr 2006. Activated on 19 May 2006. Redesignated as 78 Attack Squadron on 1 Jul 2010 (DAF/A1m Ltr 204t 1 Jul 10).

Assignments:  Unkn, 28 Feb-15 Nov 1918. 20 Pursuit Group (attached to 6 Composite Group), 1 Apr 1931; 3 Attack Wing (attached to 6 Composite Group), 15 Jun 1932; 16 Pursuit Group, 1 Dec 1932-1 Sep 1937. 18 Pursuit (later, 18 Fighter) Group, 1 Feb 1940; 15 Fighter Group, 16 Mar 1943-15 Oct 1946. 81 Fighter-Interceptor (later, 81 Fighter-Bomber) Group, 1 Nov 1952 (attached to 81 Fighter-Interceptor Wing, c. 22 Apr 1954-7 Feb 1955); 81 Fighter-Bomber (later, 81 Tactical Fighter) Wing, 8 Feb 1955-1 May 1992. 20 Operations Group, 1 Jan 1994-30 Jun 2003. Tenth Air Force, 19 May 2006; 926 Group, 17 Aug 2007-.

Stations:  Waco, TX, 28 Feb 1918; Taliaferro Field, TX, 28 Feb-15 Nov 1918. France Field, Canal Zone, 1 Apr 1931; Albrook Field, Canal Zone, 15 Oct 1932-1 Sep 1937. Wheeler Field, Territory of Hawaii (TH), 1 Feb 1940; Kaneoke, TH, c. 9 Dec 1941; Midway, 23 Jan 1943; Barking Sands, TH, 23 Apr 1943; Haliewa Field, TH, 31 Jul 1943; Stanley Field, TH, 6 Jan 1944; Mokuleia Field, TH, c. 1 Apr 1944; Bellows Field, TH, 8 Jun 1944-24 Jan 1945; South Field, Iwo Jima, 2 Mar 1945; Bellows Field, TH, 25 Nov 1945; Wheeler Field, TH, 9 Feb-15 Oct 1946. RAF Shepherds Grove, England, 1 Nov 1952; RAF Sculthorpe, England, 31 May 1956; RAF Shepherds Grove, England, 3 May 1957; RAF Woodbridge, England, 22 Dec 1958-1 May 1992. Shaw AFB, SC, 1 Jan 1994-30 Jun 2003. Nellis AFB, NV, 19 May 2006; Creech AFB, NV, 1 Jul 2008-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 28 Feb-15 Nov 1918. Unkn, 1 Apr 1931-1 Sep 1937. Capt D. W. Jenkins, Feb 1940; Capt A. J. Hanna, 20 Jul 1940; Capt W. P. Fisher, 30 Apr 1941; Maj William R. Clingerman, unkn-3 Jun 1942; Maj Sherwood E. Buckland, 3 Jun 1942; Maj Gordon R. Hyde, 25 Feb 1943; Capt William Southerland, 23 May 1943; Capt Emmett L. Kearney, 10 Dec 1943; Maj James M. Vande Hey, 14 Apr 1944; Maj James B. Tapp, 17 Apr 1945-unkn; Maj John G. Benner, c. 25 Nov 1945; Capt Edward F. Gallup, 29 Dec 1945-unkn. Lt Col Arlie J. Blood, Nov 1952; Maj Robert R. Fredette, 1 Jun 1955; Maj Herbert O. Brennan, 31 Dec 1956-unkn; Lt Col Charles E. Simpson, 30 Jun 1958; Maj Harry K. Barco, c. Jan 1960; Lt Col Ernest D. Stuyvesant, 15 Feb 1961; Maj William H. McMurray, May 1964; Lt Col Robert R. Fredette, Oct 1964; Lt Col William H. McMurray, 9 Jun 1966; Lt Col Frederick C. Kyler, 1 May 1967; Lt Col Edward A. Crimp, Mar 1970; Lt Col Donald T. Lynch, 1 May 1970; Lt Col Robert L. Cass, 1 Feb 1971; Lt Col Gary L. Dryden, 25 Sep 1971 (temporary); Lt Col Billy D. Patton, 4 Oct 1971; Lt Col George M. Decell III, 16 Nov 1972 (temporary), 20 Nov 1972 (permanent); Maj Robert R. Pedigo, 15 Jun 1973 (temporary); Lt Col William C. Hall, 27 Jul 1973; Lt Col William Baechle, 20 Jan 1975; Lt Col Sidney B. Hudson, 16 Jul 1976; Lt Col Michael W. Harris, 14 Jul 1978; Lt Col Glenn A. Profitt II, 7 Jul 1980; Lt Col Jock P. Patterson, 25 Jun 1982; Lt Col Robert O. Smith, 8 Jun 1984; Lt Col Robert S. Hinds, 2 Jun 1986; Lt Col Alvia W. Moore II, 23 Sep 1987; Lt Col Victor J. White, 3 Feb 1989; Lt Col William E. Rial, 29 May 1990; Lt Col James Fortezzo, 7 Oct 1990-15 May 1992. Lt Col Michael T. Cantwell, 1 Jan 1994; Lt Col Charles M. Dodd III, 12 May 1995; Lt Col Jon W. Armstrong, 27 Jun 1996; Lt Col Steven R. F. Searcy, 22 May 1998; Lt Col James R. Cody, 23 Jun 2000; Lt Col Charles Q. Brown Jr., 17 May 2002-30 Jun 2003. Col David L. Culbertson, c. May 2006; Lt Col Ronald J. Stefanik, 17 Apr 2008; Lt Col John E. Meyers, 2 Nov 2009-.

Aircraft:  Apparently included JN-4, JN-6, and perhaps S-4, during 1918. Not equipped, 1931-1932; P-12, 1932-1936; not equipped, 1936-1937. P-26, 1940; P-36, 1940-1941; P-40, 1941-1944; P-39, 1942; P-47, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944-1946. F-86, 1952-1955; F-84, 1954-1958; F-101, 1958-1966; F-4, 1965-1979; A-10, 1979-1992. F-16, 1994-2003. MQ-1, 2006-; MQ-9, 2007-.

Operations:  Pilot training, 28 Feb-15 Nov 1918. Patrols over the Pacific, Jan 1942-Dec 1944. Combat in Southwest Pacific, 10 Mar-14 Aug 1945. Flew combat patrols in no-fly zone, Southwest Asia in 1991, and performed combat operations over Kosovo, Mar-Jun 1999. Maintained combat-ready Reservists to train and equip combat Air Forces to conduct integrated and expeditionary combat operations as well as training operations in MQ-1 and MQ-9 weapons systems, 2006-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater. Southwest Asia: Ceasefire. Kosovo: Air Campaign.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1961-30 Jun 1963; 1 Jun 1966-31 May 1968; 1 Jul 1968-30 Jun 1970; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1978; 1 Jul 1979-30 Jun 1981; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jun 1989-31 May 1991; 1 Jun 1991-[1 May 1992]; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1994; 1 Jun 1997-31 May 1999; 24 Mar-10 Jun 1999; 1 Jun 1999-31 May 2001; 27 Aug 2007-26 Aug 2009.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc with a wide Yellow border a Bushmaster's head proper. Approved on 14 Sep 1933 (K 8569); newest rendition approved on 18 Jan 2008.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through May 2011.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through May 2011.

Table of Contents



21st Fighter Group

(Assigned to Twentieth AF during the summer of 1945)

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
The New York Military Affairs Symposium Website
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (21st Operations Group)

Lineage:  Established as 21 Bombardment Group (Medium) on 13 Jan 1942. Activated on 1 Feb 1942. Disestablished on 10 Oct 1943. Reestablished and consolidated (31 Jul 1985) with the 21 Fighter Group, which was established on 31 Mar 1944. Activated on 21 Apr 1944. Inactivated on 10 Oct 1946. Redesignated 21 Fighter-Bomber Group on 15 Nov 1952. Activated on 1 Jan 1953. Inactivated on 8 Feb 1958. Redesignated: 21 Tactical Fighter Group on 31 Jul 1985; 21 Operations Group on 25 Sep 1991. Activated on 26 Sep 1991. Inactivated on 19 Dec 1991. Activated on 15 May 1992.

Assignments:  Air Force Combat Command, 1 Feb 1942; III Bomber Command, 11 Mar 1942; XII Bomber Command, 2 May 1942; III Bomber Command, 8 May 1942-10 Oct 1943. US Army Air Forces, Central Pacific Area, 21 Apr 1944; VII Fighter Command, 24 Apr 1944; 7 Fighter Wing, 3 Jul 1944; VII Fighter Command, 10 Nov 1944 (attached to 7 Fighter Wing, 10 Nov 1944-Feb 1945); US Army Strategic Air Forces, 16 Jul 1945; 20 Fighter Wing, 5 Aug 1945-10 Oct 1946. 21 Fighter-Bomber Wing, 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958. 21 Wing, 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. 21 Space Wing, 15 May 1992-.

Components

Squadrons:  8 Reconnaissance (later, 398 Bombardment): attached 1 Feb-21 Apr 1942, assigned 22 Apr 1942-10 Oct 1943. 21 Crew Training: 15 May 1992-1 Oct 1994. 43 Fighter: 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. 46 Fighter: 15 Jun 1944-10 Oct 1946. 54 Fighter: 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. 72 Fighter (later, 72 Fighter-Bomber): 15 Jun 1944-10 Oct 1946; 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958 (detached 27 Aug-17 Sep 1953 and 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958). 90 Fighter: 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. 313 Bombardment: 1 Feb 1942-10 Oct 1943. 314 Bombardment: 1 Feb 1942-10 Oct 1943. 315 Bombardment: 1 Feb 1942-10 Oct 1943. 416 Fighter-Bomber: 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958 (detached 12 Sep-c. 2 Oct 1953 and 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958). 531 Fighter (later, 531 Fighter-Bomber): 15 Jun 1944-10 Oct 1946; 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958 (detached 26 Sep-c. 17 Oct 1953 and 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958). Flights. 84 Airlift: 1 Nov 1993-1 Apr 1997.

Stations:  Bowman Field, KY, 1 Feb 1942; Jackson AAB, MS, 6 Feb 1942; Columbia AAB, SC, 21 Apr 1942; Key Field, MS, 24 May 1942; MacDill Field, FL, 24 Jun 1942-10 Oct 1943. Wheeler Field, TH, 21 Apr 1944; Mokuleia Field, TH, 13 Oct 1944-9 Feb 1945; Central Field, Iwo Jima, 26 Mar 1945; South Field, Iwo Jima, 16 Jul 1945; Isley Field, Saipan, 4 Dec 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 17 Apr-10 Oct 1946. George AFB, CA, 1 Jan 1953-26 Nov 1954; Chambley AB, France, 12 Dec 1954-8 Feb 1958. Elmendorf AFB, AK, 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. Peterson AFB, CO, 15 May 1992-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 1-8 Feb 1942; Col Robert D. Knapp, 9 Feb 1942; Col William L. Lee, 26 Apr 1942; Lt Col John F. Batjer, 13 Aug 1942; Col Carl R. Storrie, 5 Oct 1942; Col Guy L. McNeil, 7 Nov 1942; Col Don Z. Zimmerman, 19 Apr 1943; Lt Col L. F. Brownfield, 6 Jun 1943; Col Richard T. Coiner Jr., 6 Jul-10 Oct 1943. Col Kenneth R. Powell, 21 Apr 1944; Col Charles E. Taylor, 14 Jun 1945; Lt Col Charles E. Parsons, 15 Oct 1945; Col William Eades, 25 Nov 1945; Col Lester S. Harris, Feb-10 Oct 1946. Col Paul P. Douglas Jr., 1 Jan 1953; Col Verl D. Luehring, 26 Apr 1954; Col R. C. Franklin Jr., 27 Apr 1955; Lt Col Charles J. Bowers, 5 Mar 1956; Col Donavon F. Smith, 14 Aug 1956-14 Apr 1957; none (not manned), 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958. Unkn, 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. Unkn, 15 May 1992-13 Jun 1994; Col Russell J. Anarde, 14 Jun 1994; Col Steven J. Bruger, 9 Jun 1995; Col John B. Perroni Jr., 11 Jan 1996; Col William H. Rohlman, 27 May 1997; Col Thomas D. Shearer, 8 Jul 1999; Col Michael A. Rampino, 21 Jun 2001-.

Aircraft:  A-20, 1942; B-18, 1942; B-25, 1942; B-26, 1942-1943. P-39, 1944; P-38, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944-1946; P-47, 1946. F-51, 1953; F-86, 1953-1958; T-33, 1957-1958. C-21, 1993-1997. Satellites, 1993-.

Operations:  Upon activation in 1942, trained medium bombardment crews; flew some antisubmarine patrols over Gulf of Mexico. Following activation in 1944, group conducted day and night interception missions in defense of Hawaiian Islands. In Mar 1945, group moved to Iwo Jima to escort B-29s bombing Japanese mainland from the Marianas. Suffered Japanese guerilla attack the night after its arrival but next day flew its first combat mission against targets in enemy-occupied Bonin Islands. On group's first mission to Japan on 7 Apr 1945, earned Distinguished Unit Citation for escorting B-29s that bombed the heavily-defended Nakajima aircraft factory near Tokyo. On 19 Apr 1945, participated in the first strafing mission to Japan. During May 1945, struck airfields near Tokyo and Nagoya and air installations on southern Kyushu; and escorted B-29s hitting Japanese port of Yokohama.

Operations from Iwo Jima included attacking airfields that the enemy was using to launch suicide planes against the Allied forces on Okinawa; striking enemy barracks, airfields, and shipping in the Bonins and Japan; and escorting B-29's that bombed Japanese cities. Assigned to Twentieth AF during the summer of 1945. Trained, participated in aerial reviews, and served as a part of the defense force for Iwo Jima, Saipan, and Guam after the war. Re-equipped with P-47's during the summer of 1946. Inactivated on Guam on 10 Oct 1946.

Redesignated 21st Fighter-Bomber Group. Activated in the US on 1 Jan 1953. Assigned to Tactical Air Command. Equipped for a few months with F-51's, later with F-86's. Moved to France, Nov-Dec 1954, and assigned to United States Air Forces in Europe. Provided air defense for US. Between 1954 and 1958, served in France as part of North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces. From 1992, operated worldwide network of missile warning, space surveillance, communications, and space support units.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Oct 1992-30 Sep 1994; 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1997; 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1998; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1999; 1 Jan 2000-31 Aug 2001.

Insigne:  Shield: Azure, a broad sword argent, shaded silver, hilt and pommel or, shaded yellow, outlined of the field, between four red lightning streaks proper, two and two, bendwise. Motto: Fortitudo Et Preparatio - Strength and Preparedness. (Approved 23 Jul 1957.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 23 Nov 2004.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2001.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (21st Space Wing)

Lineage:  Established as 21 Fighter-Bomber Wing on 15 Nov 1952. Activated on 1 Jan 1953. Inactivated on 8 Feb 1958. Redesignated 21 Tactical Fighter Wing on 19 May 1958. Activated on 1 Jul 1958. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 18 Jun 1960. Redesignated 21 Composite Wing, and activated, on 6 May 1966. Organized on 8 Jul 1966. Redesignated: 21 Tactical Fighter Wing on 1 Oct 1979; 21 Wing on 26 Sep 1991. Inactivated on 19 Dec 1991. Redesignated 21 Space Wing on 1 May 1992. Activated on 15 May 1992.

Assignments:  Ninth Air Force, 1 Jan 1953; Twelfth Air Force, 12 Dec 1954; United States Air Forces in Europe, 1 Jan-8 Feb 1958. Fifth Air Force, 1 Jul 1958; 39 Air Division, 10 Nov 1958-18 Jun 1960. Alaskan Air Command (later, Eleventh Air Force), 6 May 1966-19 Dec 1991. Air Force Space Command, 15 May 1992; Fourteenth Air Force, 20 Sep 1993-.

Components

Groups:  21 Fighter-Bomber (later, 21 Operations): 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958; 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991; 15 May 1992-. 343 Tactical Fighter: 15 Nov 1977-1 Jan 1980. 721 Space: 15 May 1992-24 Jun 1994. 821 Space: 31 May 1996-1 Oct 2001.

Squadrons:  2 Space Warning: 21 Jul 1995-31 May 1996. 5 Space Warning: 8 Jun 1995-10 Aug 1999. 8 Space Warning: 8 Jun-30 Sep 1995. 12 Space Warning: 8 Jun 1995-10 Aug 1999. 17 Troop Carrier (later, 17 Tactical Airlift): 8 Jul 1966-31 Mar 1975. 18 Tactical Fighter: 1 Oct-15 Nov 1977; 1 Jan 1980-1 Jan 1982. 43 Tactical Fighter: 15 Jul 1970-15 Nov 1977; 1 Jan 1980-26 Sep 1991. 54 Tactical Fighter: 8 May 1987-26 Sep 1991. 72 Fighter-Bomber: attached 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958. 90 Tactical Fighter: 29 May-26 Sep 1991. 317 Fighter-Interceptor: 8 Jul 1966-31 Dec 1969. 416 Fighter-Bomber (later, 416 Tactical Fighter): attached 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958; assigned 1 Jul 1958-18 Jun 1960. 531 Fighter-Bomber (later, 531 Tactical Fighter): attached 15 Apr 1957-8 Feb 1958; assigned 1 Jul 1958-18 Jun 1960. 5021 Tactical Operations: 1 Oct 1981-1 Jul 1988. 5040 Helicopter: 15 Jul 1969-30 Sep 1975. 5041 Tactical Operations: 1 Oct 1971-1 Oct 1977.

Stations:  George AFB, CA, 1 Jan 1953-28 Nov 1954; Chambley AB, France, 12 Dec 1954-8 Feb 1958. Misawa AB, Japan, 1 Jul 1958-18 Jun 1960. Elmendorf AFB, AK, 8 Jul 1966-19 Dec 1991. Peterson AFB, CO, 15 May 1992-.

Commanders:  Col James B. Buck, 1 Jan 1953; Col Robert R. Rowland, 27 Apr 1953; Col Robert N. Baker, 29 Jun 1956-8 Feb 1958. Col Frank J. Collins, 1 Jul 1958; Col William W. Ingenhutt, 21 Aug 1958; Col Dean Davenport, 28 Sep 1959-18 Jun 1960. None (not manned), 6 May-7 Jul 1966; Col Donald H. Lynch, 8 Jul 1966; Col Charles W. Johnson Jr., Jun 1968; Col Kennieth D. Dunaway, 23 Sep 1969; Col John A. Nelson, 15 Jan 1970; Col Kennieth D. Dunaway, 1 Sep 1970; Col James R. Larkins, 23 Jul 1971; Col James R. Brickel, 9 Aug 1971; Col David T. Stockman, 12 Jul 1972; Col Charles F. Loyd, 4 Jun 1973; Col Frederick C. Eaton, 1 Jul 1974; Col Edward L. Tixier, 1 Jul 1975; Col John T. Wotring, 29 Apr 1977; Col Michael A. Nelson,16 Apr 1979; Col Jerry D. Cobb, 20 Feb 1981; Col Evan J. Griffith Jr., 22 Apr 1982; Col Wilfred K. Abbott, 16 Apr 1984; Col Pat R. Paxton, 10 Jul 1984; Col William R. Povilus, 19 Mar 1985; Col Stuart L. Alton, 17 Oct 1986; Col Harold S. Storer Jr., 23 Aug 1988; Col Donald J. Creighton, 20 Mar 1990; Col Rodney P. Kelly, 26 Sep-19 Dec 1991. Brig Gen Ronald D. Gray, 15 May 1992; Brig Gen Donald G. Cook, 1 Sep 1993; Brig Gen Gerald F. Perryman Jr., 10 Jan 1995; Brig Gen Franklin J. Blaisdell, 7 Jun 1996; Brig Gen Jerry M. Drennan, 19 Jun 1998; Brig Gen Claude R. Kehler, 22 Aug 2000; Brig Gen Duane W. Deal, 15 May 2002; Brig Gen Richard E. Webber, 11 Mar 2004-.

Aircraft / Satellites:  F-51, 1953; F-86, 1953-1958. F-84, 1958-1959; F-100, 1958-1960. F/TF-102, 1966-1969; C-130, 1966-1975; C-124, 1969-1971, 1971-1974; H-21, 1969-1970; F-4, 1970-1982; HH-3, 1970-1975; B-57, 1971-1975; C-118, 1971-1975; T-33, 1971-1988; T-39, 1971-1977; VC-118, 1972-1975; EC-118, 1973-1975; CH-3, 1974-1975; EB-57, 1974-1976; C-12, 1977-1984; F-15, 1982-1991. C-21, 1993-1997. Satellites, 1993-.

Operations:  Maintained tactical proficiency and provided air defense augmentation in the United States, Jan 1953-Nov 1954. Became part of the NATO defense forces in Europe, performing special weapons tactical operations, Dec 1954-Jan 1958. Participated in numerous actual and simulated tactical air operations and provided air defense augmentation in Japan and Korea, Jul 1958-Jun 1960. In 1966, assumed air defense responsibility for Alaska and contiguous areas in support of North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) and Aerospace Defense Command (ADCOM) through the Alaskan NORAD Region and ADCOM Region. Provided support for multi-service special operations in arctic regions and participated in numerous search and rescue efforts, 1966-1991. Maintained air defense and alert forces at forward operating bases in Galena and King Salmon, AK, 1977-1991. In 1978-1979 lent humanitarian support and assistance to Vietnamese refugees relocating to Canada. Provided command management of Air Force Space Command's worldwide network of assigned missile warning, space surveillance, and communications units, 1992-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 8 Jul 1966-1 May 1967; 2 May 1967- 1 Jan 1968; 2 Jan-31 Dec 1968; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1969; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1970; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1971; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1972; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1974; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1975; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1978; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1980; 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1983; 1 Oct 1985-31 Dec 1986; 1 Jan 1987-31 Dec 1988; 1 Oct 1992-30 Sep 1994; 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1997; 1 Oct 1997-30 Sep 1999; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1998; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1999; 1 Jan 2000-31 Aug 2001.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 21 Operations Group prior to 1 Jan 1953. Service Streamers. None. Campaign Streamers. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater; Air Offensive, Japan. Decorations. Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  Approved on 23 Jul 1957.  Emblem Significance: (Note: Per AFI 84-105, subordinate groups use the approved emblem of their parent wing with the substitution of the group designation in the scroll.) The blue shield represents the vast blue sky - the 21st's area of operations. The upraised sword indicates the strength and readiness of our wing to perform its mission, whether in peace or war. The lightning is symbolic of the heavens beyond, our stormy power and protective Lord. The Air Force blue, red and yellow signify the three fighter squadrons of the 21st Fighter-Bomber Wing. (Source: 21 SW Emblem Significance Statement)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 Nov 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 31 Dec 2004.



Other Sites of Interest:

21st Space Wing Wiki Resources

Table of Contents



46th Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 46th Pursuit Squadron (Fighter) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Dec 1940. Redesignated: 46th Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 12 Feb 1942; 46th Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 10 Oct 1946. Redesignated 46th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron on 11 Sep 199. Activated on 1 Nov 1952. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1958. Redesignated 46th Tactical Fighter Squadron and activated 17 Apr 1962, organized 1 Jul 1962, inactivated 1 Jul 1971. Activated 1 Oct 1973, inactivated 1 Apr 1978. Redesignated 46th Tactical Fighter Training Squadron and activated 1 Oct 1983, redesignated 46th Fighter Training Squadron 1 Feb 1992, inactivated 1 Oct 1993.

Assignments:  15th Pursuit (later Fighter) Group, 1 Dec 1940; 21st Fighter Group, 15 Jun 1944-10 Oct 1946. 4710th Defense (later Air Defense) Wing, 1 Nov 1952; 4709th Air Defense Wing, 1 Mar 1956; 4621st Air Defense Wing (later New York Air Defense Sector), 1 Oct 1956; 4728th Air Defense Group, 8 Feb 1957-1 Jul 1958. Tactical Air Command, 17 Apr 1962; 15th Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Ju1 1962-1 Oct 1970 (attached to 405th Fighter Wing May 65-Aug 65), 1 Tactical Fighter Wing 1 Oct 1970-1 Jul 1971. 931st Tactical Fighter Group 1 Oct 1973-1 Jul 1975, 434th Tactical Fighter Wing 1 Jul 1975-1 Jul 1978. 917th Tactical Fighter Group 30 Sep 1983-1 Aug 92, 917th Operations Group -1 Oct 1993.

Stations:  Wheeler Field, TH, 1 Dec 1940; Hickam Field, TH, 6 Feb 1942; Mokuleia Field, TH, 22 May 1942; Hilo Field, TH, 16 Dee 1942-19 Mar 1943; Canton, 27 Mar 1943; Makin, 18 Dec 1943; Wheeler Field, TH, 17 Feb 1944; Mokuleia Field, TH, 13 Oct 1944; Iwo Jima, 26 Mar 1945; Isley Field, Saipan, 5 Dec 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 17 Apr-10 Oct 1946. Dover AFB, Del, 1 Nov 1952-1 Jul 1958. MacDill AFB, FL 1962-1971, Grissom AFB, IN 1973-1978. Barksdale AFB, LA 1983-1993.

Aircraft:  OA-9, 1940; A-12, 1940; P-36, 1940-1941; P-39, 1941-1944; P-40, 1941-1943; P-38, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944-1946; P-47, 1946. F-94, 1952-1958. F-84, 1962-1964. F-4, 1964-1971. A-37, 1973-1978. A-10, 1983-1993.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific, 7 Dec 1941-Mar 1943. Combat in Central Pacific, 18 Dec 1943-7 Feb 1944 and in Western Pacific, 28 Mar-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  On a blue disc a black sabre-tooth tiger passant in front of a horizontal bank of white clouds. (Approved 11 Mar 1942.)

Table of Contents



72nd Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 72d Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) on 4 Oct 1941. Activated on 5 Oct 1941. Redesignated 72d Fighter Squadron on 15 May 1942. Inactivated on 10 Oct 1946. Redesignated 72d Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 15 Nov 1952. Activated on 1 Jan 1953. Inactivated on 8 Feb 1958. Redesignated 72d Tactical Fighter Squadron on 19 May 1958. Activated on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated on 9 Apr 1959. Redesignated 72nd Tactical Fighter Training Sq and activated 1 Jul 1982; Redesignated 72nd Fighter Sq c. 1 Nov 1991, inactivated 19 Jun 1992.

Assignments:  15th Pursuit (later Fighter) Group, 5 Oct 1941; 318th Fighter Group, 15 Oct 1942; 21st Fighter Group, 15 Jun 1944-10 Oct 1946. 21st Fighter-Bomber Group, 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958. 6200th Air Base Wing, 1 Jul 1958-9 Apr 1959. 56th Tactical Training Wg 1982-1 Nov 1991, 56th Operations Gp -1992.

Stations:  Wheeler Field, TH, 5 Oct 1941; Hilo Field, TH, 25 Jul 1943; Wheeler Field, TH, 21 Oct 1943; Makin, 18 Dec 1943; Haleiwa Field, TH, 23 Apr 1944; Mokuleia Field, TH, 8 Jun 1944; Iwo Jima, 26 Mar 1945; Isley Field, Saipan, 5 Dec 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 17 Apr-10 Oct 1946. George AFB, Calif, 1 Jan 1953-26 Nov 1954; Chateauroux, France, 14 Dec 1954; Chambley AB, France, 9 Ju1 1955-8 Feb 1958. Clark AB, Luzon, 1 Jul 1958-9 Apr 1959. MacDill AFB, FL 1982-1992.

Aircraft:  P-40, 1941-1943; P-39, 1943-1944; P-38, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944-1946; P-47, 1946. F-51, 1953; F-86, 1953-1957. F-100, 1958-1959.

Operations:  Patrols over the Pacific, Jan 1942-Nov 1943. Combat in Central Pacific, 18 Dec 1943-14 Feb 1944, and in Western Pacific, 27 Mar-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Pacific; Air Offensive Japan; Eastern Mandates; Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945.

Emblem:  On a red disc within a black border edged Air Force golden yellow, a stylized silhouette of a bird in profile, its upraised wings extending over the border in sinister chief, its claws grasping three lightning flashes, all white; in the bird's beak a green olive branch; on the border in chief three white stars, in base the motto, letters white. Motto: PAX PER AUXILIA PARATA, Peace through Readiness. (Approved 24 Nov 1958.)

Table of Contents



531st Fighter Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 58th Bombardment Squadron (Light) on 22 Nov 1940. Activated on 1 Jan 1941. Redesignated: 58th Bombardment Squadron (Dive) on 19 Oct 1942; 531st Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 14 Aug 1943; 531st Fighter Squadron on 18 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 10 Oct 1946. Redesignated 531st Fighter-Bomber Squadron on 15 Nov 1952. Activated on 1 Jan 1953. Inactivated on 8 Feb 1958. Redesignated 531st Tactical Fighter Squadron on 19 May 1958. Activated on 1 Jul 1958. Inactivated 31 Jul 1970.

Assignments:  Hawaiian (later Seventh) Air Force, 1 Jan 1941; 21st Fighter Group, 15 Jun 1944-10 Oct 1946. 21st Fighter-Bomber Group, 1 Jan 1953-8 Feb 1958. 21st Tactical Fighter Wing, 1 Ju1 1958; 39th Air Division, 18 Jun 1960- c. 16 Jun 1964, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wg - c. 30 Nov 1965, 834th Air Div -Dec 1965, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wg -1970.

Stations:  Wheeler Field, TH, 1 Jan 1941; Bellows Field, TH, 18 Mar 1941; Hickam Field, TH, 29 Apr 1941; Bellows Field, TH, 11 Dec 1941; Wheeler Field, TH, 19 Dec 1941-18 Jun 1943; Canton, 24 Jun 1943; Makin, c. 18 Dec 1943; Bellows Field, TH, Mar 1944; Kuoloa, TH, 21 Apr 1944; Mokuleia Field, TH, 8 Oct 194; Iwo Jima, 26 Mar 1945; Isley Field, Saipan, 5 Dec 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 17 Apr-10 Oct 1946. George AFB, Calif, 1 Jan 1953-26 Nov 1954; Toul/Rosieres AB, France, 13 Dec 1954; Chambley AB, France, 14 Jun 1955-8 Feb 1958. Misawa, Japan, 1 Ju1 1958-16 Jun 1964; England AFB, LA -7 Dec 1965, Bien Hoa AB, Viet Nam -1970.

Aircraft:  B-18, 1941-1942; A-20, 1942-1943; A-24, 1943-1944; P-39, 1944; P-38, 1944-1945; P-51, 1944-1946; P-47, 1946. F-51, 1953; F-86,1953-1957. F-100, 1958-.

Operations:  Combat in Central Pacific, 18 Dec 1943-10 Mar 1944, and in Western Pacific, 30 Mar-14 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  Central Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan; Eastern Mandates.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: Japan, 7 Apr 1945. Presidential Unit Citations 8 Jun 1966-18 Apr 1967, 6 Mar 1968-31 Jul 1969; AF Outstanding Unit Award with V 31 Jan 1968-5 Mar 1968, 21 Jan 1970-31 Dec 1971 [sic]; AF Outstanding Unit Award 1 May 1964-16 Jul 1965, 11 Feb 1965-16 Mar 1965, Republic of Viet Nam Gallantry Cross with Palm 25 Nov 1965-19 May 1969, 29 Jun 1966-8 Mar 1967 (award to "Fighter Sq"), 1 May 1970-31 Jul 1970, 1 Apr 1966-31 Jul 1970.

Emblem:  On and over a white cloud formation edged and voided of the sky, Air Force blue, a black hawk swooping in downward flight, details of wings white, his beak and talons Air Force golden yellow, outlines and details red, grasping in each foot a red lightning streak. Motto: On an Air Force blue scroll, STRIKE AND RETURN, Air Force golden yellow. (Approved 10 Nov 1958.)

Table of Contents



1st Air Transport Squadron

Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (1st Airlift Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted as 1 Air Transport Squadron (Mobile) on 13 Mar 1944. Activated on 23 Mar 1944. Inactivated on 25 Mar 1946. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted, and redesignated as 1 Air Transport Squadron, Medium, on 1 Sep 1953. Activated on 18 Nov 1953. Redesignated as: 1 Air Transport Squadron, Heavy, on 8 Sep 1954; 1 Military Airlift Squadron on 8 Jan 1966. Inactivated on 30 Jun 1971. Activated on 12 Sep 1977. Redesignated as 1 Airlift Squadron on 12 Jul 1991.

Assignments:  Caribbean Wing, Air Transport Command, 23 Mar 1944; India-China Wing (later, India-China Division), Air Transport Command, c. 2 May 1944 (attached to XX Bomber Command, 17 May-20 Nov 1944); XX Bomber Command, 21 Nov 1944 (attached to 22 Air Depot Group, Nov-Dec 1944); United States Army Forces, Pacific Ocean Areas (later, US Army Strategic Air Forces), c. 20 Jun 1945; Eighth Air Force, 31 Jul 1945; Okinawa Air Depot, 10 Sep 1945; Far East Air Service Command, 9 Jan 1946; IV Air Service Area Command, 15 Jan-25 Mar 1946. 1607 Air Base Group, 18 Nov 1953; 1607 Air Transport Group, 1 Jan 1954; 1607 Air Transport Wing, 18 Jan 1963; 436 Military Airlift Wing, 8 Jan 1966-30 Jun 1971. 89 Military Airlift Wing, Special Mission (later, 89 Military Airlift Group; 89 Military Airlift Wing), 12 Sep 1977; 89 Operations Group, 12 Jul 1991-.

Stations:  Homestead AAFld, FL, 23 Mar-21 Apr 1944; Kalaikunda, India, 3 May 1944 (air echelon operated from Kharagpur, India, 7 May-4 Aug 1945); Naha AB, Okinawa, 20 Jun 1945-25 Mar 1946. Dover AFB, DE, 18 Nov 1953-30 Jun 1971. Andrews AFB, MD, 12 Sep 1977-.

Commanders:  Lt Col Samuel S. Nuckols, 23 Mar 1944; Maj Coy L. Waxler, c. 30 Jun 1945-unkn; none (not manned), C. Dec 1945-25 Mar 1946. Maj Donald L. Clarke, 18 Nov 1953; Maj Johnny C. McLean, 10 Jan 1957; Lt Col Robert L. DeBord, 20 Jun 1958; Maj Glenn W. Jones, 1 Sep 1958; Lt Col Elmo Coker, 12 Nov 1958; Lt Col Walter F. Derck, 4 May 1959; Lt Col Glen W. Jones, 4 Jan 1960; Lt Col Miles H. Watkins, 10 Jul 1963; Col Walter M. Coble, 1 Apr 1965; Col Gerald B. Edwards, 1 Aug 1967 Lt Col Lawrence A. Doyle, 17 Jul 1970-30 Jun, 1971. Lt Col Kenneth R. Hesse, 12 Sep 1977; Lt Col Charles F. Blount, 18 Apr 1978; Lt Col Glen E. Nemecek, c. 1981; Lt Col J. R. Johnson II, 8 Jan 1982; Lt Col Edward M. Bullard, 23 May 1983; Lt Col Newton I. Carpenter, c. 1984; Lt Col Keith J. Urbach, 6 Dec 1985; Lt Col John A. Steinnes, 3 Aug 1987; Lt Col Lawrence N. Lacey Jr., 4 Aug 1989; Lt Col Stephen J. Wanzek, 11 Mar 1991; Lt Col Paul E. Schutt, 9 Feb 1993; Lt Col Jeffrey Miller, 21 Jan 1994; Lt Col Peter Gray, 11 May 1995; Lt Col Robert C. Kane, 30 Jun 1997; Lt Col John R. Ranck, 3 Sep 1998; Lt Col Daniel G. Hargrove, 10 Feb 2000; Lt Col James R. Ayers, 1 Jun 2001; Lt Col Richard Klumpp, 20 Jun 2003; Lt Col Charles F. Spencer Jr., 24 Jun 2004; Lt Col James C. Mercer, 7 Jul 2006; Lt Col David L. Siegrist, 11 Jun 2008; Lt Col Timrek C. Heisler, 29 Jan 2010-.

Aircraft:  C-46, 1944-1946; C-87, 1944; C-47, 1945. C-54, 1953-1955; C-124, 1954-1960; C-133, 1960-1971. VC-6, 1977-1985; VC/C-9, 1977-1988; C-12, 1977-1994; VC-135, 1977-1991; VC-140, 1977-1987; C-20, 1983-1988; VC-137, 1987-2001; C-32, 1998-; C-40, 2002-.

Operations:  Aerial transportation in CBI, May 1944-May 1945; and in Western Pacific, c. Sep-Dec 1945. Worldwide airlift beginning Nov 1953, including transport of personnel and equipment to and from Southeast Asia, 1966-1971. Worldwide airlift support for the President and other high-ranking dignitaries of US and foreign governments, and C-12 training for personnel from all branches of the military, 1977-c. 1994. Transport of personnel to Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-Apr 1991.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; Central Burma; China Defensive; Ryukyu Islands.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Citation (Army): 5 Jun-5 Dec 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 26 Dec 1965-23 Jan 1966; 13 Nov-18 Dec 1967; 1 Jan 1968-31 Dec 1969; 1 Jul 1987-30 Jun 1989; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1991; 1 Jul 1991-30 Jun 1992; 1 Jul 1992-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2002; 1 Jul 2002-30 Jun 2004; 1 Jul 2004-30 Jun 2005; 1 Jul 2005-30 Jun 2006; 1 Jul 2006-30 Jun 2007; 1 Jul 2007-30 Jun 2008; 1 Jul 2008-30 Jun 2009. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-30 Jun 1971.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc edged with a narrow Yellow border, a Red stylized fox head within two Yellow parabolic curves. MOTTO: SAM FOX. Approved on 16 May 1983 (DFSC 83-08000); replaced emblem approved on 17 Jan 1956 (K&KE 231).

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, Commanders, Aircraft, and Honors through 3 Jun 2010.



Source:  Imphal, The Hump and Beyond - U.S.A.A.F. Combat Cargo Groups of the Second World War

The personnel of the First Air Transport Bomber Squadron were hand picked from the various Ferry Command Groups. All were well trained in their selected fields, both in schooling and actual experience. The activation of this squadron was under WD Letter, subject "Constitution and Activation of Certain Bomber Support Squadrons (Mobile)" file AG 3.22 (10-14 March 1943).

Lt. Col. Samuel S. Nuckols, a very experienced person in this type operation, was selected to command this special group. He was a graduate of flying cadet-school in 1932. Later in civilian life he was Chief Pilot for the Western Division of American Airlines. As a reserve officer, he was recalled to active duty in the early days of the conflict. Before being selected to head the First Transport Squadron, he was chief of flight training of the Third Over Seas Training School, located in Reno, Nevada. This school was located in the higher elevations of the Rocky Mountains. Its purpose was to familiarize and train pilots for the type flying encountered in the China, Burma, India Theatre and more especially "Hump" flying. One of the qualifications of the first pilots and most of the co-pilots of the First Air Transport Squadron was to have successfully completed the course at this school.

The table of organization of the squadron was four hundred men. Eighty-two of these were officers and the balance specialized enlisted men. Of the eighty-two officers, sixty seven were rated and fifteen were administrative. The aircraft consisted of twenty C-46 transport type, and they proved to be a very successful one for this kind of work. The men covered all fields of required specialist, including a flight surgeon, but excluding a chaplain. A chaplain was acquired on reaching the permanent station. The squadron was a self-sustained unit, whose mission was to go any place in the world and operate for thirty days without assistance. This required thirty days of supply of rations, water, medicine, a limited amount of aircraft parts, runway lights, a communications officer and equipment. The Twentieth Air Force was scheduled to operate out of India, with Headquarters in Khatagapur, Kalaikunda airfield, located six miles from Headquarters, became the operating and home for The First Air Transport Bomber Squadron. Here began the main part of the history of this small group of men that were, in the future, to establish records in this type operations, second to none.

The 20th Air Force with its creation in 1944, was assigned missions on a worldwide scope. It was under command of General Curtis LeMay. In 1944 Gen. Hap Arnold conceived the idea that the 20th AF Bomber Command should have control of its own specialized Air Transport Support. Three Mobile Air Transport Squadrons were organized, each with twenty C-46 Curtiss Commandos. The orders issued in creating these three squadrons, required that the best trained maintenance specialist for R-2800 engines, hydraulics, electrical, etc. People who knew the C-46. These squadrons were to be self sustaining. They were to be capable to load men and equipment into the aircraft in 24 hours, to fly where needed. In addition these units would also hauled repair parts to downed B-29's that could be repaired and flown back to base and returned downed B-29 crews who had bailed out and made their way to an airfield. They were to serve as a private Airline for the 20th Bomber Command.

The 1st Air Transport Squadon first went to Kaliakunda, India and in June 1945 to Clark Field, Manila. The 1st ATS had a likeness of the C-46 cross section on their patch to which was added from behind the ends of four bones shaped in a 'X' which resulted in the appearance of the 'Skull and Crossbones' this was added to the nose of each of the 1st ATS C-46 aircraft.



Source:  Andrews AFB (dcmilitary.com)

The 1st Airlift Squadron's lineage can be traced back to its formation at Homestead Army Airfield, Fla., on March 23,1944. As part of the Caribbean Wing of Air Transport Command, the squadron quickly prepared for activation and deployment overseas.

Upon activation, the 1st Air Transport Squadron (Mobile) trained for airlift operations in the China-Burma-India Theater of operations. It began military airlift missions at Kharagpur Airfield, India in May of 1944. Using C-46 and C-87 aircraft, the 1 ATS was responsible for transporting men and material over the Himalayas ("the Hump") to U.S. and Allied bases in China. On Jan.8, 1966, the 1st was re-designated the 1st Military Airlift Squadron and continued to serve at Dover AFB, Del., until inactivated on June 30, 1971.

The 1 AS, under the 89th Operations Group, flies the C-32A and C-40B, which are highly modified Boeing 757 and 737 aircraft, in support of our nation's leaders.

Table of Contents



2nd Air Transport Squadron (Mobile)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  Imphal, The Hump and Beyond - U.S.A.A.F. Combat Cargo Groups of the Second World War

The 20th Air Force with its creation in 1944, was assigned missions on a worldwide scope. It was under command of General Curtis LeMay. In 1944 Gen. Hap Arnold conceived the idea that the 20th AF Bomber Command should have control of its own specialized Air Transport Support. Three Mobile Air Transport Squadrons were organized, each with twenty C-46 Curtiss Commandos. The orders issued in creating these three squadrons, required that the best trained maintenance specialist for R-2800 engines, hydraulics, electrical, etc. People who knew the C-46. These squadrons were to be self sustaining. They were to be capable to load men and equipment into the aircraft in 24 hours, to fly where needed. In addition these units would also hauled repair parts to downed B-29's that could be repaired and flown back to base and returned downed B-29 crews who had bailed out and made their way to an airfield. They were to serve as a private Airline for the 20th Bomber Command.

The 2nd Air Transport Squadron first went to North Africa, then to Kaliakunda, India, Dergaon, India, and eventually on to Luliang, China. The 2nd ATS had a bright yellow diamond shape painted on its C-46's noses. The unit was nicknamed 'Sylvester's Circus' after its commanding officer Major Frank S. Sylvester of Santa Barbara, California.



Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon, Mr. Lee Schnur (2nd ATS)

Lineage:  2nd Bomber Support Sq, Mobile activated 29 Mar 44; redesignated 2nd Air Transport Sq, Mobile 8 Apr 44; activated 22 Apr 44; active through Apr 1945.

Assignments:  Probably assigned to Caribbean Wg, ATC at Homestead. On arrival in CBI theater to India-China Wg (later India-China Div), ATC until about Nov 44, then to China Wg, Provisional.

Stations:  Homestead AAB, FL until 22 May 1944, then Kalaikunda, India, Dergaon, India, and Luliang, China.

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Citation (Army): 12 Jul 44-12 Jan 45 (20 AF GO 70/45).


C-46 42-61055 (Photo courtesy of SSgt Harold McWhorter, crew chief)
Pilot: Lt. Glankler (back row, 2nd from left)   Crew Chief: SSgt (then Sgt) Harold McWhorter (back row, 3rd from left)

Table of Contents



3d Air Transport Squadron (Mobile)

Source:

Air Force Freedom of Information Act - Heraldry, Lineage & Honor (3rd Airborne Command Control Squadron)

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Constituted as 3d Air Transport Squadron (Mobile) on 13 Mar 1944; activated on 29 Mar 1944 at Homestead AAFld, FL; disbanded on 20 Jun 1945. Reconstituted, and consolidated with 3d Barrage Ballon Squadron, 3d Liaison Squadron and 3d Airborne Command and Control Squadronon 19 Sep 1985 and retained designation 3d Airborne Command and Control Squadron. Inactivated on 1 Nov 1986.

Assignments (3d ATS(M) only):  Caribbean Wing, Air Transport Command, 29 Mar 1944; XX Bomber Command, 21 Nov 1944-20 Jun 1945 (attached to India-China Division, Air Transport Command, 21 Nov 1944-c. 20 Jun 1945).

Stations:  Homestead AAFld, FL, 13 Mar-22 Jun 1944; Kharagpur, India, 19 Jul 1944; Kalaikunda, India by 15 Oct 1944; Dergaon, India, Nov 1944; Sookerating, India, 14 Jan-20 Jun 1945.

Aircraft:  C-46, 1944-1945.



Source:  Imphal, The Hump and Beyond - U.S.A.A.F. Combat Cargo Groups of the Second World War

The 20th Air Force with its creation in 1944, was assigned missions on a worldwide scope. It was under command of General Curtis LeMay. In 1944 Gen. Hap Arnold conceived the idea that the 20th AF Bomber Command should have control of its own specialized Air Transport Support. Three Mobile Air Transport Squadrons were organized, each with twenty C-46 Curtiss Commandos. The orders issued in creating these three squadrons, required that the best trained maintenance specialist for R-2800 engines, hydraulics, electrical, etc. People who knew the C-46. These squadrons were to be self sustaining. They were to be capable to load men and equipment into the aircraft in 24 hours, to fly where needed. In addition these units would also hauled repair parts to downed B-29's that could be repaired and flown back to base and returned downed B-29 crews who had bailed out and made their way to an airfield. They were to serve as a private airline for the 20th Bomber Command.



Source:

Harry S. Truman Presidential Museum and Library; "Operation Vittles Gets Organized"

Orders went out and by mid-August 81 more C-54s had been added or were en route. The planes and crews came from the 11th and 12th Air Transport Squadrons, Westover AFB, Massachusetts; the 8th and 9th Air Transport Squadrons, Kelly Field, Texas; the 22nd and 23d Air Transport Squadrons, Fairfield, California; the 3d Air Transport Squadron, Tokyo, Japan; and the 1st Air Squadron, Hickam Field, Hawaii. In the fall of 1948, 73 additional C-54s including all 24 available R5D's, the Navy version of the C-54, from the Navy VR-6 and VR-8 Squadrons joined the airlift.

Table of Contents



1st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Misidentified Patch

This insignia, while similar to the 1st PRS insignia, is actually for the 1371st Photo Mapping Squadron.  Source: usafpatches.com

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
Air Force Historical Studies Office
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (1st Air and Space Test Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted 1 Photographic Squadron on 22 Dec 1939. Activated on 1 Feb 1940. Redesignated: 1 Mapping Squadron on 13 Jan 1942; 1 Photographic Mapping Squadron on 9 Jun 1942; 1 Photographic Charting Squadron on 11 Aug 1943; 1 Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Heavy on 10 Nov 1944; 1 Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Long Range, Photographic-RCM on 4 Oct 1945; 1 Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Long Range, Photographic on 13 Nov 1945. Inactivated on 10 Mar 1947. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted, and consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with 1 Test Squadron, which was constituted on 12 Sep 1969. Activated on 15 Oct 1969. Inactivated on 30 Oct 1991. Redesignated 1 Air and Space Test Squadron on 28 Oct 2003. Activated on 1 Dec 2003.

Assignments:  Office of Chief of Air Corps, 1 Feb 1940; 1 Photographic (later, 1 Mapping; 1 Photographic Charting) Group, 10 Jun 1941; 11 Photographic Group, 1 Dec 1943; 311 Photographic Wing, 5 Oct 1944; Second Air Force, 10 Nov 1944 (attached to Eighth Air Force, c. 9 Sep 1945); 311 Reconnaissance Wing, 4 Oct 1945 (attached to United States Army Strategic Air Forces, 4 Oct 1945; Far East Air Forces, 21 Nov 1945; VII Bomber Command, 10 Dec 1945; Eighth Air Force, Mar 1946; 1 Air Division, 7 Jun 1946); Far East Air Forces, 3 Feb 1947; Thirteenth Air Force (attached to 5 Reconnaissance Group), 11 Feb-10 Mar 1947. 6 Air Division, 15 Oct 1969; Thirteenth Air Force 15 Dec 1969; 405 Fighter Wing, 20 Apr 1970; 3 Tactical Fighter Wing, 16 Sep 1974; 6200 Tactical Fighter Training Group, 1 Jan 1980-30 Oct 1991. 30 Launch Group, 1 Dec 2003-.

Stations:  Bolling Field, DC, 1 Feb 1940; Bradley Field, CT, 5 Dec 1941; MacDill Field, FL, 15 Jan 1944 (deployed to Accra, Gold Coast, British West Africa, 11 Mar-13 Oct 1944); Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 26 Oct 1944-31 Jul 1945; Kadena, Okinawa, 9 Sep 1945; Clark Field, Philippines, 11 Feb-10 Mar 1947. Clark AB, Philippines, 15 Oct 1969-30 Oct 1991. Vandenberg AFB, CA, 1 Dec 2003-.

Commanders:  Maj Donald G. Stitt, 1 Feb 1940; Maj Minton W. Kaye, 15 Nov 1940; Capt Charles P. Hollstein, 10 Jun 1941; Maj Richard W. Philbrick, by May 1942; Maj Albert M. Welsh, Dec 1942; Maj Foster S. Randle Jr., Apr 1944; Lt Col Albert M. Welsh, 16 Nov 1944; Maj Foster S. Randle Jr., 10 Oct 1945; Maj Howard E. Brown, 17 Dec 1945; unkn, Jan-Mar 1947. Lt Col William E. Powers, 15 Oct 1969; Lt Col William R. Martin, 21 Aug 1970; Lt Col William J. Watson, 27 Jun 1972; Lt Col Don O. Quane, 30 Jun 1973; Lt Col Jerry N. Hoblit, 17 Jan 1975; Lt Col James R. Alley, 25 Feb 1977; Lt Col Charles N. Nielsen, 20 Nov 1978; Lt Col Charles H. Holden, 30 Jun 1980; Lt Col Roger L. Prather, 21 Jun 1982; Lt Col Michael F. Tedesco, 1 Jun 1984; Lt Col Willard H. Whitley, by Jan 1986; Lt Col Robert F. Fischer, by Feb 1987; unkn, Jan 1988-30 Oct 1991.

Aircraft:  C-8, 1940; B-10, 1940; C-45/F-2, 1940; 1946-1947; A-29, 1941-1942; A-20/F-3, 1942; B-24/F-7, 1942-1945; B-34, 1942-1944; B-25, 1943; B-17/F-9, 1943-1944; B-29/F-13, 1944-1947; L-4, 1946; L-5, 1946-1947. F-4, 1969-unkn (at least thru 1989); BQM-34A, 1969-1989; F-15, 1980-unkn (at least thru 1989); F-16, 1982-unkn (at least thru 1989); MQM-107D, 1989-unkn.

Operations:  Mapped areas of the United States, 1940-1943; Alaska, Canada, Newfoundland, Labrador, and Greenland, 1941-1943; Africa, Middle East, India, and China, 1943-1944; Italy, Sicily, and Sardinia, 1944; and the Far East, 1945-1947. Conducted weapons system evaluation, known as COMBAT SAGE, of F-4 aircraft from 1969, of F-15 aircraft from 1980, and of F-16 aircraft from 1982, until shortly before inactivation. Also trained visiting aircrews in weapons employment and tactics.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater; World War II European-African-Middle Eastern Theater; World War II Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 3 Apr-31 May 1975; 1 Jul 1976-30 Jun 1977; 1 Apr 1980-31 Mar 1982; 1 Jul 1985-30 Jun 1987; 1 Jun 1988-1 Jun 1990. Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation: 21 Jul-15 Aug 1972.

Emblem:  On and over a blue disc bordered in yellow with white clouds issuing from base, a flying brown and white hawk, with yellow feet and beak, wearing an aviator's helmet, focusing a black aerial camera. (Approved 3 Oct 1941.) However, emblem does not meet current standards, and unit may submit a new design in accordance with AFI 84-105.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 3 Dec 2003.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Dec 1989.

Table of Contents



1st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (Flight "C")  (See 1st PRS and 3d PRS in CBI Unit Histories)

Flight "C" of the 1st Photo Reconnaissance Squadron was activated 10 February 1945 per PAR 2 WD AGO letter file AG 322 (22 Jan 1945) OB-1 AFRPGM: Subject: "Augmentation and Reassignment of certain Army Air Forces Unit" dated 5 February 1945 (without personnel and equipment). The Flight C was formed from crews in Bomb Groups of the 20th Bomber Command whose headquarters was India. Flight "C" had a number of designations as follows:

1st Photo Reconnaissance Sq (VH)
1st Photo Reconnaissance Detachment XX Bomber Command
XX Bomber Command Photo Reconn. Detachment
1st Photo Reconnaissance Sq

The Flight was based at an advance station located at Tsingching, China in the Szechwan Province. On February 1 the unit had 470 officers and 227 enlisted men. They had 5 F-13 airplanes and crews. Flight "C" carried on many photo missions over Jap held Chinese territory and along the China Coast. They cooperated with Naval Intelligence and had 3 Naval officers attached to the flight. Beside photo recon and mapping missions they spotted Japanese Naval Units off the China Coast. Photographs and locations of the Japanese Naval Units proved to be of great help to the U. S. Navy in determining the enemy's position.

On 10 April 1945 Flight "C" departed Tsingching, China for Dudhkundi, India per VOCG XX Bomber Command. The entire flight flew by shuttle missions in three days.

From India the outfit moved by air and by water to Guam. On May 1, 1945, 26 officers and 38 enlisted men arrived with the organization at Depot Field, Guam to be joined shortly after by the ground echelon of the flight. On 16 May the Flight was attached to Headquarters XXI Bomber Command for administration and operational control and on May 17 it was further attached to the 3d Photo Reconnaissance squadron for administration and operational control.

On 19 July the Flight departed from Depot Field Guam arriving at Okinawa 19 officers and 84 enlisted men. Flight "C" was relieved from attachment to XX Air Force and attached to the 8th Air Force without change of assignment per USASTAF assignment order #2.



Other Sites of Interest:

The Arthur Humby Story - Bail Out Over China And The Long Walk Home

Table of Contents



3d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
Air Force Historical Studies Office
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (3d Space Operations Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted as 3 Photographic Squadron on 15 May 1941. Activated on 10 Jun 1941. Redesignated: 3 Mapping Squadron on 13 Jan 1942; 3 Photographic Mapping Squadron on 9 Jun 1942; 3 Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Heavy, on 19 May 1944; 3 Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Long Range (Photographic-RCM), on 19 Sep 1945; 3 Reconnaissance Squadron, Very Long Range, Photographic, on 15 Jan 1946. Inactivated on 15 Mar 1947. Consolidated (13 Oct 1994) with the 3 Satellite Control Squadron, which was constituted on 9 Jan 1990. Activated on 2 Feb 1990. Redesignated 3 Space Operations Squadron on 30 Jan 1992.

Assignments:  1 Photographic (later, 1 Mapping; 1 Photographic Charting) Group, 10 Jun 1941; 11 Photographic Group, 1 Dec 1943; 311 Photographic (later, 311 Reconnaissance) Wing, 5 Mar 1944 (attached to Twentieth Air Force, 1 Nov-13 Dec 1944; XXI Bomber Command, 14 Dec 1944-15 Jul 1945; Twentieth Air Force, 16 Jul 1945-2 Feb 1947); Twentieth Air Force, 3 Feb-15 Mar 1947. 2 Space Wing, 2 Feb 1990; 50 Operations Group, 30 Jan 1992-.

Stations:  Maxwell Field, AL, 10 Jun 1941; MacDill Field, FL, 22 Dec 1941; Smoky Hill AAFld, KS, 16 Apr-3 Aug 1944; Saipan, 18 Sep 1944; Guam, 11 Jan 1945-15 Mar 1947. Falcon (later, Schriever) AFB, CO, 2 Feb 1990-.

Commanders:  Capt H. C. Houston, 10 Jun 1941; 1 Lt R. H. Payne, 16 Apr 1942; Maj Carl C. Hughes, 7 May 1942; Capt Robert S. Dodson, 10 Aug 1942; Lt Col Patrick B. McCarthy, 23 Jul 1943; Maj Robert C. Hutton, Jun 1945-unkn. Lt Col Victor P. Budura Jr., 2 Feb 1990; Lt Col Bruce M. Roang, 21 Aug 1990; Lt Col Stephen R. Gast, 27 Jul 1992; Lt Col Mark H. Owen, 17 Feb 1995; Lt Col Susan P. Asher, 24 Jun 1996; Lt Col Thomas W. Billick, 29 Sep 1998; Lt Col Michael R. Dickey, 10 Jul 2000; Lt Col David M. Tobin, 2 Jul 2002; Lt Col Anthony K. Hinson, 2 Jul 2003; Lt Col William Bishop Jr., 20 Jun 2005; Lt Col P. Brent McArthur, 28 Jun 2007-.

Aircraft and Space Systems:  Included F-2, 1942; B-25/F-10, 1942-1944; B-24, 1943-1945; B-17/F-9, 1944, 1946-1947; B-29/F-13, 1944-1947. Satellites, 1990-.

Operations:  Mapped areas of the United States, West Indies, and South America, May 1942-Jan 1943; Canada and Alaska, Mar-Jul 1943; India, Burma, and China, Dec 1943-Mar 1944. Photographic, electronic, and weather reconnaissance in Western Pacific, Nov 1944-Sep 1945. Controlled satellites for the Defense Satellite Communications System, the Fleet Satellite Communications System, the NATO satellite programs, and the UHF Follow-on Satellite Program, 1990-.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Western Pacific; Air Offensive, Japan.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Sep 1990-31 Aug 1991; 1 Oct 2000-1 Oct 2001; 1 Oct 2001-1 Oct 2002; 2 Oct 2002-2 Oct 2003.

Emblem (WWII):  Over and through a light turquoise blue disc, border light blue-violet, piped white, a caricatured figure attired in brown flight suit, tan helmet and parachute pack, kneeling on a yellow magic carpet in flight, trimmed orange, fringed yellow-orange, peering over the edge, sighting black triple mapping cameras, and pressing release button with right forefinger, camera at front piercing magic carpet, all in front of a white cloud formation, and emitting white speed lines toward rear; in sinister chief a small black bird. (Approved 24 Jul 1943.)

Emblem (Current):  Sable, a triangle, one point up Or, bearing a globe Celeste, gridlined Azure, between two lightning flashes of the first enfiling an elliptical ring surmounted by three mullets of four points one and two, all between a mullet of eight points in dexter chief and a mullet of eight points in sinister base Argent; all within a diminished bordure of the second. MOTTO: FIRST IN SPACE COMMUNICATIONS. Approved on 5 May 1992; replaced emblem approved on 24 Jul 1943 (150264 A.C.).

Emblem Significance:  Blue and yellow are the Air Force colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and the excellence required of Air Force personnel. The globe in a black field represents the unit’s function in global satellite operations. The three four-pointed stars in a concentric orbit around the globe reflect the Clarke principle of worldwide satellite coverage. The larger star in chief stands for the sun, the center of the solar system and the source of power for the satellites. The small star in base denotes the moon used by satellite operators as a reference for attitude control. The lightning bolts portray communication between the squadron and the satellite payloads.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 20 Nov 2008.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 12 Nov 2008.


Source:  3d Space Operations Squadron (Schriever AFB website)

The squadron was first activated on June 10, 1941, as the 3d Photographic Squadron. During the first half of World War II, the squadron conducted airborne mapping operations of the United States, the West Indies, South America, Canada, and the famous "Hump" region in Asia. On May 19, 1944, the unit was redesignated the 3d Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron (PRS) and began training for aerial reconnaissance operations using highly modified B-29 Superfortress bombers.

On Oct. 31, 1944, a 3d PRS F-13 became the first American aircraft over Tokyo since the famed Doolittle Raid in 1942. By the end of the war, the 3d PRS had flown 460 combat missions mainly over Japan.



Other Sites of Interest:

B-29 Superfortress Then and Now

The Arthur Humby Story - Bail Out Over China And The Long Walk Home

Table of Contents



9th Photographic Technical Squadron

Source:

Air Force History Index

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Activated 5 Dec 44, at Will Rogers Field, OK. Primary mission overseas was to provide mass production of aerial photographic prints and photo interpretation. Departed Will Rogers Field on 13 May 45. Embarked from San Francisco, CA harbor on 21 May 45 aboard the USS Ormsby. Arrived at Army Air Forces Pacific Ocean Area (AAFPOA) on Guam on 14 Jun 45. Inactivated 4 Oct 1945. Campaign credit for India-Burma. Consolidated 16 Oct 84 with the 70th Reconnaissance Technical Squadron as the 14th Reconnaissance Technical Squadron.

Table of Contents



41st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
Air Force Historical Studies Office
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (41st Electronic Combat Squadron)

Lineage:  Organized as Company A, 4th Balloon Squadron on 13 Nov 1917. Redesignated: 9th Balloon Company on 25 Jul 1918; 9th Airship Company on 30 Aug 1921; 9th Airship Squadron on 26 Oct 1933; 1st Observation Squadron on 1 Jun 1937; 1st Observation Squadron (Medium) on 13 Jan 1942; 1st Observation Squadron on 4 Jul 1942; 1st Reconnaissance Squadron (Special) on 25 Jun 1943; 41st Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron on 25 Nov 1944; 41st Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 24 Jan 1946. Inactivated on 17 Jun 1946. Redesignated 41st Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Night-Photographic, on 14 Jan 1954. Activated on 18 Mar 1954. Inactivated on 18 May 1959. Redesignated 41st Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Photo-Jet, and activated, on 30 Jun 1965. Organized on 1 Oct 1965. Redesignated: 41st Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 8 Oct 1966; 41st Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron on 15 Mar 1967. Inactivated on 31 Oct 1969. Redesignated 41st Electronic Combat Squadron on 17 Jun 1980. Activated on 1 Jul 1980.

Assignments:  Unkn, 13 Nov 1917-5 Aug 1918; Balloon Wing, IV Army Corps, 5 Aug 1918; Balloon Wing, III Army Corps, 21 Sep 1918; Balloon Group, III Army Corps, 8 Oct 1918; 2d Balloon Group, First Army, c. 20 Nov-Dec 1918; unkn, Dec 1918-May 1919; Army Balloon School, Ft Omaha, NE, May 1919; Sixth Corps Area, Oct 1921; 1st (later, 21st) Airship Group, 19 Jul 1922; Sixth Corps Area, 1 Jun 1937; Seventh Corps Area (attached to Cavalry School), 15 Jun 1937; Cavalry School, c. 1939; Second Army, 3 Oct 1940 (two flights attached to Cavalry School to c. Apr 1941; third flight remained assigned to Cavalry School throughout period); II Air Support Command, 1 Sep 1941 (flight attached to Cavalry School to c. Dec 1941); 72d Observation (later, 72d Reconnaissance) Group, 26 Sep 1941 (attached to 6th Bombardment Group, 10 Apr-c. Jun 1942); Sixth Air Force, 1 Nov 1943; II Tactical Air Division, 24 May 1944; III Tactical Air Division, 24 Jun 1944; III Tactical Air Command, 1 Oct 1944; III Tactical Air Division, 4 Dec 1944; 7th Fighter Wing, 18 Apr 1945; AAF, Pacific Ocean Area (attached to XXI Bomber Command), 13 Jun 1945; United States Army Forces, Middle Pacific (attached to Twentieth Air Force), 16 Jul 1945; 315th Bombardment Wing, 18 Sep 1945; VII Fighter Command (later, 20th Fighter Wing), 4 Jan-17 Jun 1946. 432d Tactical Reconnaissance Group, 18 Mar 1954; 363d Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, 8 Feb 1958-18 May 1959. Tactical Air Command, 30 Jun 1965; 363d Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, 1 Oct 1965; Thirteenth Air Force, 20 Oct 1965; 460th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, 18 Feb 1966; 432d Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, 18 Sep 1966; 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, 15 Aug 1967-31 Oct 1969. 552d Airborne Warning and Control Wing (later, 552d Airborne Warning and Control Division), 1 Jul 1980; 28th Air Division, 1 Apr 1985 (attached to Air Division Provisional, 15, 5 Dec 1990-17 Apr 1991); 355th Operations Group, 1 May 1992-.

Stations:  Ft Omaha, NE, 13 Nov 1917; Camp Morrison, VA, 9 Feb-29 Jun 1918; Camp de Meucon, Morbihan, France, 17 Jul 1918; Raulecourt, France, 14 Aug 1918; Xivray et Marvoisin, France, 12 Sep 1918; St Benoit-en-Woevre, France, 14 Sep 1918; Lamarche-en-Woevre, France, 16 Sep 1918; Thierville, France, 22 Sep 1918; Cumieres, France, 9 Oct 1918; Consenvoye, France, 7 Nov 1918; Fromereville, France, 12 Nov 1918; Damvillers, France, 14 Nov 1918; Ville-sur-Cousances, France, 26 Nov 1918; Colombey-les-Belles, France, 4 Feb 1919; Bordeaux, France, 18 Feb-20 Apr 1919; Camp Stuart, VA, 4 May 1919; Camp Lee, VA, 8 May 1919; Ft Omaha, NE, 18 May 1919; Scott Field, IL, 28 Oct 1921; Marshall Field, KS, 15 Jun 1937-27 Dec 1941; Rio Hato, Panama, 14 Jan 1942; Howard Field, Canal Zone, 19 Jan 1942; David, Panama, 17 Apr 1942; Rio Hato, Panama, 10 May 1942; Howard Field, Canal Zone, 20 Jun 1942-7 May 1944; Pounds Field, TX, 24 May 1944; Muskogee AAFld, OK, 7 Dec 1944-4 Apr 1945; Kualoa Field, TH, 18 Apr-31 May 1945; Northwest Field, Guam, 13 Jun 1945 (detachment at Iwo Jima, 9 Aug-c. 15 Sep 1945); Isley Field, Saipan, 4 Jan 1946; Northwest Field, Guam, 15 Apr-17 Jun 1946. Shaw AFB, SC, 18 Mar 1954-18 May 1959. Shaw AFB, SC, 1 Oct 1965; Takhli RTAFB, Thailand, 20 Oct 1965-31 Oct 1969. Davis-Monthan AFB, AZ, 1 Jul 1980- (deployed at Bateen AB, UAE, 27 Aug 1990-17 Apr 1991).

Aircraft:  Type R observation balloon, 1918-1919, 1919-1921; probably included RN-1 (Zodiac), type SST (Mullion), type AA (pony blimp), A-4, D-4, OA-1, AC-1, TA-1, TA-5, TC-1, TC-3, TC-5, TC-6, TC-10, TC-11, TC-14, TE-1, type TE-3, and TF-1 non-rigid airships, RS-9 semirigid airship, type R (later, C-3) and C-6 observation balloons, and A-6, A-7, and A-8 spherical balloons during period 1922-1937; included O-19, O-25, and apparently O-46, during period 1937-1939; in addition to O-47, 1938-1944, L-4 and B-18, 1942-1944, and P-39, 1943-1944, included YG-1, c. 1938-1940, YO-51, 1940-1941, YO-50, and apparently O-59, 1941, O-49, 1941-1943, and CG-4, 1943; A-20, 1944, primarily F-5, 1944-1946. RB-26, 1954-1956; RB-66, 1956-1959. RB-66, 1965; EB-66, 1965-1969. EC-130, 1982-.

Operations:  Observation unit with French XVII and XXXII and American III and IV Army Corps, 16 Aug-11 Nov 1918. Air defense for Panama Canal, Jan 1942-May 1944, with occasional antisubmarine patrols over the Caribbean and Pacific, especially during May and Jun 1942; deployed to Western Pacific in Jun 1945, but never entered combat. Combat in Southeast Asia, c. Nov 1965-31 Oct 1969. Command, control, and communications countermeasures, 1982-. Electronic countermeasures in Southwest Asia, 27 Aug 1990-17 Apr 1991.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II: Asiatic-Pacific Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War I: Lorraine; St Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne. World War II: Antisubmarine, American Theater. Vietnam: Vietnam Defensive; Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase III; Vietnam Air/ Ground; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; TET 69/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall 1969. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citations (Southeast Asia): 18 Feb-18 Sep 1966; 11-12 Aug and 24-28 Oct 1967; 12 Apr 1968-30 Apr 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: 18 Sep 1966-15 Aug 1967; 16 Aug 1967-11 Apr 1968; 1 Jul-31 Oct 1969. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1982-30 Jun 1984; 1 Apr 1985-31 Mar 1987; 1 Jan 1992-1 Jun 1993. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 18 Feb 1966-31 Oct 1969.

Emblem (WWII):  Three black chain links forming an equilateral triangle enclosing a blue background charged with a rising sun in gold. (Approved 3 Jan 1933.)

Emblem (Current):  On a Medium Blue disc edged Black a Blue equilateral triangle charged with a Yellow demi-sun emitting thirteen rays, all within a Black band formed by three chain links highlighted White. Approved on 28 Oct 1981 (KE 74125) and modified in 1994; replaced emblem approved on 3 Jan 1933 (K 8141).

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655th Bombardment Squadron, Reconnaissance

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 11 Aug 44 as 655th Bombardment Sq, Reconnaissance, activated 21 Aug 44, redesignated 55th Reconnaissance Sq, Very Long Range, Weather 16 Jun 45, inactivated 15 Oct 47. Redesignated 55th Strategic Reconnaissance Sq, Medium, Weather, activated 21 Feb 51, redesignated 55th Weather Reconnaissance Sq 14 Feb 54, inactivated 8 Jul 61. Activated 12 Oct 62, inactivated 1 Oct 93, redesignated 55th Space Weather Sq, activated 17 Mar 97, inactivated 6 Jul 02.

Assignments:  3 AF -1 Oct 1944, III Tactical Air Command -c. Nov 1944, III Tactical Air Div -11 Apr 1945, 20th AF (attached to XX Bomber Cd) -27 Nov 1945, 311 Reconnaissance Wg -13 Mar 1946 (attached to US Army Strategic Air Forces), Air Transport Command -20 Mar 1946, Air Weather Service -1947. Air Weather Svc 1951 to Apr 1953, 9th Weather Gp to 1961. 9th Weather Reconnaissance Gp to 8 Jul 1965, 9 Weather Reconnaissance Wg to 1 Sep 1975, 41st Rescue & Weather Reconnaissance Wg to 1993. Space Forecast Ctr 1997 to unknown, 50th Operations Gp to Oct 1999, AF Weather Agency.

Stations:  Will Rogers Fld OK -5 Mar 1945, Harmon Fld Guam 11 Apr 1945-28 Feb 1946 (Flight A - Guam; Flight B - Iwo Jima; Flight C - Okinawa), Buckley Fld, CO to 9 May 1946, Langley Fld, VA to 11 Jul 1946, Morrison Fld, FL to 26 May 1947, Fairfield-Suisun AFB to 1947. McClellan AFB 1951-1961. McClellan AFB 1962-1993. Schreiver AFB 1997-2002.

On 16 February 1945, shortly before leaving Will Rogers Field, the 655th received approval for their emblem, seen above. The likeness of Willie Weatherbee symbolizes the squadron's readiness to carry out its assigned task under all climatic conditions. This emblem would endure through and after the war, the only WW II weather reconnaissance emblem to do so. It remained the symbol of the 55th WRS until 3 July 1967. The nickname "Willie" most likely came from the name of the Army Air Field where the 655th trained.


Other Sites of Interest:

The 55th of WW II

B-29 Superfortress Then and Now

55th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron

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4th Emergency Rescue Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 1944 as 4th Emergency Rescue Squadron, activated 22 Apr 44, redesignated 4th Rescue Squadron 13 Mar 48, 4th Air Rescue Squadron 10 Aug 50, 4th Air Rescue Group 14 Nov 52, inactivated 8 Dec 56.

Assignments:  Eastern Technical Training Command 1944-Jun 44, VI Air Service Area Command -unknown, XXI Bomber Command-unknown, 20th Air Force -Mar 45, VII Fighter Command-unknown, 20th Air Force -May 49, Air Rescue Service -1956.

Stations:  Keesler Fld, MS 1944-Jun 44; Kipapa Fld, HI -unknown; Mokuleia Fld, HI -unknown; Kobler Fld, Saipan, Mariana Islands -unknown; Isley Fld, Saipan, Mariana Islands -Aug 45; Northwest Fld, Guam, Mariana Islands -unknown; North Field, Guam (later Andersen AFB), Guam, Mariana Islands -unknown; Hamilton AFB, CA.


Other Sites of Interest:

4th Rescue Squadron

Emergency Rescue Squadrons

The Army Air Forces in WWII Vol. V (Craven & Cate)

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22nd Air Depot Group


(See Air Svc Cmd Units / Air Depot Groups page)

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17th Historical Unit

Activated to provide history for XX Bomber Command.

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