ARMY GROUND FORCES



TABLE OF CONTENTS
Army Organization
Army Ground Forces
Combat Troops, Ledo Sector
Northern Area Combat Command (NCAC)
5307th Composite Unit, Provisional
(Merrill's Marauders)
1st Battalion
2nd Battalion
3d Battalion
31st Quartermaster Pack Troop
33d Quartermaster Pack Troop
5332nd Brigade, Provisional
(Mars Task Force)
124th Calvary Regiment35th Quartermaster Pack Troop
          (see QM Units)
613th Field Artillery Battalion
44th Portable Surgical Hospital
          (see Medical Service Units)
475th Infantry Regiment37th Quartermaster Pack Troop
          (see QM Units)
252nd Quartermaster Pack Troop
          (see QM Units)
253d Quartermaster Pack Troop
          (see QM Units)
612th Field Artillery Battalion
49th Portable Surgical Hospital
          (See Medical Service Units)
18th Veterinary Evac Hospital  (See Medical Service Units)
1st Tank Group, Provisional1st Tank Battalion, Provisional
2nd Tank Battalion, Provisional
3d Tank Battalion, Provisional
4th Tank Battalion, Provisional
5th Tank Battalion, Provisional
6th Tank Battalion, Provisional
527th Ordnance Company
Chinese Combat & Training Command (CT&CC)Chinese Combat Command (Prov)
Chinese Training Command (Prov)
Y-Force Operations Staff
Z-Force Operations Staff5315th Infantry Training Center (Prov)
Ramgarh Training CenterChinese Army in India (CAI)
Anti-Aircraft CommandGroups
Brigades
Battalions
Batteries
Coastal Artillery Units
Office of Strategic Services (OSS) OSS Detachment 101
OSS Detachment 206
OSS Detachment 303
OSS Detachment 404
OSS Detachment 505
Other Units:5th Field Artillery Sound Ranging Platoon



Army Organization

Source:  United States Army Home Page

*  The United States Army was also once organized into regiments, but presently uses the brigade instead. There are exceptions, such as the United States Cavalry, some parachute infantry regiments and the Army Rangers. Although every battalion or squadron is associated with a regiment for historical purposes, most combat regiments are cavalry regiments which are attached to a corps. These regiments, who are associated generally for historical purposes, can be known as parent regiments.

A brigade is smaller than a division and roughly equal to or a little larger than a regiment. Strength typically ranges from 1,500 to 3,500 personnel. Army brigades formerly contained two or more regiments, but this structure is now considered obsolete.

A regiment is larger than a company and smaller than a division. Depending on mission and makeup, a modern regiment is similar to a brigade in size in that both range from a few hundred soldiers up to 2,000-3,000, depending on branch of service and method of organization. The modern unit varies in size, scope, administrative role from nation to nation, and within the armed forces of some nations.

In the 20th century the "Division" became the tactical and administrative building block for U.S. armies in mobilizations for World Wars I & II, Korea, Vietnam and NATO. Training, administration and even tactical employment was centered at divisional level. Most combat support and logistics was also concentrated at that level.

In the 21st century, the U.S. Army has moved to "modularization", trying to use the autonomous brigade as the basic building block, as well as insert more stability and unit cohesion.

The United States Marine Corps calls its divisional brigades, regiments, for traditional reasons.

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Army Ground Forces

Source:  "The Army Almanac", U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950

Primary mission:  The mission of the Army Ground Forces, as stated by War Department Circular 59 (2 March 1942) was "to provide ground force units properly organized, trained and equipped for combat operations."

Commanders:  Lt. Gen. Lesley J. McNair, March 1942-June 1944. Lt. Gen. Ben Lear, July 1944-December 1944. Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell, January 1945-May 1945, Gen. Jacob L. Devers, June 1945-.

Chronology of events:  The Army Ground Forces was established on 9 March 1942 as the successor to General Headquarters, United States Army (which see), pursuant to an Executive order of the President of 28 February 1942. On 10 March 1948 it wag redesignated the Army Field Forces, per Circular 64, Department of the Army, dated 10 March 1948, and is still active.

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Combat Troops, Ledo Sector

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

18 Feb 43:  Combat Trps, Ledo Sec (APO 689), act with hq at Ledo, as a subordinate comd of Hq USAF CBI, with mission of protecting const of Ledo Road.

1 Feb 44:  Combat Trps, Ledo Sec, discontd and units transferred to NCAC.

Commander:  Brig Gen Raymond A Wheeler, 18 Feb 43; Brig Gen Haydon L Boatner, 6 Apr 43

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Northern Area Combat Command (NCAC)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

Effective 1 February 1944 NCAC vas organized with headquarters at the Mile 5.5 on the Ledo Road. The Commanding General, NCAC, was responsible for the supervision and direction of all special and service units (Anglo-American) placed in the NCAC, with the exception of SOS units specifically engaged in road construction and the necessary auxiliary and service units. The command of all combat troops in NCAC remained with the Commanding General, Chinese Army in India (CAI).

4 Oct 43:  5303d Hq and Hq Co (Prov) Combat trps org.

29 Jan 44:  5303d Hq and Hq Co (Prov) Combat Trps redesig 5303d Hq and Hq Co (Prov) Area Comd.

8 May 44:  5307th Comp Unit (Prov) asgd NCAC (See R/E for 5307th Comp Unit (Prov).)

16 Jun 44:  NCAC passed to opnl (assumed) contl of SEAC. (Date of release unknown.)

19 Jun 44:  Hq and Hq Co NCAC (CT&CC) act. Pers allotment for NCAC was granted in order to provide American pers for Hq and Hq Co NCAC and to provide all liaison pers with units asgd to Chih Hui Pu (CAI), all American pers with units asgd to Seagrave Hospital Unit and 1st Tank Group, and American pers for such other activities as required them.

19 Jun 44:  5303d Hq and Hq Co (Prov) Combat Trps disbanded.

17 Jul 44:  CG USAF CBI assumed direct contl of NCAC. All Allied units (except Chinese) atchd for opnl contl to NCAC.

26 Jul 44:  5332d Brig (Prov), known as MARS Task Force, act 26 Jul 44 and asgd NCAC. Mission of 5332d Brig (Prov) was to comd long-range penetration units. 5332d Brig (Prov) participated in second battle for Burma.

10 Aug 44:  475th Inf act Ledo and asgd NCAC.

24 Oct 44:  NCAC asgd to IBT. CG USAF IBT assumed comd of NCAC.

12 Nov 44:  NCAC came under opnl contl of ALFSEA.

10 Jan 45:  NCAC Fld Repl Depot established Ledo and asgd NCAC; discontinued 12 Apr 45. CG IBT announced opening of Ledo Road.

Commander:  Brig Gen Haydon L Boatner, 1 Feb 44; Lt Gen Joseph W Stilwell, 17 Jul 44; Lt Gen Daniel I Sultan, 27 Oct 44; Lt Gen Raymond A Wheeler, 22 Jun 45

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5307th Composite Unit, Provisional  (See CBI Unit Histories)

From Mr. David Fisher: "My father was a marauder with the 5307th. He told me stories of how the men in that unit had copies of their outfit emblem handmade, prior to their having had one made by the military. I sent you two (photos) (ed: photos not displayed here for space issues), the first is the one on my father's uniform. Notice the star is on the upper left part of the lapel pin. The next is the first 5307th patch issued. The patch was later changed to reflect the sunburst on the upper left side, and the 5 point star was moved to the upper right side, with the lighting bolt. Later it was changed again to what you see today, with "Merrills Marauders" across the top. This was after they were taken over by the Mars Task Force. I have been told by the Institute of Heraldry that these items were only issued to the original volunteers of operation galahad."


The symbolism of the patch is that the 5307th was made up of six "combat teams" named for colors—red, blue, white, green, khaki and orange. The patch has the first four colors and khaki was supposed to have been represented by the uniform itself. For some reason orange was left out. The white five-pointed star was for the Star of Burma and the white "sun" - actually the Kuomintang star – was for China. The red lightning bolt represents the striking power of the unit.

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

The 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), which was given the code name GALAHAD Force and later nicknamed Merrill's Marauders by the press, was organized to carry out long-range penetration operations. The operations included expeditions to harass the enemy and disrupt his communication and supply line. In addition to these operations the Marauders engaged in normal infantry combat missions in Burma. The 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) before redesignation was the 5307th Composite Regiment (Provisional).

10 Oct 43:  5307th Comp Regt (Prov) organized at Deogarh, India.

1 Jan 43:  5307th Comp Regt (Prov) formally activated at Deolali, India, as subordinate command of Hq USAF CBI and redesignated 5307th Comp Unit (Prov) 2 Jan 44.

(0/a) 5 Feb 44:  5307th Comp Unit (Prov) atchd to Chinese Army in India (CAI) and assumed further attached to Northern Combat Area Command (NCAC).

8 May 44:  5307th Comp Unit (Prov) assigned to NCAC.

10 Aug 44:  5307th Comp Unit (Prov) disbanded.

Commanders:  Brig Gen Frank D Merrill, 6 Jan 44; Col Charles N Hunter, 29 Mar 44; Brig Gen Frank D Merrill, 26 Apr 44; Col John E McCaramon, 20 May 44


Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  10 Oct 43 organized at Deogarh, India as the 5307th Composite Regiment, Provisional, and activated 1 Jan 44 under U.S. Army Forces in China-Burma-India; 2 Jan 44 redesignated as the 5307th Composite Unit, Provisional, also known as GALAHAD Force and Merrill's Marauders; organized into three long-range penetration battalions and entered Hukawing Valley Burma on 12 Feb 44; assigned to the Northern Combat Area Command on 8 May 44 and operated behind Japanese front lines, capturing Myitkyina Airfield along the Irrawaddy river 17 May 44; 3d Bn defeated at Charpate 24 May 44 and 2nd Bn driven from Namkwi 26 May 44; battled at Myitkyina until captured city 3 Aug 44 where disbanded on 10 Aug 44 and assets transferred to 475th Infantry Regiment.

Campaigns:  India-Burma

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation, 3 Mar-17 May 44, WD GO 54-44.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)


Source:

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, UNITED STATES ARMY
WOUND BALLISTICS
Chapter IV - Casualty Survey - New Georgia and Burma Campaigns

Organization of 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)

In September 1943, 650 men and officers, all volunteers, congregated in New Caledonia to form a special infantry battalion. They had been selected from the 37th, 43d, 25th, and Americal Divisions. Later, 250 additional men and officers arrived, from the 32d and 41st Divisions and from the 98th Pack Artillery, from Australia. Most of these men had been overseas for more than a year and had seen action in the South Pacific or Southwest Pacific Areas.

These men made up the 3d Battalion of what was to become the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional). They traveled to India on a transport with a battalion from the United States, which was to become the 1st Battalion of this Unit, and a battalion from the Caribbean area which was to become the 2d Battalion.

These three battalions, organized as an infantry regiment, trained in India from November 1943 to January 1944. During this time, there were many transfers of men within the battalions, and about 150 replacements arrived from casual units. The 31st Quartermaster Pack Troop was also absorbed by the regiment. On 1 January 1944, the three battalions were formally activated as the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional).


Source:

Merrill's Marauders - Introduction

The 31st and 33d Quartermaster Pack Troops, a detachment of the 835th Signal Service Battalion, and a platoon of the 502d Military Police Battalion were added to the unit early in January 1944.


Source:

Army Veterinary Service History
Chapter XVI - Evacuation and Hospitalization

The 31st Quartermaster Pack Troop came into the theater from the Zone of Interior on 6 Jan. 1944, aboard the animal transport Samuel H. Walker which departed New Orleans Port of Embarkation, 14 Oct. 1943, with 329 mules and 26 horses. The 33d Quartermaster Pack Troop came into the theater during December 1943, but its animal transport, Jose Navarro, departing New Orleans Port of Embarkation with 330 mules and 28 horses, was sunk en route (26 Dec. 1944). Each shipment was accompanied by a transport veterinary detachment. For the campaign in North Burma, the latter pack troop was remounted with horses newly arrived from New Caledonia.


Other Sites of Interest:

Merrill's Marauders Association

Merrill's Marauders in Burma

Merrill's Marauders: February - May 1944 (US Army Center of Military History)

Merrill's Marauders Combined Operations in Northern Burma in 1944 (www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/csi/Bjorge/BJORGE.asp - no longer active)


The 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) just prior to departing Ledo, February 1944


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5332nd Brigade, Provisional  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  26 Jul 44 activated in Burma and assigned to the Northern Combat Area Command and composed of 124th Calvary Regt, 475th Infantry Regt, Chinese 1st Separate Regt, and 612th and 613th Field Artillery Battalions; also known as MARS Task Force; assembled near Mong Wi Burma and attacked the Burma Road in the Namhpakka area commencing 17 Jan 45; fought at Loi-kang Ridge and seized the Hpa-pen area heights on 2 Feb 45; moved to China by air in echelon 14 Mar-14 May 45 where inactivated in late May 45.

Campaigns:  Central Burma, India-Burma

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)



Other Sites of Interest:

The Mules of Mars

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124th Calvary Regiment, Special  (See CBI Unit Histories)



124th Calvary Reg. DUI


124th Calvary Reg. Coat of Arms

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  18 Nov 40 inducted into federal service at Houston Tex as the 124th Cavalry Regiment (Horse) and moved to Ft Bliss Tex 28 Nov 40 under the 56th Cavalry Brigade; sent to Ft Brown Tex 5 Feb 41 and returned to Ft Bliss Tex 29 May 41; participated in the Louisiana Maneuvers 12 Aug-2 Oct 41 and then went to Ft Brown Tex 4 Oct 41; served at Ft D.A. Russell Tex 4 Nov-22 Dec 43 and returned to Ft Brown Tex; transferred to Ft Riley Kans 12 May 44 under Fourth Army; staged at Cp Anza Calif 10 Jul 44 until departed Los Angeles P/E 25 Jul 44; arrived India 26 Aug 44 where redesignated and reorganized as the 124th Cavalry Regiment (Special) 20-25 Sep 44; flown to Myitkyina Burma and entered combat as part of the MARS Task Force in Oct 44; established roadblocks on the Burma Road during drive to reopen the route below Nankam Burma; regiment moved over 300 miles in enemy territory relying on airdrop alone to establish a roadblock at Nampakka Burma; contacted the Japanese 15 Jan 45 and moved south along the Burma Road to arrive at Lashio Burma by 23 Mar 45; flown to China 26 Apr-14 May 45 where inactivated on 1 Jul 45 at Kunming, China.

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)


Distinctive Unit Insignia Description:  A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/2 inches (3.81 cm) in height consisting of a shield blazoned: Per bend Or and Sable, a lion sejant of the last grasping the astronomical symbol for Mars Vert. Attached above on a wreath of the colors Or and Sable, a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of live oak and olive Proper. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll turned Green inscribed "GOLPEO RAPIDAMENTE" in Black letters.

Symbolism:  The lion and the symbol for Mars commemorate the Regiment's service in World War II in the Central Burma and India-Burma campaigns. The lion is taken from the seal of Burma. The astronomical symbol for Mars, protector of soldiers, refers to the Mars Task Force with which the organization fought in World War II. The crest is the seal of Texas, the "Lone Star State." The motto translates to "I Strike Quickly."

Background:  The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 124th Cavalry Regiment on 6 April 1935. It was redesignated for the 124th Mechanized Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron on 29 August 1949. It was redesignated for the 124th Cavalry Regiment and amended to add the crest and symbol for World War II service (lion grasping the astronomical symbol for Mars) on 5 January 1967.


Coat Of Arms Description:

Shield:  Per bend Or and Sable, a lion sejant of the last grasping the astronomical symbol for Mars Vert. The lion and the symbol for Mars commemorate the Regiment's service in World War II in the Central Burma and India-Burma campaigns. The lion is taken from the seal of Burma. The astronomical symbol for Mars, protector of soldiers, refers to the Mars Task Force with which the organization fought in World War II.

Crest:  The crest is that of the regiments and separate battalions of the Texas Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Sable, a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of live oak and olive Proper.

Motto:  GOLPEO RAPIDAMENTE (I Strike Quickly).

Background:  The coat of arms was originally approved for the 124th Cavalry Regiment on 15 April 1935. It was redesignated for the 124th Mechanized Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron on 29 August 1949. The insignia was redesignated for the 124th Cavalry Regiment and amended to add a symbol for World War II service (lion grasping the astronomical symbol for Mars) on 5 January 1967.


Source:  124th Calvary Association

124th U. S. Cavalry Regiment, 1929
Texas Army National Guard

MOTTO:  "Golpeo Rapidimente" (Spanish - "I Strike Quickly" )

Formation:  Organized from six existing units of the Texas National in Central Texas on 13 February, 1929, the 124th Cavalry is the youngest of the ten combat arms regiments of the Texas National Guard. The lineage of the various units of the 124th generally is traced to Texas cavalry deployed during the First World War for Mexican border security service, including the Third, Fifth, and Seventh Texas Cavalry, 1917. Units of the 124th did state duty to enforce martial law at Borger in 1929, in Sherman in 1930, and in the East Texas oil field disorders when the entire 56th Cavalry Brigade (112 Cav /124 Cav) was ordered there in 1931. With the other units of the Texas National Guard, the 124th Cavalry Regiment (horse) was federalized in November, 1940.

World War II:  After initial training at Fort Bliss, the 124th was restationed at Fort Brown, Brownsville, Texas and Fort Ringgold at Rio Grande City. The Regiment participated in the Louisiana maneuvers and patrolled the border with Mexico from Brownsville to Laredo. After its sister regiment, the 112th Cavalry was sent overseas, the 124th continued its Mexican border service until it was moved to Fort Riley, Kansas, in 1944. It then was the last horse cavalry unit in the U. S. Army.

MARS Task Force:  In 1944 the unit was selected for overseas service in the China-Burma-India Theater to provide reinforcements for Merrill's Marauders and the Chindits. Leaving its horses at Fort Riley, the 124th was reinforced in Burma by the 613th Field Artillery battalion to form the 124th Regimental Combat Team (Special), part of the "MARS Task Force". After a killing, 300-mile approach march over difficult terrain, leading a mule supply train, the unit fought the Japanese in Burma and China from 1944 to the end of the war. Their efforts are credited with forcing Japanese withdrawal from northern Burma,allowing for full use of the Burma Road to China. The fighting was characterized by operations deep in enemy territory, extensive use of pack mules, and the use of aerial resupply.

World War II Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

1st Lt. Jack Knight, Troop F, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the only such award for ground action in the China-Burma-India theater. The unit was demobilized in China on July 1, 1945.

Postwar Service:  On July 2, 1946 several units of the Texas National Guard were organized in the lineage of the 124th. The 124th Mechanized Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron was assigned to the 49th Armored Division and in 1949 became the 2d Squadron of the 124th. Later reorganizations redesignated the 2d Squadron as the 1st and added the 2d Medium Tank Battalion, 124th Armor, elements of the 36th Division.

Pentomic Division, 1959:  In 1959, the 36th Division was reorganized using the Pentomic Army Division structure. The 1st/124 Armor was assigned as Division Troops as was the 2d Medium Tank Battalion, 124th Armor.

Reorganization, 1963:  The 1st Squadron, 124th Armor was retained as organic to the 36th Division in 1963 when the 2d Medium Tank Battalion, 124th Armor was assigned to the 49th Armored Division and redesignated the 2d Battalion/112th Armor. The 1/124 Armor was redesigned at the 1/124th Cavalry in 1963.

Retirement of the 36th and 49th Division:  When the 36th Division was retired from service in 1968, Troops A, E, and F of the 1st Squadron, 124th Cavalry were assigned as organic to the 71st, 36th and 72d Brigades respectively.

49th Armored Division:  In 1973 the units scattered to the separate brigades were reunited in the 1/124, headquartered in Waco. The 3d Battalion 143d Infantry (Airborne) was redesignated as 1/124 Armored Cavalry, retaining the lineage of the 124th Cavalry.

36th Infantry Division:  In 2004, the 49th Armored Division was reflagged as the 36th Infantry Division.

Current Assignment:  1st Squadron, 124th Armored Cavalry is organic to the 36th Infantry Division (2004) with units in Waco, Corsicana, and Athens.



Picture courtesy of the family of TSgt Donald G. Lewis



Other Sites of Interest:

124th Cavalry Regiment

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613th Field Artillery Battalion (75mm Pack Howitzer)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  17 Dec 43, Gruber, Okla
Inactivated:  25 Aug 45, Kunming, China
Locations:  Los Angeles Port of Embarkation 22 Oct 44; India 23 Nov 44; China 9 May 45

Campaigns:  Central Burma, India-Burma

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475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  10 Aug 44 activated at Ledo India from personnel of the 5307th Composite Unit, Provisional, and assigned to the Northern Combat Area Command and further to the 5332nd Brigade, Provisional, also known as MARS Task Force; opened offensive 15 Oct 44 to clear northern Burma and open a supply route to China and on 15 Nov 44 began march from Cp Landis to assist the Chinese 22nd Div near Si-u; ordered to relieve the Chinese 22nd Div in the Mo-hlang area on 6 Dec 44; counterattacked to restore positions there on 9 Dec 44 and began holding action in the Mo-hlaing/Tonk-wa Burma area the following day, less 1st Bn sent to Shwegu vicinity; repelled strong Japanese counterattacks 13-14 Dec 44 and on the latter date made contact with the British 36th Div at Katha; relieved at Tonk-wa on 31 Dec 44 and marched toward Mong Wi where attacked from commencing 8 Jan 45; fought the Battle for Loi-kang Ridge 3-4 Feb 45 and entered China in Apr 45; inactivated in China on 1 Jul 45.

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)


Ex-CBI Roundup, September 1953 Issue


Source:  CBIVA Sound-off, Summer 1984 Issue

(The following is reproduced from a special feature entitled "The Regiments" printed in the February 1984 issue of ARMY. Submitted by PNC Vie Tamashunas.)

Organized in October, 1943, in the China-Burma-India Theater as the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional). This group of volunteers specialized in jungle fighting along the Ledo Road in Burma. Its first commander was Brig. Gen. Frank D. Merrill, reflected in the regiment's nickname. The 5307th participated in successful engagements in the Hukawng and Mogaung valleys of North Burma, March-April, 1944, and received the Presidential Unit Citation for the seizure of the airfield at Myitkyina in May. Consolidated in August, 1944, with 475th Infantry, the consolidated unit designated as the 475th Infantry. Awarded the India-Burma and Central Burma campaign streamers and inactivated in July, 1945, in China. Redesigned in June, 1954, as the 75th Infantry, activated in November on Okinawa and assigned to the 75th Regimental Combat Team. Inactivated in March, 1956, on Okinawa. During the Vietnam war, long-range reconnaissance patrols (LRRPs) were assigned to each field force, division and separate brigade. Existing infantry unit members were used in forming these units until 1 January, 1969, when the 75th Infantry was added to CARS and became the parent organization for all regular Army LRRP units. Cos. C through I and K through P were formed for Vietnam. Together, these elements of the 75th Infantry earned eight Vietnam campaign streamers, six Valorous Unit Awards and two Meritorious Unit Commendations. The last element of the 75th serving in Vietnam left the country in August, 1972. The 1st and 2nd battalions, 75th Infantry, are currently serving at Ft. Stewart, Ga., and Ft. Lewis, Wash., respectively. Both are assigned to Forces Command as Ranger units and both took part in the invasion of Grenada, October, 1983. While the colors are part of the Army Regimental System, the 75th will not have a home base and linked battalions overseas - duty with the 75th will be considered "extra-regimental."


Source:

  • Organized 3 October 1943 in the Army of the United States in the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional).
  • Consolidated 10 August 1944 with the 475th Infantry (constituted 25 May 1944 in the Army of the United States) and consolidated unit designated as the 475th Infantry.
  • Inactivated 1 July 1945 in China
  • Redesignated 21 June 1954 as the 75th Infantry
  • Allotted 26 October 1954 to the Regular Army
  • Activated 20 November 1954 on Okinawa
  • Inactivated 21 March 1956 on Okinawa
  • Reorganized 1 January 1969 as a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System
  • Reorganized 1 July 1984 with Headquarters at Fort Benning, Georgia
  • Consolidated 3 February 1986 with the former 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion, 2d Infantry Battalion, and 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Ranger Infantry Battalions (see ANNEXES 1-6) and consolidated unit redesignated as the 75th Ranger Regiment; concurrently withdrawn from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System.

ANNEX 1

  • Constituted 27 May 1942 in the Army of the United States as the 1st Ranger Battalion
  • Activated 19 June 1942 in Northern Ireland
  • Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion
  • Disbanded 15 August 1944
  • Reconstituted 1 September 1948 in the Army of the United States as the 1st Infantry Battalion and activated in the Canal Zone
  • Inactivated 4 January 1950 in the Canal Zone
  • After 4 January 1950 organic elements underwent changes as follows:
    • Company A redesignated 25 October 1950 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea
    • Company B redesignated 2 November 1950 as the 5th Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea
  • Battalion redesignated 24 November 1952 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion and allotted to the Regular Army (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)
  • Consolidated 15 April 1960 with the 1st Special Service Force (activated 9 July 1942), the 2d Infantry Battalion (see ANNEX 2), and the 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Ranger Infantry Battalions (see ANNEXES 3, 4, 5, and 6) to form the 1st Special Forces, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System
  • Former 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion, 2d Infantry Battalion, and 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Ranger Infantry Battalions withdrawn 3 February 1986, consolidated with the 75th Infantry, and consolidated unit redesignated as the 75th Ranger Regiment (remainder of the 1st Special Forces - hereafter separate lineage)

ANNEX 2

  • Constituted 11 March 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 2d Ranger Battalion
  • Activated 1 April 1943 at Camp Forrest, Tennessee
  • Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Battalion
  • Inactivated 23 October 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia
  • Redesignated 29 July 1949 as the 2d Infantry Battalion (Companies E and F concurrently disbanded)
  • Activated 15 September 1949 in the Canal Zone
  • Inactivated 4 January 1950 in the Canal Zone
  • After 4 January 1950 organic elements underwent changes as follows:
    • Company A redesignated 25 October 1950 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea
    • Company B redesignated 2 November 1950 as the 6th Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 December 1951 in Germany
    • Company C redesignated 27 February 1951 as the 14th Ranger Infantry Company, allotted to the Regular Army, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 27 October 1951 at Camp Carson, Colorado
    • Company D redesignated 27 February 1951 as the 15th Ranger Infantry Company, allotted to the Regular Army, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 5 November 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia
    • Company E reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 9th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 5 January 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 5 November 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia
    • Company F reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 10th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 5 January 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 15 September 1951 in Japan
  • Battalion redesignated 24 November 1952 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Battalion and allotted to the Regular Army (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)
  • Redesignated 14 June 1955 as the 2d Infantry Battalion
  • Activated 1 July 1955 in Iceland
  • Inactivated 11 March 1960 at Fort Hamilton, New York

ANNEX 3

  • Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 3d Ranger Battalion; concurrently consolidated with the 3d Ranger Battalion (Provisional) (organized 21 May 1943 in North Africa) and consolidated unit designated as the 3d Ranger Battalion
  • Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion
  • Disbanded 15 August 1944
  • After 15 August 1944 organic elements underwent changes as follows:
    • Company A reconstituted 25 October 1950 in the Regular Army as the 3d Ranger Infantry Company; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea
    • Company B reconstituted 2 November 1950 in the Regular Army as the 7th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 5 November 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia
    • Company C reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 11th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 5 January 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 21 September 1951 in Japan
    • Company D reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 12th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 1 February 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 27 October 1951 at Camp Atterbury, Indiana
    • Company E reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 13th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 1 February 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 15 October 1951 at Camp Pickett, Virginia
  • Battalion reconstituted 24 November 1952 in the Regular Army as the 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)

ANNEX 4

  • Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 4th Ranger Battalion; concurrenly consolidated with the 4th Ranger Battalion (Provisional) (organized 29 May 1943 in North Africa) and consolidated unit designated as the 4th Ranger Battalion
  • Redesignated 1 August 1943 at the 4th Ranger Infantry Battalion
  • Disbanded 24 October 1944 at Camp Butner, North Carolina
  • After 24 October 1944 organic elements underwent changes as follows:
    • Company A reconstituted 25 October 1950 in the Regular Army as the 4th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea
    • Company B reconstituted 2 November 1950 in the Regular Army as the 8th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea
  • Battalion reconstituted 24 November 1952 in the Regular Army as the 4th Ranger Infantry Battalion (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)

ANNEX 5

  • Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 5th Ranger Battalion
  • Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 5th Ranger Infantry Battalion
  • Activated 1 September 1943 at Camp Forrest, Tennessee
  • Inactivated 22 October 1945 at Camp Myles Standish, Massachusetts

ANNEX 6

  • Constituted 16 December 1940 in the Regular Army as the 98th Field Artillery Battalion
  • Activated 20 January 1941 at Fort Lewis, Washington
  • Converted and redesignated 26 September 1944 as the 6th Ranger Infantry Battalion
  • Inactivated 30 December 1945 in Japan

Campaign Participation Credit

World War II:  Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead); Tunisia; Sicily (with arrowhead); Naples-Foggia (with arrowhead); Anzio (with arrowhead); Rome-Arno; Normandy (with arrowhead); Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; New Guinea; Leyte (with arrowhead); Luzon; India-Burma; Central Burma

Vietnam:  Advisory; Defense; Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase II; Counteroffensive, Phase III; Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase IV; Counteroffensive, Phase V; Counteroffensive, Phase VI; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Summer-Fall 1969; Winter-Spring 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase VII; Consolidation I; Consolidation II; Cease-Fire

Armed Forces Expeditions:  Grenada (with arrowhead); Panama (with arrowhead)

Decorations:

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for EL GUETTAR
Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SALERNO
Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for POINTE DU HOE
Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SAAR RIVER AREA
Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for MYITKYINA
Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for VIETNAM 1966-1968
Valorous Unit Award for VIETNAM - II CORPS AREA
Valorous Unit Award for BINH DUONG PROVINCE
Valorous Unit Award for III CORPS AREA 1969
Valorous Unit Award for FISH HOOK
Valorous Unit Award for III CORPS AREA 1971
Valorous Unit Award for THUA THIEN - QUANG TRI
Valorous Unit Award for GRENADA
Valorous Unit Award for MOGADISHU
Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1968
Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1969
Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1969-1970
Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for PACIFIC AREA

Lineage and Honors Information as of 1 Jul 2003


Pictures courtesy of the family of TSgt Donald G. Lewis

Table of Contents



612th Field Artillery Battalion (75mm Pack Howitzer)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  17 Dec 43, Gruber, Okla
Inactivated:  25 Aug 45, Kunming, China
Locations:  Los Angeles Port of Embarkation 26 Jul 44; India 26 Aug 44; China 29 Apr 45

Campaigns:  Central Burma, India-Burma


Ex-CBI Roundup, September 1953 Issue

Table of Contents



1st Tank Group, Provisional (Chinese-American)  (See CBI Unit Histories)


2nd Maintenance Co.

(Courtesy of Mr. David Kaufman; used with permission)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  1 Oct 43 activated at Ramgarh, India and arrived Ledo 1 Jan 44; entered Burma 20 Jan 44 and supported Chinese 22nd Div and Galahad Force commencing 3 Mar 44 in combat; in China Mar 45. Aug 45 Location:  Sookerating, India

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma



Other Sites of Interest:

1st Provisional Tank Group - CBI Theater of World War II

Table of Contents



1st Tank Battalion, Provisional (Chinese-American)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  1 Oct 43, Ramgarh, India
Inactivated:  Phased into Kuomintang Army by end of war
Locations:  Ramgarh, India: 1 Oct 43; Burma 20 Jan 44; Sookerating, India Aug 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



2nd Tank Battalion, Provisional (Chinese-American)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  1 Oct 43, Ramgarh, India
Inactivated:  Phased into Kuomintang Army by end of war
Locations:  Ramgarh, India: 1 Oct 43; Burma 20 Jan 44; Sookerating, India Aug 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



3d Tank Battalion, Provisional (Chinese-American)


(Courtesy of Mr. David Kaufman; used with permission)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  1 Oct 43, Ramgarh, India
Inactivated:  Phased into Kuomintang Army by end of war
Locations:  Ramgarh, India: 1 Oct 43; Burma 20 Jan 44; Sookerating, India Aug 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



4th Tank Battalion, Provisional (Chinese-American)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  1 Oct 43, Ramgarh, India
Inactivated:  Phased into Kuomintang Army by end of war
Locations:  Ramgarh, India: 1 Oct 43; Burma 20 Jan 44; Sookerating, India Aug 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



5th Tank Battalion, Provisional (Chinese-American)


(Courtesy of Mr. David Kaufman; used with permission)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  1 Oct 43, Ramgarh, India
Inactivated:  Phased into Kuomintang Army by end of war
Locations:  Ramgarh, India: 1 Oct 43; Burma 20 Jan 44; Sookerating, India Aug 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



6th Tank Battalion, Provisional (Chinese-American)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  1 Oct 43, Ramgarh, India
Inactivated:  Phased into Kuomintang Army by end of war
Locations:  Ramgarh, India: 1 Oct 43; Burma 20 Jan 44; Sookerating, India Aug 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Table of Contents



527th Ordnance Company (Heavy Maintenance) (Tank) (Chinese-American)

Source:  1st Provisional Tank Group - CBI Theater of World War II

"...the American contingent derived most of its personnel from a regular U.S. Army unit, the 527th Ordnance Company (Heavy Maintenance) (Tank). Brown (U.S. Army Col. Rothwell H. Brown, Commander, 1st PTG) wanted a unit like the 527th because of the tactical need and its unusual ability to all perform all maintenance in the field. Back in the U.S. the 527th had been raised from North Carolina state highway road crews, and trained with the III Armored Corps. During most of its tour in the CBI, the 527th Ordnance was commanded by Capt. Tom A. Miller, who was replaced on June 22, 1945 by Capt. John W. Hutchinson. The 527th had reached the CBI by a lengthy route via Oran, North Africa and Calcutta, India."

Table of Contents



Chinese Training & Combat Command

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

21 Jan 43:  Hq and Hq Det, CT&CC act Ramgarh, Bihar, India, under USAF CBI as a pool for U.S. officers and enlisted men.

29 Apr 43:  Y-Force Opns Staff (Y-FOS) activated to train, organize ,and equip Chinese divisions in Y-Force (see R/E for Y-FOS). Personnel for Y-FOS was drawn from CT&CC, but Y-FOS was directly subordinate to USAF CBI.

15 Jun 44:  Burma Road Engrs Det formed as subsection of CT&CC and attached to SOS CBI. When USAF CBI was abolished and USF CT established, a portion of CT&CC CBI was within the geographical limits of China Theater. From this organization Y-and Z-FOS commands were allotted their personnel.

17 Nov 44:  Y- and Z-FOS disbanded. That portion of the CT&CC CBI within geographical limits of CT was redesignated CT&CC CT with HQ in Kunming. Personnel of Y-and Z-FOS reverted to their original assignment in the CT&CC.

2 Dec 44:  Mission of CT&CC CT was to render staff assistance and battle liaison to Chinese armies south of Yangtze River; to assist in training of Chinese Armies involved in plan for defense of Kunming area; to increase the combat effectiveness of Chinese armies.

8 Jan 45:  CT&CC CT was split into two separate and component parts: Chinese Combat Comd (Prov) and Chinese Tng Comd (Prov) (CCC (Prov) and CTC (Prov)). In effect, CT&CC CT became a paper organization and the Commanding Officers of CCC (Prov) and CTC (Prov) reported directly to CG USF CT.

Commander:  Lt Gen Joseph W Stilwell, 21 Jan 43 *; Brig Gen Frank Dorn, 17 Nov 44

(* The commander during the interim period is unknown)


Source:  Records of the U.S. Army Forces in the China-Burma-India

The Chinese Training and Combat Command, China Theater was activated in November 1944, shortly after the China-Burma-India Theater was divided. It concluded the work of the Y-Force and Z-Force Operations Staff, which had been responsible for providing American training and supply to Chinese divisions. The new command took over the training programs at the Yunnan and the Kweilin Training Centers and continued to assist the Chinese Expeditionary Force in its offensive in central and southern China. In January 1945, the Command was organized in two subordinate administrative commands, the Chinese Training Command (Provisional) and the Chinese Combat Command (Provisional). Under the Chinese Combat Command were six subordinate commands for liaison with the Chinese Army Groups and a liaison team for each Chinese Army or Division. These organizations exercised no tactical or operational control over the Chinese commands.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)

Subordinate Units Included:

Chinese Ordnance Training Center

General Staff School


The school was in Kunming. The design is similar to the CTCC patch
with a "US" star rather than the Chinese Nationalist sun,
and the addition of "GSS" and crossed bamboo behind the star.
(Ex-CBI Roundup, January 1980 issue)

Table of Contents



Chinese Combat Command (Provisional)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

8 Jan 45:  CCC (Prov) org Kunming as a component part of CT&CC CT (which became a paper orgn). CO of CCC (Prov) reported directly to CG USF CT. Mission of CCC (Prov) was to advise and assist the staffs of the Chinese units to which its pers were atchd in planning for and execution of tac opns and tng.

Boundaries of command comprised all of unoccupied China -west to China-Burma border, south to French Indochina border, and east to Japanese-occupied areas.

29 Jan 45:  Following subareas of CCC (Prov) established: Eastern, Central, Kwangsi, Southern, Western, and Res Comds.

10 Jun 45:  CCC (Prov) ordered to prepare detailed schedule of mvmt of Chinese forces into Nanning - Liuchow - Kweilin staging area.

27 Jul 45:  Boundaries of CCC (Prov) defined as combat zone of China Theater, lying to south of a line defined by north and east boundary of 6th War Area to its junction with Yangtze River, then east along the Yangtze; the Yangtze River inclusive was within the CCC (Prov) boundaries.

Commander:  Col Albert H Stackpole, 9 Jan 45; Col Woods King, 14 Jan 45; Maj Gen Robert B McClure, 28 Jan 45

Table of Contents



Chinese Training Command (Provisional)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

8 Jan 45: CTC (Prov) org Kunming as a component part of CT&CC CT (which became a paper orgn). CO of CTC (Prov) reported directly to CG USF CT. Mission of CTC (Prov) was to develop a systematized school program for Chinese trps, in order to increase their combat effectiveness.

26 Jan 45: CTC (Prov) act. It undertook contl of Fld Arty Tng Cen, Comd and Gen Staff School, and Chinese Ordnance Training Cen, which were already in existence.

Commander:  Brig Gen John W Middleton, 8 Jan 45

Table of Contents



Y-FORCE Operations Staff (Y-FOS)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

Y-FOS was est at Kunming, China, 29 April 1943 by verbal orders of the theater comdr. The staff was to work in liaison with the staff of the Chinese Y-Force. (The Y-Force consisted of Chinese trps in Yunnan Prov that were to make 30 divs to be used for combat operations against the Japanese.) Y-FOS was charged with the mission of tng, org, and supplying the Chinese Y-Force; est priorities for the air mvmt of supplies and equipment for the Chinese; supervising the Inf Tng Ctr and the Fld Arty Tng Ctr at Kunming; and formulating plans for the opns and supply of the Chinese Y-Force.

18 Jun 43:  Activation of Y-F0S confirmed by verbal orders.

23 Jun 43:  Eastern sec SOS became G-4 Sec of Y-FOS. Y-FOS charged with responsibility for rehabilitation of Burma Road.

24 Oct 44:  Y-FOS asgd to CT.

17 Nov 44:  Y- and Z-FOS disbanded. That portion of the CT&CC CBI within geographical limits of CT was redesig CT&CC CT with hq in Kunming. Pers of Y-and Z-FOS reverted to their original asgmt in the CT&CC.

Chief of Staff *:  Col Frank Dorn, 29 Apr 43 *; Brig Gen Frank Dorn (Promotion) 8 Nov 43

(* Designated Chief of Staff 29 April 1943 - 17 November 1944. General Stilwell commanded through General Dorn.)

Table of Contents



Z-FORCE Operations Staff (Z-FOS)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

1 Jan 44:  Z-FOS act Chungking as a subordinate Comd of Fwd Ech Eq USAF CBI to train and equip a second 30 Chinese divs (known as Z-Force) for opns in East China.

24 Oct 44:  Z-FOS asgd USF CT.

17 Nov 44:  Y- and Z-FOS disbanded. That portion of the CT&CC CBI within geographical limits of CT was redesig CT&CC CT with hq in Kunming. Pers of Y-and Z-FOS reverted to their original asgmt in the CT&CC.

Chief of Staff *:  Brig Gen Malcolm F Lindsey, 1 Jan 44; Brig Gen Thomas F Timberman, 4 Sep 44; Col Harwood C Bowman, 21 Oct 44; Brig Gen Malcolm F Lindsey, 24 Oct 44

(* General Stilwell commanded through Chief of Staff)

Table of Contents



5315th Infantry Training Center (Prov)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

1 Nov 43:  5315th Inf Tng Cen (Prov), an American orgn, act Kweilin as subordinate comd of Rear Ech Hq USAF CBI to train officers and enlisted men of Chinese Army in East China.

1 Jan 44:  Z-Force Opns Staff (Z-FOS) act and directed to supervise 5315th ITC (Prov) at Kweilin.

25 Jul 44:  5315th Inf Tng Cen (Prov) disbanded.

Commander:  Brig Gen Thomas S Arms, 1 Nov 43

Table of Contents



Ramgarh Training Center

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

Ramgarh Training Center, an American-staffed, American-operated organization, was established 30 June 1942 by the Commanding General, USAF, CBI, for the training of Chinese troops in India* (Supreme Commander, China Theater, had approved Ramgarh, Bihar Province, India, as the site for a training center to train, equip, and reinforce the Chinese troops that had retreated into India from Burma.)

(* Headquarters Ramgarh Training Center was responsible for the training of Chinese Army in India, and Headquarters Chinese Army in India was responsible for the activation, organization, administration, and command of Chinese units.)

26 Aug 42:  RTC formally activated.

1 Feb 43:  Hq RTC and Hq Camp Ramgarh combined and CG RTC assumed command. (These two organizations and Hq Chinese Army in India vere the three original command organizations at Ramgarh.)

24 Oct 44:  RTC came under control of USF IBT with dissolution of USAF CBI.

15 May 43:  RTC discontinued.

Commander:  Col Frederick McCabe, 30 Jun 42; Brig Gen William E Bergin, 30 Apr 44; Brig Gen Frederick McCabe, 30 Jun 44; Col Donald A Young, 31 Jan 45; Col Raymond R Tourtillott, 1 May 45


Source:

Ramgarh Training Center

Merrill's Marauders Combined Operations in Northern Burma in 1944 (www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/csi/Bjorge/BJORGE.asp - no longer active)

124th Calvary Regiment History (http://124cav.org/history.htm - no longer active)

"In May 1942, he [Stillwell] had looked at the 9,000 Chinese soldiers who had retreated from Burma into India and seen the nucleus of a force that could play an important role in a campaign to retake northern Burma. Overcoming British doubts, resistance from the government of India, and Chiang K'ai-shek's reluctance, he had obtained agreement to equip and train not only those 9,000 troops but 23,000 more soldiers that were to be flown in from China. A former camp for Italian prisoners of war located northwest of Calcutta at Ramgarh was selected as the training site, and on 26 August 1942, the Ramgarh Training Center was activated. On 20 October, the first of the Chinese soldiers to be sent from China arrived in India. The first goal was to train two complete divisions, the 22d and the 38th. Later, the training program was expanded to include another division, the 30th, and the Chinese 1st Provisional Tank Group, commanded by Colonel Rothwell H. Brown of the U.S. Army."

Other Sites of Interest:  "THE BULL SHEET" - Ramgarh Training Center Newspaper


Source:  CBIVA Sound-off, Summer 1991 Issue

Ramgarh Training Center Service Pin

Casual Detachment 8925-B
Notes:
(1) All lettering and boundary outlines In gold.
(2) Pin is complete with screw fastener and nut.
Drawn by W. A. Rhoades 4/2/91

By William A. Rhoades

In Boyd Sinclair's Book Nine, "Confusion Beyond Imagination", page 204, the Ramgarh Training Center Service Pin, Casual Detachment 8925-B, is described. However, a picture of the pin is not presented. In my travels since the war, I have never seen this pin, either worn or displayed, and would guess there are many of us out there who are unfamiliar with the pin. Therefore, I have made a sketch and taken a picture of the pin for information. The description of the pin, as taken from Boyd Sinclair's Book Nine, "Confusion Beyond Imagination", is presented below for the readers information.

"The men who began the Ramgarh Training Center, Casual Detachment 8925-B, got their own special symbol approved by General Stilwell. Former Technical Sergeant Rex "Brushmush" Smith of Irving, Texas, described it 30 years after the war. The detachment wanted an insignia that signified what it was trying to accomplish, teaching and learning. The designers came up with a scroll, torch, and hand in a circle, with points of the compass signifying that men of the detachment came from all parts of the United States. The scroll was divided into three sections, with one of the three primary colors in each to signify that men of the detachment came from all branches of the service. Below the scroll, the designers placed a banner with the motto, "Victory Through Knowledge." Chinese characters repeating "Victory Through Knowledge" adorned two sections of the scroll.

Frank Dorn approved the design with a minor change, and Capt. Carl Arnold, serving as morale officer at Ramgarh, made arrangements for manufacture of the insignia in Calcutta, 180 miles to the southeast. Ramgarh next presented one to Vinegar Joe the next time he came through.

'His acceptance speech was slightly off the record,' Smith wrote 30 years later, 'but with words to the effect that he was proud . . . and happy about the presentation.'

Stilwell, according to Smith, granted permission for the Ramgarh men to wear the insignia only on their caps."

Table of Contents



Chinese Army in India (CAI)

Source:  "Order of Battle of the United States Army Ground Forces in World War II", Office of the Chief of Military History, 1959

23 Oct 42:  Hq Chinese Army in India (Chin Hui Pu) act under comd of Gen Stilwell. Function was to handle admin, discipline, and supply of Chinese trps in Ramgarh Training Center, while the American staff of of RTC handled, the equipping and tng of the Chinese trps.

Apr 43 - Apr 44:  During this period most of CAI shifted from Ramgarh to the North Burma front. When combat trps were moved to Assam, Fwd Ech Chin Hui Pu was est at 5 mile mark along Ledo Road. Ramgarh hq was desigd Rear Ech Chin Hui Pu.

30 Nov 44:  Supreme Comdr CT formally placed all Chinese forces in India and Burma (including CAI forces) under over-all comd of SACSEA.

1 Feb 44:  Comd of all combat units in Assam-North Burma territory (NCAC area) was under Gen Stilwell in his capacity as CG CAI. Thus there were two separate orgns, CAI and NCAC, with the sane staff, and later the same CG (Stilwell), functioning under the over-all comd of SEAC in the same area. NCAC had a service mission and CAI had a combat mission. In the summer of 1944 the two orgns became one for opns. In the fall of 1944 it became the practice to refer to combat forces in this area as NCAC forces; though technically the two orgns were separate.

O/a 5 Feb 44:  5307th Comp Unit (Prov) was atchd to CAI.

12 Nov 44:  Allied Land Forces, SEA (ALFSEA) was est as subcomd of SEAC and it was agreed to place CAI under opnl contl of ALFSEA.

16 Dec 44:  Rear Ech CAI moved to Ledo. A sub-Rear Ech remained at Ramgarh.

Commander:  Lt Gen Joseph Stilwell, 23 Oct 42*; Lt Gen Daniel I Sultan 3 Nov 44

(* The commander for the interim period following General Stilwell's departure is unknown.)

Table of Contents



Anti-Aircraft Command

Source:  "The Army Almanac", U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950

Primary mission:  To instruct and train officers and enlisted men for duty with antiaircraft artillery and barrage balloon units, and to activate, organize, equip, and train efficiently such units for combat service.

Commanders:  Maj. Gen. Joseph A. Green, 9 March 1942-27 October 1944. Brig. Gen. Frank C. McConnell, 28 October 1944-10 February 1945. Maj. Gen. George R. Meyer, 11 February 1945-8 October 1945.

Chronology of events:  Activated 9 March 1942 per AG 320.2/2 AGF (3-7-42) 9 March 1942. Headquarters at Washington, D. C. Headquarters moved to Richmond, Va. 23 March 1942 and to Fort Bliss, Tex. 13 October 1944. Discontinued 30 October 1945 per General Orders 51, Hq, AA Cmd., Fort Bliss, Tex., dated 26 October 1945.

Table of Contents



Anti-Aircraft Groups

69th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Group

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Redesignated 10 Sep 43 from 69th Coastal Artillery Regiment at San Diego, CA and moved to Ft. Bliss, TX 6 Mar 44; arrived at Camp Polk, LA 12 Jun 44 and departed Seattle Port of Embarkation 13 Jan 45; arrived in Honolulu, Hawaii 20 Jan 45 and sent to Saipan where arrived 12 Feb 45 and relieved the 24th Infantry Regiment in mopping up Japanese forces there 28 Jun - 1 Aug 45; inactivated on Saipan 5 Jun 46.

Campaigns:  Western Pacific



86th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Group

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Activated at Ft. Kamehameha, Hawaii and departed 7 Jun 44; landed on Saipan 27 Jun 44 and inactivated there 15 Jan 46.

Campaigns:  Western Pacific



87th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Group

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Activated in Ledo, India 22 Jun 44 and disbanded in Burma 8 Jul 45.

Table of Contents



Anti-Aircraft Brigades

59th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Brigade

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Activated 10 May 43 at Camp Haan, CA as the 59th Coastal Artillery Brigade (AA) where redesignated AAA Brigade 28 May 43; moved to Hamilton Field, CA 2 Dec 43 and returned to Camp Haan, CA 19 Apr 44; transferred to Camp Beauregard, LA 11 Aug 44 and Ft. Bliss, TX 15 Nov 44; staged at Ft. Lawton,WA 6 Jan 45 until departed Seattle Port of Embarkation 13 Jan 45; arrived in Hawaii 20 Jan 45 and departed 29 Jan 45; landed on Saipan 12 Feb 45 where inactivated 15 Jan 46.

Campaigns:  Western Pacific

Table of Contents



Anti-Aircraft Battalions

16th Airborne Anti-Aircraft Battalion

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Constituted 25 August 1943 in the Army of the United States as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 16th Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion and assigned to the US Army Forces in the China-Burma-India Theater. Activated 22 June 1944 at Shingbwiyang, Burma. Disbanded 9 July 1945 at Myitkyina, North Burma.

Campaigns:  World War II:  Central Burma, India-Burma

Decorations:  None

  • 663d AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)


17th Airborne Anti-Aircraft Battalion

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Constituted 1 June 1944 in the Army of the United States as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 17th Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion and assigned to the US Army Forces in the China-Burma-India Theater. Activated 22 June 1944 at Moran Airfield, India. Disbanded 10 July 1945 at Dinjan, India.

Campaigns:  World War II:  Central Burma

Decorations:  None


18th Airborne Anti-Aircraft Battalion

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  Constituted 1 June 1944 in the Army of the United States as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 18th Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion and assigned to the US Army Forces in the China-Burma-India Theater. Activated 22 June 1944 at Kurmitola, India. Arrived in Burma 16 January 1945 (ed: moved from Shwebo to Ondaw 1 Mar 45) and returned to India, 29 June 1945. Disbanded 9 July 1945 at Camp Kanchapara, India.

Campaigns:  World War II:  Central Burma

Decorations:  None

  • 644th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
  • 687th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)


64th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  12 Dec 43, Ft. Shafter, Hawaii (1st BN, 64th CA)
Inactivated:  20 May 46, Guam.
Locations:  Hawaii 1943; Guam 10 Sep 44; Guam Aug 45.

Campaigns:  Western Pacific


206th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  20 Jan 43 Ft. Bliss, TX as Sep CA Bn AA-AW (2nd Bn, 610th CA); Redesignated from Coastal Artillery 20 Apr 43
Inactivated:  15 Jan 46 Iwo Jima
Locations:  Ft. Bliss, TX 20 Jan 43; San Francisco Port of Embarkation 16 Dec 43; Hawaii 21 Dec 43; Saipan 25 Jul 44; Iwo Jima (Batteries C, D) 14 Aug 45

Campaigns:  Air Offensive Japan, Western Pacific


234th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion (Colored)


Wall plaque courtesy of Mr. Peter Castner

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  20 Jan 43 Camp Stewart, GA as CA Searchlight Bn (3d Bn, 612th CA); Redesignated from CA Searchlight BN to AAA Gun Bn 1 Aug 43
Inactivated:  15 Jun 46 Saipan
Locations:  Camp Stewart, GA 20 Jan 43; Los Angeles Port of Embarkation 19 Dec 44; India 23 Jan 45; Saipan 9 Jun 45

Campaigns:  Western Pacific (13-16 Jul 45)


464th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  15 Oct 42 Camp Davis, NC as Sep CA Bn AA-AW (Redesignated from Coastal Artillery 28 Apr 44)
Inactivated:  10 Jul 45 Calcutta, India
Locations:  Camp Davis, NC 15 Oct 42; New York Port of Embarkation 9 May 43; Brazil 25 May 43; Madagascar I 13 Jun 43; Ceylon 18 Jun 43; India 23 Jun 43; Burma 12 Jan 45; India 18 Apr 45

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma, China Defensive


484th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion (Colored) (Semimobile)

Source:

"World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

10th AF Station List, 1 Aug 1945

CBIVA Sound-off, Fall 1988 Issue

Formed:  10 Dec 42 Camp Stewart, GA as Sep CA Bn AA-AW; Redesignated from Coastal Artillery 30 Apr 43
Inactivated:  6 Jan 46 Camp Kilmer, NJ
Locations:  Camp Stewart, GA 10 Dec 42; San Francisco Port of Embarkation 21 Jul 43; India 5 Sep 43 (Chabua, Dinjan, Sookerating); Burma 22 Nov 44 (Lashio, Bhamo); Myitkyina North, Burma Aug 45; New York Port of Embarkation 5 Jan 46

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Battery "A" - Namponmao
Battery "B" - Bhamo
Battery "C" - Myitkyina South
Battery "D" - Lashio


501st Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  20 Feb 43 Camp Edwards, MA as Sep CA Bn AA-Gun; Redesignated from Coastal Artillery 7 Jun 43
Inactivated:  25 Feb 46 Saipan
Locations:  Camp Edwards, MA 20 Feb 43; San Francisco Port of Embarkation 16 Dec 43; Hawaii 21 Dec 43; Saipan 27 Jun 44

Campaigns:  Western Pacific


738th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  20 Feb 43 Camp Edwards, MA as Sep CA Bn AA-Gun (1st Bn, 609th CA); Redesignated from Coastal Artillery 7 Jun 43
Inactivated:  25 Feb 46 Saipan
Locations:  Camp Edwards, MA 20 Feb 43; San Francisco Port of Embarkation 6 Jan 44; Hawaii 15 Jan 44; Saipan 1 Sep 44

Campaigns:  Western Pacific


752nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Gun Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  12 Dec 43 Hawaii (2nd Bn, 95th CA)
Inactivated:  (Active through 1946)
Locations:  Hawaii 12 Dec 43; Saipan 6 Feb 45; Iwo Jima 11 Apr 45

Campaigns:  Air Offensive Japan, Western Pacific


843d Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion (Air Transportable)  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  20 May 43 Camp Stewart, GA
Inactivated:  7 Nov 45 Camp Kilmer, NJ
Locations:  Camp Stewart, GA 20 May 43; Los Angeles Port of Embarkation 29 Jun 44; India 7 Aug 44; Myitkyina, Burma 10 Oct 44 (less Battery B at Mogaung, Burma); Chengtu, China 16 Dec 44; India 28 Sep 45

Campaigns:  Air Offensive Japan, Western Pacific


864th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  12 Dec 43 Hawaii (3d Bn, 64th CA)
Inactivated:  (Active through 1946)
Locations:  Hawaii 12 Dec 43; Saipan Aug 45


865th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  12 Dec 43 Hawaii (3d Bn, 93d CA)
Inactivated:  (Active through 1946)
Locations:  Hawaii 12 Dec 43; Saipan Aug 45


868th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Auto-Weapons Battalion (Semimobile)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  12 Dec 43 Hawaii (3d Bn, 97th CA)
Inactivated:  15 Jan 46 Guam
Locations:  Hawaii 12 Dec 43; Guam 10 Sep 44

Campaigns:  Western Pacific

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Anti-Aircraft Batteries

644th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) (18th AAA BN)
645th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
683d AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) (16th AAA BN)
685th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
666th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) - Piardoba by 1 Aug 45
667th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) - Piardoba by 1 Aug 45
668th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
669th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
682nd AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
683d AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
684th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)  (See CBI Unit Histories)
685th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
686th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
687th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) (18th AAA BN)
701st AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
702nd AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)
703d AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) - Paoshan, China (Attached to Y-Force)
704th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne) - Wayao, China (Attached to Y-Force)
705th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)  (See CBI Unit Histories)
706th AAA Machine Gun Battery (Airborne)

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Coastal Artillery Units

33d Coastal Artillery Battalion (155 mm Gun)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  18 Feb 44 Waimea, Hawaii
Inactivated:  13 Dec 45, Saipan
Locations:  Hawaii 18 Feb 44; Saipan 26 Aug 44; Saipan Aug 45

Campaigns:  Western Pacific


177th Coastal Artillery Battalion (155 mm Gun)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  31 May 44 Ft Ruger, Hawaii (3d BN, 57th CA)
Inactivated:  15 Jan 46 Guam
Locations:  Hawaii 31 May 44; Guam 23 Nov 44; Guam Aug 45

Campaigns:  Eastern Mandates, Western Pacific


178th Coastal Artillery Battalion (155 mm Gun)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  31 May 44 Ft Ruger, Hawaii
(When formed, Battery A, 55th CA and Battery B, 57th CA were on Kwajalein. Arrived Hawaii 17 Aug 44)
Inactivated:  7 Feb 46 Guam
Locations:  Hawaii 31 May 44; Guam 4 Nov 44; Guam Aug 45

Campaigns:  Eastern Mandates, Western Pacific


180th Coastal Artillery Battalion (155 mm Gun)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Formed:  31 May 44 Honolulu, Hawaii
Inactivated:  13 Dec 45 Tinian
Locations:  Hawaii 31 May 44; Tinian 19 Oct 44; Tinian Aug 45

Campaigns:  Western Pacific

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Office of Strategic Services

Headquarters, OSS India-Burma Theater - Kandy, Ceylon


Other Sites of Interest:  Office of Strategic Services Operational Groups



OSS Detachment 101  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Source:  "World War II Order of Battle", Shelby L. Stanton, 1984

Lineage:  May 42 OSS Detachment 101 arrived in India and stationed at New Delhi; recruited force from the Kachin hill tribe of north-central Burma residing in area where the Ledo Road was constructed and assaulted Ramree Island Burma on 27 Jan 45; assaulted Lawksawk Burma 9-13 Apr 45 and 11 May 45; assaulted Mongkung Burma 11 Apr 45 and assaulted Heshi Burma 23 Apr 45; assaulted both Indaw and Rangoon Burma on 2 May 45; OSS Detachment 101 discontinued on 12 Jul 45.

Campaigns:  India-Burma, Central Burma

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation, 8 May-15 Jun 45, WD GO 7-46.

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)



Other Sites of Interest:

OSS Detachment 101

Detachment 101

Special Operations in the China-Burma-India Theater

Intelligence Operations of OSS Detachment 101

Table of Contents



OSS Detachment 206

Stations:  Chabua

Table of Contents



OSS Detachment 303  (See CBI Unit Histories)

Stations:  New Delhi


Other Sites of Interest:

OSS Detachment 303 Story

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OSS Detachment 404

Stations:  Kandy, Ceylon

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OSS Detachment 505

Stations:  Calcutta

(Presidential Unit Citation:  See "Background of the Presidential Unit Citation for MIS" in CBI Unit Histories)

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