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MEDICAL SERVICE UNITS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Air Evacuation Squadrons
Convalescent / Rest Camps
Emergency Rescue Squadrons
Hospitals
Malaria Control Units
Medical Battalions
Medical Companies
Medical Detachments / Sections
Medical Dispensaries
Medical Platoons
Veterinary Service Units
Other Units
Links for Additional Information



Air Evacuation Squadrons

803d Air Evacuation Squadron  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:

Lineage:  Activated December 1942 as 803rd Medical Air Evacuation Transport Sq; Redesignated 1943 as 803rd Medical Air Evacuation Sq.

Assignments:  349th Air Evacuation Gp 1942-1943, India-China Div, Air Tpt Cd.

Stations:  Bowman Fld, KY 1942; overseas movement Sep-Oct 1943; Chabua, India Oct 1943-1945; Kunming 1945-.

After the defeat of Japan, squadron established a detachment in Kunming for examination of recently released POWs held in China by the Japanese.

  Air Evacuation of Casualties (USAF CBI memo, 29 Jan 44)


821st Air Evacuation Squadron

Source:

Lineage:  Activated 1943 as 821st Medical Air Evacuation Transport Sq, redesignated 1943 as 821st Medical Air Evacuation Sq, active through 1 May 45.

Assignments:  349th Air Evacuation Gp - Jun 43, Unknown - Jul 44, India-China Wg, Air Tpt Cd -Nov 44, Tenth AF - unknown, India-China Division, Air Tpt Cd.

Stations:  Bowman Fld KY 1943-1943, unknown -Jul 44, Bombay -Jul 44, Chabua -Dec 44, Ledo - unknown, later may have been at Hickam Fld.



Source:  Mr. Ralph Breckenridge, Winter Park, FL

Formed at Bowan Field, Louisville, KY. Traveled aboard the Gen. George M. Randall via Newport, Panama Canal, Perth, Bombay, then via train to Calcutta, Kanchrapara, Chabua, Ledo.




Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Table of Contents



Convalescent / Rest Camps

1st Convalescent Camp - Ledo; North Malir (1945)
2nd Convalescent Camp - Calcutta
3d Convalescent Camp - Sabathu

Table of Contents



Emergency Rescue Squadrons

Source:  Air-Sea Rescue 1941-1952; U.S. Air Force Historical Study No. 95, USAF Historical Division, 1953

Air-Sea Rescue in the China-Burma-India Theater

Rescue operations in China and India during World War II were of no great importance to the history of air-sea rescue, since most of the flying in both regions was over land. The history of the 8th Emergency Rescue Squadron, stationed in China, does not include a single instance of air-sea search or rescue, and 50 per cent of the 7th Squadron operations in India were concerned with land rescue. The period of operations was not long in either case. The 8th Squadron did not arrive in China until May 1945, and the 7th was operational in India only from March until July 1945.

India

A small AAF rescue detachment was attached to the RAF for operations in June 1944. With two PBY's and only one crew, this unit afforded rescue cover for many XX Bomber Command long-distance missions.

Rescue provided by the British began to prove inadequate late in 1944, when XX Bomber Command missions were stepped up. Requests for more rescue facilities were met by stationing the British No. 212 Squadron at Karachi, with the mission of providing rescue aid in the Bay of Bengal and along the west coast of India. This proved insufficient, however, and the AAF 7th Emergency Rescue Squadron was activated on 25 January 1945. Two flights of the 1st Emergency Rescue Squadron were deployed from Italy to serve as the nucleus of the new organization, which was authorized personnel and equipment under the provisions of T/O & E 1-987*. OA-10's, B-17's, L-5's, and PT-19's made up the squadron's aircraft.

(* On 21 December 1944 the War Department prescribed a revised T/O & E (1-987). Personnel authorized under the new regulation increased the size of emergency rescue squadrons to 93 officers and 328 enlisted men. Aircraft equipment was changed to include eight B-17's, four helicopters, and four L-5's with floats. Each squadron was to retain 12 OA-10's.)

Operational flying began in March, and the first month's activities included 43 missions and 16 rescues. Over one-half of the missions were flown over land areas, and land search and rescue became increasingly important in the following months as the India-based bombers moved to bases closer to Japan.

In August 1945 the squadron moved to Okinawa, but did not arrive there until after the end of hostilities.

China

On 18 May 1945 the Air Search and Rescue Section of the China Air Service Command was established in Headquarters, XIV Air Force Service Command. The section was to be the control center for distress data in China, and in that capacity evaluated and passed on for action all distress information. The 8th Emergency Rescue Squadron was charged with carrying out the section's directives for search and rescue activity.

Two days after this organization was formed, the first incident - a C-47 search operation - took place. The first rescue, on 27 May, was accomplished by three helicopters of the 8th ER Squadron. By 15 June six more helicopter rescues had been accomplished. From its formation until 10 September 1945 the rescue section received 138 reports of distress cases. Search operations were carried out in 110 instances, and 43 rescues were accomplished.

The 8th ER Squadron was the only unit among those engaged in World War II to be equipped solely with helicopters and C-47 search aircraft. The mountainous terrain in which the squadron operated provided a thorough test of the helicopter's proficiency in rescue operations, and the results were extremely satisfactory. On the basis of helicopter performance in China, the Chief of Air Staff, Headquarters, AAF was told, "Helicopters are providing an important addition to AAF emergency rescue facilities… this is especially gratifying in view of the fact that helicopters are now standard unit equipment for emergency rescue squadrons." (Memo for C/AS AAF, "Emergency Rescue Helicopter Program", 22 June 1945.)



7th Emergency Rescue Squadron - Argartala, India


7th Air Rescue Squadron (AF Photo No. K6239B)
Courtesy of Mr. Terry Horstead
 
Unofficial insignia designed by Mr. Charles "Chuck" Dill of the 1st ERS while the unit was in Italy


Plaque located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force

Source:  Army Air Forces in WWII, Volume VII; Services Around the World, Chapter 15

(excerpt) Similarly, in North Africa and throughout the Mediterranean the AAF depended heavily upon the RAF's superior experience and organization. Not until the summer of 1943 did the AAF have a rescue organization of its own-a detachment equipped with three or four worn-out Catalinas, which had been flown by ATC from Florida.

Planes and crews belonged to the Twelfth Air Force, but they operated closely with British units under NAAF's Coastal Command. At the end of the year the crews of this detachment, no doubt because of their experience, were ordered home to serve as instructors at the newly established Emergency Rescue School at Keesler Field in Mississippi, where the AAF now undertook to organize and train its own rescue units. Appropriately, the 1st Emergency Rescue Squadron was assigned to the Mediterranean, where it began operations in April 1944. Early in 1945 two of its three flights were reassigned to India as the nucleus of a newly established 7th Emergency Rescue Squadron.



Source:  Mr. Bernie Shearon

The 7th Emergency Resuce Sq was activated 25 Jan 45, and was originally intended to serve in the CBI Theater, being stationed for a while at Argatala, India. It moved to the Pacific in the summer of 1945 and served at Okinawa before returning to Hawaii (Wheeler Field?) before inactivation 15 May 47. Postwar it was redesignated the 7th Rescue Sq and activated 1 Sep 49 at Wiesbaden AB, Germany. It was redesignated the 7th Air Rescue Sq 10 Aug 50 and the 7th Air Rescue Group 14 Nov 52, moved to Wheelus AB, Libya at about the same time and was inactivated 8 Dec 56.



Source:  Air Force History Index

Post-WWII Lineage:  7 Rescue Squadron activated 1 Sep 1949 at Wiesbaden, Germany. Squadron made up of Flight A, Wiesbaden; Flight B, Lajes Field, Azores; Flight C, Wheelus Field, Tripoli, Libya; Flight D, Dhahran Airfield, Saudi Arabia. Squadron redesignated 7 Air Rescue Squadron (ARS) 10 Aug 1950. Flight A relocated to Wheelus and then Sidi Slimane, French Morocco Jan 1952.

Military Air Transport Service (MATS) General Order issued 31 Oct 1952 redesignating 7 Air Rescue Squadron as 7 Air Rescue Group. Support squadrons include 56, 57, 58, and 59 Air Rescue.

7 Air Rescue Group Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) established early 1953. Operational control of 56, 58, and 59 Air Rescue Squadrons delegated to the Commander, 7 Air Rescue Group, enabling him to coordinate rescue activities more effectively.

Aircraft:  H-5H (-1954), H-19 (1954-), C- 47, C-82, B-17, SB-17, SA-16, F-84.

Commanders:  Lt Col James L. Jarnagin 3 Jul 1952-mid 1953; Col Herbert S. Ellis mid-1953-7 Jun 1955; Col Horace A. Stevenson 7 Jun 1955-8 Dec 1956.

Operations:  The Group is to perform search and rescue missions, provide route, area, and strike force search and rescue service within assigned areas of responsibility, render search and rescue service upon request to civil aviation of the united states and civil and military aviation of other countries, and maintain assigned squadrons in operational readiness to permit deployment in support of combat air operations.



Other Sites of Interest:  1st & 7th Emergency Rescue Squadrons


8th Emergency Rescue Squadron

Source:  Air Force Special Operations Command - AFSOC CSAR Heritage

Stationed at Chanute Field, 14 Mar 45-19 Apr 45. The 8 ERS arrived in China in May of 1945 with R-6 helicopters and C-47 search support aircraft. Designed for land rescue, the 8 ERS completed 43 saves in difficult, mountainous terrain that more than proved the value of the vertical lift R-6s.


10th Air Jungle Rescue Detachment (1st Air Commando Gp)

First Helicopter Medical Evacuation in 1944

The China-Burma-India "Hump" airlift operation was the theater for what was probably the first use of a helicopter in a combat rescue. In April 1944, TSgt Ed "Murphy" Hladovcak of the 1st Air Commandos, piloting a Stinson L-1 Vigilant with three wounded British soldiers on board, was forced down over 100 miles (160 km) behind Japanese lines, 15 miles (25 km) west of Mawlu, Burma. Deep in the jungle where an airplane could not land, unable to hike out because of the injured passengers, and with ground-rescue forces days away, the downed men hid from nearby Japanese soldiers. A newly-delivered Army Sikorsky YR-4B helicopter, piloted by Lt. Carter Harmon, with a 175-horsepower engine, was dispatched to try a rescue. In the heat and humidity of Burma, the YR-4B could carry only one passenger at a time, straining its engine past the redline just to lift off. Despite these difficulties, over the two day period 25-26 April 1944, four trips were made in and out to a secure location where the men could safely transfer to a Stinson L-5 Sentinel. The final hasty liftoff was accomplished just as shouting soldiers burst from the jungle. As Lt. Harmon learned later, the soldiers were not Japanese, but an Allied land rescue party that had finally reached the crash site. The great success of the mission encouraged the advocates of helicopters, but few other missions actually took place during WW II.

Other Sites of Interest:

Fact Sheets: Jungle Rescue (National Museum of the USAF)

The Hoverfly in CBI - First Recorded Military Rescue by Helicopter

Igor Sikorsky's R-4 Hoverfly Helicopter

WW II Helicopter Evacuation


97th Emergency Rescue Boat Crew (Type III) - Calcutta, India

Table of Contents



Hospitals  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:


U.S. Army Hospital Types

HOSPITAL TYPEPATIENT
CAPACITY
OFFICERSNURSESENLISTEDTOTALNOTE
General100075120500692 
Evacuation7504752318417 
Convalescent3000280189217 
Surgical4005060275385 
Field4002218182222 
Station7504990390529For station with 15,000 troops
Station5003560275370For station with 10,000 troops
Station2502030150200For station with 5,000 troops


U.S. Army Hospital Units

Seagraves Hospital Unit
Namkham (pre-1942); Ramgarh (1942); Myitkyina (1944)



2nd Station Hospital - activated in China 21 Jun 45



14th Evacuation - Ledo Rd, mile marker 19 (1943-1945)

43d Evacuation Hospital was activated June 1, 1941 and redesignated the 14th Evacuation Hospital on August 15, l942.

Meritorious Unit Commendation:  1 Sep 43-1 Sep 44, GO 220, Hq USF IBT, dtd 27 Sep 45.

Other Sites of Interest:

14th Evacuation Hospital - China-Burma-India Theater of World War II



18th Field - Kanchrapara (1945)



18th General - Ledo / Myitkyina (1945) (1000 bed)



19th Evacuation - China / Burma



20th General - Ledo (1943) (2000 bed)

Meritorious Unit Commendation:  15 Apr 43-1 Sep 44, GO 220, Hq USF IBT, dtd 27 Sep 45.

Other Sites of Interest:  Profiles in Penn History



21st Field - Paoshan (1944)  (See CBI Unit Histories)
Assigned to Y-Force



22nd Field  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Lineage:  Activated at Camp White, Ore., on Aug. 1, 1942; deactivated 1 Dec 1946. Relieved and replaced by the 70th Field Hospital, 16 Sep 45.

Assignments:  Y-Force

Stations:  Ledo, Kunming, Mito, Chanyi



24th Station - Jorhat; North Malir (1945) (250 bed)



25th Field - Ledo / Lashio (1943)  (See CBI Unit Histories)



27th Field - Tsuyung (1944)
Assigned to Y-Force



28th Portable Surgical ("China Dragons") - China (1943)


Source:  U.S. Army Center for Military History - Special Designations

The unit coin for the 28th Combat Support Hospital (pictured above) prominently features its special designation CHINA DRAGONS. The designation stems from the hospital's service as portable surgical hospital in China during World War II, which is symbolized on its distinctive unit insignia by a dragon.

Source:  Fort Bragg (28th Combat Support Hospital)

The 28th Combat Support Hospital was organized in May 1943 as the 28th Portable Surgical Hospital and activated in June of that year at Fort Meade, Maryland. During World War II the unit served in the Asiatic Pacific theater and participated in the China Defensive Campaign. Following the war, the 28th was deactivated in India in December 1945. It was reactivated at Fort Bragg, North Carolina on 25 July 1967 as the 28th Combat Support Hospital (CSH), becoming operational as an inflatable M.U.S.T. equipped hospital.

In 1990, the 28th Combat Support Hospital was the first Army Hospital to be deployed and operational in support of Operation Desert Shield, during Operation Desert Storm. The 28th CSH crossed into Iraq to support XVIII Airborne Corps and continued to provide medical care to U.S. Soldiers and Iraqi POWs as well as civilians 30 days after the termination of hostilities.

In August 1992, the 28th CSH deployed to Homestead, Florida in support of Hurricane Andrew Relief Operation.

In September 1994, the 28th CSH deployed to Haiti in support of Operation Uphold Democracy.

In October 1995, the 28th CSH deployed to St. Thomas, Virgin Islands in support of the Hurricane Marilyn Relief Operation.

Unit decorations include streamers embroidered: "China Defensive", "Defense of Saudi Arabia", and "Defense and Liberation of Kuwait".

Today the Hospital stands ready to support the XVIII Airborne Corps anywhere in the world at a moments notice.



Source:  U.S. Army Center of Military History (28th Combat Support Hospital)

Lineage:

  • Constituted 25 May 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 28th Portable Surgical Hospital
  • Activated 14 June 1943 at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland
  • Inactivated 20 December 1945 in India
  • Redesignated 18 April 1967 as the 28th Surgical Hospital and allotted to the Regular Army
  • Activated 25 July 1967 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina
  • Reorganized and redesignated 21 December 1972 as the 28th Combat Support Hospital

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: China Defensive; China Offensive
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for SOUTHWEST ASIA

Lineage and Honors Information as of 14 December 1999



30th Station - Panagarh (1943-1945) (250 bed)



32nd Portable Surgical - China (1943)



34th Portable Surgical - Hunan Province (1944)
Assigned to Y-Force



35th Portable Surgical
Assigned to Y-Force



36th Portable Surgical
Assigned to Y-Force



40th Portable Surgical - Ledo; Wayao, China
Assigned to Y-Force



42nd Portable Surgical - Ledo (1943); Wallabum (1944); Myitkyina
Assigned to NCAC



43d Portable Surgical - Ledo (1944); Kamaing, Burma (1944) (Assigned to NCAC)  (See CBI Unit Histories)


43d Surgical Hospital

Distinctive Unit Insignia Description:  A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a silver Burmese lion on a blue background between on left a silver disc charged with a blue Indian Asoka wheel and on right a red and blue Taeguk sitting on a horizontal maroon billet surmounted by a silver cross, the vertical arms extending over the billet; all encircled by a continuous silver scroll, the upper area bearing the inscription "BEST CARE ANYWHERE" in blue letters and curving in base behind and below the horizontal sides of the billet.

Symbolism:  Maroon and white are the colors used for Medical organizations. The Hospital's service in India and Burma during World War II is symbolized by the Indian Asoka wheel taken from the Indian National flag, and the Chimche or Burmese lion taken from the seal of Burma. The Taeguk alludes to the unit's service in Korea. The cross, symbolic of aid and assistance, and the billet, a heraldic symbol for a building or quarters, represent the Hospital.

Background:  The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 15 January 1970. It was amended to correct the description on 7 July 1970.



44th Portable Surgical (Assigned to NCAC)  (See CBI Unit Histories)


44th Surgical Hospital

Distinctive Unit Insignia Description:  A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height consisting of a gold Korean temple centered upon a white cross and across the center of the temple a row of three small rectangles, one blue between two red; above the temple and partially obscured by the upper arm of the cross a blue wheel flanked by two sprigs of laurel, the bottom of the cross enclosed by a semi-circular maroon scroll bearing the motto "TO AID THE FALLEN" in gold letters, the scroll terminating at either side of the cross.

Symbolism:  White and maroon are the colors of the Army Medical Department. The cross, representing the Hospital function, is white in recognition of the importance of cleanliness and antiseptics in surgery. The blue wheel at top is from the flag of India and represents service in the India-Burma campaign of World War II. The unit's two Korean War campaign credits are represented by the Korean temple at center with the colors red and blue referring to the Korean flag and the gold laurel sprigs alluding to an award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation for service in Korea.

Background:  The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 21 January 1970.


Source:  Mr. Phil McGonagle

Myitkyina, Bhamo (1944): 1st platoon kept moving, following the 475 Infantry Reg. and ended up at Seagrave's Hospital in Namkham (Feb-Nov 1945), there we serviced troops moving over the Ledo-Burma road; 2nd & 3d Platoon remained at Bhamo (Feb-Nov 1945).



45th Portable Surgical - Kanchrapara (1943); Kamaing; Mogaung; Shaduzup (1944); Kunming; Kweilin; Luichow; Shanghai


45th Surgical Hospital

Distinctive Unit Insignia Description:  A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a black Chinthe astride a silver cross issuing from a Taeguk between two maroon fleams. All in front and below a stylized palm branch with two oak leaves proper.

Symbolism:  Maroon and white are the colors used for the Medical Department. The Chinthe or Burmese griffin, taken from the seal of Burma, refers to the Hospital's service in that area during World War II. The Taeguk alludes to the Hospital's service in Korea and together with the two fleams (a heraldic surgical instrument used in early medicine) represents the two campaigns in Korea. The fleams and cross further symbolize the basic mission of the Surgical Hospital. The palm symbolizes long life and the oak leaves strength and bravery.

Background:  The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 3 September 1969.


Source:  Mr. Paul Theobald:  "I was the head surgical technician of the 45th Portable Surgical Hospital for over 2 years serving in CBI. We were originally scheduled to go to China, but when India was threatend by Japanese invasion we were sent into Burma over the Ledo Road. We were in Kamaing for a while and took care of Wingate's raiders as they came out from behind Japanese lines. We spent the monsoon season in Mogaung and then headed south on the "Jeep" railroad to near Bhamo and then were flown into Kunming, China at Christmas time. We were in Kweilin, Luichow and among the first into Shanghai at the end of the war. We were with the Chinese when they invaded Formosa after the war was over. They had expected some resistance but not a shot was fired. There are only about four enlisted men and one officer from our outfit that are still alive. Several years ago I wrote a monthly newsletter and sent it to the remaining 45th members at that time. It was recollections from my diary and also contained many pictures which I had taken in CBI."



46th Portable Surgical - Ledo (1943-44); Hsipaw, Burma (1944-46)
Assigned to NCAC



47th Portable Surgical - Wayao, China (1944); I-liang, China (1945)
Assigned to Y-Force

Source:  U.S. Army Center of Military History (47th Combat Support Hospital)

Lineage:

  • Constituted 21 December 1928 in the Regular Army as the 47th Surgical Hospital
  • Redesignated 31 May 1943 as the 47th Portable Surgical Hospital
  • Activated 7 June 1943 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
  • Inactivated 3 November 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey
  • Redesignated 24 November 1952 as the 47th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital
  • Activated 2 February 1953 in Korea
  • Reorganized and redesignated 25 March 1953 as the 47th Surgical Hospital
  • Inactivated 15 November 1957 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Activated 10 January 1968 at Fort Lewis, Washington
  • Reorganized and redesignated 21 May 1973 as the 47th Combat Support Hospital

Campaign Participation Credit:

  • World War II: China Defensive
  • Korean War: Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait; Cease-Fire

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for KOREA
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for SOUTHWEST ASIA

Lineage and Honors Information as of 24 March 1998

Other Sites of Interest:  Surgery in World War II, Chapter XIV, India-Burma & China Theaters



48th Evacuation - Margherita; Ramgarh; Tincha; Myitkyina; North Malir



48th Portable Surgical - Wayao, China (1943-45)
Assigned to Y-Force

Source:  48th Combat Support Hospital (US Army Reserve)

Lineage:
  • Activated:  7 June 1943, 48th Portable Surgical Hospital
  • Inactivated:  20 December 1945
  • Activated:  2 February 1953, 48th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH)
  • Inactivated:  1 May 1964
  • Activated:  15 October 2000, 48th Combat Support Hospital

Campaign Participation:
  • WWII - AP
  • China Defensive
  • Third Korean Winter
  • Korea, Summer 1953

Decorations:

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation:  15 Apr 43-1 Sep 44, GO 220, Hq IBT, dtd 27 Sep 45.
  • Streamer Embroidered Korea

Emblem:  Consists of a gold field tent upon a grassy field emitting rays above a blue area at bottom all enclosed by a rectangular maroon tripartite scroll issuing from a green wreath of laurel in base and inscribed "One Army" on the left and "One Mission" on the right in gold, at bottom a maroon cross and overall a white sword point down entwined by a green serpent.

Symbolism:  Maroon and white are the colors traditionally used by the Medical Corps; the cross represents the organization's medical support and service to the United States forces. The sword underscores the combat aspect of the mission and forms the allusion of the numeral "1", reflecting the unit's motto. The serpent and sword recalls the rod of Aesculapius, symbolizing medical care and healing. Laurel is emblematic of excellence and high achievement; green is the color of regeneration and growth. The field tent highlights mobility and total readiness; the blue area below the tent alludes to the Swaleen River and the unit's baptism of fire during World War II.

Article about 48th Combat Support Hospital:

"Support hospital unfurls its colors"  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Other Sites of Interest:  48th Combat Support Hospital



49th Portable Surgical - Activated 15 Aug 43 at Camp Ellis, Lewistown, IL; Burma (1944)



50th Portable Surgical
Activated 15 Aug 43 at Camp Ellis, Lewistown, IL
Assigned to Y-Force (China, 1944)



53d Portable Surgical
Activated 15 Aug 43 at Camp Ellis, Lewistown, IL
Assigned to Y-Force (China, 1944)



58th Portable Surgical
Activated 15 Aug 43 at Camp Ellis, Lewistown, IL
Ledo (1944); Myitkyina (1944)



60th Portable Surgical
Activated 15 Aug 43 at Camp Ellis, Lewistown, IL
Ledo (1944); China (1944-45)



69th General
Source:  69th General Hospital War Log 1943-1945, courtesy of Mr. Russell Melton

Activated 25 Jun 43 at Camp Ellis, Lewistown, IL
Camp Swift, TX, 9 Sep 43
Camp Patrick Henry, VA (Hampton Roads POE), 27 Mar 44
Bombay, India 1 Jun 44
Declared operational at Margherita, 5 Aug 44
Closed 25 Jul 45
Departed India 5 Aug 45



70th Field - Ledo (1944); Chengtu (1945); Kunming; Calcutta
235th Medical Dispensary (Avn)



71st Field - Bombay / Kanchrapara (1944)



72nd Field - Tezpur (1944); Yenshan (1945)



73d Evacuation - Ledo (1943); Shingbwiyang (Ledo Rd, mile marker 103) (1944)

Meritorious Unit Commendation:  15 Apr 43-1 Sep 44, GO 220, Hq USF IBT, dtd 27 Sep 45.



94th Station - Kharagpur (1944); Piardoba (1945) (150 bed)



95th Field - Kunming (1945)



95th Station - Chabua / Kunming (1943-45)



96th Field - Central Burma, Shanghai (1945)



97th Station - Agra (1942-1945) (100 bed)



98th Station - Ramgarh (1942-43); Chakulia (1943-45); Shingbwiyang (1945); North Malir (1945) (200 bed)



99th Station - Gaya (1942-1945) (100 bed)



100th Station - New Delhi (1942-1945) (150 bed)



111th Station - Chabua (1943)

Meritorious Unit Commendation:  Jul 44-Aug 44, GO 181, Hq USF IBT, dtd 22 Aug 45.

From Mr. Frank C. Wilkosz:  "The 111th Station Hospital was activated at Camp Wheeler, Ga. early in 1943. After about 3 months training as a unit it was moved to Camp Anza, Calif. for preparation overseas. The unit boarded the USS Uraquay on Aug. 2, 1943 and arrived at Chabua early in October. Six or 7 months later the unit was upgraded and became 234th General Hospital. Col. Bennett G Owens, MD, commanded this organization from beginning until near it's disbandment after WWll ended. Major Willard F. Fischer, MAC, was in charge of the enlisted personel. This unit had about 80 physicians and dentists, 80 or 90 nurses and approximately 600 enlisted men with over 750 beds. I served with those units for over 2 years."



112th Station - Calcutta (1943)

Source:  CBIVA Sound-off, Summer 1984 issue

The 112th Station Hospital broke ground as the U.S. Army Hospital in Calcutta in early April 1943 on Southern Ave. using two 3-story apartment buildings as a beginning. Over a year later, after many wards and other buildings were built, the 112th was redesignated the 263d General Hospital. In November 1944 this unit was replaced by the 142nd General Hospital, the designation of the facility until the war's end.



118th General - Karachi



131st Station - North Malir (1945) (50 bed)



142nd General - Lake Dhakuria (Calcutta) (1944) (2000 bed)

Former 112th Station Hospital, 263th General Hospital



159th Station - Karachi (1942)

Later redesignated 181st General Hospital



172nd General - Kunming (1944)

Source:  U.S. Army Center of Military History (455th Field Hospital)

Lineage:

  • Constituted 23 February 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 172d General Hospital
  • Activated 29 July 1944 at Camp Barkeley, Texas
  • Inactivated 30 April 1946 in China
  • Redesignated 23 May 1949 as the 455th General Hospital and allotted to the Organized Reserve Corps
  • Activated 26 May 1949 at Providence, Rhode Island
  • (Organized Reserve Corps redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve)
  • Location changed 1 April 1960 to Warwick, Rhode Island; on 1 February 1976 to Providence, Rhode Island
  • Reorganized and redesignated 17 September 1993 as the 455th Field Hospital

Campaign Participation Credit:  World War II: India-Burma

Decorations:  None

Lineage and Honors Information as of 30 June 1994



178th Station - Lalmanirhat (1943-1945) (100 bed)



181st General - Karachi (1943); North Malir (1945) (500 bed)



198th Station - Dacca (450 bed)  (See CBI Unit Histories)



234th General - Chabua (1945) (1000 bed)

Meritorious Unit Commendation:  Jul-Aug 44, GO 181, Hq USF IBT, dtd 22 Aug 45.

(See note for 111th Station Hospital, above.)



259th Station - Activated 25 Mar 43, New Orleans POE; Kweiyang (1945)



263d General - Karachi / Calcutta (1943)

Redesignated from 112th Station Hospital; inactivated 11/44; replaced by 142nd General Hospital



335th Station - Tagap-Ga (Ledo Rd, mile marker 80) (1944); North Malir (1945) (100 bed)
Activated 15 Aug 43, Fort Huachuca, AZ

Other Sites of Interest:  335th Station Hospital



371st Station - Ramgarh (c. Oct 44), Kanchrapara (1945) (500 bed)
Detachment - Angus Mills (1945)



372nd Station - Kaliakunda (200 bed)



383d Station - Tagap-Ga (Ledo Rd, mile marker 52) (1944)




14th Evacuation Hospital at Mile 19 on the Ledo Road


View of the enlisted men's area at the 14th Evacuation Hospital in
Assam, India, shown from the top of a water tank.
U.S. Army photo taken Dec. 16, 1944 (Ex-CBI Roundup, May 1952 issue)


20th General Hospital main entrance


Nurses quarters at the 20th General Hospital, August 1945


An injured Chinese soldier is treated at the 25th Field Hospital in northern Burma, 1944


Personnel of the 45th PSH moved to Kamaing on June 23,1944.
We set up shelters under tarps and air-drop parachutes for living tents.
(Photo by Dr. Paul Theobald)


73d Evacuation Hospital at Shingbwiyang, Burma, Mile 103 on the Ledo Road


Seagrave Hospital Unit at Tagap Ga, Burma, August 1943


Aerial view of Myitkyina airstrip from the south after the fall of Myitkyina.
Left arrow indicates the general area of the 42nd Portable Surgical Hospital; right arrow, Seagrave's hospital.
A road leads off at the left to a water point about 1 mile distant.

Table of Contents



Malaria Control Units

India-Burma Malaria Spraying Flight - Chabua

7th Malaria Survey Unit - Chabua
8th Malaria Survey Unit - Kunming; Paoshan
9th Malaria Survey Unit - Calcutta
18th Malaria Survey Unit - Activated 14 Apr 43 New Orleans POE, LA; Ledo; Myitkyina
35th Malaria Survey Unit - Ledo
Activated 10 Sep 43, ASFUTC, New Orleans, LA

36th Malaria Survey Unit - 315th ASG, Hsingching, by 11 May 45
Activated 10 Sep 43, ASFUTC, New Orleans, LA

17th Malaria Control Unit - Ondal
18th Malaria Control Unit - Jorhat
30th Malaria Control Unit - Activated 14 Apr 43 New Orleans POE, LA; Chabua
31st Malaria Control Unit - Activated 14 Apr 43 New Orleans POE, LA; Chabua
32nd Malaria Control Unit - Activated 14 Apr 43 New Orleans POE, LA; Lalmanirhat
43d Malaria Control Unit - Kalaikunda
44th Malaria Control Unit - Pandu
45th Malaria Control Unit - Ledo; Myitkyina
46th Malaria Control Unit - Ledo
47th Malaria Control Unit - Kurmitola
Activated 14 Aug 43, New Orleans, LA

48th Malaria Control Unit - Ledo  (1st Malaria Control Unit in India - Feb 43)
Activated 10 Sep 43, ASFUTC, New Orleans, LA

49th Malaria Control Unit - Ledo; Bhamo
Activated 10 Sep 43, ASFUTC, New Orleans, LA

50th Malaria Control Unit - Dinjan
Activated 10 Sep 43, ASFUTC, New Orleans, LA

51st Malaria Control Unit - Misamari
Activated 10 Sep 43, ASFUTC, New Orleans, LA

72nd Malaria Control Unit - Kharagpur
73d Malaria Control Unit - Warazup
107th Malaria Control Unit - Myitkyina
113th Malaria Control Unit - Ondal
114th Malaria Control Unit
116th Malaria Control Unit - Myitkyina
117th Malaria Control Unit - Shingbwiyang
119th Malaria Control Unit - Karachi
125th Malaria Control Unit - Kanchrapara
126th Malaria Control Unit - Chabua
164th Malaria Control Unit - Tezgaon
165th Malaria Control Unit - North Malir
166th Malaria Control Unit - Ledo
169th Malaria Control Unit - Calcutta
171st Malaria Control Unit - Ledo
173th Malaria Control Unit - Chabua
174th Malaria Control Unit - Kurmitola; Tezgaon
175th Malaria Control Unit *

* Source:  various issues of Ex-CBI Roundup



IBT Roundup, 15 Mar 45 Issue
Courtesy of Mr. Carl Weidenburner

B-25 BOMBERS BLAST NIPS AND MOSQUITOES

HQ., INDIA-BURMA AIR SERVICE COMMAND - Originally, the B-25 Mitchell bomber came to India and Burma to blast Japs, but since its arrival, this plane has taken up the task of exterminating another kind of insect - the malaria-giving Anopheles mosquito.

For waging war against the mosquito, the B-25's have been re-fitted with special tanks to spray DDT solution, the new mosquito destroyer, on large areas of swamp land and infected jungle.

The idea of spraying insecticide from a swiftly-moving airplane is not new, but it is believed that the actual spray ship constructed at the Bangalore Air Depot is the first of its kind. The present project is the outgrowth of U.S. Medical Officers' campaign to control the ravages of malaria.

Behind the successful application of the DDT bomber lies the teamwork of numerous American military and civilian mechanical experts of the Air Service Command's Bangalore Air Depot, Mr. Christian J. Ohlschlager, American Technical Instructor, had much to do with the creation of a workable tank and spray system. Working with him on this were Robert T. Wise, an American engineer, and U.S. mechanical experts Daniel Chako and John J. Uebele, both veterans of the Orient.

Expert Indian airplane mechanics, who participated in the conversion work, were H. N. Delawala and A. G. Khan.

When the tank, valve and spray pipe system had been built and installed, Lt. Dodge E. Leary stepped in to test-fly this new weapon against our enemy.

These men had much to do with conversion of B-25's to Malaria Control Spray units. Lt. Dodge E. Leary, Cambria, Wis., test-flew the airplanes. Robert T. Wise, Cleveland, O., John J. Uebele, Pittsburgh, Pa., and Daniel Chako, Girard, O., American civilians at Bangalore Air Depot of Air Service Command, participated in the tank and spray installations.

Table of Contents



Medical Battalions

13th Mountain Medical Battalion - Shaduzup (1944)  (See CBI Unit Histories)
63d Medical Battalion *
151st Medical Battalion
Departed U.S. 20 Jan 43 on U.S.S. Monticello. Arrived Bombay 3 Mar 43. Moved to Ledo and later Myitkyina.

685th Medical Collection Co.
889th Ambulance Co. (Motor)

358th Medical Battalion - Attached to 748th Railway Operating Battalion

* Source:  various issues of Ex-CBI Roundup

Table of Contents



Medical Companies

14th Medical Depot Co. - Calcutta
       Meritorious Unit Commendation:  1 Dec 44-1 Mar 45, GO 220, Hq IBT, dtd 27 Sep 45.

20th Medical Depot Co. - Ledo (activated 6 Jun 45 in theater); North Malir by Sep 45
25th Medical Depot Co. - Chabua
Maintenance & S & I Platoons - Ledo (20th General Hospital)

69th Medical Supply Depot Co. - Chabua
240th Medical Supply Depot Co.
255th Medical Supply Depot Co. - Ledo, Chabua
512th Medical Coll. Co.
685th Medical Clearing Co. (151st Medical Battalion)
686th Medical Clearing Co.
889th Ambulance Co. (Motor) - Myitkyina
896th Medical Clearing Co.
955th Ambulance Co. (Motor) - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater

Table of Contents



Medical Detachments / Sections

Hq, Hq Serv Co Med Det - Kharagpur, India

1st Medical Detachment Museum & Medical Arts Service - Ledo
7th Medical Detachment Museum & Medical Arts Service - Calcutta

29th Medical Composite Section (Lab) - Calcutta
89th Medical Composite Section
90th Medical Composite Section

9th Medical Lab - Chabua

242nd Medical Maintenance Det - Calcutta

240th Medical Supply Det - Myitkyina
241st Medical Supply Det - Myitkyina

562nd Dental Operating Det - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
563d Dental Operating Det - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
564th Dental Operating Det - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
565th Dental Operating Det - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
566th Dental Operating Det - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
567th Dental Operating Det - Ledo (activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater)
568th Dental Operating Det - Ledo
569th Dental Operating Det - Ledo
570th Dental Operating Det - Ledo
571st Dental Operating Det - Ledo
572nd Dental Operating Det - Ledo
573d Dental Operating Det - Ledo
574th Dental Operating Det - Ledo
575th Dental Operating Det - Ledo
576th Dental Operating Det - Ledo

81st Dental Prosthetic Det (Fixed) - Calcutta
82nd Dental Prosthetic Det (Fixed) - Chabua

Table of Contents



Medical Dispensaries

14th Medical General Dispensary - New Delhi
15th Medical General Dispensary - New Delhi
16th Medical General Dispensary - New Delhi

164th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - 1337th AAFBU, Sookerating, India
  • Activated 5 Apr 43, Presque Isle AAB, ME
  • Campaign Credit: India-Burma

165th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Tezpur, India
Campaign Credit: India-Burma

166th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Mohanbari, India
  • Activated 5 Apr 43, Morrison Fld, FL
  • Campaign Credit: India-Burma

167th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Chabua, India
  • Activated 5 Apr 43, Camp Luna, NM
  • Campaign Credit: India-Burma

168th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Jorhat, India
Campaign Credit: India-Burma

169th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Misamari, India
  • Activated 5 Apr 43, Long Beach AAB, CA
  • Campaign Credit: India-Burma

224th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - (20th AF, 58th Bomb Wing)
Activated 25 Nov 43 at Drew Field, Tampa, FL

225th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Calcutta, India
Activated 25 Nov 43 at Drew Field, Tampa, FL

226th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Calcutta, India
230th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Dinjan; Piardoba; Bhamo
  • Activated at Robins Field, GA on 24 Dec 43
  • Inactivated 15 Dec 45

231st Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Kharagpur, India
  • Activated 15 Nov 43 at Robins Field, GA
  • Moved to Bombay, India
  • Unit assigned Kuinglai, China sometime in 1945.

232nd Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Kharagpur, India
  • Activated 4 Jan 44 at Robins Field, GA
  • Assigned to India-Burma Sector c. Spring 1944
  • Moved to Yunannyi, China to operate air base dispensary
  • Campaign Credit: China Defensive, 6 Jun-23 Aug 44

233d Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Kharagpur, India; Kwanghan, China
  • Organized at Robins Field, GA Dec 43
  • Formally activated 4 Jan 44
  • Deactivated 1 Dec 45.

234th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - 14th Air Service Command
  • Activated 1 Jan 44. Assigned to India
  • Personnel move from India to China c. Apr 45
  • Located Kiangwan Air Base, Shanghai, China

235th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - 14th Air Service Command (70th Field Hospital - Chengtu)
  • Activated at Robins Field, GA, 1 Jan 44
  • Arrives Kunming, China, 28 Aug 44
  • Operated at Base Dispensary, Sian Army Air Base, China
  • Deactivated 6 Dec 45 at Camp Anza, CA

236th Medical Dispensary (Avn)
  • Located at Lakeland Army Air Field, FL Aug 44
  • Transferred to Kalaikunda Army Air Base c. Oct 44 (2nd Air Commando Gp)

238th Medical Dispensary (Avn)
  • Activated 15 Mar 44 at Robins Field, GA
  • Transferred to Pandeveswar, India c. spring 45
  • Campaign Credit: India-Burma, Central Burma

239th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Depot Fld (later Harmon Fld), Guam
  • activated c. Spring 1944
  • Bronze Service Star for participation in Western Pacific Campaign awarded for period 15 Jun 44-18 Feb 45

240th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Chittagong, India
Campaign Credit: India-Burma, Central Burma, China Offensive

241st Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Feni; Pandaveswar by 1 Aug 45
  • Activated 15 Mar 44, Robins Field, GA
  • Campaign Credit: Central Burma

283d Medical Dispensary (Avn) - 1st Combat Cargo Gp
  • Activated 3 Oct 44 at Robins Field, GA
  • Relocated to India on 19 Dec 44
  • Inactivated c. Fall 1945
  • Campaign Credit: Central Burma

284th Medical Dispensary (Avn) - Ondal, India (1st Air Commando Gp)
285th Medical Dispensary (Avn)
  • Activated 1 Sep 44 in India
  • Stationed at Asansol by 1 Aug 45 (1st Air Commando Gp)
  • Returned to U.S. during Sep 45
  • Campaign Credit: India-Burma, Central Burma

354th Medical Dispensary - Myitkyina; Parbatipur
355th Medical Dispensary - Kanchrapara
356th Medical Dispensary - Pandu
357th Medical Dispensary - Kanchrapara
358th Medical Dispensary - Tinsukia
536th Medical Dispensary - Yunnanyi - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
537th Medical Dispensary - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
538th Medical Dispensary - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
539th Medical Dispensary - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
540th Medical Dispensary - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
541th Medical Dispensary - activated 6 Jun 45 in IB theater
548th Medical Dispensary - North Malir by Sep 45
549th Medical Dispensary - North Malir by Sep 45
550th Medical Dispensary - North Malir by Sep 45
837th Medical Dispensary
838th Medical Dispensary - Kanchrapara
839th Medical Dispensary - Kanchrapara
840th Medical Dispensary - North Malir
841st Medical Dispensary - North Malir
842nd Medical Dispensary - Kanchrapara

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Medical Platoons

4th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - 48 ADG, Agra, India
Det - Chabua, India

8th Medical Supply Platoon
  • Assigned to 301 ASG
  • Attached to 68th ASG 13 Mar 44

16th Medical Supply Platoon *
22nd Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - 22 ADG, Kharagpur, India
Moved to Okinawa from India c. Aug 45

25th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - 83 ADG, Titagarh, India
  • Activated 1 Sep 42 at Warner Robins, GA
  • Transfered to Orlando Army Air Base, 9 Jan 43
  • Unit transferred operations to 18 Medical Supply Platoon and prepared to transfer to Wilmington, CA, Feb 44
  • Movement orders changed to transfer unit to Camp Patrick Henry, VA, Mar 44

48th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - Bengal Air Depot, India
52nd Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn)
  • Activated at Robins Field, Warner Robins, GA, 15 Mar 43
  • Arrived Bally Jute Mill, Howrah District, India, 6 Nov 43

75th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - 28 ADG (arrived 31 Mar 45)
  • Unit activated 29 Jun 44
  • Immediately transferred to Robins Field, GA
  • Moved to Kelly Field, TX, 2-9 Nov 44
  • Assigned to 28th air depot group, India, arriving 31 Mar 45

76th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - 47 ADG
  • Unit activated 29 Jun 44, Kelly Field, TX
  • Transferred less personnel and equipment to Robins Field, GA
  • Departed for Calcutta, India by way of Bombay, arriving at port 10 Mar 45
  • Unit relieved of assignment India-Burma Theater and assigned to China Theater (14 ADG) effective 24 Sep 45
  • Unit left Bengal Air Depot and went to Shanghai via Calcutta and Singapore, arriving 9 Nov 45
  • Inactivated 18 Mar 46

78th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - Tezgaon, India
  • Organized 5 Jul 44, Robins Field, GA
  • Activated 16 Oct 44, Kelly Field, TX
  • Assigned China-Burma-India Air Service Command, 16 Oct 44
  • Sailed for overseas destination, 27 May 45

79th Medical Platoon (Supply, Avn) - Calcutta, India
Meritorious Unit Commendation:  1 Dec 44-1 Mar 45, GO 220, Hq USF IBT, dtd 27 Sep 45

* Source:  various issues of Ex-CBI Roundup

Table of Contents



Veterinary Service Units

Source:  Army Veterinary Service

The Army Veterinary Service is a component of the Army Medical Service and as such shares the responsibility of safeguarding the health of the Army. It fulfilled a vital mission in World War II by inspection of the food intended for troop consumption at the time of its purchase and receipt, as well as during its storage and shipment. As part of this mission, Veterinary Corps personnel inspected civilian as well as government installations to insure proper sanitation and techniques of storage and handling of all meat and meat products, marine and dairy products, and nonanimal products.

In the early months of 1944, the Army Veterinary Service with USAFCBI had approximately 90 officers and twice that number of enlisted personnel; numerically, it was almost equally divided between the India-Burma and the China sectors, and only a third were on duty at U.S. services of supply and air force installations, while two-thirds of them were being utilized for instructing, on liaison duty with, or providing supporting veterinary animal services to, the Chinese armies in India and in China. By mid-June 1944, the veterinary officer strength was increased to 141. These officers were assigned to duty as follows:

Theater Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, USAFCBI

Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, Services of Supply, at New Delhi:
  • Base Section 1, at Karachi
  • Base Section 2, at Calcutta
  • Base Section 3, at Ledo
  • Advance Section 1, at Kunming
  • Advance Section 2, at Chabua
  • Station complement, Ramgarh Training Center
  • War Dog Detachment
  • Services of Supply Remount Service
  • Services of Supply General Depot 1
  • Services of Supply General Depot 2
  • 1st Veterinary Company (Separate)
  • 9th Medical Laboratory
    • Meritorious Unit Commendation:  Feb-Mar 45, GO 111, Hq USF IBT, dtd 5 Jun 45.

Theater troops:
  • Company E (Veterinary), 13th Mountain Medical Battalion
  • 5307th Composite Regiment (Provisional)
  • Ramgarh Training Center (instructional staff)
  • X-Force Operations Staff
  • Y-Force Operations Staff
  • Z-Force Operations Staff

Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, AAF, India-Burma Sector:
  • China-Burma-India Air Service Command
  • Fourteenth Air Force
  • India-China Wing, Air Transport Command

When the India-Burma theater was established, the Allied Chinese military forces in Burma were beginning to clear the Japanese from their last holdings on the developing overland supply route into China, and, after that time, the theater was important only to support military operations in China. Many veterinary personnel were then transferred to USAFCT, as the requirements for them in India and Burma became less urgent. As of 1 November 1944, the India-Burma theater had 92 veterinary officers, but many of these, plus new arrivals, were redeployed gradually to the China theater. As of 1 January 1945, this personnel strength reached a temporary peak of 118 officers and then was gradually reduced to 74 by 1 July 1945. At the beginning of 1945, the veterinary service organization included:

Veterinarian, Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, USAFIBT, and Medical Section, Services of Supply

Theater-assigned Troops:
  • Veterinarian, India-Burma Theater War Dog Detachment
  • Sector Veterinarian, Northern Combat Area Command:
    • 7th, 43d, and 44th Veterinary Companies (Separate)
      • 43d, 44th Vet. Comapanies activated 10 Sep 43 at Fort Clark, TX; disbanded 3 Jun 45

    • 18th and 19th Veterinary Evacuation Hospitals
    • Company E (Veterinary), 13th Mountain Medical Battalion


      13th Mountain Medical Battalion - Shaduzup (1944)  (See CBI Unit Histories)


    • Veterinarian, Surgeon's Office, 5332d Brigade (Provisional):
      • Veterinary Detachment, 124th Cavalry Regiment
      • Veterinary Detachment, 475th Infantry Regiment
      • Veterinary Detatchments, 612th and 613th Field Artillery Pack Battalions
    • Veterinary Liaison Officers on duty with Chinese Army in India

Services of Supply:
  • Sector Veterinarian, Base Section 1:
    • 94th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment
  • American Delhi Military Area Command:
    • 79th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment
  • Sector Veterinarian, Base Section 2:
    • 78th Veterinary Hospital Detachment
    • 80th, 81st, 82d, 83d, 901st, 902d, 903d, 904th, and 905th Veterinary Food Inspection

Detachments:
  • Veterinarian, Headquarters, 69th General Depot (or General Depot No. 2)
  • Sector Veterinarian, Intermediate Section 2:
    • 1st Veterinary Company (Separate)
    • 39th, 40th, and 41st Veterinary Animal Service Detachments
    • 91st, 92d, 93d, and 906th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachments
    • Veterinarian, 9th Medical Laboratory
    • Veterinary Detachment, Troop A of 253d Quartermaster Remount Squadron
      (later redesignated 475th Quartermaster Remount Troop)
    • Veterinary Detachments, Troop A of 252d Quartermaster Remount Squadron
      (later redesignated 476th Quartermaster Remount Troop) and 699th Quartermaster Remount Troop
  • Sector Veterinarian, Advance Section 3:
    • 2d Veterinary Company (Separate)
    • 51st and 52d Veterinary Animal Service Detachments
    • 88th, 89th, 90th, 907th, and 908th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachments
    • Veterinary Detachment, 698th Quartermaster Remount Troop
  • Veterinarian, Surgeon's Office, Air Service Command, AAF:
    • Veterinarian, 3d Air Depot Group
    • Veterinarian, 305th Air Service Center
  • Veterinarian, Surgeon's Office, India-China Division, Air Transport Command

As of 1 March 1945, the Army Veterinary Service with USAFCT totaled 89 officers assigned as follows:
  • Theater surgeon's office (2)
  • Services of Supply (including 4 veterinary food inspection detachments) (7)
  • Air Forces Air Service Command (2)
  • Chinese Combat Command (including 19 veterinary animal service detachments) (71)
  • Chinese Training Command (7)

As of 2 September 1945, this number of personnel had increased to 123 veterinary officers, then located as follows:

Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, USAFCT
  • Theater Headquarters Station Command:
    • 245th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment

Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, Services of Supply:
  • Base Section 1:
    • 87th, 243d, 915th, 917th, 938th, 940th, and 943d Veterinary Food Inspection Detachments
  • Base Section 2:
    • 84th, 85th, and 944th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachments
  • Base Section 3:
    • 82d and 244th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachments
  • Base Section 4:
    • 80th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment
  • Base Section 5:
    • 86th, 913th, and 914th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachments

Surgeon's Office, Air Service Command, Army Air Forces, China Theater:
  • Station Veterinary Detachment, 315th Service Group

Surgeon's Office, Chinese Training Command:
  • Station Veterinary Detachment

Surgeon's Office, Chinese Combat Command:
  • 7th Veterinary Company (Separate)  (See CBI Unit Histories)
  • 19th Veterinary Evacuation Hospital
  • 42d through 50th, and 53d through 62d Veterinary Animal Service Detachments

    43d Veterinary Animal Service Detachment

    Source:  U.S. Army Center of Military History (43d Medical Detachment)

    Lineage:

    • Constituted 20 March 1944 in the Army of the United States as the 43d Veterinary Detachment
    • Activated 6 July 1944 in China
    • Reorganized and redesignated 16 March 1945 as the 43d Veterinary Animal Service Detachment
    • Inactivated 20 September 1945 in China
    • Redesignated 13 August 1951 as Headquarters, 43d Veterinary Service Detachment and allotted to the Regular Army
    • Activated 22 August 1951 at Camp Carson, Colorado
    • Reorganized and redesignated 15 January 1953 as Headquarters, 43d Medical Detachment
    • Reorganized and redesignated 3 December 1954 as the 43d Medical Detachment
    • Inactivated 23 February 1967 in France
    • Activated 26 May 1967 at Fort Sam Houston, Texas
    • Inactivated 26 December 1971 in Vietnam
    • Activated 1 October 1993 at Fort Hood, Texas

    Honors

    Campaign Participation Credit:

    • World War II: China Defensive; China Offensive
    • Vietnam: Counteroffensive, Phase IV; Counteroffensive, Phase V; Counteroffensive, Phase VI; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Summer-Fall 1969; Winter-Spring 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase VII; Consolidation I; Consolidation II

    Decorations:  None

    Lineage and Honors Information as of 22 May 2001.

  • Veterinary liaison officers

Other Veterinary Units:

5th Veterinary Detachment (Avn) - Depot Fld (later Harmon Fld), Guam

937th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Ledo
939th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Ledo
941st Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Ledo
942nd Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Ledo
945th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Ledo
946th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Ledo
947th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - North Malir
948th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - North Malir
949th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - North Malir
950th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - North Malir
951st Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Calcutta
952nd Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Calcutta
953d Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Dikom
954th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Gauhati
955th Veterinary Food Inspection Detachment - Calcutta



Other Sites of Interest:

History of the Army Veterinary Service

The Mules of Mars WWII

Table of Contents



Other Units

American Typhus Commission, Hq Southern Area Command, Advance Section, IBT, USA
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation:  Mar 44-Sep 45, GO 286, Hq USF IBT, dtd 24 Nov 45.

Table of Contents



Links for Additional Information

Crisis Fleeting - Military Medicine in India and Burma

Office of Medical History, Office of the Surgeon General

Surgery in World War II

World War II Combat Medic

The World War II Combat Medic (home.att.net/~steinert/index.html - no longer active)

Table of Contents
Please send additions / corrections to