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Project 7 (unofficial)
(See HERE for patch description)

AIR TRANSPORT UNITS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Ferrying Command2nd Ferrying Gp
10th Air Force Transport UnitsTrans-India Ferry Command
Assam-Burma-China Ferry Command
India-China Ferry Command
Air Transport Command (ATC)
India-China Wing, ATC (ICWATC)1st Ferrying Gp3d Ferrying Sq
6th Ferrying Sq
13th Ferrying Sq
22nd Transport Gp77th Transport Sq
78th Transport Sq
88th Transport Sq
28th Transport Gp96th Transport Sq
97th Transport Sq
98th Transport Sq
29th Transport Gp13th Ferrying Sq
99th Transport Sq
100th Transport Sq
301st Transport Sq
30th Transport Gp302nd Transport Sq
303d Transport Sq
304th Transport Sq
64th Troop Carrier Gp4th Troop Carrier Sq
16th Troop Carrier Sq
17th Troop Carrier Sq
18th Troop Carrier Sq
35th Troop Carrier Sq
443d Troop Carrier Gp1st Troop Carrier Sq
2nd Troop Carrier Sq
27th Troop Carrier Sq
315th Troop Carrier Sq
Air Cargo Resupply Squadrons
Airways Detachments
ICWATC Stations
Army Air Forces Base Units (AAFBU)
China National Aviation Corporation (CNAC)



FERRYING COMMAND


Army Air Corps Ferrying Command

Army Air Forces Ferrying Command


Monument located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force



Source:  "Administrative History of the Ferrying Command
(29 May 1941 - 30 June 1942)"
Prepared by
Assistant Chief of Air Staff, Intelligence
Historical Division
June 1945

(Revisions provided by Mr. Bernie Shearon)



Source:  Military.com, Mr. Charles Aresta

Lineage:  Constituted in the Regular Army as the Air Corps Ferrying Command and activated 29 May 1941 at Washington, DC. Redesignated 4 July 1942 as the Air Transport Command. Transferred to control of the United States Air Force per the National Security Act of 26 July 1947.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a silver disc a white globe with dark blue gridlines; overall a symbolic aircraft in red and dark blue; on dexter border from upper edge of globe to upright wing of aircraft the Morse code dots and dashes in red, white, and blue for letter AFATC. SYMBOLISM: The badge represents aircraft being transported from the West to the East which refers to President Roosevelt's directive to the command that aircraft be transported "with the greatest possible speed".


NOTES:

  • The official USAF linages do not reflect the dropping of the "Air Corps" from Ferry Squadron designations in the spring of 1943. Contemporary records also indicate that at this time the "Ferry" was changed to "Ferrying." All of this may have been done retroactively.)

  • Ferry/Ferrying and Transport Groups/Squadrons were disbanded c. 1 Dec 1943 and replaced with India-China Wing, ATC (ICWATC) Stations.

  • ICWATC Stations were replaced by AAFBU designations c. 1 Aug 1944.


History of the CBI Theater:

"Army Air Forces in WWII"  (7 volumes)
Office of Air Force History
Wesley Craven & James Cate, editors

Table of Contents



2nd Ferrying Group


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Operation Orders on first C-46 flight to India from 22 Aug 44 Historical Report, 2nd Ferrying Gp.

Operation Orders on first C-54 flight to India from 22 Aug 44 Historical Report, 2nd Ferrying Gp.

Table of Contents



Trans-India Ferry Command

Source:

Army Air Forces in WWII Series, Vol. VII

Air Force History Index

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Ex-CBI Roundup, Feb 1978 issue

Lineage:  Activated 6 Apr 1942. Assigned to 10th AF. Operated air route between Karachi as western terminal and upper Assam as eastern terminal. Merged with Assam-Burma-China Ferry Command to form India-China Ferry Command 16 Jul 1942.

Table of Contents



Assam-Burma-India Ferry Command

Source:

Army Air Forces in WWII Series, Vol. VII

Air Force History Index

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Ex-CBI Roundup, Feb 1978 issue

Lineage:  Activated 17 Apr 1942. Assigned to 10th AF. Merged with Trans-India Ferry Command to form India-China Ferry Command 16 Jul 1942.

Table of Contents



India-China Ferry Command

Source:

Air Force History Index

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Ex-CBI Roundup, Feb 1978 issue

Lineage:  Activated 16 July 1942 by combining of Trans-India Ferry Command and Assam-Burma-China Ferry Command. Inactivated 1 Dec 1942 when the India-China Wing, ATC (ICWATC) was activated.

Table of Contents


AIR TRANSPORT COMMAND (ATC)

Source:

The Army Almanac
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950

AIR TRANSPORT COMMAND

Headquarters:  Washington, D. C.

Remarks:  Commenced operations 29 May 1941. Preliminary mission was delivering combat aircraft to the fighting fronts. Later expanded to 11 component divisions delivering to almost every part of the world.

On VJ-day a peak number of 3,354 aircraft was assigned to ATC transport operations, and its planes were crossing the Atlantic on an average of one every 13 minutes and the Pacific one every 90 minutes. Its annual lift included more than a billion pounds of high priority cargo, passengers and mail. The outstanding single lift was in the CBI theater in an effort to supply the isolated 14th and 20th Air Forces across the Himalaya Mountains. By VJ-day, ATC was flying planes over the "Hump" at an average of one every 1.3 minutes.


Source:  Military.com, Mr. Charles Aresta

Lineage:  Constituted in the Regular Army as the Air Corps Ferrying Command and activated 29 May 1941 at Washington, DC. Redesignated 4 July 1942 as the Air Transport Command. Transferred to control of the United States Air Force per the National Security Act of 26 July 1947.

Campaigns:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  On a silver disc a white globe with dark blue gridlines; overall a symbolic aircraft in red and dark blue; on dexter border from upper edge of globe to upright wing of aircraft the Morse code dots and dashes in red, white, and blue for letter AFATC. SYMBOLISM: The badge represents aircraft being transported from the West to the East which refers to President Roosevelt's directive to the command that aircraft be transported "with the greatest possible speed".



NATS

MATS

MATS

Source:  Military Air Transport Service (MATS) History

The Military Air Transport Service was activated 1 June 1948. It was created by consolidating the Air Transport Command and the Naval Air Transport Service under the control of the newly created United States Air Force (USAF). The first test of the newly created MATS was the Berlin Airlift--"OPERATION VITTLES". The Soviets had blocked all surface transportation in the western part of Berlin. Railroads tracks were destroyed, barges were stopped on the rivers, and highways and roads blocked. The only avenue left was through the air. On June 26, 1948, the airlift began. MATS transports from around the globe began making their way to Germany, including 2 of the U.S. Navy's air transport squadrons assigned to MATS. This operation would continue for some 15 months until the Soviets lifted the blockade. MATS would provide numerous humanitarian airlifts of global proportions.

Within MATS there were other technical services such as Air Weather Service (AWS), Air Rescue Service (ARS), Special Airlift Mission (SAM), Air Photographic and Charting Service (APCS), and the Aeromedical Transport Wing (AMTW). The U.S. Navy was an integral part of MATS, providing 5 transport squadrons to the joint service effort.

In the early days of MATS, there were 3 divisions, Atlantic, Pacific, and Continental. A later reoganization called for just 2 divisions -- Eastern Transport Air Force (EASTAF) and the Western Transport Air Force (WESTAF). To accomplish the global mission required, MATS has used many different aircraft. The C-47 "Gooney Bird", C-46 Curtis Commado, C-135 Stratolifter, C-141 Starlifter, C-130 Hercules, C-133 Cargomaster, C-124 Globemaster, C-118 Liftmaster, C-121 Super Constellation, C-74 Globemaster I, C-97 Stratofreighter, and the C-131 Samaritan just to name a few. Each of the individual technical MATS services had their own specific aircraft to carry out their mission.

On January 1, 1966 MATS was deactivated and the Military Airlift Command was created to continue the traditions MATS had began.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (Military Airlift Command)

The organization that would become widely known as the Air Transport Command was established in May 1941 as the Air Corps Ferrying Command, and was charged initially with flying aircraft overseas for delivery to the British. No real antecedents of this command are to be found, for until 1941 the Army's air arm had no pressing need for a major organization devoted primarily to ferrying aircraft and transporting troops and cargo by air. There were a few squadron echelon units involved in air transport from the late 1930s and a group from 1937, but most Air Corps units ferried their own aircraft and moved their own cargo.

In 1948 the Air Transport Command and the Navy Air Transport Service merged into a new organization, the Military Air Transport Service (MATS). Air Transport Command was inactivated and its resources were passed to the new command. In 1982 HQ USAF officially consolidated the Air Transport Command with the Military Airlift Command (MAC) - a new designation of MATS. HQ USAF inactivated MAC in June 1992 merging its resources with tanker resources from Strategic Air Command and forming the Air Mobility Command.

Lineage:  Established as Air Corps Ferrying Command on 29 May 1941. Redesignated: Army Air Forces Ferry Command on 9 March 1942; Army Air Forces Ferrying Command on 31 March 1942; Air Transport Command on 1 July 1942. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 June 1948. Consolidated on 13 May 1982 with Military Airlift Command (established as Military Air Transport Service, a major command, on 1 June 1948, and redesignated Military Airlift Command on 1 January 1966). Designated a specified command on 1 February 1977. Lost specified command status on 1 October 1988. Inactivated on 1 June 1992.


Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (Air Mobility Command)

Lineage:  Established as Air Mobility Command, and activated on 1 Jun 1992.

Assignments:  United States Air Force.

Components

Air Forces:  Fifteenth, 1 Jun 1992-1 Oct 2003. Eighteenth, 1 Oct 2003-. Twenty-First, 1 Jun 1992-1 Oct 2003. Twenty-Second, 1 Jun 1992-1 Jul 1993.

Centers:  Air Mobility Command Tanker Airlift Control, 1 Jun 1992-1 Oct 2003. USAF Air Mobility School (later, Air Mobility Warfare Center), 1 Jun 1992-.

Services:  Air Combat Camera, 1 Jun 1992-1 Oct 1994. Air Rescue, 1 Jun 1992-1 Feb 1993. Defense Courier, 15 Oct 1998-1 Oct 2004.

Stations:  Scott AFB, IL, 1 Jun 1992-.

Commanders:  Gen Hansford T. Johnson, 1 Jun 1992; Gen Ronald R. Fogleman, 25 Aug 1992; Gen Robert L. Rutherford, 18 Oct 1994; Gen Walter Kross, 15 Jul 1996; Gen Charles T. Robertson Jr., 3 Aug 1998; Gen John W. Handy, 5 Nov 2001; Lt Gen Christopher A. Kelly (temporary), 7 Sep 2005; Gen Duncan J. McNabb, 14 Oct 2005-.

Operations:  HQ USAF established this command by combining the airlift assets of Military Airlift Command and most of the air refueling assets of Strategic Air Command to control and improve world-wide tanker/airlift operations. Air Mobility Command is the USAF component of the United States Transportation Command. AMC provides rapid global mobility and sustainment through tactical and strategic airlift and aerial refueling for US armed forces. In addition, it provides special duty and operational support aircraft and global humanitarian support and performs both peacetime and wartime aeromedical evacuation.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Organizational Excellence Awards: 1 Jun 1992-31 May 1994; 1 Jun 1994-31 May 1996; 1 Jun 1996-31 May 1998; 1 Jun 1998-31 May 2000; 1 Jun 2000-31 May 2002; 1 Jun 2002-31 May 2004.

Emblem:  Approved for Military Air Transport Service on 22 Jun 1948. Adopted by Air Mobility Command on 1 Jun 1992.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 25 Sep 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 2006.

Table of Contents



India-China Wing, ATC (ICWATC)

Lineage:  Activated on 1 Dec 42 and took over all India and China transport operations formerly performed by India-China Ferry Command.

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1st Ferrying Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)


The 1st Ferrying Group Operations building is located in the center of a
tea plantation at Chabua, Assam, India. The thatched room serves
two purposes - it keeps the interior cool and also serves as camouflage.
-- National Archives Photo, July 1943.

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  1st Ferrying Gp constituted 3 Mar 42; activated 7 Mar 42; redesignated 1st Transport Gp c. 1 Jul 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 31 Jul 85 and redesignated 431st Military Airlift Training Gp (not active).

Assignments:  AF Combat Cd until May 42, 10 AF until Jul 42, India-China Wg, ATC.

Stations:  Pope Fld, NC -18 Mar 42, Charleston AAB -c. Mar 42, Karachi Apt, Sind, India (Pakistan) -May 42, Dinjan until unknown, Chabua Afld, Assam, India.


Source:

"Administrative History of the Ferrying Command
(29 May 1941 - 30 June 1942)"
Prepared by
Assistant Chief of Air Staff, Intelligence
Historical Division
June 1945

The 3d, 6th, and 13th Ferrying Squadrons were activated at Pope Field, Fort Bragg, N.C., on 7 March, instead of at West Palm Beach as originally ordered. Before their activation they were transferred from the jurisdiction of the Ferrying Command to that of the 1st Ferrying Group, which in turn was constituted by the Adjutant General on 3 March 1942. The 1st Ferrying Group and its three ferrying squadrons were destined for transport service in the China-Burma-India theater and left the United States by boat on 17 March. They arrived in India in May and thereafter operated under the control of the Commanding General of the Tenth Air Force until the establishment of the India-China Wing of the Air Transport Command on 1 December 1942.


Source:  1337th Army Air Force Base Unit Website (no longer active)

...On December 1st (1942) the Headquarters Squadron, First Ferrying Group, was relieved from assignment to the Headquarters, U.S. Army Air Forces in India and China, Tenth U.S. Air Forces, Delhi, India and reassigned to the India-China Wing, Air Transport Command.


Source:  Mr. Park W. Carter, Eureka, KS

"Somewhere along the line, the First Ferry's name was dropped and we became Army Air Force Base Unit 1337. Also in later stages we were part of the India-Burma Wing of the ATC. China was then designated as a separate unit - China Wing of the ATC."

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3d Ferrying Squadron

Chabua, Assam, India, c. 1944.
If you look closely, you will see a C-46 on the runway.
The white line in the distance is the Brahmaputra River.

Source:

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted 3d Air Corps Ferrying Squadron on 18 Feb 1942. Activated on 7 Mar 1942. Redesignated 3d Ferrying Squadron 12 Mar 43. Redesignated 3d Transport Squadron on 24 Mar 1943. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Reconstituted, and redesignated 3d Air Transport Squadron, Heavy, on 20 Jun 1952. Activated on 20 Jul 1952. Redesignated: 3d Military Airlift Squadron on 8 Jan 1966; 3d Airlift Squadron on 1 Dec 1991.

Assignments:  1st Ferrying (later, 1st Transport) Group, 7 Mar 1942-1 Dec 1943. 1703d Air Transport Group, 20 Jul 1952; 1700th Air Transport Group, 18 Jun 1957; 1608th Air Transport Wing, 24 Nov 1957; 1608th Air Transport Group, 18 Jun 1958; 1608th Air Transport Wing, 18 Jan 1963; 437th Military Airlift Wing, 8 Jan 1966; 436th Military Airlift Wing, 1 Aug 1973; 436th Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-.

Stations:  Pope Field, NC, 7 Mar 1942; Charleston SC, 17-19 Mar 1942; Karachi, India, 15 May 1942; New Malir Cantonment, India, 17 May 1942; (Contemporary sources indicate that the squadron left the New Malir contonment for the Karachi Airport and spent a short time at Sookerating before moving to Chabua.) Chabua, India, 1 Aug 1942-1 Dec 1943. Brookley AFB, AL, 20 Jul 1952; Charleston AFB, SC, 18 Jun 1958; Dover AFB, DE, 1 Aug 1973-.

Aircraft:  C-46, 1942-1943. C-124, 1952-1965; C-74, 1955; C-130, 1965; C-141, 1965-1970; C-5, 1970-.

Operations:  Air transport in CBI, 17 May 1942-1 Dec 1943. Began worldwide airlift in 1952. Flew missions to Southeast Asia, 1965-1973. Supported operations in Grenada, 24 Oct-18 Dec 1983; Panama, 19 Dec 1989-14 Jan 1990; and Southwest Asia, Aug 1990-Jul 1991.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive. Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jan 1963-1 Feb 1964; 11 Jul 1966-10 Jul 1967; 11 Jul 1967-10 Jul 1968; 11 Jul 1968-12 Jun 1969; 13 Jun 1969-12 Jun 1970; 1 Jul 1972-30 Jun 1973; 13 Oct-14 Nov 1973; 1 Jan 1974-30 Apr 1975; 1 May 1975-31 May 1976; 1 Jun 1976-31 May 1978; 1 Jun 1978-31 May 1979; 1 Jun 1981-31 May 1982; 1 Jun 1982-31 May 1984. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-28 Jan 1970.

Emblem:  On a Blue disc bordered Blue, a Golden Yellow sun issuing from dexter (right), radials Blue, the perimeter surmounted by a White lighting flash arched; in chief three small White stars forming "Orion's Belt"; in sinister (left) one (1) large White star "Sirius"; over all a Golden crown trimmed Red, lined Blue with highlights White, outlines and details Blue. MOTTO: SAFE, SWIFT, SURE. Approved on 31 Jul 1959 (K 11378).



Source:  3d Airlift Squadron Alumni Association

History of the 3d Airlift Squadron, 1942-1973

The 3d Squadron was first constituted as the 3d Air Corps Ferrying Squadron on 18 February 1942, and was activated on 7 March 1942. The squadron was assigned to Pope Field, NC and then moved to Charleston AAF, SC 17-19 March 1942 where it was redesignated as the 3d Transport Squadron on 24 March 1942. In May the squadron moved to Karachi, India and two days later (17 May 1942) to New Malit Cantonment, India. Two months later the squadron was shipped to Chabau, India. During the months in India (to 1 December 1943) the squadron was part of the 1st Ferrying (later 1st Transport) Group, Tenth Air Force, and later the India-China Wing, Air Transport Command.

The 3d flew C-46 air transport missions over the "Hump" into China in support of the 14th Air Force. Extensive losses of aircraft and personnel were suffered supporting ground forces, including the air supply operations for General Stilwell's beleaguered forces in northern Burma in 1942. The 3d Transport Squadron was disbanded on 1 December 1943 in India. Personnel were reassigned to other flying units.

When the United States became involved in the Korea Conflict, the 3d was reconstituted and was redesignated as the 3d Air Transport Squadron, Heavy on 20 June 1952. The squadron was assigned to Brookley AFB, AL on 20 July 1952 and the 3d was given the C-124. The Squadron was transferred to the 1608th Air Transport Wing, Charleston AFB, SC on 18 June 1958. During these years the squadron operated missions to Greenland, the Caribbean, Europe, South America, and to North Africa.

Notable operations in which the 3d took part included the United Nations Congo Airlift of the early 1960's, the Cuban Crisis, and the Electonic Counter Measure (ECM and ECCM) missions in the early and mid-60's, many humanitarian missions, and extensive exercises in the US and overseas. The squadron began flying missions to Southeast Asia in the mid-1960's in support of US operations in Vietnam. In 1966 the Military Air Transport Service was elevated to command status, and MATS became MAC. At the same time, the 1608 Air Transport Wing became the 437th Military Airlift Wing, and the 3d became the 3d Military Airlfit Squadron (MAS). The 3d continued to fly the C-124 until 14 August 1965 when it received the C-141 (40624 named the "City of Charleston").

Another first for the 3d occurred in June 1970 when it became the first operational squadron to receive the C-5. The C-5 Galaxy, the worlds largest airplane, completed it's inaugural operational mission when it touched down at Cam Ranh Bay, South Vietnam on 9 July 1970 and unloaded 83,000 pounds of cargo.

In 1973 the 3d entitled to two campaign streamers for action in India-Burma and the China Defensive, and to thirteen decorations. These include the Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm and eleven Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards, some with Combat V devices.


Other Sites of Interest:

Story on 3d Ferrying Squadron Social Life

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6th Ferrying Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  6th Air Corps Ferry Squadron constituted c. 18 Feb 42, activated 7 Mar 42, redesignated 6th Transport Squadron 29 Mar 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted on or about 20 Jun 52 as 6th Air Transport Squadron, Heavy, activated 20 Jul 52, inactivated 1 Jul 55.

Assignments:  1st Ferrying Group/Transport Group 1942-1943. 1703d Air Transport Group 1952-1955.

Stations:  Pope Fld, NC 1942-17 Mar 42, Mohanbari Apt, Assam, India -unknown, Chabua Afld, Assam, India -1943. Brookley AFB, AL 1952-1955.

Table of Contents



13th Ferrying Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  13th Air Corps Ferry Squadron constituted c. 18 Feb 42, activated 7 Mar 42, redesignated 13th Transport Squadron 24 Mar 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted on or about 20 Jun 52 as 13th Air Transport Squadron, activated 20 Jul 52, inactivated 1 Jul 57. Organized 15 Oct 69, inactivated 30 Sep 70.

Assignments:  1st Ferrying Group/Transport Group 1942-1943. 1703d Air Transport Group 1952-18 Jun 57, Continental Divison, Military Air Transport Service -1 Jul 57. 2nd Aircraft Delivery Group 1969-1970.

Stations:  Pope Fld, NC 1942-17 Mar 42, Charleston AAB, SC -1942, Karachi Apt, Sind, India (Pakistan) -unknown, Chabua Afld, Assam, India -unknown, Sookerating Apt, Assam, India -unknown, Chabua Afld, Assam, India -1943, Brookley AFB, AL 1952-1957, Dobbins AFB, GA 1969-1970.


Source:  1337th Army Air Force Base Unit

...On December 1st (1942) the Headquarters Squadron, First Ferrying Group, was relieved from assignment to the Headquarters, U.S. Army Air Forces in India and China, Tenth U.S. Air Forces, Delhi, India and reassigned to the India-China Wing, Air Transport Command. In that manner Squadron 13 of the Air Transport Command was born.

On August 9, 1943 the personnel of the 13th Ferrying Squadron were transferred to the 29th Transport Group, with Lt. Col. J.W. Gurr as the first commanding officer.


Source:

Brian's WWII Squadron Patch Gallery

USAFPatches.com Forum

The 13th FS / ATS was assigned to the 29th Transport Group and flew the India out of India over the Hump. This unit was last active as the 13th Aeromedical Transport Squadron flying the C-131's & C-118's.

Designated as the 13th Ferrying Squadron and later the 13th Ferry Squardon, 13th Air Transport Squadron, and 13th Aeromedical Transport Squadron. The mission was to move supplies from the rear bases to the forward bases but these were not combat units. The combat airlift operations were flown by the troop carrier squadrons.

Although the designation number (13) is the same the 13th Air Transport Squadron, and though the 13th Troop Carrier Squadron did many of the same types of missions, they are not the same units. The lineage for the Ferry Sq. lineage traces back to WWII's Air Transport Command (A Non Combat - Logistics unit tasked to move supplies and equipment from the States to the forward areas) while the Troop Carrier Sq. delivered men and equipment at the front lines and were combat units. Post war, both existed in the same manner, with ATS's working for MATS and the TCS's working for TAC and the forward Commands. In 1966, both types of units were renamed as Airlift Squadrons the ATS's becoming "Military Airlift Squadrons" and the TCS's becoming "Tactical Airlift Squadrons" with a theater role. In 1991, they were both renamed as "Airlift Squadrons" causing some units to be renumbered due to duplication.

(See 29th Transport Group, below)


Note:  The insignia shown on the above referenced web site and several others is incorrectly identified as the 13th Ferrying Sq. See below:


1504th AAFBU

Source:  USAFPatches.com (posted 26 March 2005):

"Tonight I received this information from Sam Parker, (Editor of "The Insignia Detective"):

13th Air Corps Ferrying Sq is misidentified and should be indentified as the 1504th Army Air Forces Base Unit (AAFBU).

USAF (or US Army) Photo Neg K4797 C ca: 1952 for the 1504th AAFBU (from Lt Col Terry Carlson)"

-- posted on USAFPatches.com by Mr. Terry L. Horstead

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22nd Transport Group

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  22nd Ferrying Gp activated 22 Feb 43, redesignated 22nd Transport Gp 1 Jul 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43 and replaced by 1330th AAFBU. Reconstituted 31 Jul 85 and redesignated 422nd Tactical Airlift Gp (not active).

Assignments:  India-China Wg, ATC.

Stations:  Chabua Afld, Assam, India -Apr 43, Jorhat, Assam, India.

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77th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  77th Air Corps Ferry Squadron constituted c. 30 Jan 43, activated 22 Feb 43, redesignated 77th Transport Squadron 1 Jul 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 16 Sep 52 as 77th Air Transport Squadron, activated 24 Sep 52, inactivated 1 Jul 55. Consolidated 19 Sep 85 with 7th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy as 7th Air Refueling Squadron.

Assignments:  22nd Ferry Group/Transport Group 1942-1943. 1705th Air Transport Group 1952-20 Nov 53, 1501st Air Transport Group -1955.

Stations:  Chabua Afld, Assam, India 1943-Apr 43, Jorhat, Assam, India -1943. McChord AFB, WA 1952-20 Nov 53, Travis AFB, CA -1955.

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78th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  78th Air Corps Ferry Squadron constituted c. 30 Jan 43, activated 22 Feb 43 and assigned to the 22d Ferrying Gp. On 1 Jul 43, the Squadron and Group were redesignated 78th Transport Sq and 22d Transport Gp., disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted as 78th Air Transport Squadron, activated unknown, inactivated 1 Jul 55. Consolidated 19 Sep 85 with 24th Air Corps Ferry Squadron as 24th Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron.

Assignments:  India-China Wg of Air Transport Cmd. On 1 Dec 43, Air Transport Command reorganized and the 78th was replaced by Station 6, India-China Wg, Air Transport Cmd, and on 1 Aug 44, that unit was replaced by the 1333d AAF Base Unit (Foreign Transport Station), which looked after local Air Transport Cmd operations at Chabua until Christmas 1945.

Stations:Chabua Afld, Assam, India 1943-Apr 43, Jorhat, Assam, India -1943. Unknown -1955. Assigned to 22nd Ferry Group/Transport Group 1942-1943. Unknown -1955.

(NOTE:  Unit stationed at Sookerating sometime 1943-1944 per several 78th TS veterans).

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88th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  88th Air Corps Ferry Squadron constituted 1943, activated 10 May 43, redesignated 88th Transport Squadron 1 Jul 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43.

Assignments:  22nd Ferry Group/Transport Group 1943-Sep 43, India Sector -1943.

Stations:  Ondal Apt, Bihar, India 1943-Jun 43, Karachi Apt, Sind, India (Pakistan) -1943.

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28th Transport Group

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  28th Transport Gp activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 31 Jul 85 and redesignated 428th Military Airlift Gp (not active).

Assignments:  India-China Wg, ATC.

Stations:  Tezpur, Assam, India.

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96th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  96th Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43.

Assignments:  28th Transport Group.

Stations:  Tezpur, Assam, India.

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97th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  97th Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 22 Jun 43; Squadron remained inactive until 4 Aug 43; disbanded 1 Dec 43.

Assignments:  28th Transport Group.

Stations:  Tezpur, Assam, India.



Source:  Mr. Frank Jasek

C-47 Serial # 41-38597, MACR # 704, September 15, 1943

       Pilot:  Thomas Caldwell
       Co-pilot:  Robert Samuel
       Navigator:  Tipton Tate
       Radio:  James Vaffis

Went down from what I gather from weather conditions reported by pilots the same day and over the same route (MACR # 00702-00704).

Severe down drafts and heavy icing encountered while flying course 285.


James Vaffis

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98th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  98th Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 22 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43.

Assignments:  28th Transport Group.

Stations:  Tezpur, Assam, India.

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29th Transport Group

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  29th Transport Gp activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 31 Jul 85 and redesignated 429th Combat Crew Training Gp (not active).

Assignments:  India-China Wg, ATC.

Stations:  Sookerating Apt, Assam, India.

NOTES:

  • 10 Dec 1943:  29th Transport Group redesignated as ICWATC Station No. 7

  • 4 Aug 1944:  Station No. 7 redesignated as 1337th AAFBU

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13th Ferry Squadron / Air Transport Squadron  (See above)


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99th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  99th Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted on or about 20 Jun 52 as 99th Air Transport Squadron, activated 20 Jul 52, inactivated 25 Jul 55. Consolidated 19 Sep 85 with 10th Aeromedical Evacuation Transport Squadron (later 10th Aeromedical Airlift Squadron) as 10th Aeromedical Airlift Squadron.

Assignments:  29th Transport Group 1943. 1611th Air Transport Group 1952-1955.

Stations:  Sookerating Apt, Assam, India 1943. McGuire AFB, NJ 1952-1955.

Table of Contents



100th Transport Squadron

Source:

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Constituted as 100 Transport Squadron on 4 Jun 1943. Activated on 21 Jun 1943. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Reconstituted, and redesignated 100 Air Transport Squadron, Medium, on 20 Jun 1952. Activated on 20 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 25 Oct 1955. Consolidated (19 Sep 1985) with the 300 Military Airlift Squadron (Associate), which was constituted on 31 Jul 1969. Activated in the Reserve on 25 Sep 1969. Redesignated: 300 Airlift Squadron (Associate) on 1 Feb 1992; 300 Airlift Squadron on 1 Oct 1994.

Assignments:  29 Transport Group, 21 Jun-1 Dec 1943. 1503 Air Transport Wing, 20 Jul 1952; 1611 Air Transport Group, 9-25 Oct 1955. 943 Military Airlift Group (Associate), 25 Sep 1969; 315 Military Airlift (later, 315 Airlift) Wing, 1 Jul 1973; 315 Operations Group, 1 Aug 1992-.

Stations:  Sookerating, India, 21 Jun-1 Dec 1943. Haneda AB (later, Tokyo International Aprt), Japan, 20 Jul 1952-8 Oct 1955; McGuire AFB, NJ, 9-25 Oct 1955. Charleston AFB, SC, 25 Sep 1969-.

Commanders:  Unkn, Jun-Dec 1943. Maj John K. Thompson, 21 Jun 1952; Lt Col Gordon L. Kelley, by Jun 1953; Maj William H. Munn, 8 Apr 1954; Lt Col Gordon L. Kelly, 15 Sep 1954-Oct 1955. Lt Col Knox R. Hardy, 25 Sep 1969; Maj Donald C. Hart, 29 Mar 1972; Maj Ronald W. Hull, by Dec 1972; Maj Earl E. Fairchild Jr., by Sep 1973; Maj Malvin D. Sinclair, by Aug 1974; Maj Earl E. Fairchild Jr., Jul 1975; Lt Col Jerome Yarchever, 1 Nov 1975; Lt Col Benjamin H. Tollison, 6 Nov 1979; Lt Col Charles F. Gosser, by Jun 1981; Lt Col Malvin D. Sinclair, by Jun 1983; Lt Col Raymond L. Bell Jr., 30 Jun 1986; Lt Col William Dubis, 2 Sep 1987; Lt Col Steven R. Donovan, 1 Jul 1991; Lt Col Sidney W. Stuart, 20 Jun 1993; Lt Col Donny E. Griffin, 19 Jun 1994; Lt Col Michael C. Stampley, 18 Jun 1995; Lt Col John G. Mentavlos, 3 May 1998; Lt Col Jeffrey R. Morrow, 8 Aug 1999; Lt Col John P. Hall Jr., 9 Sep 2000-.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1943; C-46, 1943. C-54, 1952-1955. C-141, 1969-1997; C-17, 1997-.

Operations:  Airlifted military supplies from India to Allied forces in Burma and China in 1943. Between 1952 and 1955, flew airlift missions within Japan and to Southeast and southern Asia and in 1953, airlifted ill and US ex-prisoners of war wounded in Korea from Japan to the United States. In 1954, transported French troops wounded in Indo-china from Japan to France and Algeria. Augmented active duty crews flying airlift missions worldwide, 1969-. Aircrews deployed to Vietnam for duty in the war there until 1973. Later in 1973, carried war supplies to Israel during a conflict in that region. In 1983, supported Operation URGENT FURY by airlifting US troops to Grenada and US students from Grenada to the United States. In 1989, flew missions in support of Operation JUST CAUSE in Panama. Flew humanitarian missions to Washington DC and New York City in aftermath of 11 Sep 2001 terrorist attack on the US.

Service Streamers:  Korean Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 13 Jun 1970-30 Jun 1972; 1 Jul 1972-30 Jun 1973; 1 Jan 1982-31 Dec 1983; 1 Jul 1988-30 Jun 1989; 1 Jul 1989-30 Jun 1990; 21 Sep-31 Oct 1989; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1997; 1 Jul 1998-30 Jun 2000; 1 Sep 1998-31 Aug 2000; 11 Sep 2001-10 Sep 2003; 1 Aug 2005-31 Jul 2007. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 25 Sep 1969-28 Jan 1973.

Emblem:  Approved on 1 Aug 1978; modified on 25 Jun 1996; newest rendition approved on 13 Nov 2007.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 22 May 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Sep 2001.

Table of Contents



301st Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  301st Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 19 Sep 85 and consolidated with 322nd Transport Squadron and 301st Air Refueling Squadron, Medium as 301st Air Refueling Squadron.

Assignments:  29th Transport Group.

Stations:  Sookerating Apt, Assam, India.

Table of Contents



30th Transport Group

Source:

Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  Activated 22 Jun 43 at Mohanbari Air Base, Mohanbari, Lahaol Station, Assam, India. Derived from 6 Transport Squadron, 1 Transport Group. Comprised of 302, 303, And 304 Transport Squadrons. Reorganized into Station No. 9, India-China Wing. Disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 31 Jul 85 and redesignated 430th Combat Crew Training Gp (not active).

Assignments:  India-China Wg, ATC.

Stations:  Mohanbari Apt, Assam, India.

Table of Contents



302nd Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  302nd Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 19 Sep 85 and consolidated with 320th Troop Carrier Squadron and 302nd Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron as 302nd Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (see 320th Troop Carrier Sq in 20th AF Units Section).

Assignments:  30th Transport Group.

Stations:  Mohanbari Apt, Assam, India.

Table of Contents



303d Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  303d Transport Squadron Constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 19 Sep 85 and consolidated with 483d Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) and 303d Air Refueling Squadron, Medium as 303d Air Refueling Squadron (see 483d Bombardment Sq in 20th AF Units Section).

Assignments:  30th Transport Group.

Stations:  Mohanbari Apt, Assam, India.

Table of Contents



304th Transport Squadron

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Lineage:  304th Transport Squadron constituted c. 4 Jun 43, activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Reconstituted 19 Sep 85 and consolidated with 4th Strategic Support Squadron as 304th Special Operations Squadron.

Assignments:  30th Transport Group.

Stations:  Mohanbari Apt, Assam, India.

Table of Contents



64th Troop Carrier Group  (See CBI Unit Histories)



Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Established as 64 Transport Group on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 4 Dec 1940. Redesignated as 64 Troop Carrier Group on 1 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1945. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated as 64 Troop Carrier Group, Medium on 3 Jul 1952. Activated on 14 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 21 Jul 1954. Redesignated as: 64 Military Airlift Group on 31 Jul 1985; 64 Operations Group on 1 May 1991. Activated on 15 May 1991. Inactivated on 1 Apr 1997. Redesignated as 64 Air Expeditionary Group, and converted to provisional status, on 4 Dec 2001.

Assignments:  Fourth Air Force, 4 Dec 1940; 50 Transport Wing, 31 Mar 1942; 51 Transport (later, 51 Troop Carrier) Wing, 1 Jun 1942; Eighth Air Force, 18 Aug 1942; 51 Troop Carrier Wing, 1 Sep 1942; Twelfth Air Force, 4 Sep 1942; 51 Troop Carrier Wing, 25 Oct 1942; 52 Troop Carrier Wing, 15 Jun 1943; 51 Troop Carrier Wing, 11 Jul 1943 (air echelon attached to Tenth Air Force, c. 7 Apr-c. 15 Jun 1944); Air Transport Command, 25 May-31 Jul 1945. Tactical Air Command, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 64 Troop Carrier Wing, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954 (attached to 443 Troop Carrier Wing, 19 Jul-16 Oct 1952; 63 Troop Carrier Wing, 15 Oct 1953-15 Feb 1954). 64 Flying Training Wing, 15 May 1991-1 Apr 1997. Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate at anytime after 4 Dec 2001.

Operational Components

Squadrons:  4 Liaison: attached 22 Jul 1952-23 Jan 1953. 7 Liaison: attached 20 Oct 1952-9 Jan 1953. 16 Troop Carrier: 11 Dec 1940-31 Jul 1945; 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 17 Troop Carrier: 11 Dec 1940-31 Jul 1945; 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948; 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. 18 Troop Carrier: 11 Dec 1940-31 Jul 1945; 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. 33 Flying Training: 15 Dec 1991-1 Oct 1992. 35 Transport (later 35 Troop Carrier, 35 Tactical Airlift, 35 Flying Training): 9 Jun 1942-31 Jul 1945; 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954; 15 Dec 1991-31 Jul 1996. 52 Flying Training: 15 Dec 1991-1 Apr 1997. T-1A Flying Training Squadron, Provisional, 52: attached 15 Dec 1991-1 Oct 1992. 54 Transport (later 54 Troop Carrier, 54 Flying Training): 1-11 Jun 1942; 15 Dec 1991-1 Apr 1997.

Stations:  Duncan Field, TX, 4 Dec 1940; March Field, CA, c. 13 Jul 1941; Hamilton Field, CA, 1 Feb 1942; Westover Field, MA, 8 Jun-31 Jul 1942; Ramsbury, England, Aug-Nov 1942; Maison Blanche, Algeria, 11 Nov 1942 (air echelon); Blida, Algeria, 17 Nov 1942 (air echelon), c. 30 Nov 1942 (ground echelon); Kairouan, Tunisia, 28 Jun 1943; El Djem, Tunisia, 26 Jul 1943; Comiso, Sicily, 29 Aug 1943; (air echelon on detached service to Lalmai, India, c. 10 Apr-c. 15 Jun 1944); Ciampino, Italy, 10 Jul 1944; Rosignano Airfield, Italy, 10 Jan-23 May 1945; Waller Field, Trinidad, 4 Jun-31 Jul 1945. Langley Field, VA, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Donaldson AFB, SC, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Reese AFB, TX, 15 May 1991-1 Apr 1997.

Commanders:  Lt Col Malcolm S. Lawton, c. Dec 1940; Col Tracey K. Dorsett, by Jul 1942; Lt Col Claire B. Collier, 1 Mar 1943; Col John Cerny, 16 May 1943-1945. Unkn (probably unmanned), 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Col Steward H. Nichols, 14 Jul 1952; Col David E. Kunkel Jr., c. Nov 1953; Lt Col William G. Forwood, unkn-1954. Col Robert M. Negley Jr., 15 May 1991; Col Larry W. Driskill, 1 Jan 1992; Col F. Randall Starbuck, 21 Sep 1992; Lt Col Julius R. McRee, 28 Jun 1993; Col Frank K. Geisler Jr., 24 Sep 1993; Col Randall C. Gelwix, 15 Jul 1994; Col Bruce E. Burda, 28 Jul 1995; Lt Col Kenneth A. Montague, 16 Jan-1 Apr 1997.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1940-1945. C-82, 1952-1953; L-20, 1952-1953; C-119, 1953-1954. T-37, 1991-1996; T-38, 1991-1997; T-1, 1992-1997.

Operations:  Used C-47s for training and flying transport missions in the US. After Jul 1942, trained with paratroop and glider units in airborne operations. Moved to England Jul-Aug 1942 and trained for Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa. On 10 Nov the air echelon flew from England via Gibraltar and on 11 Nov landed personnel of the British 3 Parachute Battalion at Maison Blanche, near Algiers. By mid-Dec, the ground echelon joined the air echelon at Blida, Algeria. Released paratroops near Gela and Catania when the Allies invaded Sicily in Jul 1943. Dropped paratroops near Avellino during the invasion of Italy in Sep 1943 to destroy a bridge on the enemy's supply line to Salerno. Participated in the assault on southern France in Aug 1944 by releasing gliders and paratroops in the battle zone. Supported the partisans in northern Italy early in 1945 by dropping paratroops, supplies, and propaganda leaflets behind enemy lines. When not engaged in airborne operations, the group continually transported men and supplies to the front lines and evacuated wounded personnel. Most of the group was on detached service in the CBI theater, Apr-Jun 1944, while a skeleton force remained in Sicily. With its squadrons operating from separate bases in India, the 64th group aided the Allied offensive in Burma, being awarded a DUC for flying unarmed over rugged enemy territory to carry food, clothing, medical supplies, guns, ammunition, and mules to the combat zone and to evacuate wounded personnel. Moved to Trinidad, without aircraft, in May-Jun 1945 and inactivated in July 1945. Assigned to Tactical Air Command and activated in May 1947, the group remained a paper organization, unmanned, until its inactivation on 10 Sep 1948. Activated at Donaldson AFB, SC on 14 Jul 1952, the 64 Troop Carrier Group transported personnel and equipment worldwide and participated in joint training operations with the 82 Airborne Division until inactivation on 21 Jul 1954. Activated in May 1991, and conducted undergraduate pilot training 1991-1997. In 1996, began preparing Reese AFB, TX for closure. Graduated last pilot training class in Jan 1997 and inactivated on 1 Apr 1997.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; India-Burma; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: CBI Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award: 1 Oct 1995-[1 Apr] 1997.

Emblem:  Shield: Azure, an eagle's leg a la cuisse or charged with a mullet of the field. Motto: Flying Support. (Approved 16 Jun 1942.)

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 4 Dec 2001.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 1 Apr 1997.


Source:

Lineage:  Established as 64 Troop Carrier Wing, Medium on 3 Jul 1952. Activated on 14 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 21 Jul 1954. Activated on 24 Oct 1960. Organized on 8 Feb 1961. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 Jan 1963. Redesignated as 64 Troop Carrier Wing, and activated, on 7 Mar 1966. Organized on 1 Jul 1966. Redesignated as 64 Tactical Airlift Wing on 1 May 1967. Inactivated on 31 May 1971. Redesignated as 64 Flying Training Wing on 14 Apr 1972. Activated on 1 Oct 1972. Inactivated on 30 Sep 1997. Redesignated as 64 Air Expeditionary Wing, and converted to provisional status, on 4 Dec 2001.

Assignments:  Eighteenth Air Force, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954 (attached to 63 Troop Carrier Wing, 15 Oct 1953-1 Mar 1954). Tactical Air Command, 24 Oct 1960; Ninth Air Force, 8 Feb 1961; Twelfth Air Force, 1 Jan 1962-1 Jan 1963. Tactical Air Command, 7 Mar 1966; 839 Air Division, 1 Jul 1966; Twelfth Air Force, 9 Mar 1970-31 May 1971. Air Training Command, 1 Oct 1972; Nineteenth Air Force, 1 Jul 1993-30 Sep 1997. Air Combat Command to activate or inactivate at anytime after 4 Dec 2001.

Components

Groups:  64 Troop Carrier (later, 64 Operations): 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954 (detached 15 Oct 1953-15 Feb 1954); 15 May 1991-1 Apr 1997. 443 Troop Carrier: attached 8 Jan-1 Feb 1953. 465 Troop Carrier: attached 1 Feb-15 Oct 1953.

Squadrons:  4 Liaison: attached 22 Jul 1952-23 Jan 1953. 7 Liaison: attached 20 Oct 1952-9 Jan 1953. 17 Troop Carrier: 8 Feb 1961-1 Jan 1963. 18 Troop Carrier: 8 Jan 1962-1 Jan 1963. 33 Flying Training: 11 May 1990-15 Dec 1991. 35 Flying Training: 1 Oct 1972-15 Dec 1991. 52 Flying Training: 11 May 1990-15 Dec 1991. 54 Flying Training: 1 Oct 1972-15 Dec 1991. 61 Troop Carrier: 1 Jul 1966-31 May 1971 (detached 5 May-14 Aug 1967, 28 Mar-29 Jun 1968, 28 May-7 Jul 1970, 12 Oct-19 Dec 1970). 62 Troop Carrier: 1 Jul 1966-31 May 1971 (detached 13 Dec 1967-c. 28 Mar 1968, 1 Jul-2 Oct 1968, 5 Nov 1969-17 Jan 1970, 2 Jul-31 Aug 1970, 2 Apr-31 May 1971).

Stations:  Donaldson AFB, SC, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Dyess AFB, TX, 8 Feb 1961-1 Jan 1963. Sewart AFB, TN, 1 Jul 1966; Little Rock AFB, AR, 9 Mar 1970-31 May 1971. Reese AFB, TX, 1 Oct 1972-30 Sep 1997.

Commanders:  Brig Gen Franklin Rose, 14 Jul 1952; Brig Gen Glynne M. Jones, 1 Oct 1953 (additional duty); Col Bob Arnold, 28 Feb 1954; Col William C. Bentley, 1 May-21 Jul 1954. None (not manned), 24 Oct 1960-7 Feb 1961; Col Donald F. Blake, 8 Feb 1961; Lt Col Raymond J. Berger, 14 Jul 1962; Col Burl W. McLaughlin, 19 Jul 1962-1 Jan 1963. None (not manned), 7 Mar-30 Jun 1966; Col Jack W. Crawford Jr., 1 Jul 1966; Col Robert D. Brown, 6 Jan 1967; Col Earle F. MacDonald, 20 Oct 1967; Col Leo A. Drake Jr., 1 Aug 1968; Col Richard J. Gibney, 7 Jan 1970-31 May 1971. Col Walter H. Baxter III, 1 Oct 1972; Col Schuyler Bissell, 29 Jul 1974; Brig Gen Edward Mendel, 5 May 1975; Col Charles E. Bishop, 21 May 1977; Col Richard A. Ingram, 15 Feb 1979; Col Monte D. Montgomery, 7 Aug 1980; Col Richard E. Hearne, 9 Aug 1982; Col John R. Hullender, 28 Nov 1983; Col James W. McIntyre, 7 Aug 1985; Col Mark H. Lillard III, 9 Jul 1987; Col Monroe S. Sams, 20 Dec 1988; Col William C. Henny, 22 Jun 1990; Col David R. Love, 29 May 1992; Col Roger A. Brady, 20 Jul 1993; Col Randall C. Gelwix, 28 Jul 1995; Col Henry W. Horton, 8 Jan-30 Sep 1997.

Aircraft:  C-82, 1952-1953; L-20, 1952-1953; C-119, 1953, 1954. C-130, 1961-1963. C-130, 1966-1971. T-41, 1972-1973; T-37, 1972-1996; T-38, 1972-1997; T-1, 1992-1997.

Operations:  Performed airlift and airdrop/airlanding of troops and cargo, routinely and during frequent maneuvers, 1952-1953. Began phasing down for inactivation in mid-Oct 1953, at which time tactical operations passed to 63 Troop Carrier Wing. In Feb 1954, however, began building up again in preparation for an overseas movement, but was inactivated instead. Activated at Dyess AFB, TX, in Feb 1961 with a troop carrier/airlift mission, plus resupply of Distant Early Warning (DEW) sites on the Greenland ice cap. Inactivated on 1 Jan 1963. Replaced Troop Carrier Wing Provisional, 4413, in Jul 1966 at Sewart AFB, TN. Provided global airlift and aeromedical evacuation, Jul 1966-May 1971. Also provided C-130 combat crew training for other C-130 units, 1 Jul 1966-6 Mar 1970, with this being the wing's primary activity from 9 Aug 1968 to 6 Mar 1970. Replaced at Little Rock AFB, AR, in May 1971 by 314 Tactical Airlift Wing. Replaced 3500 Pilot Training Wing in Oct 1972 and assumed mission of undergraduate pilot training and operation and maintenance of Reese AFB, TX. Supported Accelerated Co-Pilot Enrichment Program through operating locations at Minot AFB, ND, Ellsworth AFB, SD, and Grand Forks AFB, ND, 1976-1991. Began specialized undergraduate pilot training in Jul 1992, using T-1A to prepare students for airlift tanker/transport training and T-37/T-38s for students in fighter/bomber track. Graduated last class of undergraduate pilots in Jan 1997.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Force Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: [1 Jul 1966]-30 Jun 1967. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jun 1969-31 May 1971; 30 Apr 1981-29 Apr 1983; 1 Apr 1984-31 Mar 1986; 1 Apr 1988-31 Mar 1990; 1 Oct 1995-30 Sep 1997.

Bestowed Honors:  Authorized to display honors earned by the 64 Expeditionary Operations Group prior to 14 Jul 1952.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; India-Burma; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: CBI Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944.

Emblem:  Azure, a stylized eagle ascending bendwise with wings elevated, head, neck, wing tips, and tail feathers Argent, body, beak, wings, legs, claws and talons Or garnished Brown and Sable, grasping a lightning flash of the second, in dexter chief a mullet of five points of the like, all within a diminished bordure Or. Approved on 20 Feb 1973 (KE 51351); replaced emblems approved on 11 May 1962 (K 13154) and 4 Nov 1952 (27086 AC). Current emblem approved on 20 Feb 1973.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 6 Oct 2009.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 30 Sep 1997.


Source:  17th Troop Carrier Squadron History

The 64th was activated as a Transport Group at Duncan Field on December 6, 1940. Group Headquarters moved to March Field July 1, 1941. The 16th to Portland, Oregon, the 17th to Hamilton Field, and the 18th to March Field. On June 3, 1942, the Group was re-designated as the 64th Troop Carrier Group and moved to Westover Field and then to Barnes Airport at Westover, Massachusetts. The 35th joined the group on 7 June at Westover after having been formed at Middleton Air Depot, Pennsylvania.

On April 1, 1944, the air echelon of the 64th Troop Carrier Group (and the 4th squadron of the 62nd group) were ordered to depart the following morning for the CBI (China-Burma-India) theater of operations. Quoting from the official Air Force History "The 35th squadron, first to take off left the airdrome (Comiso, Sicily) at 0600 hours on April 2, 1944--other squadrons followed and the planes made the trip to India via Bengasi (Libya), Cairo (Egypt), Abadan (Iran), Karachi (Pakistan), and Gaya (India)." (Beginning operations in India on April 7, 1944.)

The Group, through April, May, and the first part of June was instrumental in supplying Merrill's Marauders, General Stillwell's American and Chinese Armies in the Naingkwan section of Northern Burma, and the 170,000 British troops besieged in the Imphal Valley, Burma. One of the Group's C-47s was jumped by two Zero's one of which crashed into the tail of the transport and sheared off all but a foot of the vertical stabilizer, the Zero crashed and the pilot (Hal Scrugham) received credit for downing one airplane." By June 15, 1944, the Air Echelon had returned to Sicily.

Table of Contents



4th Troop Carrier Squadron (62nd Troop Carrier Group)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 4 Provisional Transport Squadron on 1 Mar 1935. Redesignated 4 Transport Squadron on 25 Jun 1935. Activated on 8 Jul 1935. Redesignated 4 Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 13 Dec 1945. Activated on 7 Sep 1946. Redesignated: 4 Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium, on 23 Jun 1948; 4 Troop Carrier Squadron, Heavy, on 12 Oct 1949; 4 Air Transport Squadron, Heavy, on 8 Jul 1962; 4 Military Airlift Squadron on 8 Jan 1966; 4 Airlift Squadron on 1 Dec 1991.

Assignments:  Rockwell Air Depot, 8 Jul 1935; 10 Transport Group, 20 May 1937; 62 Transport (later, 62 Troop Carrier) Group, 10 May 1941-14 Nov 1945 (attached to 64 Troop Carrier Group, 3 Apr-19 Jun 1944); unkn, 14 Nov-13 Dec 1945. 62 Troop Carrier Group, 7 Sep 1946 (attached to 374 Troop Carrier Wing, 1-24 Dec 1950; 6122 Air Base Group, 25 Dec 1950-25 Jan 1951; 315 Air Division, 25 Jan 1951-1 Oct 1951; Far East Air Forces, 1 Oct-7 Nov 1951); 62 Troop Carrier (later, 62 Air Transport; 62 Military Airlift) Wing, 15 Jan 1960; 62 Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991-.

Stations:  Rockwell Field, CA, 8 Jul 1935; Sacramento, CA, 1 Dec 1938; Kellogg Field, MI, 29 May 1942; Florence, SC, 1 Jul-14 Aug 1942; Keevil, England, 25 Sep 1942; Tafaraoui, Algeria, 15 Nov 1942; Casablanca, French Morocco, 16 Dec 1942; Nouvion, Algeria, 29 Mar 1943; Matemore, Algeria, 18 May 1943; Goubrine, Tunisia, 25 Jun 1943; Gela, Sicily, 7 Sep 1943; Catania, Sicily, 18 Oct 1943; Ponte Olivo, Sicily, 27 Feb 1944 (operated from bases in India, 12 Apr-11 Jun 1944); Gaudo Airfield, Italy, 8 May 1944; Galera Airfield, Italy, 29 Jun 1944; Malignano Airfield, Italy, 3 Oct 1944; Tarquinia, Italy, 9 Jan 1945; Rosignano Airfield, Italy, 26 May 1945; Marcianise, Italy, 28 Sep 1945; Naples, Italy, c. Oct-13 Dec 1945. Bergstrom Field, TX, 7 Sep 1946; McChord Field (later AFB), WA, 20 Jul 1947-28 Nov 1950; Ashiya AB, Japan, 1 Dec 1950; Tachikawa AB, Japan, 25 Jul 1951-16 Nov 1951; McChord AFB, WA, 16 Nov 1951; Larson AFB, WA, 11 May 1952; McChord AFB, WA, 13 Jun 1960-.

Commanders:  Unkn, 8 Jul 1935-Jan 1942; Maj Aubrey J. Hurron, by Jan 1942; Maj Alphonse L. Coenan, 27 Mar 1943; Maj William J. Burke, 11 Jul 1944; Maj Oliver K. Halderson, 14 Aug 1944; Maj Lester A. Brinkerhoff, 19 Nov 1944; Maj Oliver K. Halderson, by 8 Mar 1945; Maj Thomas E. Hallifax, 4 Jun 1945-c. 15 Dec 1945. Col Paul W. Stephens, c. 7 Sep 1946; Lt Col Richard Jones, by Mar 1949; Lt Col Richard W. Etter, 16 Nov 1951; Lt Col Jerome M. Triolo, Dec 1952; Maj Milton W. Byrn, by 30 Jun 1954; Lt Col Harry M. Odren, by 31 Dec 1955; Maj Jack W. Weaver, by 30 Jun 1956; Lt Col Burgess Gradwell, by 30 Jun 1957; Maj Thomas J. Upton, by 30 Jun 1960; Lt Col Clarence I. Shuman, 20 Jan 1961; Lt Col Maurice A. Erickson Jr., by 30 Jun 1962; Lt Col George B. Demmon, by Dec 1965; Lt Col Donald W. Feuerstein, by Dec 1966; Lt Col James H. Newton, 14 Aug 1967; Lt Col Dale E. Borgen, 15 Jul 1968; Lt Col Clifford J. Horkans, 1 May 1970; Lt Col Robert B. Downs, 6 May 1971; Lt Col Forrest G. Johnson, 8 Jun 1972; Lt Col John H. Billings, 26 Aug 1974; Lt Col Robert E. Baltzell, 9 Sep 1974; Lt Col David R. Vance, 17 Apr 1978; Lt Col Charles Z. Ridgway Jr., 29 Mar 1979; Lt Col John S. Baughman, 16 Jan 1981; Lt Col John S. Rogers, 7 Jun 1982; Lt Col Thomas A. Mikolajcik, 17 Aug 1983; Lt Col Joseph L. Castonguay, 8 Oct 1985; Lt Col Peter J. Bein, 21 Nov 1986; Lt Col Charles A. Royce, 23 Jun 1988; Lt Col Thomas F. Watson, 11 Jun 1990; Lt Col John L. Strube, 1 May 1992; Lt Col Jeff Cain, 20 May 1993; Lt Col Brian L. Sutter, 17 Apr 1995; Lt Col Henry W. Mauer, 7 May 1996; Lt Col James L. Schneller, 1 Aug 1997; Lt Col William J. Bender, 8 Sep 1998; Lt Col Balan Ayyar, 10 Jul 2001; Lt Col David D. Blomberg, 1 Jul 2002; Lt Col Mark Camerer, 15 Sep 2003; Lt Col James Regenor, 15 Jun 2004-.

Aircraft:  C-27, 1935-1937; C-33, 1936-1941; C-39, 1938-1942; C-47, 1942-1945. C-46, 1946-1947; C-82, 1947-1949; C-54, 1949-1951; C-124, 1951-1969; C-141, 1966-2000. C-17, 2000-.

Operations:  World War II: Included airborne assaults on Sicily, on Myitkyina, Burma, and on Southern France; support of partisans in Northern Italy and the Balkans; aerial transportation in Mediterranean Theater of Operations and, briefly, in China-Burma-India Theater. Korea: Aerial transportation from US to Japan, and subsequently between Japan and Korea in the period 1 Dec 1950-16 Nov 1951. Airdrop of heavy equipment and personnel during the invasion of Panama on 20 Dec 1989. Assisted in the evacuation of US personnel from Philippine Islands following the Jun 1991 eruption of Mt Pinatubo. Conducted aerial delivery of rations to Afghani towns and villages during Global War on Terrorism operations in 2001.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley; Air Combat, EAME Theater; India-Burma with Arrowhead. Korea: Chinese Communist Forces Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  Panama, 1989-1990.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: China-Burma-India Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944. Meritorious Unit Award: 11 Sep 2001-10 Sep 2003. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 19 Apr-5 May 1954; 1 Jan 1961-1 Nov 1962; 1 Jul 1965-15 Jul 1966; 1 Jul 1969-30 Jun 1970; 1 Jul 1973-30 Jun 1974; 1 Jul 1981-30 Jun 1983; 1 Jul 1983-30 Jun 1985; 14 Jun-3 Jul 1991; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1996; 1 Jul 1996-30 Jun 1997; 1 Jul 1997-30 Jun 1999; 1 Jul 2000-30 Jun 2001; 11 Sep 2005-10 Sep 2006. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation: 1 Jul 1951-[15 Nov 1951]. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Apr 1966-28 Jan 1973.

Emblem:  Upon a Light Blue disc edged in Black and issuant from White clouds detailed blue in base a Brown winged Army mule with provoked expression carrying a Green box strapped on its back. Approved on 17 Sep 1942 (K 2903).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 12 Apr 2007.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Dec 2005.

Table of Contents



16th Troop Carrier Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 16 Transport Squadron on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 11 Dec 1940. Redesignated 16 Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1945. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated 16 Troop Carrier Squadron, Assault, Light on 19 Sep 1950. Activated on 5 Oct 1950. Redesignated 16 Troop Carrier Squadron, Assault, Fixed Wing on 8 Nov 1954. Inactivated on 8 Jul 1955. Redesignated 16 Tactical Airlift Training Squadron on 14 Aug 1969. Activated on 15 Oct 1969. Redesignated 16 Airlift Squadron on 1 Dec 1991. Inactivated on 29 Sep 2000. Activated on 1 Jul 2002.

Assignments:  64 Transport (later, 64 Troop Carrier) Group, 11 Dec 1940-31 Jul 1945. 64 Troop Carrier Group, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 316 Troop Carrier Group, 5 Oct 1950; Eighteenth Air Force (attached to 463 Troop Carrier Wing), 14 Nov 1954-8 Jul 1955. 4442 Combat Crew Training Wing, 15 Oct 1969; 314 Tactical Airlift Wing, 1 Aug 1971; 34 Tactical Airlift Training Group, 1 Nov 1978; 314 Operations Group, 1 Dec 1991; 437 Operations Group, 1 Oct 1993-29 Sep 2000. 437 Operations Group, 1 Jul 2002-.

Stations:  McClellan Field, CA, 11 Dec 1940; Portland, OR, 9 Jul 1941; Westover Field, MA, 12 Jun-31 Jul 1942; Ramsbury, England, 18 Aug-Nov 1942 (operated from Maison Blanche, Algeria, 11 Nov-Dec 1942); Blida, Algeria, c. 12 Dec 1942; Kairouan, Tunisia, 28 Jun 1943; El Djem, Tunisia, 26 Jul 1943; Comiso, Sicily, 4 Sep 1943 (operated from bases in India, 7 Apr-Jun 1944); Ciampino, Italy, 10 Jul 1944 (operated from Istres, France, 7 Sep-11 Oct 1944); Rosignano Airfield, Italy, 10 Jan-23 May 1945 (operated from Brindisi, Italy, 29 Mar-13 May 1945) ; Waller Field, Trinidad, 4 Jun-31 Jul 1945. Langley Field, VA, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Sewart AFB, TN, 5 Oct 1950; Ardmore AFB, OK, 14 Nov 1954-8 Jul 1955. Sewart AFB, TN, 15 Oct 1969; Little Rock AFB, AR, c. 15 Mar 1970; Charleston AFB, SC, 1 Oct 1993-29 Sep 2000. Charleston AFB, SC, 1 Jul 2002-.

Commanders:  Capt Ralph J. Moore, 11 Dec 1940; 1Lt John Cerny, 1 May 1941; Capt Lloyd A. Hardesty, 25 Apr 1942; Maj John Cerny, 16 Jun 1942; Lt Col John H. Champion, 18 May 1943; Capt Long, 4 Sep 1944; Capt Jack F. Linn, 29 Sep 1944-31 Jul 1945. None (not manned), 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Unkn, 5 Oct 1950-Apr 1951; Lt Col Earl A. Butts, c. May 1951; Major James S. Hamer, c. Mar 1952; Maj Louis P. Lindsay, by Mar 1953; Capt Elden C. Funk, c. 30 Jun 1953; Maj Louis P. Lindsay, c. Dec 1953-8 Jul 1955. Lt Col George A. Ashbridge, 15 Oct 1969; Lt Col John D. Hedges, 1 Mar 1970; Lt Col Ralph A. Yates, 1 Aug 1971; Lt Col Walter J. Ford, 20 Nov 1972; Lt Col Delbert A. Emerson Jr., 1 Aug 1973; Lt Col Jerry D. Livingston, 3 May 1976; Lt Col James L. Biggs, 10 Mar 1977; Lt Col Richard W. Blatter, 9 Feb 1979; Lt Col Robert C. Peck, 14 Nov 1980; Lt Col Ronald L. Morey, 11 Aug 1982; Lt Col Robert E. Snyder, 9 Mar 1984; Lt Col Charles H. Wittrock, 21 Mar 1986; Lt Col Robert W. Topel, 10 Feb 1988; Lt Col Jon L. Martinson, 28 Jul 1989; Lt Col Paul M. Rouse, 26 Jun 1990; Lt Col Carl W. Gustke, 25 Jun 1992; Lt Col Keith A. Feigh, 22 Jun 1993; Lt Col Charles P. Brooks Jr., 1 Oct 1993; Lt Col Kip L. Self, 18 Apr 1994; Lt Col Michael C. Jackson, 1 Mar 1996; Lt Col Richard J. Richardson, 16 Oct 1997; Lt Col James J. Wendling, 1 Dec 1998-29 Sep 2000.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1941-1945. C-119, 1950-1951; YC-122, 1951-1955; H-19, 1952; H-5, 1952. C-130, 1969-1993; C-141, 1993-2000.

Operations:  World War II: Airborne assaults on Sicily and Southern France; support for partisans in Northern Italy, Jan-May 1945; aerial transportation in MTO, and briefly in CBI. Airlift of Army assault troops in training exercises, 1951-1954. Aircrew training, 1969-1993; flew humanitarian and resupply missions worldwide, including to Bosnia and Southwest Asia, 1993-2000.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley; India-Burma; Air Combat, EAME Theater.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: CBI Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 30 Sep 1975-30 Jun 1976; 1 Jun 1985-31 May 1986; 1 Jul 1991-30 Jun 1993; 1 Jul 1993-30 Jun 1995; 1 Jul 1995-30 Jun 1997; 1 Jul 1997-30 Jun 1998; 1 Jul 1998-29 Sep 2000.

Emblem:  On a Yellow disc edged with a narrow Blue border; a Red lion rampant with Red tongue, White wings, grasping in its dexter paw a White short sword with blade up and in its sinister paw a White rolled scroll, all details Black. Approved on 17 Dec 1980 (KE 72060); replaced emblem approved on 25 Jun 1951 (K 6239).

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 3 Jun 2002.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 2000.


Other Sites of Interest:

16th Airlift Squadron (Charleston AFB website)

Table of Contents



17th Troop Carrier Squadron


Squadron patch of the 17th Troop Carrier Squadron in North Africa during World War II. (Photograph of this actual original patch courtesy of Forrest W. Gregg, Electrician, 17th TCS, WW II.)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 17 Transport Squadron on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 11 Dec 1940. Redesignated 17 Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1945. Activated on 19 May 1947. Inactivated on 10 Sep 1948. Redesignated 17 Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium, on 3 Jul 1952. Activated on 14 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 21 Jul 1954. Activated on 24 Oct 1960. Organized on 8 Feb 1961. Redesignated: 17 Troop Carrier Squadron on 8 Dec 1965; 17 Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Sep 1967; 517 Airlift Squadron on 1 Apr 1992.

Assignments:  64 Transport (later, 64 Troop Carrier) Group, 11 Dec 1940-31 Jul 1945. 64 Troop Carrier Group, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. 64 Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Tactical Air Command, 24 Oct 1960; 64 Troop Carrier Wing, 8 Feb 1961; 516 Troop Carrier Wing, 1 Jan 1963; 5040 Air Base Wing, 15 Jun 1964; 21 Composite Wing, 8 Jul 1966; Twenty-Second Air Force, 31 Mar 1975; 616 Military Airlift Group, 1 Nov 1975; 3 Operations Group, 1 Apr 1992-.

Stations:  McClellan Field, CA, 11 Jul 1940; Hamilton Field, CA, 11 Jul 1941; Westover Field, MA, 13 Jun-31 Jul 1942; Ramsbury, England, 18 Aug 1942; Greenham Common Airdrome, England, 26 Sep 1942; Blida, Algeria, 27 Nov 1942 (air echelon operated from Nouvion, Algeria, 6-27 Jun 1943 and Kairouan, Tunisia, 27 Jun-26 Jul 1943); Kairouan, Tunisia, 29 Jun 1943; El Djem, Tunisia, 26 Jul 1943; Milo/Trapani Airdrome, Sicily, 1 Sep 1943; Comiso, Sicily, 4 Sep 1943 (air echelon operated from Lalmia, India, 7 Apr-9 Jun 1944); Ciampino, Italy, 8 Jul 1944 (operated from Istres, France, 8 Sep-11 Nov 1944); Rosignano Airfield, Italy, 10 Jan-23 May 1945; Waller Field, Trinidad, 4 Jun-31 Jul 1945. Langley Field, VA, 19 May 1947-10 Sep 1948. Donaldson AFB, SC, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Dyess AFB, TX, 8 Feb 1961; Elmendorf AFB, AK, 15 Jun 1964-.

Commanders:  Capt Aaron H. Hoffeditz, 11 Dec 1940; Capt Albert B. Willett, 10 May1941; Maj William S. Pocock, 15 Dec 1941; Maj Earl B. Cook, 16 Mar 1942; Maj John T. Thompson, 13 Oct 1942; Maj LaVerne L. Cheney, 17 May 1943; Maj Leo J. Hagerty, 7 Nov 1944-unkn; Capt William B. Parker, unkn-4 Mar 1945; Maj Leo J. Hagerty, 4 Mar 1945; Capt William B. Parker, 21 Mar 1945-unkn. None (not manned), 19 Sep 1947-10 Sep 1948. Maj Wesly C. Brashear, by Sep 1952; Capt Robert E. Lee, by Oct 1952; Lt Col G. B. Gray, by Dec 1952-unkn. Capt Charles D. Adams, 8 Feb 1961; Maj Guy E. Ridgeway Jr., 1 Apr 1961; Lt Col Joseph J. Kesler, Oct 1961; Lt Col Guy E. Ridgeway Jr., 25 Apr 1962; Col John H. Statts, 12 Mar 1963; Lt Col Kenneth E. Bethe, 1 Jul 1966-unkn; Lt Col R. T. Tinney, by 1 Sep 1969; Lt Col John C. Parker, 22 Sep 1969; Lt Col Ora J. Baird Jr., by Mar 1971; Lt Col Charles F. Renner, by May 1971; Lt Col Ora J. Baird Jr., by Jun 1971; Lt Col Charles F. Renner, 4 Jun 1971; Lt Col Ora J. Baird Jr., 3 Sep 1971; Lt Col John D. Hedges, 26 Jun 1972; Lt Col Donald R. Gould, 11 Dec 1972; Lt Col John D. Hedges, by Apr 1973; Lt Col Donald R. Gould, 10 Apr 1973; Lt Col James H. Waldman, 1 Apr 1974; Lt Col William J. Gibbons, 22 Jun 1976; Lt Col Robert T. Shellenberger Jr., 22 Jul 1976; Lt Col David M. Calder, 26 Aug 1978; Lt Col William P. Martin Jr., by 30 Sep 1978; Lt Col Donald L. Smith, 1 Jul 1979; Lt Col Ronald B. Dorcy, 2 Jun 1981; Lt Col James W. Prouty, 4 Jan 1984; Lt Col George N. Williams, 14 Nov 1985; Lt Col Ralph G. Bent II, by Jan 1988; Lt Col Andrew M. Gessner, 6 Jul 1989; Lt Col Richard J. Casey, 29 Jun 1991; Lt Col Douglas L. Miller, 28 Jun 1993; Lt Col William M. Hudson, 20 Jun 1994; Lt Col Walter J. Tomczak, 12 Jul 1996; Lt Col Paul A. Curlett, 2 Jul 1998; Lt Col Neil B. Friedli, 17 Mar 2000; Lt Col Paul Stephenson, 23 Mar 2001; Lt Col Patrick Hollrah, 13 Mar 2003; Lt Col Paul E. Feather, 24 Aug 2004; Lt Col Gary J. Gottschall, 27 Jan 2006-.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1941-1945. None, 1947-1948. C-82, 1952-1953; C-119, 1953-1954. C-130, 1961-; C-124, 1970-1971; C-12, 1992-; C-17, 2007-.

Operations:  World War II: Included airborne assaults on Sicily and Southern France; support for partisans in Northern Italy, Jan-May 1945; aerial transportation in MTO, and briefly in CBI. Unmanned, 1947-1948. Resupplied Distant Early Warning (DEW) line sites in Northern Canada and radar sites in Greenland, 1964-1975. Parts of the squadron deployed to South Vietnam, 1967-1968 to provide tactical airlift. Provided intratheater airlift within Alaska including support to forward operating bases; airland/airdrop of troops, equipment and supplies; search and rescue as required. Provided C-130 aircraft and crews for Pacific airlift to Southwest Asia, Aug-Nov 1990. Since 1992, provided worldwide combat airdrop, tactical air/land, operational support airlift, airlift for theater deployed forces and resupply of remote Alaskan long-range radar sites in support of PACAF. Provided continuous rotational airlift and airdrop support for Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, 2004-. Among first responders to Asian tsunami that occurred on 26 Dec 2004.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley, India-Burma. Vietnam: Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: CBI Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Combat "V" Device: 2 May 1967-1 Jan 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1962-15 Jun 1964; 16 Jun 1964-31 May 1966; 8 Jul 1966-1 May 1967; 2 Jan-31 Dec 1968; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1969; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1970; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1971; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1972; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1974; 1 Jan-30 Mar 1975; 1 Jan-31 Dec 1979; 1 Jun 1986-31 May 1987; 1 Jun 1987-31 May 1989; 1 Jan 1994-31 Dec 1995; 1 Jan 1996-30 Sep 1998; 1 Jan 2000-31 Dec 2001; 1 Jan 2002-30 Sep 2003; 1 Oct 2003-30 Sep 2005. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 1 Sep 1966-1 Jan 1968.

Emblem:  On a disc Argent, a stylized eagle (firebird) volant traversed wings to chief Gules, all within a diminished border of the second. Attached above the disc, a White scroll edged with a narrow Red border and inscribed "517TH AIRLIFT SQ" in Red letters. Attached below the disc, a White scroll edged with a narrow Red border and inscribed "FIREBIRDS" in Red letters. MOTTO: VERSATILE, CAPABLE. Approved on 29 Mar 1962 (K 13056); modified on 16 Feb 1999.

Symbolism:  The eagle in flight symbolizes the mythical firebird renowned for its strength and reflects the strength, speed and tenacity with which the unit performs its mission. The Squadron's versatility with equipment and flexibility in operation are also suggested by the powerful bird.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 29 Sep 2006.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through 29 Sep 2006.



Source:  Firebird Association

Gary G. Lattin, an aircraft commander in the squadron, designed the Firebird emblem of the 17th Troop Carrier Squadron. In the early 1960s, the 64th Troop Carrier Wing selected Gary's work of art as being the best entered in a contest to select an appropriate emblem for the newly reactivated 17th TCS.

Wearing the Firebird Patch - (from Mr. Jim Waldman)

The Firebird patch as designed by Gary Lattin and worn by 17th TCS/TAS members always faced to heraldic right. However, when the 17th was transferred from AAC to MAC, the gaining command required all assigned members to wear the MAJCOM patch on the chest and the squadron patch on the right shoulder.

Since this would have had the bird flying towards the wearer's rear (flying backwards), the 17th requested that the USAF heraldry board permit the insignia to be redesigned with the bird facing to the left for those occasions when display would have the bird flying backwards. The heraldry board concurred.

The bird continued to be displayed in the more familiar manner, with the bird facing to heraldic right except when worn on the right shoulder.

In summary, THE BIRD FACES OR FLYS RIGHT UNLESS THIS MAKES IT FLY BACKWARDS.

(Note: Jim Waldman is a former commander of the 17th TAS. And, as such, he is the person responsible for having had the patch approved by the USAF Heraldry Board to face either direction.)



Other Sites of Interest:

Firebird Association

517th Airlift Squadron (Elmendorf AFB website)

Table of Contents



18th Troop Carrier Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 18 Transport Squadron on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 11 Dec 1940. Redesignated 18 Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1945. Redesignated 18 Troop Carrier Squadron, Heavy on 24 Jul 1948. Activated on 1 Aug 1948. Inactivated on 1 Mar 1949. Redesignated 18 Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium on 3 Jul 1952. Activated on 14 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 21 Jul 1954. Activated on 3 Aug 1961. Organized on 8 Jan 1962. Redesignated 18 Troop Carrier Squadron on 1 Mar 1966. Discontinued, and inactivated, on 25 Jun 1967. Redesignated 18 Tactical Airlift Training Squadron on 14 Aug 1969. Activated on 15 Oct 1969. Inactivated on 31 Aug 1972. Redesignated 18 Air Refueling Squadron on 9 Sep 1994. Activated in the Reserve on 1 Oct 1995.

Assignments:  64 Transport (later, 64 Troop Carrier) Group, 11 Dec 1940-31 Jul 1945. 5700 Composite Wing, 1 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1949. 64 Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Tactical Air Command, 3 Aug 1961; 64 Troop Carrier Wing, 8 Jan 1962; 516 Troop Carrier Wing, 1 Jan 1963; 314 Troop Carrier Wing, 1 Jul 1963; 317 Troop Carrier (later, 317 Tactical Airlift) Wing, 1 Apr 1965-25 Jun 1967. 516 Tactical Airlift Wing, 15 Oct 1969; 463 Tactical Airlift Wing, 1 Jun-31 Aug 1972. 931 Air Refueling Group, 1 Oct 1995-.

Stations:  McClellan Field, CA, 11 Dec 1940; March Field, CA, 11 Jul 1941; Westover Field, MA, 9 Jun-31 Jul 1942; Ramsbury, England, 18 Aug-c. Nov 1942 (operated from Maison Blanche, Algeria, 11 Nov-Dec 1942); Bilda, Algeria, 16 Dec 1942; Kairouan, Tunisia, 1 Jul 1943; El Djem, Tunisia, 26 Jul 1943; Comiso, Sicily, 8 Sep 1943 (operated from bases in India, Apr-Jun 1944); Ciampino, Italy, 10 Jul 1944 (operated from Istres, France, 7 Sep-11 Nov 1944); Rosignano Airfield, Italy, 9 Jan-23 May 1945; Waller Field, Trinidad, 4 Jun-31 Jul 1945. Albrook AFB, Canal Zone, 1 Aug 1948-1 Mar 1949. Donaldson AFB, SC, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Dyess AFB, TX, 8 Jan 1962; Sewart AFB, TN, 1 Jul 1963; Lockbourne AFB, OH, 1 Apr 1965-25 Jun 1967. Dyess AFB, TX 15 Oct 1969-31 Aug 1972. McConnell AFB, KS, 1 Oct 1995-.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1941-1945. C-54, 1948-1949. C-82, 1951-1953; C-119, 1953-1954. C-130, 1962-1967. C-7, 1969-1972. KC-135, 1995-.

Operations:  During World War II flew airborne assaults on Sicily, Myitkyina, Burma, and Southern France; supported partisans in Northern Italy, Jan-May 1945; aerial transportation in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations and briefly in the China-Burma-India Theater. Strategic and tactical airlift missions, 1948-1954 and 1962-1967. Tactical airlift training for US and later, South Vietnamese pilots and crews, 1969-1972. Worldwide air refueling, 1995-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Algeria-French Morocco; Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley; India-Burma with Arrowhead.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: CBI Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Apr-30 Jun 1965; 1 Nov 1995-31 Oct 1997; 1 Nov 1997-31 Oct 1999.

Lineage, Assignments, Components, Stations, and Honors through 1 April 2002.

Commanders, Aircraft, and Operations through Sep 1997.

Emblem:  Approved on 20 May 1964.

Table of Contents



35th Troop Carrier Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 35th Transport Squadron on 2 Feb 1942. Activated on 14 Feb 1942. Redesignated 35th Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 31 Jul 1945. Redesignated 35th Troop Carrier Squadron, Medium, on 3 Jul 1952. Activated on 14 Jul 1952. Inactivated on 21 Jul 1954. Activated on 20 Dec 1962. Organized on 8 Jan 1963. Redesignated: 35th Troop Carrier Squadron on 8 Dec 1965; 35th Tactical Airlift Squadron on 1 Aug 1967. Inactivated on 31 Mar 1971. Redesignated 35th Flying Training Squadron on 14 Apr 1972. Activated on 1 Oct 1972. Inactivated on 1 Jul 1996.

Assignments:  315th Transport Group, 14 Feb 1942; 64th Transport (later, 64th Troop Carrier) Group, 9 Jun 1942-31 Jul 1945. 64th Troop Carrier Group, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Pacific Air Forces, 20 Dec 1962; 315th Air Division, 8 Jan 1963; 374th Troop Carrier (later, 374th Tactical Airlift) Wing, 8 Aug 1966-31 Mar 1971. 64th Flying Training Wing, 1 Oct 1972; 64th Operations Group, 15 Dec 1991-1 Jul 1996.

Stations:  Olmsted Field, PA, 14 Feb 1942; Westover Field, MA, 8 Jun-31 Jul 1942; Ramsbury, England, 18 Aug-Nov 1942 (operated from Casablanca, French Morocco, 14 Nov-Dec 1942); Blida, Algeria, c. 12 Dec 1942 (operated from Telergma, Algeria, 4 Jan-21 Mar 1943); Kairouan, Tunisia, 28 Jun 1943; El Djem, Tunisia, 26 Jul 1943; Comiso, Sicily, 7 Sep 1943 (operated from bases in India, Apr-Jun 1944); Ciampino, Italy, 8 Jul 1944 (operated from Istres, France, 6 Sep-11 Oct 1944); Rosignano Airfield, Italy, 9 Jan-23 May 1945; Waller Field, Trinidad, 4 Jun-31 Jul 1945. Donaldson AFB, SC, 14 Jul 1952-21 Jul 1954. Naha AB, Okinawa, 8 Jan 1963-31 Mar 1971. Reese AFB, TX, 1 Oct 1972-1 Jul 1996.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1942-1945. C-82, 1952-1953; C-119, 1953-1954. C-130, 1963-1971. T-37, 1972-1996.

Operations:  During World War II, included airborne assaults on Sicily and Southern France; support for partisans in northern Italy, Jan-May 1945; aerial transportation in MTO, and briefly in CBI. Transported cargo and personnel in the Far East and Southeast Asia, 1963-1971. Undergraduate pilot training, 1972-1996.

Honors

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: Tunisia; Sicily; Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; Southern France; North Apennines; Po Valley; India-Burma.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: CBI Theater, 7 Apr-15 Jun 1944. Presidential Unit Citation: Southeast Asia, 8 Aug 1967-7 Aug 1968. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: 1 Jul 1964-30 Apr 1966; 8 Aug 1966-7 Aug 1967; 1 Jan 1974-31 Dec 1975; 30 Apr 1981-29 Apr 1983; 30 Apr 1983-31 Dec 1984; 1 Jan 1985-31 Mar 1986; 1 Apr 1987-31 Mar 1989; 1 Apr 1988-31 Mar 1990. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: 8 Aug 1966-31 Mar 1971.

Emblem (WWII):  On a disc light sky blue, border green, over the disc a lightning bolt red, point downward between two stylized clouds white in base; the bolt surmounted by a caricatured US mule, dark gray, riding a paradrop platform and pulling forward a drag chute, shades of white; the mule, platform, and drag chute outlined dark gray. (Approved 15 Jul 1954.)

Emblem (Current):  Azure, two ribbons barbed, each arcing from base doubled in chief braced and arcing back to base Or, between five mullets one, two, Or, and two Argent. Approved on 20 Feb 1973 (KE 48987); replaced emblem approved on 15 Jul 1954 (150593 A.C.).

Table of Contents



443d Troop Carrier Group

Source:

Combat Units of WWII; AFHRA, Maurer Maurer, editor:
or
Air Force Historical Studies Office  (Adobe Acrobat file)

Lineage:  Constituted as 443d Troop Carrier Group on May 25, 1943. Activated on Oct 1, 1943. Equipped with L-3, C-53 and C-47 aircraft. Transferred without personnel and equipment on Feb 15, 1944 to India, where the group remanned and new squadrons were assigned. Operated in the CBI theater until after the war, using C-47's and sometimes gliders to transport Allied troops, evacuate wounded personnel, and haul supplies and material, including gasoline, oil, signal and engineering equipment, medicine rations, and ammunition. The Group's missions were concerned primarily with support for Allied forces that were driving southward through Burma, but the 443d also made flights to China. It moved to China in Aug. 1945 and received a DUC for transporting men from Chihkiang to Nanking in Sept. 1945. Returned to US in Dec 1945. Inactivated on Dec. 26, 1945. Redesignated 443d Troop Carrier Group (Medium) and allotted to reserve. Activated on June 27, 1949. Called to active duty on May 1, 1951. Assigned to Tactical Air Command. Equipped first with C-46's, later (Feb 1952) with C-119's. Inactivated Feb 1, 1953.

Squadrons:  1st 1944-1945, 2nd 1944-1945, 27th 1944-1945, 309th 1943-1944; 1949-1953, 310th 1943-1944; 1949-1953, 315th 1943-1945, 343d 1949-1953, 344th 1949-1951.

Stations:  Sedalia AAFld, Mo. Oct 1, 1943; Alliance AAFld, Neb. Jan 19 1944-Feb 15, 1944; Sylhet, India, Feb 15, 1944; Sookerating, India, Jun 6, 1944; Dinjan, India, July 9, 1944; Ledo, India, Oct 8, 1944; Dinjan, India, May 11, 1945; Chihkiang, China, Aug 28, 1945; Hankow, China, Sept 25-20, 1945; Camp Anza, Ca, Dec 23-26, 1945. Hensley Field, Tx. Jun 27, 1949; Donaldson AFB, SC. Aug 9, 1951-Feb 1, 1953.

Commanders:  Maj Elmer F Estrumse, 5 Oct 1943; Lt Col Charles D Farr, 13 Mar 1944; Lt Col Loren Cornell, 16 May 1944; Col Thomas Schofield, 1 Nov 1944; Col Herbert A Bott, 12 Apr 1945; Col Frederick L Moore, 11 Sep 1945; Lt Col Jack F Marr, Deck. 16 Dec 1945. Col James B Henson, 1 May 1951; Maj Clifford F Harris, c. 15 Dec 1952-1 Feb 1953.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation: China, Sep 5-30, 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



1st Troop Carrier Squadron


Patch handmade for Lt. Hannah and McDonald. Lettering means "Sad Sams - U Call, We Haul Staple And Fancy Foods". Named for 1st TCS commander, Lauren Cornell, aka "Sad Sam".

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 1st Provisional Transport Squadron on 1 Mar 1935. Redesignated 1st Transport Squadron on 25 Jun 1935. Activated on 15 Jul 1935. Redesignated 1st Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 18 Dec 1945.

Assignments:  Fairfield Air Depot, 15 Jul 1935; 10th Transport (later Troop Carrier) Group, 20 May 1937; Tenth Air Force, c. 2 Feb 1943 (attached to India-China Wing, Air Transport Command, 2 Feb-7 Mar 1943, and to Troop Carrier Command, Eastern Air Command, 20 Dec 1943-6 Mar 1944); 443d Troop Carrier Group, 6 Mar 1944-18 Dec 1945.

Stations:  Patterson Field, Ohio, 15 Jul 1935 (a flight operated from Wright Field, Ohio, 15 Jul 1935-9 Feb 1937); General Billy Mitchell Field, Wis, 26 May 1942; Pope Field, NC, 4 Oct 1942-9 Jan 1943; Chabua, India, 2 Feb 1943; New Delhi, India, 7 Mar 1943 (detachments operated from various bases in India and China); Sookerating, India, 19 Oct 1943; Warazup, Burma, 20 Apr 1945; Dinjan, India, 1 Jun 1945; Chihkiang, China, 28 Aug 1945; Hankow, China, 25 Sep 1945; Shanghai, China, 21-30 Nov 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 16-18 Dec 1945.

Aircraft:  C-27, 1935-1937; C-33, 1936-1939; included C-39 and various civilian and military modifications of DC-3s during period 1939-1941; C-47, 1942-1945; C-46, 1945.

Operations:  Airborne assault on Myitkyina, Burma, 17 May 1944; aerial transportation in CBI, c. Feb 1943-27 Aug 1945; airlift of Chinese troops to eastern China for disarmament operations, Sep-Nov 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma with Arrowhead; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations:  Myitkyina, Burma, 17 May-16 Jun 1944 (WD GO 26-45); China, 5-30 Sep 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



2nd Troop Carrier Squadron


NOT A WAREHOUSE, but Headquarters building of the 2nd Troop Carrier Squadron at
Shingbwiyang. Idol in the foreground was "borrowed" from a nearby Burmese pagoda.
Photo by Earl J. Harris. (Ex-CBI Roundup, May 1953 issue)

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 2nd Provisional Transport Squadron on 1 Mar 1935. Redesignated 2nd Transport Squadron, and activated, on 28 Jun 1935. Redesignated 2nd Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942. Inactivated on 24 Dec 1945. Redesignated 2nd Airlift Squadron, and activated, on 1 Jun 1992.

Assignments:  Middletown Air Depot, PA, 28 Jun 1935; 10th Transport (later, 10th Troop Carrier) Group, 20 May 1937; Tenth Air Force, c. 17 Feb 1943 (attached to India-China Wing, Air Transport Command, 9 Mar-1 Jul 1943); Assam Air Base Command, c. 1 Jul 1943 (attached to Troop Carrier Command, Eastern Air Command, 20 Dec 1943-6 Mar 1944); 443d Troop Carrier Group, 6 Mar 1944-24 Dec 1945. 23d Operations Group, 1 Jun 1992-.

Stations:  Olmsted Field, PA, 28 Jun 1935; Stout Field, IN, 21 May 1942; Kellogg Field, MI, 1 Jul 1942; Bowman Field, KY, 4 Aug 1942; Pope Field, NC, 1 Oct 1942-23 Jan 1943; Yangkai, China, 17 Feb 1943; Dinjan, India, 1 Jul 1943; Shingbwiyang, Burma, 14 Aug 1944; Dinjan, India, 1 Jun 1945; Chihkiang, China, 24 Aug 1945; Hankow, China, 25 Sep-21 Nov 1945; Camp Anza, CA, 23-24 Dec 1945. Pope AFB, NC, 1 Jun 1992-.

Aircraft:  C-27, 1935-1937; C-33, 1936-1939; including C-39 and various civilian and military modifications of DC-3 during period 1939-1941; C-47, 1942-1945; C-46, 1945. C-130, 1992-.

Operations:  Trained transport pilots, 21 May-1 Oct 1942; airborne assault on Myitkyina, Burma, 17 May 1944; aerial transportation in CBI, 25 Feb 1943-c. Aug 1945; airlift of Chinese troops to eastern China for disarmament operations, Sep-Nov 1945. Airlift for airborne troops, 1 Jun 1992-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma with Arrowhead; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: China, Burma, and India, 26 Jan-31 Dec 1943 (WD GO91-44); Burma, 1-29 Feb 1944 (WD GO 91-44); China, 5-30 Sep 1945.

Emblem:  Upon a disc per bend indented Or and Azure, a Brown spear in fesse, headed Gold, winged Gules. Approved on 5 May 1942 (K 2903).

Table of Contents



27th Troop Carrier Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)


C-47A from the 27th in 1944 supporting Wingate's Chindit operations.
"A" = squadron designator, "B" = aircraft letter. -- Courtesy of Mr. Nick King

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 27th Transport Squadron on 19 Jan 1942 per AG 320.2 (12 Jan 42). Activated on 1 Feb 1942. Redesignated 27th Troop Carrier Squadron on 4 Jul 1942 per AG 320.2 (3 Jul 42). Inactivated on 27 Dec 1945.

Assignments:   89th Transport Group, 1 Feb 1942; 10th Transport (later Troop Carrier) Group, 15 Jun 1942 (attached to 62nd Transport [later Troop Carrier] Group, 21 Jun - 5 Aug 1942); Tenth Air Force (attached to Troop Carrier Command, Eastern Air Command), 12 Jan 1944; 443d Troop Carrier Group, 6 Mar 1944 - 27 Dec 1945 (attached to 69th Composite Wing, 21 May 1944 - c. Jul 1945).

Stations:  Daniel Field, Ga, 1 Feb 1942; Harding Field, La, 10 Mar 1942; Kellogg Field, Mich, 21 Jun 1942 (attached to 62nd Transport Group); Bowman Field, Ky, 5 Aug 1942; Pope Field, NC, 4 Oct 1942; Lawson Field, Ga, 2 Dec 1942; Dunnellon AAFld, Fla, 14 Feb - 13 Dec 1943; Sylhet, India, 12 Jan 1944; Yunnani, China, 21 May 1944 (detachments operated from Chanyi, Chengtu, and Kunming at various times); Chengkung, China, 15 Feb 1945; Liangshan, China, 13 Aug - 27 Dec 1945.

Aircraft:  C-48, 1942; C-49, 1942; C-53, 1942-1943; C-47, 1942-1945.

Operations:  Training of transport pilots and glider pilots, and later replacement crews, 21 Jun 1942 - 30 Nov 1943; aerial transportation in CBI, 13 Jan 1944 - c. 13 Aug 1945.

Service Streamers:  American Theater.

Campaigns:  India-Burma; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  Over and through a light blue disc, border red, piped white, a black and white checkered taxicab, winged gold, resting on a white cloud formation in base. (Approved 25 Feb 1943.)


Photo courtesy of Mr. Paul Shindelar


Source:  27th Troop Carrier Squadron

"Flying Taxi": The Special Service Division, U.S. Army Air Forces, gave official approval of the "Flying Taxi" for marking of the aircraft of the Twenty Seventh Troop Carrier Squadron on 25th February 1943, per authority contained in AG letter 400. 161 OB-S-A 7 December 1942 subject "Army Air Forces Organizational Designs.

Over and through a light blue disc, border red, piped white, a black and white checkered taxicab, winged gold, resting on a white cloud, formation in base, as per record drawing 28655 A.C.

"Hump T Dump": On a argent and blue disc bordered red, argent and blue, a cartoon character depicting "HUMPTY DUMPTY" argent, riding a parachute with mountain tops in the background. The parachute is red, blue add argent, repeated blue and red. The lower portion of the parachute is laced with Chinese, Burmese and Indian characters depicting the name of each country. The design contains the unit motto "HUMP T DUMPS", depicting flying over the "Hump" and "Dumping" their cargo.

The "Flying Taxi" insignia was used by the squadron from its inception through its arrival overseas. Interviews with former troopers confirms that the design was drawn by a member of the squadron, a former employee of the Walt Disney organization, name unknown.

The "Flying Taxi" was again placed into service with the assignment of Major James H.S. Rasmussen, as commander of the Twenty Seventh in its later days of the war in China.

The "Hump T Dump" patch was designed by S/Sgt. Earl J. Hohlmayer, per the request of Major Lewis C. Burwell, Jr. commander of the unit at the time. It was his desire to have an insignia more closely related to the squadron's efforts in the China-Burma-India Theater. Sergeant Hohlmayer was serving in the Twenty Seventh as a parachute rigger.

Although never submitted to the Special Service Division of the United States Army Air Forces for approval, it did receive the endorsement of the Tenth and Fourteenth Air Force high commands. The rocker at the bottom of the design, carrying the Twenty Seventh's name, was added in the post war years. The design in its entirety was adopted by former members of the squadron assembled, by unanimous vote, in the post war years.

 27th TCS Insignia History
(courtesy of Mr. Paul Shindelar)

Table of Contents



315th Troop Carrier Squadron

Source:

Combat Squadrons of the Air Force - World War II; AFHRC, Maurer Maurer, editor:  (Adobe Acrobat files)
or
Air Force Historical Research Agency
     Part I
     Part II

Lineage:  Constituted 315th Troop Carrier Squadron on 8 Dec 1943. Activated on 1 Jan 1944. Inactivated on 28 Dec 1945. Activated in the reserve on 11 Jun 1948. Inactivated on 27 Jun 1949.

Assignments:  Tenth Air Force (attached to Troop Carrier Command, Easter Air Command), 1 Jan 1944; 443d Troop Carrier Group, 6 Mar 1944 - 26 Dec 1945. Second Air Force, 11 Jun 1948; Tenth Air Force, 1 Jul 1948. First Air Force, 15 Aug 1948; 443d Troop Carrier Group, 28 Oct 1948; Tenth Air Force, 28 Mar - 27 Jun 1949.

Stations:  Dinjan, India, 1 Jan 1944; Sylhet, India, 10 Jan 1944; Sookerating, India, 10 Jun 1944; Moran, India, 20 Jun 1944; Sookerating, India, 14 Jul 1944 (detachments operated from Shingbwiyang, Burma, 13 Jul - 8 Aug 1944, and Ledo, India, 14 Jul - 2 Aug 1944); Ledo, India, 2 Aug 1944; Dinjan, India, 10 May 1945; Chihkiang, China, 2 Sep 1945; Hankow, China, 25 Sep 1945; Shanghai, China, c. Oct - 5 Dec 1945; Ft. Lawton, Wash, 27-28 Dec 1945; Kent County Aprt, Mich, 11 Jun 1948 - 27 Jun 1949.

Aircraft:  C-47, 1944-1945; C-46, 1945.

Operations:  Airborne assault on Myitkyina, Burma, 17 May 1944; aerial transportation in CBI, 9 Jan 1944 - 25 Aug 1945; airlift of Chinese troops to bases in eastern China for disarmament operations, 2 Sep - 24 Oct 1945.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaigns:  India-Burma with Arrowhead; China Defensive; Central Burma; China Offensive.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citations: Burma, 5 Mar - 1 Oct 1944; China, 5-30 Sep 1945.

Emblem:  None.

Table of Contents



Air Cargo Resupply Squadrons

1st Air Cargo Resupply Sq

Source:

Mr. Tom Egleston, 1st ACRS

Air Force History Index

1st ACRS Operational and Administrative Assignments

Activated 21 Jul 44 at Army Air Base, Herbert Smart Airport, GA
Located at WARAZUP, BURMA, early 1945 (443d Troop Carrier Group)
31 May 1945
  • Dropped from 443d Troop Carrier Group for administrative control.
  • Dropped from Services of Supply, Advance Section #3, US Forces, India-Burma Theater for operational control.
3 June 1945
  • Assigned to North Burma Air Task Force for administrative control.
  • Assigned to India-China Division, ATC for operational control.
16 June 1945
  • Dropped from North Burma Air Task Force for administrative control.
Moved to MYITKYINA, BURMA, 20 June 1945
20 June 1945
  • Dropped from India-China Division, ATC for operational control.
12 July 1945
  • Assigned to 3d Combat Cargo Group for admimistrative control.

2nd Air Cargo Resupply Sq - Dinjan, India; Shingbwiyang, Burma
3d Air Cargo Resupply Sq - (69th Composite Wing)

4th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - Clark Field
5th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - Clark Field
6th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - SW Pacific
8th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - SW Pacific
11th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - SW Pacific
12th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - Ledo, Dinjan, Burma
13th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - SW Pacific
17th Air Cargo Resupply Sq - India
5330th Air Cargo Resupply Sq (Prov) - Ledo, India (later moved to FEAF)

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Airway Detachments

Source:  Ex-CBI Roundup, April 1964 issue, letter from Mr. G. F. Baumbardner

In 1942, seven Airways Detachments were formed at Camp Mills, L.I., consisting of 50 enlisted men and four officers. On October 7, 1942, these seven detachments (numbered from the 21st to the 27th inclusive) set sail from Newport News for what was then an unknown destination. Fifty-six days later we debarked at Karachi, India, from the good ship Mauretania. These seven detachments were spread out from Karachi-Agra, Gaya, Dinjan (Chabua), and into China, each one of the units setting up a refueling stop for the supply line into China.

Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

Chabua was the activation base for the 11-14 Airway Dets. ATC disbanded its Airways Dets on 1 Dec 43 and rolled many of them into its AAF Base Units. Any that survived were probably transferred to other commands (eg., Air Service Command).



11th Airways Det:  Activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Stationed at Chabua -1943, Yunanyi.

12th Airways Det:  Activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Stationed at Chabua -Jul 43, Agra.

13th Airways Det:  Activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Stationed at Chabua -1943, Ondal.

14th Airways Det:  Activated 21 Jun 43, disbanded 1 Dec 43. Stationed at Chabua -1943, Calcutta.

15th Airways Det:  Active between 1 May 44 and Nov 44, disbanded 8 Oct 48. Stationed at Calcutta -Nov 44; Kunming; Chengkung by 11 May 45 (68th ASG).

16th Airways Det:  Active between 1 May 44 and Nov 44, disbanded 8 Oct 48. Stationed at Calcutta -Nov 44, Hsinching (315th ASG).

17th Airways Det:  Organized in the US (Wendover AAF and Sioux City AAF). Active between 1 May 44 and Nov 44, disbanded 8 Oct 48. Assigned to the 14th Service Group. Stationed at Calcutta -Nov 44; Chanyi by 11 May 45 (14th ASG).

18th Airways Det:  Active 1 May 44, disbanded 8 Oct 48. Stationed at Calcutta; Yunnani by 11 May 45 (68th ASG).

21st Airways Det:  Constituted on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Stationed at Karachi -Jul 43, Chengkung -unknown, Kweilin.

22d Airways Det:  Constituted on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Stationed at Gaya.

23d Airways Det:

Source:

Lineage:  Constituted 23d Airways Detachment on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Reconstituted, and redesignated 23d Space Operations Squadron, on 8 Oct 1991. Activated on 1 Nov 1991.

Assignments:  Tenth Air Force, 25 Jul 1942 (attached to Air Service Command, 25 Jul-Sep 1942); Air Transport Command, 21 Dec 1942; India-China Wing, ATC, by Mar 1943-1 Dec 1943. 2d Satellite Tracking (later, 750th Space) Group, 1 Nov 1991-.

Stations:  Mitchel Fld, NY, 25 Jul 1942; Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, PA, 29 Sep-6 Oct 1942; Karachi, India, c. 12 Nov 1942; Chabua, India, by Mar 1943; Kunming, China, by c. May-1 Dec 1943 (with a detachment at Yunnanyi). New Boston AFS (later, AS) NH, 1 Nov 1991-.

Operations:  Combat communications, CBI Theater, Nov 1942-Dec 1943. Operated remote satellite tracking station, 1991-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: India-Burma; China Defensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Emblem:  Sable a demi-globe issuant from base Azure land masses Or and therefrom issuant a specture of the first eyed Yellow and habited Gray between in dexter a flight symbol ascending palewise and in sinister chief a mullet of four Argent, all within a diminished bordure of the second. MOTTO: SEMPER VIGILANS-Ever Watchful. Approved on 5 Jun 1995.

24th Airways Det:  Constituted on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Stationed at Agra -1943, Misamari -Jul 43, Tezpur, Chengkung.

25th Airways Det:  Constituted on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Stationed at Rome AAF - 1943, Karachi -1943, Chabua -Jul 43, Yangkai. Assigned to Rome Air Depot -Dec 42, 10th AF -unknown, India China Wg, ATC -May 43, 14th AF -Jul 43, unknown.

26th Airways Det:  Constituted on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Stationed at Agra -1943, Lalmanirhat.

27th Airways Det:  Constituted on 21 Jul 1942. Activated on 25 Jul 1942. Disbanded on 1 Dec 1943. Stationed at Chabua -1943, Agra -1943, Jorhat, Chengkung.

Table of Contents



India-China Wing, Air Transport Command (ICWATC) Stations

(ICWATC numbered stations instituted c. 1 Dec 1943)

Exterior view of the building that housed the headquarters of the
Eastern Sector of the India-China Wing of Air Transport Command at
Chabua, India. Formerly the building was used to dry tea leaves.
National Archives, 1943.

Source:  Army Air Force Units In The India-Burma Theater on 1 May 1944 (See May 1944 AAF Station List)

* Station #1 (Wing Hq) (192 NY) - Calcutta, India  (Replaced by 1300 AAFBU)
* Station #2 (Hq, Assam Wing) (629 NY) - Chabua, India  (Replaced by 1325 AAFBU)
* Station #3 (Hq, Bengal Wing) (433 NY) - Tezgaon, India  (Replaced by 1304 AAFBU)
Station #4 (466 NY) - Jorhat, India
* Station #5 (429 NY) - Tezpur, India  (Replaced by 1327 AAFBU)
* Station #6 (629 NY) - Chabua, India  (Replaced by 1333 AAFBU)
* Station #7 (457 NY) - Sookerating, India  (Replaced by 1337 AAFBU)
* Station #8 (Hq, India Wing) (885 NY) New Delhi, India  (Replaced by 1307 AAFBU)
* Station #9 (629 NY) Mohanbari, India  (Replaced by 1332 AAFBU)
* Station #10 (431 NY) Lalmanir Hat, India  (Replaced by 1326 AAFBU)
* Station #11 (886 NY) Misamari, India  (Replaced by 1328 AAFBU)
* Station #12 (488 NY) Yunnanyi, China  (Replaced by 1338 AAFBU)
* Station #13 (Hq, China Wing)(627 NY) Kunming, China  (Replaced by 1340 AAFBU)
* Station #14 (627 NY) Yangkai, China  (Replaced by 1341 AAFBU)
* Station #15 (627 NY) Chengkung, China  (Replaced by 1339 AAFBU)
* Station #16 (886 NY) Karachi, India  (Replaced by 1306 AAFBU)
* Station #17 (884 NY) Agra, India  (Replaced by 1303 AAFBU)
* Station #18 (690 NY) Ondal, India  (Replaced by 1312 AAFBU)
* Station #19 (465 NY) Calcutta, India  (Replaced by 1305 AAFBU)
* Station #20 (630 NY) Gaya, India  (Replaced by 1311 AAFBU)
* Station #21 (886 NY) Moran, India  (Replaced by 1330 AAFBU)
* Station #22 (886 NY) Deragon, India  (Replaced by 1329 AAFBU)
* Station #23 (886 NY) Golaghat, India  (Replaced by 1334 AAFBU)
Station #24 (430 NY) Kweilin, China
Station #25 (886 NY) Ranchi, India
Station #26 (886 NY) Fort Hertz, Burma
Station #27 (491 NY) Bangalore, India
Station #28 (881 NY) Bombay, India
Station #29 (885 NY) Colombo, Ceylon
Station #30 (627 NY) Chanyi, China

(*  Awarded Distinguished Unit Citation, Dec 43, WDGO 18/44)

Table of Contents



Army Air Forces Base Units (AAFBU)

(Replaced India-China Wing, Air Transport Command (ICWATC) Stations, c. 1 Aug 1944)

Source:

Army Air Force Units In The India-Burma Theater on 1 May 1945 (See May 1945 AAF Station List)

Mr. Bernie Shearon (data from Military Airlift Command historian's office)

OrganizationUnit DesignationLocationYear(s)
1300th AAFBUHq, India-China Div, ATCCalcutta1 Aug 44-15 Feb 46
1301st AAFBUIndia-China Div ReserveCalcutta1 Aug 44-3 Jan 46
1302nd AAFBUHq, India Wing, ATCAgra
New Delhi
1 Aug 44-15 Nov 45
1303d AAFBUForeign Service StationAgra1 Aug 44-20 Dec 45
1304th AAFBUForeign Service Station
Hq, India Wing, ATC
Barrackpore1 Aug 44-15 Nov 45
15 Nov 45-15 Jun 46
1305th AAFBUForeign Service StationDum Dum1 Aug 44-14 Dec 45
1306th AAFBUForeign Service StationKarachi1 Aug 44-3 Jan 46
1307th AAFBU  (see photos, below)Foreign Service StationNew Delhi1 Aug 44-5 Dec 45
1308th AAFBU(?)Bombay1 Aug 44-13 Nov 45
1309th AAFBUForeign Service StationBangalore1 Aug 44-15 Oct 45
1310th AAFBU(?)Colombo, Ceylon1 Aug 44-19 Oct 45
1311th AAFBU(?)
8th Operational Training Unit
Gaya1 Aug 44-4 Sep 45
4 Sep 45-5 Dec 45
1312th AAFBU(?)Ondal1 Aug 44-7 Feb 45
1325th AAFBUHq, Assam Wing, ATCChabua1 Aug 44-15 Oct 45
1326th AAFBU
 
Foreign Service StationLalmanir Hat1 Aug 44-26 Oct 45
1327th AAFBU  (See CBI Unit Histories)Foreign Service StationTezpur1 Aug 44-26 Jun 45
1328th AAFBU


Courtesy of Mr. James Liebgott
(used with permission)
Foreign Service StationMisamari1 Aug 44-20 Oct 45
1329th AAFBUForeign Service StationDergaon1 Aug 44-18 Jul 45
1330th AAFBU

Replaced Station 21, India-China Wg, ATC 1 Aug 44 (which replaced the 22d Transport Gp 1 Dec 43) at Jorhat. Discontinued 11 Oct 45.
Foreign Service StationJorhat1 Aug 44-11 Oct 45
1331st AAFBUForeign Service StationMoran1 Aug 44-7 Mar 45
1332nd AAFBUForeign Service StationMohanbari1 Aug 44-5 Dec 45
1333d AAFBU  (see photos, below)Foreign Service StationChabua1 Aug 44-25 Dec 45
1334th AAFBUForeign Service StationGolaghat1 Aug 44-7 Mar 45
1335th AAFBUForeign Service StationNagpur1 Aug 44-7 Feb 45
1336th AAFBUForeign Service StationTadepellegundum1 Aug 44-7 Feb 45
1337th AAFBU  (Former 1st Ferrying Group)

(See CBI Unit Histories)

Other Site of Interest:
1337th Army Air Force Base Unit
Foreign Service StationSookerating1 Aug 44-25 Nov 45
1338th AAFBUForeign Service StationYunnanyi1 Aug 44-10 Oct 45
1339th AAFBUForeign Service StationChengkung1 Aug 44-20 Oct 45
1340th AAFBU
4th Air Transport Sq, MobileKunming1 Aug 44-25 Nov 45
1341st AAFBUForeign Service StationYangkai1 Aug 44-10 Sep 45
1342nd AAFBUForeign Service StationChanyi1 Aug 44-12 Oct 45
1343d AAFBU2nd Air Transport Sq, MobileLuliang1 Aug 44-12 Oct 45
1344th AAFBUForeign Service StationChengtu
Hsinching
1 Aug 44-? 44
? 44-10 Sep 45
1345th AAFBU (1)
(redesignated 1346th AAFBU - see below)
Foreign Service StationTezgaon19 Feb 45-26 Mar 45
1345th AAFBU (2)Foreign Service StationKurmitola1 May 45-15 Dec 45
1346th AAFBU
(see 1345th AAFBU (1), above)

Foreign Service StationTezgaon26 Mar 45-15 Dec 45
1347th AAFBUForeign Service StationShamshernagar1 Dec 44-20 Oct 45
1348th AAFBUForeign Service StationMyitkyina
(South Fld)
19 Apr 45-1 Nov 45
1349th AAFBUForeign Service StationJiwani1 Aug 44-22 Sep 45
1350th AAFBUHq, China Wing, ATCKunming1 Dec 44-26 Nov 45
1351st AAFBUHq, Bengal Wing, ATCChabua
Mohanbari
Kurmitola
20 Dec 44-1 Nov 45
1352nd AAFBU  (See CBI Unit Histories)


The 1352d AAF Base Unit (Search & Rescue) was organized 1 Dec 44 at Tezgaon Airfield (Dacca, Bengal, India -- now Dakka, Bangladesh), under the India-China Division of Air Transport Command. Moved to Mohanbari Airfield (Guwhati, Assam, India) some time in 1945 and was discontinued on 22 Dec 45.

(see photos, below)
Search & RescueTezgaon
Mohanbari
1 Dec 44-? 45
? 45-22 Dec 45
1353d AAFBUForeign Service StationChungking1 Apr 45-15 Oct 45
1354th AAFBUForeign Service StationChengtu1 Aug 44-23 Sep 45
1355th AAFBUForeign Service StationKalaikunda14 Apr 45-23 Aug 45
1356th AAFBUForeign Service StationNampanmao15 May 45-26 Jun 45
1357th AAFBUForeign Service StationMyitkyina
(North Fld)
15 May 45-26 Jun 45
1358th AAFBUForeign Service StationBhamo15 May 45-15 Oct 45
1359th AAFBUForeign Service StationLoping17 May 45-5 Sep 45
1360th AAFBUForeign Service StationLuhsien17 May 45-15 Oct 45
1361st AAFBUForeign Service StationRupsi31 May 45-26 Jun 45
1362nd AAFBUForeign Service StationDinjan31 May 45-26 Jun 45
1363d AAFBUForeign Service StationLiuchow15 Jul 45-28 Oct 45
1364th AAFBU (1)Foreign Service StationNanning16 Jul 45-29 Aug 45
1364th AAFBU (2)Foreign Service StationCanton10 Sep 45-5 Oct 45
1365th AAFBUMobileKunming16 Jul 45-25 Oct 45
1366th AAFBUMaintenance SqLuliang16 Jul 45-12 Oct 45
1367th AAFBUMaintenance SqChanyi16 Jul 45-12 Oct 45
1368th AAFBUMaintenance SqChungking16 Jul 45-20 Oct 45
1369th AAFBU (1)Foreign Service StationKweilin16 Jul 45-29 Aug 45
1369th AAFBU (2)Foreign Service StationShanghai10 Sep 45-? Nov 45
1370th AAFBU (1)Foreign Service StationShwebo16 Jul 45-23 Aug 45
1370th AAFBU (2)Foreign Service StationShilong10 Sep 45-10 Dec 45
1371st AAFBUForeign Service StationPiardoba16 Jul 45-23 Aug 45
1373d AAFBUForeign Service StationDudkhundi16 Jul 45-23 Aug 45
1520th AAFBUHq, Central Pacific Wing, ATCHickam
Guam
1 Aug 44-Jan 45
Jan 45-20 Dec 45
1537th AAFBUForeign Service StationHarmon Field, Guam
Harmon AFB, Guam
1 Aug 44
26 Sep 47-3 Jul 48
1538th AAFBUForeign Service StationGuam
Okinawa
1 Aug 44-?
?-29 Jan 46
1539th AAFBUForeign Service StationTinian1 Aug 44-Sep 45 (?)



1307th AAFBU Photos


Photo courtesy of Theresa Biasi, daughter of Joseph A. Biasi (seated)



1333d AAFBU Photos

(courtesy of David Wilma, The Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History)

Dick Wilma's crew, 1333d AAFBU



1352nd AAFBU Photos


(Ex-CBI Roundup, November 1955 Issue)


C-47 of the 1352nd AAFBU



Photos taken at Shamshernagar, India

(courtesy of Mr. James Casey, 777th EPD Co.)


Can you imagine what one Japanese bomber could have done here?


I heard one of these explode upon take-off and one of the crew actually lived.
He spent a long time in Jorhat Hospital encased in plaster.


Ed Danielkiewicz was a member of the 777th EPD Co.

Table of Contents



China National Aviation Corporation (CNAC)

Source:

U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet
First Over the 'Hump:' The China National Aviation Corporation

In early 1940, lone DC-3 passenger aircraft of the China National Aviation Corporation (CNAC) cautiously probed over and around the highest mountains in the world seeking air routes between China and India ... and to the outside world. CNAC's great success in finding these vital air routes led to the first regular flights over the Himalaya Mountains, known in history as the "Hump" and later becoming vital partners in the world's first strategic airlift.

CNAC was formed in 1929. By 1933, it had evolved into a partnership between the Government of China and Pan American World Airways from the United States. Following the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese war in 1937, CNAC became China's only direct means of communication with the outside world. Flight operations were a pilot's nightmare. The 500+ mile flights were extremely hazardous over the world's roughest terrain, in unpredictable weather conditions, and with poor navigation aids. Japanese fighter aircraft were also on the prowl.

The aircrews were typically made up of both American and Chinese pilots along with Chinese flight engineers and radio operators. In 1942 when the American Volunteer Group (Flying Tigers) disbanded, 17 of the pilots chose to remain in China and fly for CNAC. Among notable CNAC passengers during the early war years were Lt. Col. James Doolittle and other Tokyo Raiders, who were being evacuated from China back to India after their raid on the Japanese mainland. The CNAC DC-3 on this flight was flown by Capt. Moon Chin, a Chinese-American pilot from Baltimore, Md.

After America's entry into the war, the U.S. 10th Air Force began flight operations over the Hump. As the airlift expanded operations, it came under the direct control of the Air Transport Command. CNAC flights were fully merged into the airlift along with military aircraft. CNAC was provided with C-46, C-47 and C-54 aircraft to expand their capabilities. In 1944 and 1945, CNAC also provided low-level tactical airlift support over enemy territory during the Burma campaign by dropping supplies to Chinese and American ground forces, evacuating beleaguered Chinese and British troops, and supplying the Ledo Road project with men and equipment.

Between April 1942 and August 1945, CNAC crews are reported to have flown over 38,000 missions transporting 114,500 tons of vital materials and personnel to Allied Forces in China, Burma and India. In recognition of CNAC contributions to the war effort and their successful incorporation into Air Transport Command operations, former American CNAC aircrew were granted veteran status in 1993 and awarded all due awards and decorations including the Victory Medal, Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross.

"Flying the 'Hump' was the foremost and by far the most dangerous, difficult and historic achievement of the entire war." -- Gen. Albert C. Wedemeyer, Commander, U.S. Forces - China

Other Sites of Interest:  CNAC Display at the National Museum of the US Air Force


CNAC C-47


CNAC C-46


CNAC Crew


CNAC display, National Museum of the United States Air Force

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