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ARMY AIRWAYS COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM UNITS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Sources of Information
AACS Background
Force Structure Before 15 May 1944 Airways Control Areas
10th AACS Sq
25th AACS Sq
Force Structure as of 15 May 1944
Force Structure as of 20 July 1945
88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing) 711th AAFBU (61st AACS Gp) 1st AACS Tactical Sq
754th AAFBU (124th AACS Sq)
755th AAFBU (125th AACS Sq)
756th AAFBU (126th AACS Sq)
712th AAFBU (62nd AACS Gp) 757th AAFBU (127th AACS Sq)
758th AAFBU (128th AACS Sq)
713th AAFBU (63d AACS Gp) 788th AAFBU (158th AACS Sq)
789th AAFBU (159th AACS Sq)
719th AAFBU (69th AACS Gp) 759th AAFBU (129th AACS Sq)
760th AAFBU (130th AACS Sq)
Air Base Communications Detachments
91st AAFBU (7th AACS Wing) 720th AAFBU (70th AACS Gp) 777th AAFBU (147th AACS Sq)
Force Structure as of 1 March 1946



Sources of Information:


The following sources were used throughout this section:

Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)  (formerly AACS Alumni Association)

Air Force History Index

AAF Station Lists

NOTE:  The AAF Station Lists were generated by the AAF and was obtained from the National Archives.  They are a snapshot-in-time of units and their locations at the time the list was compiled.  It is not completely accurate as units were often in transition between the times the list was compiled and published.

Also note that some of the APOs are not necessarily the location of the unit but rather the APO used by the unit.  Therefore there may be differences in AACS unit locations between the AAF Station Lists and AACS Alumni Association data.  Both lists are provided for comparison.

Air Force Communications Agency

Military.com, Mr. Charles Aresta

Mr. Larry Morrison, AFCA Staff Historian (AFCA/HO), Scott AFB, IL

Mr. Carl Bailey, AFHRA Historian (AFHRA/RSO), Maxwell AFB, AL

Mr. Mark Boland

Mr. Bernie Shearon



AACS Background

The AACS emblem was approved for use in 1944 and remained in use until 1961.


The current emblem design debuted on 1 July 1961 during the ceremonies officiated by Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. Curtis E. LeMay marking the redesignation of the Airways and Air Communications Service as Air Force Communications Service.

Emblem Significance:  The mailed fist represents Air Force commanders who exercise command and control of aerospace forces. The electronic flashes represent all forms of aerospace communications through which control of aerospace forces is provided. The North Star symbolizes the heritage of navigation and air traffic control as distinct but integrated parts of command and control, and the world portrays the global aspects of AFCA and Air Force operations.


Bench located in Memorial Park
National Museum of the United States Air Force


AFCA Lineage

The Army Airways Communications System was first organized on 15 Nov 1938, in the Directorate of Communications of the U.S. Army Air Corps. On 13 Apr 1943, the official lineage of the Army Airways Communications System as a separate organization began with the constitution of the Army Airways Communications System Wing. The Wing was activated as part of the Flight Control Command on 26 Apr 1943.

On 14 Jul 1943, the Wing was reassigned directly to the Army Air Forces. It was redesignated the Army Airways Communications Service, the Wing designator was dropped, on 26 Apr 1944. On 13 Mar 1946, the Army Airways Communications Service was redesignated the Air Communications Service and reassigned to the Air Transport Command. The Air Communications Service was redesignated the Airways and Air Communications Service 11 Sep 1946. Airways and Air Communications Service was reassigned to the Military Air Transport Service 1 Jun 1948.

Airways and Air Communications Service became the Air Force's 16th major air command 1 Jul, 1961 and was simultaneously redesignated the Air Force Communications Service. Air Force Communications Service was redesignated the Air Force Communications Command 15 Nov 1979. Air Force Communications Command became a field operating agency on 1 Jul 1991, and, on 28 May 1993 was redesignated the Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Computer Agency. The Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Computer Agency was redesignated the Air Force Communications Agency 13 Jun 1996. On 1 Apr 1997, the Agency was reassigned as a subordinate unit of the Air Force Communications and Information Center. The Agency was redesignated a field operating agency, reporting directly to the Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications and Information, Washington, D.C., 1 Oct 2000. The Agency is due to be redesignated as the Air Force Network Integration Center, reporting to AF Space Command, on 15 Jul 2009.

AFCA Designations and Dates

15 November 1938 Army Airways Communications System

13 April 1943 Army Airways Communications System Wing

26 April 1944 Army Airways Communications System

13 March 1946 Air Communications Service

11 September 1946 Airways and Air Communications Service

1 July 1961 Air Force Communications Service

15 November 1979 Air Force Communications Command

28 May 1993 Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Computer Agency

13 June 1996 Air Force Communications Agency

15 July 2009 - Air Force Network Integration Center



Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (Air Force Network Integration Center )

Lineage:  Established as Army Airways Communications System Wing on 13 Apr 1943. Activated on 26 Apr 1943. Redesignated as: Army Airways Communications System on 26 Apr 1944; Air Communications Service on 13 Mar 1946; Airways and Air Communications Service on 11 Sep 1946. Inactivated on 1 Jun 1948. Activated on 1 Jun 1948. Organized on 16 Aug 1948. Redesignated as Air Force Communications Service on 1 Jul 1961 and designated as a major command. Redesignated as Air Force Communications Command on 15 Nov 1979. Status of unit changed from major command to a field operating agency of USAF on 1 Jul 1991. Redesignated as: Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Computer Agency on 28 May 1993; Air Force Communications Agency on 13 Jun 1996. Status of unit changed from a field operating agency of USAF to a subordinate unit of the Air Force Communications and Information Center on 1 Apr 1997. Status of unit changed from a subordinate unit of the Air Force Communications and Information Center to a field operating agency of the USAF on 1 Oct 2000. Status of unit changed from field operating agency of USAF to a subordinate unit of the Air Force Space Command on 4 May 2009. Redesignated as Air Force Network Integration Center on 15 Jul 2009.

Assignments:  Flight Control Command, 26 Apr 1943; Army Air Forces, 13 Jul 1943; Air Transport Command, 13 Mar 1946-1 Jun 1948. Military Air Transport Service, 16 Aug 1948; United States Air Force, 1 Jul 1961; Air Force Communications and Information Center, 1 Apr 1997; United States Air Force, 1 Oct 2000; Air Force Space Command, 5 May 2009-.

Stations:  Ashville, NC, 26 Apr 1943; Langley Field, VA, 29 Dec 1945; Gravelly Point, VA, 12 Dec 1946-1 Jun 1948. Gravelly Point, VA, 16 Aug 1948; Andrews AFB, MD, 22 Nov 1948; Scott AFB, IL, 15 Jan 1958; Richards-Gebaur AFB, MO, 16 Jul 1970; Scott AFB, IL, 30 Sep 1977-.

Service Streamers:  World War II American Theater.

Campaign Streamers:  None.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  Air Force Organizational Excellence Awards: 1 Jul 1984-30 Jun 1986; 1 Jul 1986-30 Jun 1988; 1 Jul 1988-30 Jun 1990; 1 Jul 1990-30 Jun 1992; 1 Jul 1992-30 Jun 1994; 1 Jul 1994-30 Jun 1996; 1 Apr 1997-30 Apr 1998; 1 Oct 2000-31 Mar 2002; 30 Apr 2002-30 Sep 2003; 1 Oct 2003-30 Sep 2004; 10 May 2005-30 Sep 2006; 1 Oct 2006-30 Sep 2008.

Emblem:  Approved on 1 Jul 1961; newest rendition approved on 8 Dec 2009.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through Jun 2011.


Source:

Army Air Forces in WWII Series, Volume 7, Chapter 12
Office of Air Force History
Wesley Craven & James Cate, editors

China-Burma-India

In CBI the 10th AACS Squadron, operating as a unit of the Tenth Air Force, struggled through the winter of 1942-43 to establish communications facilities linking India and China and at the same time to render such assistance as it could to tactical operations in Burma. The squadron was reassigned to AACS in April 1943, and in July its responsibilities were divided with a newly assigned 25th Squadron. The 10th retained responsibility for India and Burma, except for Assam, and the 25th, with headquarters at Chabua, took up the task of providing communications along the famed "Hump" route into China. In the fall, as previously noted, the Asiatic Airways Communications Area (AACA) was introduced as a superior headquarters for the two squadrons. These developments followed a pattern of organization that was becoming familiar throughout AACS at the time. More important is the fact that they also reflected a growing concern at the highest level of command for the assistance of China. The Fourteenth Air Force recently had been activated, and ATC had been given targets for cargo deliveries over the Hump that were staggering by comparison with anything theretofore achieved.

For the Hump and its defending forces, the 10th Squadron had managed to put into operation nine stations-three on the China side of the Himalayas and six on the India side-of which Chabua in Assam and Kunming in China were the chief, as was the 10th's station at Karachi the chief link joining Chabua with Khartoum and other points along the airways of Africa. To man its stations, the 25th took over from the 10th a complement of 16 officers and 168 enlisted men who often worked on twelve-hour shifts while they waited for reinforcements that would bring strength up to 77 officers and 540 men. The 10th Squadron began its separate operations with another nine stations, of which the one at Delhi, where military headquarters in CBI tended to concentrate, and the one at Karachi, gateway to India, were the chief. With a complement, to begin with of 31 officers and 141 enlisted men, the 10th AACS Squadron had many members who also knew, day after day, what a twelve-hour tour of duty meant. When AACA gave way in May 1944 to the 4th AACS Wing, the new wing took charge of more than a hundred and twenty stations. The wing included the 1st Tactical Group, a unit organized specifically for assistance of the B-29's of XX Bomber Command.

More than one of the AACS stations in CBI were now major installations embodying some of the more advanced technical equipment and skill of the society that had placed them "on the other side of the world." Some were limited by geographical considerations, by the lack of an adequate source of power, or by the speed of military developments to makeshift facilities that depended ultimately for their effectiveness upon the men who manned them. These were men to whom the G.I. term of "sweating it out" became something quite literal in the climate of India or Assam, men who often knew in China or in Burma the meaning of repeated enemy attacks, and men who experienced the isolation of duty in remote mountain stations or in the jungles of Burma.

Beginning in December 1943 the AACS had undertaken to provide tactical communications in Southeast Asia at the request of the Fourteenth Air Force and other combat units. Its first two stations for that purpose were established in eastern China, to support air operations against Japanese shipping in the China Sea and against enemy troops and supply concentrations in the Changsha area. Other facilities were installed in the Imphal-Kohima region, where enemy ground forces had broken into India and almost reached the railroad from Assam to Bengal. Farther south, stations were established at Bangalore and Ceylon for the support of amphibious operations of the Southeast Asia Command. During the spring of 1944, eight others were set up to assist air and ground forces operating in China, India, and Burma.

In spite of these new and enlarged installations, air communications in eastern and southeastern Asia continued to present a serious problem. The lack of adequately powered radio aids to navigation seriously limited bad-weather operations. Shortages of personnel and equipment to handle point-to-point communications caused overloaded channels and delayed reception of weather and other tactical information at command headquarters. Outdated or inaccurate weather data were especially injurious to air-transport operations and directly affected the air supply of forward bases.

Airways to Tokyo

...In keeping with a recent decision in Washington for redesignation of AACS units, the Pacific Airways Communications Area became on 15 May 1944 the 7th AACS Wing with jurisdiction over the 5th, 7th, and 20th Squadrons-now redesignated, respectively, as the 68th, 70th, and 71st AACS Groups. The subdivision of the groups into squadrons, and of squadrons into detachments, gave to the AACS in the Pacific, as elsewhere, a superior structure for the accomplishment of its mission. No less important was the establishment of a common headquarters for the combat zones of the Pacific war.

Biak, Saipan, Guam, Leyte, Luzon, Iwo Jima, Okinawa-all found their way into the history of the 7th Wing, as finally did Tokyo. When news of the Japanese proposal for surrender came, the 7th Wing and more especially the 68th Group received orders to fly into Atsugi Airfield, below Tokyo, the communications equipment and personnel necessary for guidance and reception of the great transports scheduled to "fly in" the first contingent of the occupation troops. AACS's mission was to provide navigational aids, point-to-point communication with Okinawa, air-to-ground communication for planes in flight, weather data, and traffic control. A special unit of handpicked men was quickly organized, put through a trial exercise at Clark Field near Manila, and flown to Okinawa to await the signal from higher headquarters. On the morning of 28 August 1945 some two dozen C-47's (one of them a fully equipped mobile radio station) flew from Okinawa to Atsugi carrying technical equipment and technicians, many of them belonging to the AACS, for the establishment of an emergency air base in Japan's homeland. And so were men long accustomed to follow combat troops ashore put in a position to welcome combat units as they reached the war's last beachhead.

Table of Contents



Force Structure Before 15 May 1944


Prepared & Published by AC/S Intelligence
HQ, AACS Wing, AAF
Asheville, NC
Based on AAF Regulation 100-2 & 100-2a
20 November 1943

Airways Control Areas (ACA)

The first AACS organizations were called Airways Control Areas.  On 15 May 1944 most became Army Air Forces Base Units (Wings) - e.g., 88th AAFBU (4th Wing)

Asiatic ACA

Lineage:  Constituted 22 Feb 43; activated 9 Oct 43 as a superior headquarters for the 10th and 25th AACS Squadrons; disbanded 15 May 44 and replaced by 4th AACS Wing.

Stations:  New Delhi, India

10th AACS Sq

Lineage:  Activated 17 Apr 42 and assigned to Tenth AF; redesignated 10th Airways Comm Sq, 23 Dec 42; redesignated 10th Army Airways Comm Sq, 4 May 43 and assigned to AACS; 10th Army Airways Communications System Region and 10th Army Airways Communications System Squadron were disbanded effective 11 Jun 44. Personnel were assigned to 61st Army Airways Communications System Group which was activated on 11 Jun 44 at Charra, India, with Lt Col William A. Swearingen as commanding officer.

Stations:  Bolling Field, DC; Morrison Field, FL; Miami, FL; Chabua, Karachi (882 NY), New Delhi

Detachments
Det (884 NY) - Agra, India
Det (886 NY) - Allahabad, India
Det (465 NY) - Calcutta, India
Det (629 NY) - Chabua, India
Det (631 NY) - Chakulia, India
Det (630 NY) - Gaya, India
Det (886 NY) - Jodhpur, India
Det (431 NY) - Lalmanir Hat, India
Det (886 NY) - Karachi, India
Det (886 NY) - Pandaveswar, India



Source:  Air Force History Index

Capt. Louis Lhores was replaced as commanding officer of Squadron on 18 Feb 44 by Capt. Edward L. Hersey. 10 Army Airways Communications System Region and 10 Army Airways Communications System Squadron were disbanded effective 11 Jun 44. Personnel were assigned to 61 Army Airways Communications System Group which was activated on 11 Jun 44 with Maj. Leonard D. Sprague assigned as Group commander.

25th AACS Sq

Established Jul 43; On 15 May 44, the 25th AACS Sq was disbanded and replaced by the 88th AAF Base Unit (4th AACS Wing)

Stations:  Chabua, India; Chengkung, China (627 NY)

Detachments
Det (466 NY) - Jorhat, India
Det (627 NY) - Kunming, China
Det (689 NY) - Ledo, India
Det (629 NY) - Mohanbari, India
Det (467 NY) - Sookerating, India
Det (429 NY) - Tezpur, India
Det (627 NY) - Yangkai, China
Det (627 NY) - Yunnanyi, China

Table of Contents



Force Structure as of 15 May 1944


Boundaries of AACS Wings & Groups
Based on AAF Regulation 100-2 & 100-2a 20 Nov 1943 and
LTR WD AG-322 (25 April 1944) OB-I-AFRDG-M Dated 26 April 1944
Edition of 15 May 1944
Revised 5 June 1944

From 15 May 44 to 20 Jul 45, AACS units were lettered squadrons (sections) of AAF Base Units.

The following list of lettered squadrons (sections) comes from the 1 May 1945 AAF Station List:

88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wg)
   Sec A (Hq, 4th AACS Wg) - Calcutta, India
   Sec B (61st AACS Gp)Sec C (Hq, 61st AACS Gp) - New Delhi, India
Sec D (124th AACS Sq) - Myitkyina, Burma
Sec E (125th AACS Sq) - Calcutta, India
Sec F (126th AACS Sq) - Malir, India
   Sec G (62nd AACS Gp)Sec H (Hq, 62nd AACS Gp) - Chabua, India
Sec I (127th AACS Sq) - Chabua, India
Sec J (128th AACS Sq) - Kurmitola, India
   Sec K (1st Tactical Gp, AACS)Sec L (Hq, 1st Tactical Gp, AACS) - Hijii, India
Sec M (129th AACS Sq) - Kharagpur, India
Sec N (130th AACS Sq) - Barrackpore, India
   Sec O (63d AACS Gp)Sec P (Hq, 63d AACS Gp) - Kunming, China
Sec Q (158th AACS Sq) - Chengkung, China
Sec R (159th AACS Sq) - Chengtu, China

91st AAFBU (7th AACS Wg)
   Sec A (Hq, 7th AACS Wg) - Hickam Field, T. H.
   Sec B (68th AACS Gp)Sec C (Hq, 68th AACS Gp) - Hollandia, New Guinea
Sec D (139th AACS Sq) - Brisbane, Australia
Sec E (140th AACS Sq) - Dreger Harbor, New Guinea
Sec F (141st AACS Sq) - Clark Field, P. I.
   Sec G (69th AACS Gp)Sec H (Hq, 69th AACS Gp) - Morotai Island
Sec I (142nd AACS Sq) - Morotai Island
Sec J (143d AACS Sq) - Hollandia, New Guinea
Sec K (144th AACS Sq) - inactive
   Sec L (70th AACS Gp)Sec M (Hq, 70th AACS Gp) - Hickam Field, T. H.
Sec N (145th AACS Sq) - Hickam Field, T. H.
Sec O (146th AACS Sq) - Kwajalein Island
Sec P (147th AACS Sq) - Saipan Island
Sec Q (148th AACS Sq) - Hickam Field, T. H.
   Sec R (71st AACS Gp)Sec S (Hq, 71st AACS Gp) - New Caledonia
Sec T (149th AACS Sq) - New Caledonia
Sec U (150th AACS Sq) - Guadalcanal
Sec V (151st AACS Sq) - inactive

Table of Contents



Force Structure as of 20 July 1945

88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing) - Calcutta, India

Lineage:  From 15 May 44 to 20 Jul 45, AACS units in the CBI were lettered squadrons (sections) of the 88th AAF Base Unit (4th AACS Wg). On that date, AACS formed separate base units for its groups and squadrons. 88 Army Air Forces Base Unit inactivated 15 Jan 46 with all its personnel being assigned to 61 Army Airways Communications System Group.

Stations:  Calcutta, Hastings Mill until some time in 1945, and finally New Delhi, where it was discontinued on 5 Jan 46.

NOTE:  Even though they were really AAF Base Units, AACS units used their parenthetical group and squadron descriptions almost exclusively (e.g., the 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing) would be referred to as the 4th AACS Wing).  This includes station lists (see 1945 AAF Station List).



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Wing was activated in 1944 and was located in China. Wing was involved in over the Hump activities. Wing was originally known as Asiatic Airways Communications Area.

  • Apr 45: Wing located at Hastings Air Base, India.

  • Wing was inactivated on 15 Jan 46.

Table of Contents



711th AAFBU (61st AACS Gp) - Calcutta, Hastings Mill

10th Army Airways Communications System Region and 10th Army Airways Communications System Squadron were disbanded effective 11 Jun 44. Personnel were assigned to 61st Army Airways Communications System Group which was activated on 11 Jun 44 at Charra, India.

Emergency Maintenance Center, located at Bengal Air Depot, transferred to 61 Army Airways Communications Group 1 Dec 45. 711 Army Air Forces Base Unit activated 20 Jul 45 from Sections B and C of 88 Army Air Forces Base Unit, 20 Jul 45. 88 Army Air Forces Base Unit inactivated 15 Jan 46 with all its personnel being assigned to 61 Army Airways Communications System Group. Group inactivated with duties being transferred to 56 Army Airways Communications System Group c. 28 Feb 46.

Detachments/Stations
Det - Agra Det/Sta - Haungpa
Det - Allahabad Det/Sta - Kunming
Det - Chabua Det/Sta - Kurmitola
Det - Cooch Behar Det/Sta - Lalmanirhat
Det - Delhi Det/Sta - Lankiung
Det - Gaya Det/Sta - Luchuan
Det - Jodhpur Det/Sta - Lufeng
Det - Karachi Det/Sta - Misamari
Det/Sta - Assam area Det/Sta - Mohanbari
Det/Sta - Bishuapur Det/Sta - Pandaveswar
Det/Sta - Chakolia Det/Sta - Sookerating
Det/Sta - China area Det/Sta - Tezpur
Det/Sta - Dinjan Det/Sta - Yangkai
Det/Sta - Dum Dum Det/Sta - Yunnanyi
Det/Sta - Fort Hertz  

Planned Stations
Sta - Bangalore Sta - Mienning
Sta - Calcutta Sta - Ondal
Sta - Ceylon Sta - Poona
Sta - Chittagong Sta - Sagaing
Sta - Lashio Sta - Shwebo
Sta - Mandalay Sta - Yanan
Sta - Maymyo  

Table of Contents



1st AACS Tactical Sq

Replaced Section K, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  Mr. Larry Morrison, AFCA Historian

"According to the AACS history, the 61st AACS Group was authorized 15 May 1944 but did not actually become established until 11 June. Under that group were three squadrons: the 124th with headquarters at New Delhi, the 125th with headquarters at New Delhi but later moved to Dum Dum.

"Then the interesting part -- quoting from the history:  The third squadron "set a precedent, without fuller definition at first, it was merely designated as the First Tactical Squadron. Headquarters was designated at Kharagpur ... "The history later states, "eventually the squadron developed into a group." Later, the history notes that the First Tactical Squadron was redesignated the 69th AACS Group in December 1944."

NOTE:  The Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) has no record of this unit in their archives.  It appears likely that the 1st AACS Tac Sq was redesignated as the 1st AACS Tactical Group as this Group does appear on the 1 May 1945 AAF Station List (see Force Structure as of 15 May 1944, above), and then redesignated again as the 69th AACS Gp, with the 129th and 130th AACS Squadrons assigned (see entry for 69th AACS Gp, below).

Table of Contents



754th AAFBU (124th AACS Sq) - New Delhi, Kurmitola (20 Jul 45 - 10 Oct 45)

Replaced Section D, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  AAF 1 May 1945 Station List

124th Army Airways Communication System Squadron (218 NY) - Myitkyina, Burma

Stations
Station #252 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #270 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #253 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #272 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #254 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #275 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #255 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #276 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #262 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #278 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #263 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #279 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #264 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #285 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #265 (218 NY) - Myitkyina  



Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Agra Det - Nagpur
Det - Bangalore Det - Nampanmao
Det - Bhamo Det - New Delhi
Det - Columbo Det - New Delhi
Det - Hsipaw Det - New Delhi
Det - Kuttkai Det - Sahmaw
(activated late Sep 44)
Det - Lashio Det - Shingbwiyang
Det - Mongmit Det - Sumprabum
Det - Myitkyina East Det - Tingkawk Sakan
Det - Myitkyina North Det - Warazup
Det - Myitkyina South  

Other Locations (post-war):

124 AACS Sq (later 1901 AACS Sq, 1901 Comm Sq, 1901 Comm Gp, 1901 Information Systems Gp), Travis AFB, 1 Jun 48-

Table of Contents



755th AAFBU (125th AACS Sq) - New Delhi, Dum Dum, Hastings Fld (20 Jul 45 - 30 Apr 46)

Replaced Section E, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  AAF 1 May 1945 Station List

125th Army Airways Communication System Squadron (465 NY) - Calcutta, India

Stations
Station #136 (492 NY) - Barrackpore Station #149 (465 NY) - Calcutta
Station #139 (465 NY) - Calcutta Station #150 (465 NY) - Calcutta
Station #141 (630 NY) - Gaya Station #151 (465 NY) - Calcutta
Station #142 (671 NY) - Calcutta Station #152 (465 NY) - Calcutta
Station #145 (630 NY) - Gaya Station #153 (491 NY) - Bangalore
Station #146 (690 NY) - Ondal Station #154 (432 NY) - Kandy, Ceylon
Station #147 (690 NY) - Ondal Station #155 (630 NY) - Gaya
Station #148 (690 NY) - Ondal Station #156 (492 NY) - Barrackpore


Photo from Station #150, courtesy of Mrs. Carol Lynn Ott Heye, daughter of Cpl. William Ott



Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Agra Det - Kharagpur
Det - Bangalore Det - Lalmanirhat
Det - Bangkok Det - Ledo
Det - Barrackpore Det - Myitkyina South
Det - Bhagalpur Det - Nawadih
Det - Bhamo Det - New Delhi
Det - Calcutta Det - Ondal
Det - Chabua Det - Panagarp
Det - Char Chapli Island Det - Pandaveswar
Det - Cocanada Det - Piardoba
Det - Colombo Det - Puri
Det - Dudkundi Det - Rangoon
Det - Dum Dum Det - Saigon
Det - Fenny Det - Shamshernagar
Det - Gaya Det - Shwebo
Det - Hastings Det - Singapore (Kallang)
Det - Hijli Det - Sookerating
Det - Jodhpur Det - Suylhet
Det - Jorhat Det - Tezgaon
Det - Kalaikunda Det - Tezpur
Det - Karachi Det - Waltair



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Detachment located at Jodhpur, India activated on 30 Apr 42. Mission of Detachment had been to serve as important communications link in China-Burma-India Theater of operations.

  • Detachment located at Gaya, India arrived at Gaya, India on 14 Jun 42.

  • Detachment located at Dum Dum Airdrome, Calcutta, India: Dum Dum Airdrome was a satellite station responsible to Army Air Forces Station at Barrackpore, India. Detachment was activated on 13 Jun 43. Very high frequency radio facility was placed in operation on 28 Oct 44. Dum Dum Airdrome began functioning as independent detachment and was no longer responsible to station at Barrackpore, India c. Jan 45. Instrument landing equipment was put into operation on 12 Jun 45. Army Air Forces flight operations officially ceased at base on 1 Jan 46. Royal Air Force took over operation of air traffic control tower on 25 Jan 46.

  • Detachment located at Pandaveswar, India activated on 25 Aug 43. Mission of Detachment was to provide direction finding assistance for bomber aircraft returning from operations in China-Burma-India Theater.

  • Detachment located at Ondal, India activated on 8 Nov 43. Detachment personnel underwent training in air/ground procedure until instructions were received to close down air/ground facility on 1 Nov 44.

  • Detachment located at Hastings Air Base, Rishra, India started operations on 7 Jul 44.

  • Detachment located at Hijili, India activated on 1 Aug 44. Air traffic at base included B-29 aircraft operations.

  • Detachment located at Ondal, India: 1Lt Joseph V. Guerrissi was replaced as Detachment commander on 12 Jan 45 by Capt. Harley D. Edwards. Mission of Detachment at Ondal, India included responsibility for operation of Army Airways Communications System facilities at satellite stations of Panagarh and Pandaveswar, India. Air traffic increased due to training of both Chinese and American pilots in handling P-51 and P-47 aircraft.

  • Detachment located at Char Chapli Island, India: Detachment arrived at station site on Char Chapli Island, India as of 12 Feb 45. 1Lt William G. Read was assigned as Detachment Commander. Mission of Detachment was to install and operate weather station.

  • Detachment located at Puri, India activated on 9 Mar 45. Mission of Detachment was to supply radio navigational aid to aircraft flying over Bay of Bengal and Burma. Detachment was inactivated on 15 Jul 45.

  • Detachment located at Cocanada, India: Detachment arrived at Station site at Cocanada, India on 21 Mar 45. 2Lt. Wade S. Paxton was assigned as Detachment commander. Mission of Detachment was to provide long range navigational system for aircraft and ships operating in Bay of Bengal and along coast of Burma.

  • Detachment located at Bhagalpur, India began operation on 4 Apr 45. Mission of detachment was responsibility for weather reporting. Detachment facilities were closed down on 23 May 45.

  • Detachment located at Waltair, India: Mission of Detachment was to establish long range navigation Station for monitoring east coast of India. Operation of Station was turned over to Royal Air Force in Jul 45.

  • Detachment located at Cocanada, India transferred to British control as of 15 Jul 45.

  • Detachment located at Kalaikunda, India discontinued operations during Sep 45. Detachment was inactivated on 3 Oct 45.

  • Detachment located at Nawadih, India: Air Base at Nawadih, India had operated as satellite station of base at Gaya, India. Operation of Detachment facilities was discontinued and Nawadih Air Base was closed on 15 Sep 45.

  • Detachment located at Piardoba, India ceased operations at Piardoba, India on 25 Sep 45. Detachment was inactivated effective 19 Oct 45.

  • Detachment located at Kharagpur, India inactivated on 24 Oct 45.

  • Detachment located at Panagarh, India: Personnel and equipment at satellite station of Pandaveswar, India were relocated to Station at Panagarh, India. Detachment began handling all message traffic for Eastern India Air Depot, Panagarh, India c. Oct 45. Operation of Detachment equipment was discontinued during Mar 46.

  • Detachment located at Sookerating, India closed down during Nov 45.

  • Detachment located at Bhamo, Burma ceased operations as of 18 Dec 45.

  • Detachment located at Myitkyina, Burma was discontinued during Dec 45.

  • Detachment located at Ondal, India: Aircraft operations at Ondal, India were discontinued and Detachment was placed on inactive status in late Dec 45.

  • Detachment located at Dudhkundi, India: Air traffic control tower was closed down as of 3 Jan 46.

  • Detachment located at Shwebo, Burma placed on inactive status in late Dec 45.

  • Detachment located at Shamshernager, India decommissioned and Detachment was placed in inactive status during Dec 45.

  • Detachment located at Tezgaon, India discontinued in late Dec 45. Detachment was inactivated on 25 Jan 46.

  • Detachment located at Ledo, India inactivated in late Jan 46.

  • Detachment located at Hastings Air Base, Rishra, India: Air Transport Command Division Headquarters operations were discontinued and Detachment inactivated on 22 Feb 46.

Table of Contents



756th AAFBU (126th AACS Sq) - Malir, Karachi (20 Jul 45 - Feb 46)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Replaced Section F, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  AAF 1 May 1945 Station List

126th Army Airways Communication System Squadron (883 NY) - Malir, India

Stations
Station #171 (882 NY) - Karachi Station #177 (883 NY) - Karachi
Station #172 (881 NY) - Bombay Station #178 (884 NY) - Agra
Station #174 (882 NY) - Karachi Station #179 (885 NY) - New Delhi
Station #175 (886 NY) - Karachi Station #180 (885 NY) - New Delhi
Station #176 (882 NY) - Karachi Station #181 (885 NY) - New Delhi



Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Agra Det - Jodhpur
Det - Allahabad Det - Karachi
Det - Bangalore Det - Malir
Det - Bombay Det - New Delhi
Det - Cawnpore Det - New Delhi
Det - Colombo Det - New Delhi
Det - Jiwani Det - Spinagar



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Squadron was activated on 8 Oct 44. Capt. Leonard Sternberg was assigned as commanding officer. Squadron headquarters were located at Malir, India (Pakistan). Mission of Squadron included responsibility for processing Army Airways Communications System personnel for duty assignments in China-Burma-India Theater.

  • 126 Army Airways Communications System Squadron took over administration of two stations formerly under jurisdiction of 125 Army Airways Communications System Squadron. Stations taken over were located in Bangalore, India and Colombo, Ceylon.

  • 126 Army Airways Communications System Squadron took over responsibility for administration of four stations formerly under jurisdiction of 124 Army Airways Communications System Squadron. Stations taken over were located in Delhi and Agra, India.

  • Detachment at Jiwani, India (Pakistan) activated on 21 Feb 44.

  • Detachment at New Delhi, India was transferred from 124 Army Airways Communications Squadron to 126 Army Airways Communications Squadron on 10 Mar 45.

  • Detachment at Malir, India inactivated Sep 45.

  • Oct 45: Squadron operations included inactivation of Station Detachments located at Allahabad, Cawnpore, and Srinagar, India.

  • Detachment at Allahabad, India inactivated on 2 Oct 45.

  • Detachment at Bholari, India began operation on 12 Jul 44. Bholari, India was located 15 miles from Hyderabad, India. Detachment was inactivated on 19 Oct 45.

  • Detachment at Cawnpore, India activated 20 Jun 45 and inactivated at end Oct 45.

  • Detachment at Srinagar, India activated in Jul 45 and inactivated Oct 45.

  • Squadron headquarters were relocated from Malir, India (Pakistan) to Karachi, India (Pakistan) as of 25 Jan 46.

Other Locations (post-war):

126th AACS Sq, later 1928 AACS Sq, 1928 AACS Gp, 1928 Information Systems Gp, MacDill AFB, 1 Jun 48-

Table of Contents



712th AAFBU (62nd AACS Gp) - Chabua (20 Jul 45 - 20 Nov 45)

25 Army Airways Communications Region was activated on 10 Jul 43. Regional headquarters was established at Chabua, Assam, India. Area of responsibility included China-Burma-India theater. 25 Army Airways Communications Region was reconstituted as 62 Army Airways Communications System Group 15 May 44. 62 Army Airways Communications Group headquarters (Section C, 88 Army Air Forces Base Unit) organized 15 May 44. Operations in Group curtailed during Sep 45 with many stations being closed. Group experienced considerable reorganization and consolidation during Oct 45. Group inactivated 20 Nov 45.

Table of Contents



757th AAFBU (127th AACS Sq) - Chabua

Assigned to 62nd AACS Gp, 15 May 1944

Replaced Section I, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  AAF 1 May 1945 Station List

Stations
Station #201 (629 NY) - Chabua Station #215 (629 NY) - Chabua
Station #202 (466 NY) - Jorhat Station #216 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #203 (466 NY) - Jorhat Station #217 (689 NY) - Ledo
Station #204 (629 NY) - Chabua Station #218 (689 NY) - Ledo
Station #205 (466 NY) - Jorhat Station #219 (689 NY) - Ledo
Station #206 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #220 (689 NY) - Ledo
Station #207 (489 NY) - Misamari Station #221 (487 NY) - Dinjan
Station #208 (490 NY) - Mohanbari Station #222 (466 NY) - Jorhat
Station #209 (629 NY) - Chabua Station #223 (467 NY) - Sookerating
Station #210 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #224 (629 NY) - Chabua
Station #211 (467 NY) - Sookerating Station #225 (629 NY) - Chabua
Station #212 (429 NY) - Tezpur Station #226 (629 NY) - Chabua
Station #213 (467 NY) - Sookerating Station #228 (466 NY) - Jorhat
Station #214 (429 NY) - Tezpur  



Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Amguri Det - Myitkyina
Det - Chabua Det - Namrup
Det - Dergaon Det - Pangsau Pass
Det - Dinjan Det - Pathalipam
Det - Ft. Hertz Det - Paya
Det - Golaghat Det - Sadiya
Det - Hoogrijaan Det - Shingbwiyang
Det - Imphal Det - Singri
Det - Jorhat Det - Sookerating
Det - Ledo Det - Tezpur
Det - Manipur Det - Tingkawk Sakan
Det - Mohanbari Det - Warazup
Det - Moran  



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Squadron was activated in May 44 with Capt. Harris M. Browder as commanding officer. Squadron was responsible for eastern India (in Assam River Valley) and Burma. Most activity in area involved flying supplies over Hump to China. Headquarters were located in Chabua, India.

  • Detachment located at Sadiya, India activated during Apr 44.

  • Detachment located at Singri, India: Singri homing Station and check point was established 11 Apr 44.

  • Detachment located at Sookerating, India activated Apr to Jun 43 and inactivated 15 May 44.

  • Detachment located at Amguri, India: Loran Station was activated on 7 Sep 44.

  • Oct 44: Squadron was split into two parts: 127 Army Airways Communications System Squadron and 128 Army Airways Communications System Squadron. Headquarters of 127 Army Airways Communications System Squadron remained at Chabua in Assam, India. Headquarters of 128 Army Airways Communications System Squadron were at Kurmitola, in Bengal, India. 127 Army Airways Communications System Squadron was composed of sixteen stations in upper Assam Valley and two stations in Burma.

  • Detachment located at Pangsau, Burma: inactivation procedures were begun in Oct 45.

  • Squadron was inactivated Nov 45.

Table of Contents



758th AAFBU (128th AACS Sq) - Kurmitola

Assigned to 62nd AACS Gp, 15 May 1944

Replaced Section J, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45. 758 Army Air Forces Base Unit (128 Army Airways Communications System Squadron), Furitola, India, inactivated 20 Dec 45.

Source:  AAF 1 May 1945 Station List

128th Army Airways Communication System Squadron (433 NY) - Kurmitola, India

Stations
Station #251 (433 NY) - Tezgaon Station #269 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #252 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #270 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #253 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #271 (433 NY) - Tezgaon
Station #254 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #272 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #255 (689 NY) - Ledo Station #273 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #256 (214 NY) - Chittagong Station #274 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #257 (433 NY) - Tezgaon Station #275 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #258 (433 NY) - Tezgaon Station #276 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #259 (431 NY) - Lalmanir Hat Station #277 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #260 (219 NY) - Shamsbernagar Station #278 (218 NY) - Myitkyina
Station #261 (433 NY) - Tezgaon Station #280 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #262 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #281 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #263 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #282 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #264 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #283 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #265 (218 NY) - Myitkyina Station #284 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #267 (219 NY) - Shamsbernagar Station #286 (214 NY) - Chittagong
Station #268 (433 NY) - Tezgaon Station #287 (214 NY) - Chittagong



Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Agartala Det - Mobile Wea Team 1
Det - Akyab Det - Mohanbari
Det - Alon Det - Mse
Det - Bahe Det - Myingyan
Det - Bangkok Det - Myitkyina East
Det - Bhamo Det - Myitkyina North
Det - Bonzukan Det - Myitkyina South
Det - Chabua Det - Nampanmao
Det - Chanyi Det - Nanning
Det - Chittagong Det - Nansin
Det - Comilla Det - Ordaw
Det - Dwehla Det - Panghkam
Det - Ehrtong Det - Ramree Island
Det - Fenny Det - Rangoon
Det - Fungwhanshan Det - Rumkhapalong
Det - Hathazari Det - Rupsi
Det - Imphas Det - Sahmaw
Det - Indainggale Det - Saigon
Det - Kan Det - Shamsher Nager
Det - Kunyang Det - Shingbwiyang
Det - Kurmitola Det - Shwebo
Det - Kweilin Det - Singapore
Det - Lalmanirhat (Coochbehar) Det - Singri
Det - Lashio Det - Sinthe
Det - Ledo Det - Suichwan
Det - Lewe Det - Syhlhet
Det - Lingling Det - Tac Team 1 (Payagyi, Zaytkwin & Mingaladon)
Det - Magwe Det - Tac Team 5 ( Mawlu, Katha & Lashio)
Det - Meiktila Det - Tac Team 6 (Momauk & Bhamo)
Det - Mingaladon Det - Yangkai
Det - Misamari Det - Ywataung



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Detachment at Yanghai, China activated in Dec 42.

  • Detachment at Fungwhanshan, China activated in Apr 44.

  • Detachment located at Alon, Burma (Station 277) built between 20 Jan and 6 Feb 45.

  • Detachments located at Kurmitola and Tezgaon, India (stations 258 and 261).

  • Station 257 located at Fenny, India provided communications services for the 12 Bombardment Group.

  • Detachment 291 located at Hathazari, India served as communications arm of the 1 Combat Cargo Group in the area of ground to air and message center operations.

  • Detachment located at Hathazari, India attached to 4 Airdrome Squadron for quarters and rations.

  • Detachment located at Chittagong, India (Station 256)dismantled and men transferred to Kurmitola, India.

  • Detachment at Ywataung, Burma was supposed to move from Taungtha, Burma to Ywataung, Burma in May 45 but move was never accomplished. Instead, Detachment went to India where it was dispatched to other locations.

  • Detachment located at Akyab, Burma (Station 281) radio site which was situated on an island off the Burma coast, which had been taken from the Japanese by English commandos and Sherman tanks, c. 17 Feb 45. States radio operations began in tents borrowed from other units on the island.

  • Station 256 located at Chittagong, India dismantled and men transfered to Kurmitola, India (date unknown).

  • Detachment located George, India (Station 42828) closed Nov 45.

  • Detachment located at Bangkok, Thailand (Station 42830) established on 8 Oct 45, with operational date stated as 24 Oct 45.

  • Detachment located at Tulihal, India (Station 42825) dismantled on 20 Dec 45.

  • 758 Army Air Forces Base Unit (128 Army Airways Communications System Squadron), Furuitola, India, inactivated 20 Dec 45.

Table of Contents



713th AAFBU (63d AACS Gp) - Liuchow, Nanking, Shanghai (20 Jul 45 - Mar 46)

Section O, 88 Army Air Forces Base Unit activated 31 Oct 44 at Kunming. Redesignated 713 Army Air Forces Base Unit. Group moved to Shanghai, China, 6 Oct 45. Group transferred to 7 Army Airways Communications System Wing 15 Jan 46; inactivated 5 Feb 46.

Table of Contents



788th AAFBU (158th AACS Sq)
  • Organized at Chenking, China 20 Jul 45, replacing Section Q, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing)
  • Discontinued about 24 Oct 45

Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Changting Det - Mengsa
Det - Chanyi Det - Mengtsze
Det - Chaotung Det - Nanning
Det - Chengkung Det - Paiyikou
Det - Chihkiang Det - Paoshan
Det - Hosi Det - Poseh
Det - Jochow Det - Shihtsung
Det - Kai Yuen Det - Sichow
Det - Kanhaitze Det - Sincheng
Det - Kunming Det - Suichwan
Det - Kunyang Det - Szemao
Det - Laowhangping Det - Tengchung
Det - Likiang Det - Tengehuan
Det - Liuchow Det - Tsing Chen
Det - Loping Det - Tsuyung
Det - Lotze Det - Tushan
Det - Luliang Det - Yangkai
Det - Mengshih Det - Yunnanyi



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • The Army Airways Communications System Squadron Station at Likiang got its start as a weather reporting Station in Nov 43.

  • History of Detachment at Station 310, Chaotung, China: transferred to 158 Army Airways Communications System Squadron 21 Feb 45.

  • Detachment at Chengkung, China activated on 24 Jul 43.

  • Detachment at Shihtsung, China activated on 15 May 45 at Shihtsung, China.

  • Detachment at Sichow, China activated on 1 Jan 44 with Lt. Eldredge Sullivan assigned as commanding officer. Mission of Detachment was to furnish weather data to Army Air Forces pilots flying aircraft from India to China. Detachment facilities closed down on 10 Dec 44.

  • Detachment at Mangshih, China activated on 10 Dec 44 with 1Lt Owen E. Jacoby served as Detachment commander.

  • Detachment at Mengsa, China activated on 23 Mar 45. Primary mission of Detachment was to serve as aid to navigation for overflying aircraft. Detachment facilities closed down as of 16 Aug 45.

  • Detachment at Mengtsz, China activated on 7 Mar 45. 1Lt Charles Sovern was assigned as Detachment commander on 12 Mar 45. Mission of Detachment included responsibility for providing weather data for tactical aircraft operations. 1Lt Raymond R. Jansen was assigned as commanding officer of Detachment on 3 Jul 45.

  • Detachment at Paoshan, China activated on 7 Mar 44. Mission of Detachment was to operate radio Station which provided weather data to aircraft in flight.

  • Detachment at Paiyikou, China activated on 24 Jul 45. Detachment facilities were inactivated on 11 Oct 45.

  • Detachment at Nanning, China: 1Lt James R. Grover, Jr. served as Detachment commander. Detachment facilities at Nanning, China were closed down as of 18 Nov 44.

  • Detachment at Shihtsung, China: Detachment ceased operations at Shihtsung, China on 29 Aug 45.

  • Detachment at Szemao, China organized on 10 Apr 45 and activated on 23 May 45. Detachment began operations on 13 Jun 45. Mission of Detachment was to transmit weather data and maintain homing beacon.

  • Detachment at Suichwan, China activated on 18 Dec 44 with 1Lt W. B. Watson assigned as commanding officer. Detachment facilities included air traffic control tower and direction finding equipment. Detachment operations ceased on 22 Jan 45.

  • Detachment at Sincheng, China: Detachment operations were discontinued during Jan 45.

  • Detachment at Poseh, China activated on 24 Mar 45 with 1Lt Harry S. Louis assigned as Detachment commander.

  • Detachment at Tsing Chen, China (Station 305) activated on 25 Sep 44. Established at Kweiyang, China. 2 Dec 44 conducted movement to Tsing Chen, China.

  • Station 310, Chaotung, China

  • Station 43829, Tengchuan, China inactivated 8 Oct 45.

  • Station 312, Tengchuan, China

  • Station 43816, Yangkai, China / Station 313, Yangkai, China

  • Station 314, Yunnanyi, China supported American Volunteer Group.

  • Station 315, Tushan, China activated 10 Mar 45.

  • Detachment at Tengchung, China (Station 316): Personnel arrived by aircraft from Kunming, China, 15 Dec 44. Activated to support 14 Air Force aerial movement of Chinese forces. Aerial movement did not take place. Supported air transport command transporting supplies for construction of Burma road. Operations commenced 10 Jan 45.

  • Station 43815, Tsuyung, China / Station 327, Tsuyung, China



Other Locations (post-war):

Templehof Air Base, GE:
788 AAFBU (158 AACS Sq), later 788 AF BU (158 AACS Sq), 10 Sep 47-3 Jun 48
158 AACS Sq (later 1946 AACS Sq), 3 Jun 48-1 Nov 53
1946 AACS Sq (later 1946 Comm Sq) 1 Nov 53-

Table of Contents



789th AAFBU (159th AACS Sq) - Peishiyi, Ipin, Chunking (20 Jul 45 - 5 Nov 45)

Replaced Section R, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Ankang Det - Lanchow
Det - Chaotung Det - Liangshan
Det - Chia Kiang Det - Loshan
Det - Chiu Ling Po Det - Lunsien (La Tiem Pa)
Det - Enshih Det - Peishiyi
Det - Fungwhanshan Det - Pengshan
Det - Hanchung Det - Pung Cha Cheng
Det - Hsian Det - Schwengliu
Det - Hsinching - Sta 353 Det - Suchow
Det - Hsinching - Sta 359 Det - Suining
Det - Hsinching - Sta 371 Det - Szemao
Det - Hsinching - Sta 374 Det - Tihwa
Det - Ipin Det - Wuchussu
Det - Kiunglai Det - Yenan
Det - Kwanghan  

Photos courtesy of Mr. Jay Marvin
Son of Mr. John Marvin, 159th AACS



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Derived from 10 Army Airways Communications System (AACS) Region, which included China, 25 AACS Region, comprised of Assam Valley, Burma and China, China Sector of 62 AACS Group, and 158 AACS Squadron of 63 AACS Group. Activated 1 Nov 44 to be located at Peishiyi, China. Location changed to Ipin, China. Capt. Robert M. Smith assumed command, 24 Nov 44. Organized at Kunming, China, with personnel and equipment conducting movement to Ipin, China, 13 Dec 44. 11 stations under Squadron jurisdiction: Ipin (Suifu); Peishiyi; Sichang; Hsian; Anhsi; Lanchow; Lushien (Lan Tieu Pa); Tihwa (Urumchi); Chihkiang; Chaotung; and Hanchung, all in China.

  • Feb 45: Conducted movement from Chungking to Hsinching, China. Area of responsibility changed to include stations formerly of 130 Army Airways Communications System (AACS) Squadron and comprised of stations north of 28 degrees parallel. Station at Chaotung, China, transferred to 168 AACS Squadron. Anticipated activation of Station at Yenan (Fushih), China. stations being developed: Ankang; Chiulungpo; Enshih; and Laohokow.

  • Feb 45: Det 526 supported operations of 91 Fighter Squadron, 81 Fighter Group. Transferred from 130 Army Airways Communications System (AACS) Squadron, 69 AACS Group. Alternate spelling of place name: Fungwanshan, China.

  • Feb 45: Det 364 at Kiunglai,Szechwan, China transferred from 130 Army Airways Communications System (AACS) Squadron 20 Feb 45.

  • Activated as part of reorganization of 5 Airways and Air Communications Service (AACS) Wing at Wiesbaden, Germany 10 Sep 47. Maj. Harley Sather assumed command.

Table of Contents



719th AAFBU (69th AACS Gp)

Source:


88 Army Air Forces Base Unit, Section L located at Hijili Base, India. Group redesignated as 1 Tactical Group on 5 Dec 44 (see 1st AACS Tactical Sq, above). Group located at Hsinching Airport, China, Jan 45.

NOTE:  The Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) has no record of this unit in their archives.  Their records jump from the 68th AACS Gp to the 70th AACS Gp.  However, the AAF 1 May 1945 Station List has this entry:

Hq, 69 Army Airways Communication System Group (693 NY) - Kharagpur, India

Table of Contents



759th AAFBU (129th AACS Sq) - Shanghai (20 Jul 45 - 25 Apr 46)

Replaced Section M, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  AAF 1 May 1945 Station List

129th Army Airways Communication System Squadron (493 NY) - Kharagpur, India

Stations
Station #501 (631 NY) - Chakulia
Station #502 (493 NY) - Kharagpur
Station #503 (493 NY) - Kharagpur
Station #504 (493 NY) - Kharagpur
Station #505 (220 NY) - Piardoba
Station #506 (215 NY) - Dudhkundi
Station #507 (493 NY) - Kharagpur
Station #541 (432 NY) - Kandy, Ceylon



Source:


Detachments
Det - Canton Det - Nanking
Det - Chakulia Det - Nanning
Det - Chihkiang Det - Peiping
Det - Dudhkundi Det - Peishiyi
Det - Hangchow Det - Piardoba
Det - Hankow Det - Shanghai - Sta 43109
Det - Hijli Det - Shanghai - Sta 43112
Det - Kalaikunda
Detachment activated 17 May 44; inactivated 28 Dec 44; reactivated on 20 Feb 45.
 Det - Shanghai - Sta 43118
Det - Kharagpur Det - Suichwan
Det - Kunming Det - Tsinan
Det - Liuchow Det - Yushan



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Squadron was activated 1 Aug 44. Capt. Alfred A. Arraj was Squadron commander. Squadron was comprised of seven stations in India and Ceylon. Headquarters were located in Hijili, India.

  • Geographical boundaries of Squadron were eastern China and Formosa, but did not include Inner Mongolia and Manchuria.

  • Detachment at Piardoba, India activated in Jun 44.

  • Detachment at Kharagpur, India activated 2 Jul 44 with Lt. Donald J. Adams as Detachment commander. Adams was replaced by Lt. Gordon G. Bandow in Sep 44 and Bandow was replaced by Lt. Gobert A. Hengen in Oct 44.

  • Detachment at Dudhkundi, India activated 10 Jul 44.

  • Detachment at Hijili, India was located near Kharagpur, India. Detachment inactivated 1 Aug 44.

  • Detachment at Kalaikunda, India activated 17 May 44 and inactivated on 28 Dec 44. Detachment commander throughout period was 1Lt William A. Hefron. Detachment reactivated on 20 Feb 45. Detachment commander was 1Lt John D. Inkster.

  • Detachment at Chakulia, India moved from Chakulia, India on 10 May 45 for reassignment.

  • Squadron headquarters were transferred from India to Kunming, China in Jul 45.

  • Detachment at Liuchow, China inactivated during Jul 45.

  • Detachment at Nanking, China activated 6 Aug 45 at Nunming, China but soon moved to Nanking, China. Detachment inactivated in Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Hankow, China activated in Sep 45.

  • Detachment at Yushan, China moved to Yushan, China on 17 Sep 45.

  • Detachment at Peking, China inactivated on 26 Sep 45.

  • Detachment at Shanghai, China activated on 6 Oct 45 at Kunming, China with Lt. Carmen R. Runyan III as Detachment commander. Detachment moved to Shanghai, China soon after activation. Detachment inactivated on 20 Dec 45.

  • Detachment at Suichwan, China moved from Changting, China to Suichwan, China (date unknown).

  • Detachment at Tsinan, China moved to Tsinan, China on 6 Oct 45. Tsinan was capital of Shantung Province. Detachment commander was 1Lt Hugh W. Graham.

  • Detachment at Hangchow, China activated in Oct 45 and inactivated on 17 Jan 46.

  • Detachment at Canton, China activated in Oct 45. Chinese assumed command of Station on 14 Apr 46. Detachment was inactivated.

  • Squadron headquarters moved from Kunming, China to Shanghai, China in Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Chihkiang, China was inactivated Jan 46.

  • Detachment at Kunming, China inactivated during Feb 46.

  • Detachment at Peishiyi, China inactivated on 25 Apr 46.

  • Squadron was inactivated on 25 Apr 46 and China Theater was to be closed on 1 May 46.

  • Detachment at Peishiyi, China was only Army Airways Communications System Station still open in western China in Feb 46.

  • Detachment at Hankow, China was closed Apr 46 and Detachment inactivated.

Table of Contents



760th AAFBU (130th AACS Sq) - Kunming, Hsinching (20 Jul 45 - Jan 46)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Replaced Section N, 88th AAFBU (4th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Chanyi Det - Luliang
Det - Chengkung Det - Mangshih
Det - Fungwhanshan Det - Mengsa
Det - Hanchung Det - Mengtsz
Det - Hosi Det - Paoshan
Det - Hsian Det - Peishiyi
Det - Hsinching - Stations: 521, 522, 537, 43027, 43035 Det - Pengshan
Det - Jochow Det - Poseh
Det - Kai Yuen Det - Pung Cha Cheng
Det - Kiunglai Det - Schwangliu
Det - Kunming - Stations 43002/3 Det - Suchow
Det - Kunyang Det - Suining
Det - Kwanghan Det - Szemao
Det - Kweichow Det - Tsinan
Det - Laohuangping Det - Tushan
Det - Liangshan Det - Wuchussu
Det - Loping Det - Yanglin
Det - Loshan Det - Yunnanyi
Det - Lotzu Det - Yangkai
Det - Luhsien  



Source:  Air Force History Index

  • Detachment at Hsingching, China was activated in Dec 43.

  • Detachment at Kwanghan, China was activated 27 Apr 44.

  • Detachment at Kiunglai, China was activated 10 May 44.

  • Detachment at Schwangliu, China was activated 26 Jun 44 with sole purpose of operating a control tower.

  • Squadron was activated on 1 Aug 44.

  • Jan 45: Squadron headquarters were in Hsinching, China.

  • Mar 45: Squadron headquarters moved from Hsinching, China to Calcutta, India. Squadron was attached to Bengal Air Depot. Capt. Ronald J. MacGillis was Squadron commander.

  • Jun 45: Squadron headquarters were now located at Kunming, China. Capt. John J. Shanahan was Squadron commander. Capt. Arthur H. Kiendl was new Squadron commander. Squadron was apparently reorganized during month.

  • Detachment at Kweichow, China was activated on 7 Jul 45.

  • Detachment at Kunming become part of 130 Army Airways Communications System Squadron on 15 Aug 45. It had been part 158 Army Airways Communications System Squadron. Detachment was activated on 28 Aug 45.

  • Nov 45: 159 Army Airways Communications System Squadron was consolidated with this Squadron. 158 Army Airways Communications System was inactivated in Oct 45 and most personnel joined this Squadron.

  • Detachment at Mengtsz, China: all facilities were turned over to Chinese on 10 Nov 45 and all American personnel were removed from base.

  • Detachment at Hosi, China was inactivated in Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Chengkung, China was inactivated Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Chanyi, China was inactivated on 8 Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Jochow, China was inactivated Nov 45 and equipment turned over to Chinese.

  • Detachment at Mengsa, China began operation on 19 Nov 45 but was inactivated in Dec 45.

  • Detachment at Luliang, China was inactivated in Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Poseh, China waas inactivated in Nov 45 and Station was turned over to Chinese.

  • Detachment at Laohuangping, China: on 10 Nov 45 all equipment at Station was turned over to Chinese and Detachment was inactivated.

  • Detachment at Lotzu, China was inactivated on 17 Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Tushan, China was inactivated during Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Szemao, China was inactivated on 19 Nov 45.

  • Detachment at Kunyang, China was turned over to Chinese on 6 Dec 45.

  • Detachment at Loping, China was inactivated in Dec 45.

  • Detachment at Suchow, China was inactivated on 4 Dec 45.

  • Squadron was inactivated in Jan 46.

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Air Base Communications Detachments:

Asiatic Airways Tech & Admin Training School (885 NY) - Karachi, India
1st Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 69th Composite Wing
2nd Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 68th Air Service Gp (attached) - Chengkung by 11 May 45
3d Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - China Air Service Cmd (14th ASG, Luliang by 11 May 45)
4th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - Chinese-American Composite Wing
5th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 68th Air Service Gp (attached) - Yunnanyi by 11 May 45
6th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 68th Air Service Gp (attached) - Yangkai by 11 May 45
7th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 312th Fighter Wing
Source:  Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) (7th Air Support Operations Squadron)

Lineage:  Constituted as 7 Air Base Communications Detachment (Special) on 27 Jan 1944. Activated on 17 Feb 1944. Inactivated on 7 Dec 1945. Disbanded on 8 Oct 1948. Reconstituted and redesignated as the 7 Air Support Operations Squadron, 3 Air Support Operations Group, Fort Bliss TX, 12 Aug 2008 per DAF/A1M 011t, 12 Aug 2008. Activated 15 Aug 2008 per DAF/A1M 011t, 12 Aug 2008; SO #GB-128, Hq ACC, 13 Aug 2008.

Assignments:  Western Signal Aviation Unit Training Center, 17 Feb 1944; Unkn, 19 Apr-10 Jul 1944; Tenth Air Force, 11 Jul 1944; Fourteenth Air Force, 30 Sep 1944; 312 Fighter Wing, 13 Mar-7 Dec 1945. 3 Air Support Operations Group, 15 Aug 2008-.

Stations:  Camp Pinedale, CA, 17 Feb 1944; Camp Patrick Henry, VA, 19 Apr-3 May 1944; Oran, Algeria, 21-28 May 1944; New Delhi, India, 11 Jul 1944; Kanchrapara, India, 15 Aug 1944; Shwangliu, China, 25 Nov 1944-unkn; India, unkn-8 Nov 1945; Camp Kilmer, NJ, 6-7 Dec 1945. Fort Bliss, TX, 15 Aug 2008-.

Service Streamers:  None.

Campaign Streamers:  World War II: China Offensive; China Defensive.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Streamers:  None.

Decorations:  None.

Emblem:  None on file. Squadron may design and request approval of an emblem in accordance with AFI 84-105, Chapter 3.

Lineage, Assignments, Stations, and Honors through 15 Aug 2008.

8th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 315th Air Service Gp (attached)
9th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - 315th Air Service Gp (attached)
  • 9th Air Base Communications Detachment (Special) disbanded 8 Oct 48. Reconstituted 1 Jun 92 as 9th Communications Systems Squadron, activated 12 Jun 92 and assigned to 9th Air Operations Group at Shaw AFB, SC per DAF/MO Letter 348r, 15 Jun 92, Subject: Organization Actions Affecting Certain Air Combat Command Units. Inactivated 1 Jan 94.

10th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - China Air Service Cmd (attached) - Chanyi by 11 May 45
11th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) - Ledo as of 1 Aug 45; 69th Composite Wing
Other Sites of Interest:  Jake Jesse in the CBI Theater

12th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) (218 NY) - Myitkyina, Burma
  • 12th Air Base Comm Det (Special) disbanded 8 Oct 48. Reconstituted 1 Jun 92 as 12th Comm Sys Sq, activated 15 Jun 92 and assigned to 12th Air Operations Gp at Bergstrom AFB, TX per DAF/MO Letter 348r, 15 Jun 92, Subject: Organization Actions Affecting Certain Air Combat Command Units. Moved to Davis-Monthan AFB Oct 92, inactivated 1 Jan 94.

13th Air Base Communications Det (Sp) (218 NY) - Myitkyina, Burma

NOTE:  The 1, 3, 6, 9, 13 Air Base Comm. Dets. were activated at Camp Pinedale, CA on 17 Feb 1944. The 8th Air Base Comm. Det. was activated on 6 Feb 1944, same location. All were disbanded on 8 Oct 48.

General Order 120 showing assignment of 11th, 12th, 13th Air Base Communications Detachments

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91st AAFBU (7th AACS Wing) - Hickam Field, T. H.

Lineage:  The 91st AAF Base Unit (7th AACS Wing) was organized at Hickam Fld 15 May 44, moved to Fort McKinley in Jul 45, and Tokyo in May 46. It was redesignated 91st AF Base Unit (7th AACS Wing) 26 Sep 47. It was discontinued 3 Jun 48 and replaced by the 7th AACS Wg, which was designated 24 May 48 and organized 1 Jun 48 (this unit was last active in 1990 as the Pacific Communications Div).

Until 20 Jul 45, all AACS units in the Pacific were lettered squadrons (sections) of the 91st AAF Base Unit. On that date, AACS formed separate base units for its groups and squadrons.

NOTE:  Even though they were really AAF Base Units, AACS units used their parenthetical group and squadron descriptions almost exclusively (e.g., the 91st AAFBU (7th AACS Wing) would be referred to as the 7th AACS Wing).  This even includes station lists (see 1945 AAF Station List).

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720th AAFBU (70th AACS Group) - Oahu, Guam

Replaced Section L, 91st AAFBU (7th AACS Wing), 20 Jul 45

Source:


Unit was designated as the 7 Communications Squadron until 15 May 44 when it was redesignated as the 70 Army Airways Communications System Group. Group located on guam, Sep 45. Group inactivated 5 Feb 46.

Detachments
Det - Eniwetok
Det - Majuro Atoll

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777th AAFBU (147th AACS Sq) - Harmon Fld, Guam

15 May 44 - 20 Jul 45: Section P, 91st AAF Base Unit (147th AACS Sq). 20 Jul 45 - 3 Jun 48: 777th AAF Base Unit (147th AACS Sq).

Source:  Air Force Communicators & Air Traffic Controllers Association (AFCOMMATC)

Detachments
Det - Angaur Det - Peleliu (Also Angaur)
Det - Biak (Borokoe Strip) Det - Saipan Det 32
Det - Guam Det 33 Det - Saipan Det 46
Det - Guam Det 36 Det - Saipan Det 55
Det - Guam Det 38 Det - Saipan Det 56
Det - Guam Det 57 Det - Tinian
Det - Iwo Jima Det 44 Det - Truk Atoll (Moen Island)
Det - Marcus Island Det - Ulithi



Source:  Air Force History Index

Squadron was activated on 7 Oct 44 at Hickam Field, TH with Maj. Willis S. Johns assigned as commanding officer. Squadron headquarters were relocated to Saipan, Mariana Islands as of 30 Nov 44. Squadron was responsible for all Army Airways Communications System Station Detachments in Western Pacific Region. Maj. Vane W. Burnett replaced Maj. Willis S. Johns as Squadron commander on 5 Jan 45.

Sep 45: Maj. Blaine B. Menth was assigned as commanding officer of Squadron. Plans were made by Squadron headquarters to close nonessential Station Detachment facilities and to expedite flow of Army Airways Communications System personnel back to continental United States.

Capt. Robert S. McCollum replaced Maj. Blaine B. Menth as Squadron commander on 5 Nov 45.

Capt. Herbert I. Barness replaced Capt. Robert S. McCollum as Squadron commander (date unknown).

Detachment 39: Angaur, Palau islands

Squadron headquarters were relocated from Saipan, Mariana Islands to Guam, Mariana Islands during early Feb 46.

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Force Structure as of 1 March 1946

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